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DAY

JANUARY 10, 2016

THE REAL McCOY

OUTSIDE FRONT

DEPARTING CAMELBAK CEO SALLY McCOY WOMANSPLAINS THE INDUSTRY

PAGE 23

GREATER THAN ALL OUTDOORS event

Heartfelt tribute The Outdoor Inspiration Awards honored six deserving heroes. PAGE

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news

Guns & Gunners Showgoers riff on Bundy takeover, learn from men with real military chops PAGE

85

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health

Does OR make you fat? A special investigation by our calorie-counting, happy hour-haunting sleuth PAGE

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DAY

JANUARY 10, 2016

THE REAL McCOY DEPARTING CAMELBAK CEO SALLY McCOY WOMANSPLAINS THE INDUSTRY

PAGE 23

event

Heartfelt tribute The Outdoor Inspiration Awards honored six deserving heroes. PAGE

14

news

Guns & Gunners Showgoers riff on Bundy takeover, learn from men with real military chops PAGE

85

health

Does OR make you fat? A special investigation by our calorie-counting, happy hour-haunting sleuth PAGE

88

The official publication of:


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content1

day4

OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY JANUARY 10, 2016

cover 23 The Real McCoy Sally McCoy, outgoing CamelBak CEO and longtime champion of outdoorswomen, talked fairness in wages, leadership and designing women’s gear at the OIWC Breakfast.

gear 11 Green Giants? Small companies face bigger sustainability hurdles than their larger cousins. Find out how several boutique brands are rising to the eco-friendly challenge.

photos 16 Made in the USA

Cover and this page: Photos by Andrew Bydlon/Caveman Collective

Wave the flag and check out our roundup of boots, packs and apparel made stateside.

Jeremy Collins, artist, t-shirt maker and self-proclaimed niche (p. 84)

january 10, 2016 / day 4

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content2

day4

OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY JANUARY 10, 2016

news 11 Carbon and Cash Pushing the economic benefits of slashing emissions is the only way to win the climate fight, sustainability experts said at a panel.

12, 14 Business Trends & Land Grabs Learn what sold best last year. Plus: what the Bundy standoff means for land access.

80, 82 Cheap Down & Fabric Surprises Feathers get cheaper, and Gore-Tex fast-tracks a new innovation.

84, 86 Q&A Sit down with climber/ entrepreneur Jeremy Collins and the fatherson team behind Mystery Ranch.

logistics 64-72 Show Info & Maps Wondering where to fuel up on food or curious about show rules? We have you covered with a collection of maps and show information.

89-90 Calendar Last day of the show! Learn where to score cheap or free gear and grub before you split.

more gear 22 Editors’ Picks

50 New Product Gallery

new exhibitors 48 Meet several of the show’s record 204 first-time exhibitors.

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gear trends 27

PERFORMANCE DENIM New-school jeans fight back against the athleisure craze.

30, 34

RUNNING SHOES & GOGGLES The latest winter footwear and slopeside eyewear.

show buzz 96

Kristin Hostetter curates her best-ofshow news and finds.


Photo: Tero Repo

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news

what’s happening out there

Take the offensive Emotional advocacy for the environment isn’t enough, say “Climate Heroes” panelists—now’s the time for action

Photo by Lauren Danilek

S

nowboarding may have led freerider Jeremy Jones to ignore emails and housework, as he told attendees at the “Climate Heroes: How Outdoor Sports Brands are Helping Advance the Climate Movement” panel at Winter Market Friday afternoon, but it also made him aware that the peaks where he loved to ride are changing. “I’ve spent my life in the mountains. I’ve become totally addicted to the mountains and the intricacies of snow,” Jones told a packed room. “The snowboarding that I do requires me to have an acute focus on changes in snow, so along the path of this evolution of my snowboard problem, I realized that we had a snow problem.” Having seen worrisome changes in the places he boarded, he founded the Protect Our Winters (POW) advocacy group to unify people around the climate cause. “We learned early on polar bears don’t really work on Capitol Hill and that it’s all about jobs, and we actually created a green jobs report to show the difference between a below-average winter and an average winter on the economy,” Jones said. “That’s the currency on Capitol Hill.” He spoke as part of a panel of sustainability leaders who called on the outdoor industry to shift from emotional pleas and playing defense to leading the way on climate change through financial support and consumer engagement, while also using the role of job creators and economic stimulators to pressure Congress. “There’s been enough inaction that actually it’s threatening humans’ ability to exist on the Earth in the future,” said Amy Roberts, executive director of the Outdoor Industry Association, which just released an updated climate change statement. Instead of working to mitigate impacts, she suggested advocating on the front end with caps on carbon or other methods to economically incentivize reducing greenhouse gas emissions. That advocacy needs to be met with efforts to reduce emissions in operations, supply chains, product transportation, headquarters’ power sources and retail stores. “One of the things that increases the urgency is that it’s going to take a while after we take action for those impacts to show, so it’s not something we can wait until the last minute to do,” she said. Roberts called on industry leaders to talk to Congress about specific initiatives and to advocate not on issues, but as brands with a strong relationship to consumers–many of whom, we hope, vote. “We’re in the fight of our lives,” said Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club. “We need all hands on deck. So regardless of who you are or what makes your heart sing, where your passion is, where you are in society, we need you to engage. We need institutions to engage.” Reading from a list of a dozen ideas, he suggested giving cash to local groups working on the issue (pointing out that $50,000 pays for one activist’s annual salary), voting, lobbying, using a portion of marketing to talk about climate, getting arrested and weathering any storm that might come from a vocal minority during the fight. “We don’t have to have one argument, we don’t have to have one constituency, we don’t have to have one perspective, one set of beliefs,” he said. “We have to have all of them.” As seen during the latest United Nations Conference of Parties (COP) in Paris, using business as a rationale to advance the conversation on climate change has proven effective, said Letitia Ferrier Webster, global director of corporate sustainability at VF Corporation, parent company for The North Face, Vans, Timberland and Smartwool, which has a target of 100-percent renewable energy by 2025.

“As much as we may all agree with the environmental argument, it may not always work in the boardroom, it may not always work in politics and it certainly did not work on Wall Street,” she said. In her visits to Capitol Hill, she hears a refrain that Congress never hears from companies that care about climate change. “We try to take politics out and insert business, and that language works across all parties and all groups,” she said. Webster suggested rallying the industry’s loyal consumer base to use its purchasing power to show support for the cause. But hers weren’t the only comments aimed at wallets. Jones pointed to the reported $646 billion in outdoor recreation spending and the .001 of 1 percent of it spent on the climate fight. “That needs to change,” he said. “There are hundreds of millions of dollars spent marketing pristine wilderness, and there’s really less than a penny on the dollar put into protecting pristine wilderness. You really have to put your money where your mouth is, because this fight needs money. Anything more than zero is all I’m asking, and there’s too much zero.” —ELIZABETH MILLER january 10, 2016 / day 4

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news

Social studies NPD Group’s research gurus discuss data trends around customer participation Camping is up, athleisure is down, and everybody just wants to have fun: The NPD Group served up these research nuggets and more alongside coffee and pastries in its “Market Intelligence and Analysis on Consumer Trends in Outdoor Practices” breakfast event on Friday. Speakers described current trends and reflected on changes needed to move the industry forward—especially if we’re going to attract the attention of Millennial consumers. NPD Sports Industry Analyst Matt Powell kicked off the morning with a look at where the industry is today. His takeaway message: Today’s consumers have a social mind-set—and that’s manifested in more than just their passion for Facebook and Instagram. Powell pointed to the way consumers exercise to back up his claim. “We’re no longer going to the gym to work out by ourselves,” he said. Rather than hitting the treadmill for an hour and heading home, people attend Zumba and CrossFit classes, where they get to know fellow attendees and form new relationships. Consumers are signing up for fewer 5K and 10K races, while participation in less competitive, more social fun runs and adventure races has skyrocketed. Interest in camping is also high (the category saw a 13 percent yearover-year increase in the outdoor specialty and e-commerce segments) thanks to the laid-back atmosphere inherent in a few friends swapping stories around a campfire. “It’s not about being competitive,” Powell said. “It’s about getting exercise and being with friends. You’re not trying to get a personal best; you’re trying to have fun.” Ultimately, the mentality around outdoor sports and fitness—and the products that go hand-in-hand with these activities—has shifted. “[Consumers] are not looking for products that will get them to extreme activities and conditions,” Powell said. “They’re looking for products that will let them have shared experiences.”

Regarding product trends, athleisure is losing steam. While Powell attributes some of the decline to seasonal and weather-related fluxes (summer’s skintight leggings are better sellers than winter’s fleece), he noted the gap between athleisure goods and the rest of apparel is beginning to close. Taking its place is denim, which has co-opted stretch and antimicrobial properties to improve the comfort and fit of jeans. Consumer interest in fitness trackers remains high, with the category up 120 percent. However, the products need to evolve, Powell warned. For one thing, current devices do little to help users improve performance: “They don’t tell me how I can improve my backhand or golf swing,” he joked. Also, the trackers often remain tethered to a phone, requiring the user to carry both items. Those factors and others contribute to a 40 percent abandonment rate after six months. Turning her eye to the future, Julia Day, NPD executive director of business development, offered a look at growth areas for the industry. First and foremost, brands and retailers need to determine what their core values are and then follow through by living them out. That means accepting the impossibility of pleasing everyone. “I can’t win everybody over, so I’m going to look at my core values and put my stake in the ground,” Day said, speaking from the brand or retailer’s point of view. “The people who love me will love me even more and the people who don’t will go away.” Collaboration will also play a vital role in future success. Whether it’s Big Agnes partnering with Burton on the Safari camping collection or Tory Burch working with FitBit to class up the fitness tracker’s wristband, companies that recognize the benefits of playing with others are likely to reap financial benefits. “When you start to collaborate, it can change the energy,” Day said. —COURTNEY HOLDEN

Money Movers

Sales trends 2015 versus 2014* Outdoor Industry Sales $18.8B (+6.7% dollars, +2.5% units, +4.1% ASP)

Top Outdoor Categories ($Volume)

High Growth Categories

$2B

$100M

6%

$0

32%

CLIMBING GEAR

59%

HAMMOCKS

209%

103% OUTDOOR SANDALS

6%

16%

DIGITAL FITNESS DEVICES

CAMPING EQUIPMENT

$50M

COOLERS

13% PADDLE SPORTS

9% OUTDOOR FOOTWEAR

OUTERWEAR

$1B

EQUIPMENT ACCESSORIES

8%

THERMAL/INSULATED CONTAINERS

207%

$0 *All data according to The NPD Group

12 outdoor retailer daily


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news

Roll Out the Red Carpet Outdoor Inspiration Awards recognize rising and passed community leaders

“In a short time, this will seem like a long time ago. Be present and enjoy it,” said Greg Thomsen, Managing Director at adidas Outdoor USA, to launch last night’s buzzing Inspiration Awards. Sponsored by adidas, the Boy Scouts of America and DreamJobbing, the annual fest honored a handful of instrumental individuals and commemorated several who recently passed. Following a red carpet rollout, TV show host Alex Boylan and Burton Roberts—a top 5 finalist on Survivor: Pearl Islands—took the stage to announce six 2016 recipients chosen from a pool of candidates nominated for their efforts to uplift in-need populations. The winners were: Individual Award: Andy Janicki, founder of the nonprofit Wheels to Water, which connects people with disabilities to life-altering outdoor experiences via kayaking trips. Janicki had been a longtime snowshoer, canoeist and backpacker when a spinal cord injury left him quadriplegic. “Your life can change in a second,” he said. “Wheels to Water aims to give people a taste of adventure again.”

Manufacturer Award: LifeStraw won for its Follow the Liters program. For each LifeStraw purchased, funds go toward delivering LifeStraw Community water purifiers to schools in developing countries. Since the effort’s 2014 launch, hundreds of Kenyan schools have received the purifiers, resulting in clean water for nearly 158,000 students. Nonprofit Martin & Jeff Weidman Award: Big City Mountaineers was honored for its 25 years of providing wilderness mentoring to at-risk and unders erved yo u t h . “ T h i s award would not be possible had it not been for the support of the outdoor industry that enabled us to provide thousands of nights under the stars for kids without access,” said Bryan Martin, Big City Mountaineers executive director.

Retailer Award: Alpenglow Sports took the trophy for its communitycentric business model. Alpenglow prioritizes high-quality events such as its annual Winter Film Series, which features speakers like Jeremy Jones and Emily Harrington, while also raising funds for local nonprofits like Tahoe Nordic Search & Rescue. “We believe in believing in something bigger than ourselves,” said owner Brendan Madigan. Youth Award: Jackie Timmins—who has been recognized with the Silver Award in the Venturing program of the Boy Scouts of America—was recognized as a passionate, rising outdoor leader who gives back to the community at every opportunity. The evening concluded with an emotional tribute to Skip Yowell, who posthumously received the first Lifetime Achievement Award. Former JanSport president Paul Delorey and Lou Whittaker, co-founder of Rainier Mountaineering, shared heartwarming stories of Yowell’s unmatched charisma, care for others, and dashing style (fringe buckskin jacket, cowboy boots and bolo tie). Winnie Kingsbury, his widow, accepted the award. “Skip had the love and support of JanSport for more than 50 years,” she told the crowd, “and [you all] supported him for who he was. I was his wife, and you were his love. Thank you for being his friends.” Whittaker & Delorey

—MORGAN TILTON WATCH A VIDEO RECAP OF THE EVENT AT YOUTUBE .COM/OUTDOORRETAILERSHOW.

MALHEUR MISAPPROPRIATION What does the Bundy siege mean for land access?  From Fox News to the Salt Palace aisles, this week has been rife with chatter about an obscure bird sanctuary and the 20 self-proclaimed liberators who’re staging a heavily armed takeover there. But conservation advocates at ORWM say that much of the discussion is misinformed—and

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missing the point that this siege is a real threat to wild lands access. One irony, said John Sterling of The Conservation Alliance, is that the Bundys and others pay almost nothing to use the land for cattle grazing. “It’s an interesting situation where people’s livelihood is subsidized by the federal

government by rock-bottom grazing permits … and they’re complaining about it,” Sterling said. Another issue, said Phil Powers, CEO of the American Alpine Club, is that many people can’t gain easy access to the outdoors, such as the inner-city students OIA and others

are trying to support through Every Kid in a Park. If the Bundys’ quest succeeds, he noted, creating a more diverse community of outdoor enthusiasts will be harder. —KASSONDRA CLOOS See snewsnet.com/bundy for more reactions from the show floor.

Top: Photo by Tim McManus; winners by Emma Light and Lauren Danilek

The hosts address a packed house.


news OutdoorRetailer

scene

capturing the show’s key moments

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’Merican Made

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1. Devon Abbott, Topo Designs’ East Coast account manager, models the Pom Beanie. 2. The checkered pattern on Woolrich’s Suffolk Buffalo blanket is made from completely dye-free, naturally occurring fibers that are, of course, 100 percent wool. 3. Chosen by Daniel Craig for the newest James Bond film, Danner’s black MTN Light II, are just straight badass. 4. Pendleton’s rich pattern (American Treasures Blue) adds Southwestern flair to the Jacquard Muffler, a scarf made with 100-percent virgin wool. 5. Northern Lites owner Jim York holds up the company’s new teal-colored, 38-ounce women’s lightweight snowshoes. 6. Voilé handcrafts its entire line of skis and splitboards here in Utah, including the debut ladies’ Supercharger, held by Northwest rep Sean Wagner.

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Photos by Emma Light

Homegrown gear continues to flourish as more brands build close to home


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january 10, 2016 / day 4

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OIA UNITES THE INDUSTRY AND AMPLIFIES YOUR BRAND AND BUSINESS.

TELL YOUR STORY ONLINE AT OUTDOORINDUSTRY.ORG

THANK YOU!

YOU COULD WIN A DENALI HIKING ADVENTURE OIA, TourRadar and Alaska Alpine Adventures are honoring the National Park Service’s Centennial anniversary by giving away an unforgettable experience for two to Denali National Park in Alaska. Tell your story and register at outdoorindustry.org.

GET SOCIAL WITH US #MYOUTDOORSTORY


APRIL 26–27, 2016 WASHINGTON, D.C.

View the full list of sessions in the education section of the OR Daily.

Support a healthy future for the outdoor industry. Come to OIA Capitol Summit. outdoorindustry.org/events/capitol-summit/

WHO IS YOUR CUSTOMER? Learn what outdoor consumers buy and how to better target them with ConsumerVue. Stop by OIA’s booth #BRL200 to learn more. outdoorindustry.org/consumervue

SEE YOU IN DENVER September 26 – 28, 2016


editors’picks

1. EMBERLIT FIRE STARTER NECKLACE This is no trinket. The owlshaped medallion is highcarbon steel that sparks if it so much looks at a piece of flint, and the 550 FireCord contains a waxcoated, fuel-impregnated cotton wick–waterproof tinder in a pinch. #18049 (MSRP $20 for Flint Striker, $30 with cord) 2. GSI OUTDOORS ESSENTIAL TRAVEL SPOON Tired of eating Teflon? Instead of peeling it off the bottom of pan with metal utensils, use this siliconeedged spoon, which

20 outdoor retailer daily

doubles as a nonstick pot pot-friendly scraper. #21019 (MSRP $4)

material and melting the ends. #32043(MSRP $20)

3. VAPUR WANDERVINO Portable Wine Kit This spout-equipped bladder has room for a full bottle of your favorite red. It comes with two light, flexible plastic GoVino glasses for toasts on the go. #24035 (MSRP $20)

5. FAIL FALLING Pick up an installment of Royal Robbins’ three-part autobiography, which documents his life and adventures during the Golden Age of American climbing. # 8017 (MSRP $20)

4. EK USA DESIGNER KUTT OFF BELT The belt doubles as a designer gear strap to accentuate the hourglass figure in your sleeping bag or yoga mat. Customize fit by chopping excess

6. PETZL TIKKINA Petzl boosted the lumens on this baby from 60 to 80 with no weight gain. #4027 (MSRP $20)

Under $20 Club

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7. METOLIUS GATEKEEPER The wire gate on this belay carabiner folds down away from the locking gate, making it easy to slip on and off your belay loop. The contouring keeps your Grigri in place and prevents crossloading. #3027 (MSRP $18) 8. MADROCK TRIGGERWIRE You’re stick clipping that first bolt, and you’re not ashamed. So you might as well grab it on the first try and get to leading as soon as possible. A hidden side hook folds out and holds the gate open until you clip, making this the

ideal ‘biner for reachy sport routes and aided bolt ladders. #3033 (MSRP $20) 9. HYDAWAY COLLAPSIBLE BOTTLE A bottle without the bulk, this BPA-free, collapsible silicone vessel will only take up precious pack room when it’s full. # 18027(MSRP $20) 10. SALOMON EXIT HIKING SOCK Shin padding and woven support on this merinopolyester midweight keep feet toasty while preventing moisture buildup and blistering. #35073 (MSRP $17)

11. EPICUREAN WOOD FIBER CUTTING BOARD A beveled edge on this 9-inch cutting board turns the whole thing into a spatula for flipping quesadillas, and the perforated edge strains pasta like a dream. # BR300 (MSRP $20) 12. GEARAID GEAR PATCHES Highlight your gear’s battle scars with these brightly colored patches. #24027 (MSRP $10)

january 10, 2016 / day 4

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feature

Photo by Andrew Bydlon / Caveman Collective

The Real McCoy The OIWC’s keynote breakfast speaker accepts the first-ever Honorary Lifetime Achievement Award

BY KASSONDRA CLOOS AND KRISTIN HOSTETTER

january 10, 2016 / day 4

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feature

7 Habits of Highly Successful Leaders: The Sally McCoy Edition

1.

Leave everything better than you found it.

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2.

more than her and not performing as well, she went to the president of the company and called him out. He explained the wage gap was because her colleague “has to provide for his family.” “‘I can’t believe you just said that,’” McCoy said she told him. “’Do you realize that’s so unfair? And besides which, his wife’s a law partner. She makes more than all of us.’” She got the raise. “I was probably young enough and dumb enough to be direct like that, but if you know me, you know that’s sort of typical,” she said. Offering advice to women at the OIWC breakfast, she noted that you don’t get what you don’t ask for—so demand what you’re worth. “You always say what you mean and mean what you say,” Krcik said to McCoy. “I think we’d all be better off if [everyone] did that.” McCoy spoke yesterday of barriers she faced decades ago and the immense amount of work yet to be done. The outdoor industry has made progress, but still falls far short of goals to have truly equal gender representation in leadership, marketing, advertising, targeting customers and building solid gear made outside of the “shrink it and pink it” mindset. Studies show it could take 118 years to close the wage gap, McCoy said, and it’s an issue men should care about just as much as women. She recalled a recent editorial in British magazine OCC Outdoors, in which the editor called a panel discussion about the state of women in the outdoor industry a waste

Know who owns your company, and what their goals are.

3.

They can’t say no if you don’t ask.

4.

Chose the company culture wisely.

of time. It was “hogging some space that could have usefully been given over to a real issue,” he wrote. McCoy was on that all-female panel, at the European Outdoor Summit. An innovation panel was made up entirely of men. When she brought up that dichotomy, no one commented. But then a man made the same observation, and everyone praised him. It happens to many women, she said, both wellknown women and those in entry-level jobs. She joked, too, about being “mansplained.” When she talks about climbing Mount Everest, for instance, men frequently give her advice on the best way to climb it—men whose only experience on the mountain comes from sitting in IMAX theaters with buckets of popcorn on their laps. McCoy encouraged companies to take a hard look at the experience they require for promotions and hiring, because many managers (herself included, she admitted) demand more than necessary. These demands are a barrier in finding good talent, no matter the gender. She shared a quote from Yvon Chouinard: “I hire dirtbags, because I can take a dirtbag and teach him business,” she quoted. “But I can’t take a businessman and teach him how to be a dirtbag.” McCoy closed by saying that she doesn’t want to be known as a woman who speaks for women, and offered seven steps to anyone looking to build a long, satisfying career in the outdoor industry (see below). “It’s a time of incredible change and a time of great potential out there,” McCoy said. “We can only drive our industry forward with great talent.”

5.

Network. It’s OK to be transactional.

6.

Set goals.

7.

Care about what you do and how you do it.

Photo by Lauren Danilek

WHEN SALLY MCCOY was 10 years old, her father asked her what she wanted to be when she grew up. “A ranger,” she told him, because it was the only job she knew of at the time that would let her work outside. “‘That’s good,’” she recalled her dad saying at the time, “‘because it’ll probably still be a man’s world when you’re grown up.’ That pissed me off.” She never did become a ranger, but at 23, after a barrage of rejection letters from outdoor companies (some of which she still has), she landed her very first job in the industry as a mail clerk at The North Face, “at a below-poverty-level wage.” Five years later, she was vice president. “She picked an industry, she picked a company, and she got in the door,” said Ann Krcik, The North Face’s senior director of brand communications. Yesterday morning, Krcik presented McCoy with the Outdoor Industry Women’s Coalition’s first-ever Lifetime Achievement Award at the nonprofit’s standing room-only breakfast. Few people have done more for the betterment of our industry than Sally McCoy. She’s held leadership positions at nonprofits like The Conservation Alliance, the Outdoor Industry Association and the Outdoor Industry Women’s Coalition. And although she’s too humble to applaud her own success, she has been a brilliant fixer and grower of companies. She turned Sierra Designs around in the early ’90s, in part by launching an innovative line of women’s technical apparel and sleeping bags built from the ground up, instead of the “shrink it and pink it” stuff that was common then. Both were firsts for the industry at a time when “women’s” and “unisex” meant exactly the same thing. Some at SD accused her of “ruining the company” with her new women’s lines, Sally recalled, “but when we made better women’s clothing and gear, we got better at men’s, too.” Perhaps more importantly, Sally has had a profound impact on the people and cultures with whom she’s engaged her considerable energies. After nine years as CamelBak’s CEO, where she achieved the goals she set for herself—to grow the company and start innovating—she announced her resignation early this week during one of her companywide Town Hall meetings. “I started crying, and pretty soon almost everyone in the room was crying,” she said. “It’s her personal approach to leadership,” says Shannon Stearns of CamelBak. “She makes an effort to connect with, understand and relate to every single person on her team.” But don’t let those warm-and-fuzzies trick you. McCoy’s no-BS approach is legendary. When McCoy was a sales director at The North Face and found out a male colleague was being paid


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Preview the Fall 2016 Apparel Collections, featuring the Mt. Davis Waxed Canvas Jacket. Booth #32112.

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geartrends

performance denim

JEAN GENIES

Innovation in denim sparks hope for improved sales. BY COREY BUHAY

SWEAT IN A PAIR of traditional jeans, and you’ve resigned to a day of dampness. Jump a lake in them? It’s all over. For nearly 150 years, jeans have drawn fame from their durability, but their stiffness and absorbency have historically rendered “performance denim,” an oxymoron. In recent years, technical tweaks like spandex blends and waterproof coatings have made performance jeans one of the last bastions of cotton in outdoor sports apparel. Still, jeans — even those sporting performance tech — have been unable to compete with the undeniable comfort of yoga pants and the jegging’s convincing impersonation. Athleisure (clothes designed to transition seamlessly from trail to happy hour) has invaded the market that once belonged to denim, but there’s good news: According to Matt Powell, Sports Industry Analyst at market research firm NPD, denim’s decline is lessening — if just a little bit. Jean sales dropped just five percent between May 2014 and May 2015, as opposed to eight percent during the 2014 calendar year The bad news? Sales probably won’t recover entirely, especially now that retailers are churning out synthetic technical wear in increasingly fashionable and comfortable styles. But this isn’t the death rattle for denim. With a little technical tweaking, it might even regain some of its former prowess. “We’re seeing a lot of the attributes that make athleisure clothes more comfortable trickle down into denim,” said Powell. From stretch to quick-dry to waterproofing, these attributes, often applied to jeans at the fiber level, have become key to holding consumer interest. Some retailers are bent on finding the perfect recipe of fibers as the ticket to successful competition with athleisure. The idea of fabric blends isn’t new. Virtually every performance jean uses some sort of elastane for stretch, and manufacturers like Patagonia (#13027) and prAna (#11012) utilize polyester in its jeans for its quick-dry properties. Levi Strauss achieves extra durability by interweaving Dyneema, a super-tough fiber used in everything from personal armor to abrasion and UV-resistant climbing webbing. Cordura (#39213), longtime fabric manufacturer

Dish & Duer is taking the sweat out of denim.

and the denim supplier for Levi’s Skateboarding Collection, has focused R&D efforts on projects like incorporating nylon 6,6, a material used in the fabric of soft-sided luggage, to simultaneously toughen and lighten jeans while making them more breathable. Ellen Krimmel, prAna’s vice president of design and merchandising says prAna experimented for years to find the right mix of spandex, cotton, and polyester that gave its jeans stretch and breathability without sacrificing drape or softness. PrAna’s sales tactics involve a second angle, however — tugging at pursestrings by appealing to buyers’ values, especially where the environment is concerned. The company is exploring alternative dying for its technical jeans as well as new printing methods that will lessen prAna’s environmental footprint without any discernable change to the

desired product aesthetic. With its “Denim is a filthy business” tagline, Patagonia has been publicizing its own recent move to organic, fair-trade cotton. Supplemented by a less water-intensive dying process, the result is a much more environmentally friendly jean that also has the benefits of stretch polyester and a DWR coating. Helena Barbour, Patagonia’s Sportwear Business Unit Director, said it’s the company’s strong environmental and social values that keep the patrons coming back. Barbour compared the apparel manufacturing industry to the pre-Whole Foods grocery sector: consumers are just beginning to gain awareness of the process behind the product, which she believes will become increasingly important. CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 january 9, 2016 / day 3

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geartrends

performance denim

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27

German brand Ortovox (#4001) champions this farm-to-shelf transparency by sourcing sustainablyraised wool for its Merino-blended jeans. Millenials in particular are an eco-conscious bunch, and so far, says NPD’s Matt Powell, they’ve been putting their money where their mouths are. Though Patagonia’s goal behind sourcing fairtrade organic raw materials was to raise the standard and inspire change in the industry, according to Barbour, the result has been more than just a warm fuzzy feeling. “We’ve been seeing triple-digit increases in sales this season,” she said. Cordura’s Global Brand and Marketing Director Cindy McNaull said the ethical shift toward sustainability means that customers are starting to prefer owning fewer, higher quality products that are built to last rather than a closet heaped with trendier items. Powell was skeptical about any decline in “disposable fashion.” For street wear, fast-fashion empires like H&M are still seeing enormous growth, and wellestablished stores like Gap and JC Penney are jumping on that high-turnover bandwagon in the face of falling profit margins. Though there’s no evidence of a wide-scale cultural shift in buying habits, it’s possible that customer values differ in the outdoor-specific arena. “People are becoming more interested in the story their clothing tells,” said Patagonia’s Helena Barbour. That can mean the origin story of raw materials or the stories clothes gather as they’re worn. Imagine a consumer who wants to point to the shirt she trekked through Nepal in or the boots that carried her through the streets of Amsterdam. A quality-over-quantity model means fewer purchases, so it’s up to brands to earn their place in sparser closets. Marketing a product as “green” or socially conscious is one way to catch a buyers’ attention and establish trust – making them more likely to head to that brand’s website when looking for the jean they will choose to last them for the next 10 years. The challenge doesn’t always lie in creating longlasting, functional products, but fashionable ones. Vancouver-based jeaner Dish & Duer (#VO206) approaches from that angle rather than from the athletic side. Dish & Duer strives to create a technical pant the consumer can wear not only to the bar but under a blazer at an important meeting. Despite the fashion focus, Dish & Duer’s president and co-founder Gary Lennett emphasized the difference between fashion and trend. Jumping from crest to crest to ride the trends would put Dish & Duer in the realm of fast fashion. “It would make us hypocrites,” Lennett said. “About 67 pounds of clothing per person goes into the landfill every year. It’s the biggest untold environmental story there is.” Though Dish & Duer incorporates renewable fibers Tencel and Modal (derived from eucalyptus and beech wood, respectively) for antimicrobial and moisture control features, its main environmental focus is on building a product that lasts. The brand’s return policy reflects it: they’ll push the pants back

28 outdoor retailer daily

Dish & Duer (left), Patagonia (right).

across the counter if a customer tries to surrender a purchase with the tags still on. “How do you know if you don’t like them if you haven’t tried to wear them out?” Lennett asks. That playful twist on a take-back guarantee is one example of how denim retailers are trying to tell a story to get noticed in the crowd. Five Ten’s approach is to create an even more niche jean rather than trying to appeal to the masses. The Yosemite Jean, is climber-specific and has been met with “runaway success,” according to Five Ten Apparel Category Manager Jesus Alvarez. “It’s our feeling that climbers want to be identified with the sport but not in a flashy way with giant company logos,” Alvarez said. To that end, the Yosemite Jean features a subtly stitched contour of Half Dome on the back pocket. It’s this climbing-specific marketing that makes it stand out; its 1 percent Lycra composition is nothing new. Big-name players don’t mean enthusiasm is universal. NPD’s Powell warns retailers against celebrating too early: overall sales haven’t quite gone up. “We are still in the middle of the athleisure trend,” Powell said. Snow sports apparel manufacturer Flylow (#10)

has made a name for itself by creating clothes that are technical without looking technical, and though they’re moving into leisure apparel “for the mountain renaissance man,” jeans aren’t in the mix. Flylow CEO and co-founder Dan Abrams pointed to the 2010 U.S. snowboarding team uniform. “They did a denim print on a GoreTex fabric. So in some respects technical denim is a little played up for us,” said Abrams. Instead, Flylow’s 2016 spring line will include a thick corduroy pant burly enough to take a rasping on bouldering problems as well as lightweight chinos with a gusseted crotch and 2 percent spandex, better for fast-paced activities. Flylow uses Nikwax’s Cotton Proof coating to add water resistance to its natural fiber products. “We’re giving people something to wear to the ski hill rather than just wear on the ski hill,” said Abrams. That’s the essence of athleisure, people want to be identified with a sport even when they aren’t doing it. To Lennett, this reperesents a fundamental paradigm shift. “Fifteen years ago if my wife was caught in her athletic clothing in a grocery store, she would have hid behind a post, whereas today it’s like a badge of honor.


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geartrends

running footwear

COLD FRONT

Winter running shoes help consumers embrace all that snow, ice, mud and, ultimately, self-appointed suffering. BY JENNA BLUMENFELD

» Channeling the new buzzword “light alpinism,” The North Face (#35051) has launched Ultra MT Winter (MSRP $170), what the brand describes as “the answer runners have been seeking for high-alpine trails.” This workhorse of a shoe is packed with materials designed to repel water and stick to ice. A splash-proof vamp contains HydroSeal; sailcloth material is concentrated in the heel for lightweight durability; a FlashDry collar lining keeps wearers cool and dry. The midsole contains ESS from the midfoot to the forefoot for protection from stones, and springy energy return.

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Light alpinism

Shoppers who voluntarily choose to run trails in frigid weather rather than sip hot cocoa are already more hard core than the average outdoor enthusiast consumer. The newest offerings from brands at the O.R. Winter Market deliver on light running shoes that also come with all of the bells and whistles of burly, heavier trail runners. For example, The North Face looks to their mountaineering and winter hiking footwear line to inform protection against water, ice, mud and snow for their newest winter trail runner, the Ultra MT Winter: The shoe’s heel is constructed from sailcloth– a sturdy but light material. Plus, it’s designed to be compatible with snowshoes. The brand is dedicated to pared down performance. “We start by looking at a running shoe and adding in only the protection and technology you need for the environment and activity,” said The North Face VP of footwear, Brian Moore. Similarly, Salomon leveraged its alpinist roots to craft the new S-Lab XA Alpine, a shoe that will be a godsend to consumers who relish forging through powdery switchbacks via a weather resistant, highly-breathable, integrated gaiter.

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Biomechanics-driven

No longer are brands shooting in the dark to design smart running shoes. The coolest companies are employing in-depth biomechanical data to advise product development. New Balance, for instance, innovates using nitrogen-infused TPU foam by extending it through three-fourths of the midsole, which provides durability mile after mile. “[Biomechanic] understandings drive and fuel us to understand how we can address these differences through our performance line-up,” said Claire Wood, senior product manager for

30 outdoor retailer daily

New Balance’s performance running division. “We have brand new product offerings poised to take us into a new world of speed,” she continues, referring to the company’s new Vazee 2090. Running shoe mainstay Brooks also embraces the use of new technologies for running design via variegated fabrics that offer stability, support, comfort, protection and stretch. “For 2016 footwear trends, we see engineered mesh, knits and woven uppers emerging; they all provide improved performance and better fit,” said Brice Newton, Brooks’ senior manager of global footwear merchandising. “Underfoot, new midsole foams are providing increased energy return and weight reduction, two things runners want in their shoes.” Keep an eye out for Brooks’ newest addition, the Mazama, a flashy shoe that has a nearly seamless upper, thanks to a double-layer of mesh.

3

Traction and responsiveness

As with winter hiking boots, consumers continue to value winter running shoes that have ample traction to prevent slips and falls while bombing down canyons. With it’s new Terrex Trailmaker for men and women (also available in a waterproof Gore-Tex model), Adidas prioritizes grip by taking inspiration from baron tires: The outsole is covered in deep lugs made with continental rubber. Likewise, The North Face uses tried-and-true Vibram Icetrek for it’s newest mountain trailer runner, which provides superior grip in cold terrain. Widely spaced lugs help shed packed snow and grit. Such emphasis on traction also helps improve shoe responsiveness. Like welltuned skis, a shoe’s grip improves the running experience by giving stability on sketchy terrain. CONTINUED ON PAGE 32


geartrends

running footwear

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30 1. Outdoor shoppers who are tired of flicking snow out of their socks will flock to Salomon’s (#36126) new S-Lab XA Alpine (MSRP $250). Designed to expand the boundaries of off-trail winter running, this new shoe contains an integrated, breathable gaiter that hugs the ankle to repel the elements. The sole is comprised of two layers of compressed EVA, a carbon chassis for a light, stiff midfoot integrity, and WET traction Contragrip outsole for traction. We appreciated the thoughtful details, such as medial ankle protection, a Quicklace system and a vertically walled toe-cap. Also check out Salomon’s updated Speedcross 4 (MSRP $140), that contains improved traction, and the Speedtrak (MSRP $115), which is designed for mud and obstacle races.

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1

2. Brooks (#36197) expands its “Propel Me” category with the built-for-speed Mazama (MSRP $140). Brand new to the line, this relatively light shoe for men and women (9.3 ounces and 7.9 ounces, respectively) features a decoupled midfoot for a powerful push off, and a fast runner experience. With a 6mm drop, we love how this shoe has optimized traction for both uphill and downhill running, and a protective, double-mesh upper to repel pebbles and grit. Also check out the brand’s updated Glycerin 9, a cushy shoe that contains new 3D Stretch Print technology in the upper for strategic fit and support. 3. While minimalism design is less common in winter running footwear, maximalist options continue to gain ground. New Balance (#36165) innovates in this category with the new Vazee 2090 (MSRP $150) — specifically in the midsole with nitrogen-infused TPU foam (called N2). Here, the N2 foam extends through three-fourths of the midsole to merge with the company’s staple REVlite foam. The result? A light, cushioned ride that maintains stability and responsiveness. Also, look for the new Fresh Foam Gobi (MSRP $95) and Vazee Pace v2 (MSRP $110), updated for added durability.

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3

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4. adidas (#1009) continues to dominate the trail-running category with it’s Terrex Trailmaker (MSRP $115) and Terrex Trailmaker GTX ($140), which contains a Gore-Tex insert for protection against water and slush. With 4mm-deep lugs and an outsole pattern inspired by the baron tire, shoppers will delight in the superior traction. At just 11.3 ounces to 8.8 ounces, these trail-running machines deliver a fast, light experience. Speed lacing provides a quick, comfortable fit.


geartrends

goggles

AIMING FOR INVISIBLE These goggles will do more work for you on the slopes. BY ELIZABETH MILLER

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Goggle-makers are still pursuing the best lens to meet the needs of changing light conditions. While swappable lenses continue to fit into the arsenal, this year’s newcomers sport lenses that also change conditions automatically when the light does. K2 has gone with Transitions lenses, an industry leader for eyeglasses that responds to UV light to adjust from clear indoors — for glasses, for goggles they selected a pale orange-based tint for flat light conditions — to gray sunglasses shades outdoors. Some gear companies are going all in and launching a proprietary lens. Take Zeal, which debuts a new photochromic lens, and Julbo, which has four options for photochromic lenses. Nick Yardley, CEO of Julbo declared, “Nobody ever changes their lenses while skiing, no matter how many lenses they have in their pocket. We really believe that, for skiing, your lens has to do the work.” Others see the cost of coating those lenses, which can run higher per ounce than gold and in some cases nearly double the cost for consumers, as a barrier that makes it worth keeping lens-swapping technologies around.

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2. Airflux (MSRP $150) from Julbo (#2043) uses the popular Zebra MXT lens, which established Julbo in the photochromatic market and a patent-pending pullout lens venting system to prevent fogging. The Airflux boasts almost the same line of features as the already successful Aerospace goggle, which returns this year with a polycarbonate lens. 3. K2 (#36103 and #D118) launches a photochromic lens this year in two goggles: the tested Source goggles, and the newcomer Scene, a shorter goggle with a tighter

Go ahead, break a sweat

Backcountry fever spills over into goggle designs with ongoing attention to anti-fogging technologies. Check for venting systems and for coatings meant to meet the needs of those determined to earn their turns. Julbo’s SuperFlow venting system rises to that demand with a system that allows the lens to pop away from the frame for ventilation while sweating your way uphill. Zeal pairs their fabric and mesh venting systems with the new Everclear antifogging coating that promises to hold off the cloud for more than 220 seconds.

3

1. Also stepping up their photochromic game this year, Zeal (#VO223) launches the Automatic+ lens, which uses UV-activated photochromic polarized lens tinted to protect eyes from both UV and HEV light. The proprietary lens, also treated with anti-fog and anti-scratch, adjusts color in about 30 seconds and builds on a base of a yellow-tinted lens for enhanced clarity even in flat-light conditions. It’s in the Forecast (MSRP $109 or $239 with Automatic+), which uses the powers of Everclear anti-fog to allow for better peripheral vision.

One lens to rule them all

curvature meant to fit smaller faces. The Scene T (MSRP $224), comes with Transitions lenses that adjust when bluebird days cloud over. Removable outriggers on both models allow goggle straps to feed straight into the frame and fit easily whether the wearer prefers the strap over the helmet or inside it. The swappable-lens version, Scene Z (MSRP $144), is available with “Lens by Zeiss” designs by Carl Zeiss made with increasing visibility in low light conditions in mind.

3

One size doesn’t have to fit all

New models offer a wider range of options as some companies adjust or broaden their line to promise a better fit for kids of all ages and to make way for younger shredders. K2 swaps their approach from male versus female to launch three unisex chassis meant to promise a better fit that integrates seamlessly with helmets. “We’re trying to push toward, ‘pick what fits your face best, pick whatever style you like,’” said Aaron Wahlborg with K2. “We didn’t want people to think, ‘Well, that’s a woman’s goggle so a man shouldn’t be wearing that,’ or vice versa.’” Stalwart entries in this line also continue to lean on precisely cut goggles and flexible frames meant to fit a variety of face shapes.


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geartrends

socks

SOCK IT TO ME

The new spin on socks? Hotter, smoother and more synthetic. BY MORGAN TILTON 3 1

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1. Made in Germany, the CEP Ski Ultralight Socks (MSRP $55) from CEP Compression Sportswear (#38191) will help to heat-up chairlift rides with the textile technology Smart Infrared. In the brand’s thinnest ski sock to date, the Emana yarn — made by Solvay — is embedded with bioactive minerals that absorb body heat and emanate far infrared rays back onto the skin. 2. For skiers and boarders, the Women’s Taos (MSRPs $23-$24) from Darn Tough Vermont (#32150) features a color-poppy Southwest design, inspired by Native American blankets, on a trending deniminspired vapor blue.

36 outdoor retailer daily

3. Thermolite expands in the wheelhouse of Darn Tough Vermont (#32150) who has chosen to honor that wool isn’t for everyone. For hardcore, stopwatch-crushing skiers the streamlined, ultra-light RFL Sock (MSRP $24) is now available in a synthetic version with seamless construction. 4. For a sock that can be worn both on the trails and with dress shoes, Lorpen North America (#32164) introduces the TR2 (MSRPs $18), which debuts a new Merinopolyester micro-fiber blend that enhances the performance of the Merino. 5. In lightweight designs with zonal heeland-toe cushioning, Wigwam (#19019)

Non-wool spool

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Warming hut

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Hikes to Hops

More and more synthetic socks are showing up next season, including fresh pairs for skiers, snowboarders and runners. That’s because choosing a nonwool blend could be a lifestyle or environmental preference: “Some people that are vegan have requested for us to have a synthetic sock,” said Brian Brand, Marketing Director at Darn Tough Vermont. Cringing at “wool” in a label could be part educational, too. Ideas of traditional wool — itchy, uncomfortable, bulky — may eclipse the modern affair. “There’s a stigma around merino, which is not the same material as what people think of as grandmother’s classic wool. My whole neck turns blotchy with ragg wool, but it’s pretty infrequent that someone is going to have an allergic reaction to merino,” Brand added.

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Your toes needn’t stay toasty with hot cocoa and peppermint schnapps alone. New textile technologies from some brands are jumping into ski socks that can help to regulate heat — even in the thinnest, pairs intended for racers. “Anything to increase heat in the foot is a good thing, which is a number one priority for everyone on the ski hill,” said Jared Finnery, CEP Compression Sportswear Sales Manager — not just slalom skiers.

Taking queues from multiuse footwear and overarching athleisure trends, socks are experiencing more crossover, technically and aesthetically. Hikers want thoughtful style and design for post-trail beta swaps and professionals want more durability. “The consumer is looking for product that fits any environment they encounter and that’s also visually appealing,” said Margaret Newhard, Director of Product Management for Wigwam, which focused on designing socks for ’16-’17 that “provide the wearer with the ability to hike a fourteener and then seamlessly transition to meeting up with friends afterward at a local pub.” Having solely stylish socks also helps to streamline that sock drawer. releases the Peak to Pub Collection (MSRPs $16-$17) with Ultimax construction — a push-pull system that draws moisture away from the bottom of the sock byway of drirelease at the foot’s base and Merino wool up top — in three of the four pairs. 6. For ladies’ everyday wear, the medium weight over-the-calf Billings Knee High (MSRP $26) from Farm to Feet (#BR429) reflects a trending fashion-forward pattern of abstract forms and geometric arrays with strong, saturated colors. Socks’ graphics continue to evolve with greater detail and more complexity. One reason is the influence from the screen print market and sublimation, which pours into

the outdoor market, and helps to drive competition and technology, attributed Farm to Feet Product Designer Anna Hall. 7. Krimson Klover (#23039) ups the novelty even more in its ski sock designs with new custom illustrations including the Ski Resort Graffiti (MSRP $28). Knit with a custom house-made Merino based yarn, the sock “is a play to all of the graffiti we are seeing in the fashion world right now. We took a few of our favorite ski resorts around the world and created a fun, whimsical print that would resonate with the ski and outdoor industry,” said Krimson Klover Founder Rhonda Swenson.


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geartrends

gloves

HOLD ON

Gloves (and mitts) get a firmer grip on elements we’ve come to love. BY ELIZABETH MILLER 1

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Built-in benefits

Glove designers are reducing bulk by building some features into the fabric with which the gloves are made. “For cut and sew it’s easier, and translate, cheaper, but it’s also a seamless design, so you don’t notice when you’re using the glove for something other than your phone, you don’t feel that seam at your fingertip,” says Ben Martin, product developer for Black Diamond’s new smartphone-savvy Screentap glove line.

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Goldilockspleasing options in heat

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3

Battery-operated hand-warming technology is reaching all ends of the spectrum, appearing this year not just in technical alpine gloves for long days on the slopes, but also in mountaineering gloves designed to de-thaw fingers long enough for one more pitch, casual gloves for gripping coffees and dog leashes and mitts for truly frigid hands. .

3

The tagline of so much yoga apparel that it’s both street- and studio-ready crosses over to gloves with designers keeping an eye on the fashion appeal as well as the function of new offerings. New gloves source transition-friendly fabrics and just enough water- and windproofing to function on the ski hill while not looking out-of-place downtown. Happily, neon looks to be heading back to the 1980s, where they belongs.

4

4 1. Black Diamond (#6009) launches the Solano Glove (MSRP $349.95) this year with a new supplier providing the three-setting rechargeable heating system with PrimaLoft Gold lining in a Gore-Tex glove with a goat leather and the style of freeride gloves. 2. Hestra (#34127) debuts a heated liner glove (MSRP $250) designed to layer with other gloves and mitts in their line-up but made of tough enough ripstop, wind- and waterproof fabric and fiber insulation to go it alone, too.

38 outdoor retailer daily

3. Harnessing the sun hits closer to hand with Seirus (#30040E), makers of the kinetic-heating technology Heatwave, which debuts the Solarsphere Brink Glove (MSRP $49.99). Solarsphere deploys a fabric that absorbs UV light from the sun into a downalternative insulation to raise temperatures inside the glove by up to 10 degrees. 4. The North Face (#35051) debuts the Himalayan Mitt (MSRP $165) at the show. The high altitude-ready mitt pairs 600 fill Responsible Down Standard-

Athleisure crosses over

certified goose down insulation and Primaloft with goat leather and a Windstopper shell. 5. Outdoor Research (#26015) used a 3D printer to make a hand model and pin fabric to its pre-curved shape to completely reconceives their glove patterns. “The whole idea was to create a glove that was really built around your hand r hand, so where you flex, the glove flexes with you,” says Meghan Martens, glove line manager for Outdoor Research. It comes together in the Alti Glove (MSRP $159).

Fingerless frenzy

Demand for mitts has ticked upward and designers are responding with the “puffy coat for your hands” approach, packing mitts with down insulation. These compressible mitts can provide a small and lightweight promise of warm hands as an emergency-use mitt, but are also durable enough to hold-up to the battery of ongoing use.

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Work hard, play harder

It’s no surprise that the quick-drying, breathable insulation needed to meet the ongoing demands of an active lifestyle that means getting outside no matter the weather in insulatiing layers is making a repeat appearance in gloves. Designers are sourcing natural fibers, like wool, down and leather, as well insulation we’ve come to know and love like Primaloft and fleece, to keep hands warm and dry.


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STYLE

STORY

A curated selection of brands at the forefront of the modern outdoor experience, Venture Out is where core outdoor retailers are finding the brands to attract new, younger and more urban-influenced consumers.

outdoorretailer.com/VentureOut CURRENT EXHIBITORS Alchemy Equipment

Ethnotek

Locally Grown Clothing Co.

Oliberte

Solo Eyewear

American Icon

Fawn and Foal

Malibu Sandals

Olukai

Synergy Organic Clothing

Athletic Recon

Fayettechill

Maloja

Poler Stuff

Tenkara USA

Chippewa Boots

Forsake

MiiR

Proof Eyewear

tentree

Dish and Duer

HASTA

Mizu, Inc.

Rumpl

Teton Bros.

Duckworth

Hood Rubber Company

Sanuk

United By Blue

Endurance Conspiracy

Jeremiah

Shwood Eyewear

Wolfgang Man & Beast

Epic Provisions

SHOW PHOTOS: CARLO NASISSE / HEDHI MEDIA

JANUARY 7 - 10, 2016

ZEAL Optics

S ALT L AKE CIT Y, UT


RETAILERLOUNGE Located in MR 254B

Did you know? Overlooking the show floor, the Retailer Lounge offers respite from everything going on below. Open to retailers and reps only, the Retailer Lounge will have plenty of seating, free WiFi, charging stations, refreshments and—above all else—quiet. With panoramic views of the show floor, the Retailer Lounge is located just beyond the Business Center in MR 254B.


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SUMMER MARKET EXPO AUGUST 3-6, 2016 Salt Palace Convention Center, Salt Lake City, UT

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ALL MOUNTAIN DEMO JANUARY 6, 2017 Solitude Mountain Resort, UT

WINTER MARKET EXPO JANUARY 7-10, 2017 Salt Palace Convention Center, Salt Lake City, UT

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geartrends

sustainability

GREEN GIANTS?

Can small outdoor brands be as sustainable as their bigger brethren? BY GRACE CHUA

 When Mike Cangi and Brian Linton started apparel company United By Blue (#BR423, VO129) in Philadelphia in 2010, they wanted to bake environmental sustainability into their business from the get-go. The young founders began with a line of organic t-shirts, promising to remove a pound of trash from oceans and waterways for every product sold. By September 2015, they had delivered on this promise, cleaning up 250,000 pounds of trash. Around the same time, Colorado wool-apparel startup Voormi (#VO233) began sourcing domestic merino wool from Rocky Mountain herds, developing longer-lasting technical fabrics, working with manufacturers around its homebase of Pagosa Springs, and field-testing shirts and jackets,

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all the while aiming to be sustainable. In fall 2015, it launched its third season of technical garments. It often seems as though larger firms have more resources to devote to environmental and labor sustainability. But a determined group of small, idealistic firms are hoping to overcome challenges to pioneer new ways of doing business and influence the outdoor industry on a broader scale.

It ain’t easy being green from the get-go With small businesses historically creating 6 out of ten of net new jobs in the U.S., and contributing close to half the nation’s GDP, it’s vital for them to help influence sustainability. “Small firms play a large role in changing business culture and transitioning from

short-termism to long term prosperity,” says Katie Holcomb, spokesman for B Lab, a nonprofit which certifies sustainable businesses. In the outdoor industry, firms take a variety of approaches to sustainability. Wool apparel brands Voormi and Duckworth (#VO105, VO107) both source their raw materials locally; in fact, Montana rancher John Helle, whose sheep provide the merino for Duckworth’s garments, is a partner in the firm. Both companies manufacture domestically to keep jobs within the U.S. and reduce the distance that raw materials and finished products travel. Duckworth also uses a chemical-free proprietary method to treat wool so it doesn’t shrink in the wash. CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

Photo courtesy United By Blue

B Boys: United By Blue founder Brian Linton and vice president Mike Cangi went the B Corp route to ensure the brand put sustainability ahead of profits.


#ItTakesADrop avexsport.com

Visit us at booth #21013

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geartrends

sustainability

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 44

Growing pains As small these firms scale, however, can they maintain margins while staying true to their mission? United By Blue has already dealt with some of these growing pains. A few years ago, it tried to eliminate plastic packaging. But the substitutes, banana-fiber paper bags, cost 50 cents apiece, 50 times as much as polyethylene bags. And the company’s larger retail accounts were asking it to send products in polybags to be processed into retailers’ warehouses, while other retailers mistakenly displayed the garments still in their paper bags. “Although the bags were cool, it’s hard for a customer to buy a t-shirt when it’s hidden behind a paper bag,” says Cangi. After two seasons, costs and logistics became too much, and United By Blue reverted to polybags. In September 2013, three and a half years after it started, United By Blue opened its first retail locationand-coffeehouse in Philadelphia. Since then, it has opened two more as well as a warehouse. “We all of a sudden had a whole new set of processes to look at,”

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Waste Not: United By Blue has cleaned up 250,000 pounds of trash (one pound for each shirt it sells) from oceans and waterways as of September 2015.

Cangi says: everything from stores’ energy use down to composting coffee grounds. It’s paid off, as selling through multiple channels — online, physical retail shops and via other retailers — has proven good for business. Instead of competing with each other, the channels bring in new customers from unexpected directions. For instance, partnerships with UK and Canadian retailers have brought traffic to the United By Blue website. Meanwhile, Voormi and Duckworth hope that their demand for high-quality, locally-sourced wool will send signals to producers to make more and reinvigorate the US wool industry. “Today, the U.S. wool industry is kind of a by-product of the demand for lamb,” Smith says. “As you create demand [for fine merino], the industry begins to take notice.” Both firms have also invested in developing proprietary wool fabrics from the ground up. Sometimes the biggest challenge for a small firm is staying power. Nau (#5001), a Portland, Oregon green-clothing maker launched with a bang in 2007, opening high-end retail stores in four cities. When the economy tanked, so did Nau. Later, it was acquired by Horny Toad, then Korean outdoor giant Black Yak. The acquisition has not changed the way it does business, says sustainability director Mary Jane Murphy. In 2015, it launched a line of jackets made with recycled down from old bedding.

How to get there Beyond the challenges, small manufacturers do have some advantages. For one, they are often more agile and able to respond to changes in demand, and decisions can be made more quickly. And small companies need close ties with trusted manufactur-

ers. While new materials and small minimum orders can be pricey, domestic suppliers may be more willing to work with small companies, says Shannon Whitehead, founder of Factory45, an ethical-clothing startup accelerator. “I think there’s a huge trust issue that happened with offshoring.” The Factory45 program also links participants with skilled manufacturers based in the US — something that’s often difficult for brand-new market entrants with no connections in the industry. Meanwhile, Voormi distributes manufacturing among multiple smaller factories, rather than producing at a single large one. This approach lets it keep production within the U.S. rather than having to move to Asia to scale up. Companies can also participate in the Outdoor Industry Association’s Sustainability Working Group, started about eight years ago to examine chemical use, supply chain management and other issues. Hodgson estimates some 50 companies are dues-paying members, while about 250 firms in all actively take part in discussions. For smaller outdoor firms like Nau, United By Blue and hosiery company Farm to Feet (#BR429), the group offers peer-to-peer support and other resources, she says. Finally, the first big step towards sustainability is to simply begin measuring social and environmental performance, using tools such as B Lab’s Impact Assessment questions or the Higg Index. Early in its life, United By Blue went through the B Corp certification process, and is today a certified B Corporation, legally obligated to consider its impact on the environment and community over profits. “It forces you to look at the company and all your processes holistically,” says Cangi. “That was something we were really excited about.”

Photo courtesy United By Blue

Some, like United By Blue and Nau, use organic materials that are biodegradable at the end of their lifespan, or polyester made from recycled plastics or reclaimed waste materials. Novel Supply Co., a Vancouver lifestyle-apparel startup that aims to launch by winter 2016, will use organic hemp fabric. But using specialty materials isn’t simply a matter of giving suppliers a design to produce. Novel Supply Co. founder Kaya Dorey discovered the North American sustainable-textile industry was “pretty much nonexistent” and had to source her hemp fabrics through middlemen from China and Laos. “We’re often looking for fabrics or materials that aren’t readily available on the market,” says United By Blue’s Cangi . For instance, United By Blue wanted to develop an organic slub jersey knit, but none of its manufacturers stocked any, so it had to develop the actual fabric in order to make the t-shirt. “That’s a similar problem that we continue to run into today. That’s challenging for a small business, especially from a cashflow perspective, and when you’re launching new products and items you don’t know what the market’s going to be like yet.” Manufacturing locally also has its hurdles, says Voormi’s head of marketing Timm Smith. “It’s pretty easy in a big city to put an ad in the paper and say we need 15 sewers. In a small community, it takes a lot more work, more intimacy in the community.” Yet the company is committed to its headquarters in Pagosa Springs, a southern Colorado town of less than 2,000 residents. Keeping jobs local helps the town diversify its economy away from one too reliant on seasonal tourism, Smith believes. In general, small companies, particularly new ones, lack the bandwidth to devote specifically to sustainability issues, says Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) corporate responsibility coordinator Nikki Hodgson. “At Columbia or The North Face, you might have a department of folks looking at sourcing issues, or a director of sustainability.”


US MATERIALS

US MANUFAC T URING

VER 100% AMERICAN

Photo Jay Beyer

DISC

US WORKERS

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MULTIPLE STYLES FOR M’S & W’S

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Visit our booth to see entire selection of graphic ski socks.

www.farmtofeet.com


newexhibitors

Teton Bros

Bringing big-mountain culture from Jackson to Japan to the halls of the Salt Palace. BY MORGAN TILTON Following a stint in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Nori Suzuki brought the inspiration he’d garnered from the Teton Range back to Japan. A raft and ski guide and allover outdoor enthusiast, Nori experienced his first big mountain ski lines in the Rocky Mountains. And, he noticed the popular use of technical apparel—a category he hadn’t seen in Japan—ideal for farreaching backcountry adventure. Motivated to share both concepts in his home country, the land of deeppowder dreams, Nori moved back to the Pacific Island and founded Teton Bros., an alpinist and backcountry skiwear company. Coming full circle, the brand is making an introduction in the U.S. this Winter 2015/2016. “I learned the definition of big mountain skiing during the time I spent in Jackson Hole, and I wanted all

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of my friends in Japan to know what it’s all about,” shared Nori. “I thought that creating a line of technical wear not found in any Japanese brands would help bring the outdoor culture that I found in the U.S. to Japan.” In Japan, mountains occupy nearly three quarters of the landscape, Nori described—on an isle that’s smaller than the state of Montana. A known snowfall haven, more than 670 inches annually sprinkles Niseko, a cluster of ski resorts in Hokkaido where Nori teamed up with ski patrol for the research and development of the company’s 2008 flagship designs: the TB Jacket and Bib Pant. Then, a core community of outdoor enthusiasts existed in Japan, albeit no brands were developing technical outerwear when Nori debuted Tetons Bros. And Japan’s outdoor industry has matured

Nori Suzuki and Co. take the backcountry life global.

steadily over the past decade, but Teton Bros. is still the country’s only brand that focuses on product designs tailored to the backcountry consumer. Keeping a laser focus on the design intention allows Nori and Junko— his wife and Teton Bros. Co-founder and Designer—to create unique, extremely functional apparel for men and women. Simultaneously, the apparel is versatile for various outdoor activities, and thoughtful elements are incorporated, like the angled ventilation zipper on the Tsurugi Pullover. With further rarity,

all of the apparel incorporates colors from an ancient Japanese palette selection that was traditionally used for Kimono garments. For the duo, choosing the most elite fabrics is central. “We are located near some of the most innovative textile companies in the world and are in constant dialogue with them. We are always looking for and testing the next best fabric,” shared Nori. Regarding all the aforementioned: The majority of Japanese consumers hold high expectations of quality, which has kept the bar high.


“Japanese outdoor enthusiasts prefer technically superior products. For example, in the waterproof breathable category you rarely find any product that is not a 3-layer laminate. Selling to the Japanese consumer creates a need to have a superior product in terms of function and reliability,” explained Nori. “To sell products in Japan, the quality has to be superb, so we are very happy to have partnered with such a quality manufacturer.” While the States inspirited Tetons Bros., Japan was the perfect place to birth the idea. “A re l at ive ly s m a l l island, Japan has great places to ski and climb without having to travel too far,” described Nori. During the initial two years of product development Nori te sted garments with ski patrol, professional skiers and snowboarders— including Takayuki H i ra n o, To s h iya S ato, and turns with former Olympian and friend Tetsuya Okabe—in a variety of weather conditions. Not to mention, incessantly deep snow. The areas where they skied included Mt. Yotei, Asahidake, Hakuba, Tanigawadake and Hinoemata: all mountainsides where the term powder heaven is an axiom. “With nonstop powder runs, at times, Niseko truly transformed our brand to what it is today,” Niro attributed. “We could get over-head powder, easily, without having to search too hard. Nowhere else in the world could we test garments with ski patrol and pro backcountry skiers with endless powder runs day after day. I think our garments are perfected for powder days for this reason.” Over the last five years the competition between recreationalists for those fresh powder lines has increased drastically, he shared. Niseko’s ski mountains are practically unchanged, but the blossom of the tourism industry has made the area busier with people from all over the world seeking ski turns. “Niseko is still a great place to ski and find world-class powder. With some of the lightest snow around, it is a great place to test our products over and over again,” he assured. Nori grew up playing competitive soccer on various national teams.

Later, throughout his University years, he worked during winter breaks at a Nigata-based ski resort managed by his uncle. After graduating, he decided he needed a change of pace, packed his bags and left the “concrete jungle” of Tokyo for Jackson Hole to become a ski bum and outdoor instructor. He submerged himself in American culture and learned the English language, quickly. After returning to Japan, Nori worked as the country’s exclusive Spyder Active Sports distributor before launching Teton Bros. A die-hard backcountry s n ow b o a rd e r, J u n k o t r av e l e d all over Japan as a professional snowboarder and then taught snowboarding at Hakuba Ski Resort. The couple became acquainted at outdoor tradeshows, and with a shared p a s s ion for t he backcountry they traveled and skied together. It was during those trips that they conceptualized an idea that would later become Tetons Bros. As lead designer, Junko is in charge of the women’s collection, as well as choosing colors for all of the garments. Now, Tetons Bros. is ready to bridge into the U.S. market. “I’ve gotten huge support from my friends not only in Japan, but also in the U.S. to start Tetons Bros. I want to bring the Teton Bros. apparel line to the U.S. where my outdoor career and the first inspiration came from,” said Nori. Come November 2015, key styles will be available online and in select retail locations in Montana. This season, Junko and Niro will meet retailers throughout the Rocky Mountains— from Wyoming to Utah, California and Oregon—to discuss partnerships and distribution opportunities for the 2016/17-product line. “We are planning on visiting stores and areas with specialty retailers and introducing our brand and products,” explained Nori. “I am a huge fan of skiing with our clients and believe that off-site meetings on the chairlift or in the backcountry is a great way to create a strong relationship.” Founded in 2007 / en.teton-bros. com / Nori Suzuki , Founder / Irvine, CA / #VO327 january 10, 2016 / day 4

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Atomic’s Backland NC is an entrylevel backcountry touring boot. Experience a freegliding cuff for natural movement, crosslace system for a precise fit, PU cuff and shell, gold washable liner and a soft tongue. The skywalk rubber sole prevents you from slipping on icy transition surfaces. Weighing in at 1320 grams per boot. (MSRP $725) #36126 www.atomic.com

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A quick preview of the hot new products that you need to see for yourself at ORWM16

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The Shade Out Pant is the most flattering pant on the mountain. Features include Dare 2b’s AEP Kinematics, waterproof, breathable 4-way stretch fabric, DWR, and taped seams. Stretch lining to upper legs, ergonomic shaped waistband, adjustable detachable braces with backslider system and elasticated waist adjusters all make it an incredibly comfortable bottom layer. (MSRP $190) #36133 www.dare2b.com

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Walls Outdoor Goods’ Kevlar Shirt Jack features 10oz cotton/ polyester/Kevlar blend fabric that offers remarkable durability without the weight. The Shirt Jack features 6 ounces of synthetic insulation, water-resistant Dry IQ finish, fleece lined pockets and snap front. (MSRP TBD) #40159 www.walls.com

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Sperry’s Sojourn Duck Chukka features a rubber-duck toe construction and nubuck uppers with a neoprene bootie. Removable compression-molded EVA footbed maximizes comfort and AEGIS microbe shield protects against odor-causing bacteria. EVA midsole provides lightweight cushioning and shock absorption while the skeletal molded rubber outsole with molded Wave-Siping provides flexibility and ultimate wet/dry traction. (MSRP $110) #32117 www.sperry.com

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The Dry Guy Force Dry DX quickly dries boots and gloves after a day in wet conditions using a forcedair drying system that heats to 105 degrees and dries up to four garments in just one to two hours. Drying wet gear faster helps control odor-causing bacteria. The Force Dry DX features a three-hour timer with heat/no heat switch for overnight drying. (MSRP $80) #32173 www.dryguy.com


Made from nature to stand up to the elements. Introducing Teflon EcoElite™. The first renewably sourced, durable water repellent finish. It’s up to three times more durable than existing non-fluorinated repellents and delivers peak performance on cottons, synthetics and blends. To protect your performance fabrics, turn to the finish that’s sourced from nature. teflon.com/ordaily

Visit us at the Outdoor Retailer Show, Booth 40044.

© 2016 The Chemours Company FC, LLC. Teflon EcoElite™ and any associated logos are trademarks or copyrights of The Chemours Company FC, LLC. Chemours™ and the Chemours Logo are trademarks of The Chemours Company.


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Watson’s toddler midweight interlock base layer set features an extra soft brushed interior for maximum softness and comfort. This cotton blend double knit base layer retains body heat to keep your little ones warm all day. (MSRP $18) #36155 www.mywatsons.ca

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Berghaus USA is setting the new standard in mountaineering down jackets with a lighter and warmer jacket. Every down baffle has been analyzed for optimum fill and performance in conjunction with the body’s thermoregulatory framework. Hydrodown, powered by Nikwax, and PFC-free hydrophobic down (RDS Certified) provide water repellency for up to 16.6 hours. (MSRP $450) #8007 usa.berghaus.com

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With the natural warmth, odor control and wicking properties of 100% Merino Wool, it’s no wonder Buff’s Merino Wool Balaclava is the optimal choice for comfort in frigid temps. A wind-resistant layer, you can wear it under a helmet, as a hood, over the face or around the neck. (MSRP $37) #24031 www.buffusa.com

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The Avalanche Divinity top for women features a 4-way stretch jacquard knit design with next-toskin fit, unrestricted mobility and flat seam construction. Additional design elements include an adjustable cowl neck, thumbholes and 360-degree reflectivity. (MSRP $65) #28010 www.avalanchewear.com

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Introducing men’s & women’s active apparel for Spring 2016. Inspired by the practice. Crafted with intention.

BOOTH#

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38202


FASHION & FUNCTION PERFECTLY PAIRED See the Entire Women’s Fashion Collection at Baffin’s Booth #32093

CHAMONIX URBAN SERIES Rated to 15F

KRISTI

ULTRALITE SERIES Rated to -58F

CARLA

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MIKU SERIES

MIKU SERIES

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COMO URBAN SERIES Rated to 15F

VERBIER

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MADELEINE MIKU SERIES Rated to -4F

ROSSEAU MIKU SERIES Rated to -4F

For more information please contact 1-888-BAFFINS or marketing@baffin.com

BOOTH #32093


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ZÜCA has a new line of durable carry-alls that will revolutionize the way outdoor enthusiasts transport their belongings. ZÜCA’s All-Terrain roller features off-road tires, which make it easier to safely haul more gear farther than ever before. The bag’s aluminum alloy frame not only protects gear — it also doubles as a seat. (MSRP $275) #35 www.zuca.com

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ColdPruf’s Women’s Honeycomb Fleece top uses ColdPruf Technical Fiber Polyester with Silvadur Intelligent Freshness and spandex, creating a moves-withyou fit with excellent moisture management, warmth and lasting odor control. ColdPruf’s Figurfit design construction, features an extended body and longer sleeves with thumbholes. Raglan sleeves, flatlock seams and tagless design ensure all-day comfort. (MSRP $40) #34119 www.coldpruf.com

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Certified gluten free with organic tapioca syrup, organic honey, and added electrolytes, Mango Orange is the latest addition to Honey Stinger’s roster of delicious, organic energy gels–perfect for fueling any athletic endeavor. (MSRP $1.39) #15051 www.honeystinger.com

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The new Arc’teryx Voltair avalanche airbag is powered by a 22.2V Lithium-Ion Polymer rechargeable battery that allows the user to deploy the airbag multiple times. Advanced engineered centrifugal blower delivers more initial pressure to the balloon than any other battery powered avalanche airbag system on the market. (MSRP $1,250-$1,300) #1019 www.arcteryx.com

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Chums’ new Ratchet molded eyewear retainer features silicone rubber temples with a unique ratchet head system for adjustability. Featuring four retainer positions for a 180 degree range of motion, the Ratchet gives users plenty of options for keeping glasses comfortable and secure. (MSRP $11.99) #14019 www.chums.com


C O M E

S E E

U S

A T

B O O T H

# 38157

DON’T JUST WORK OUT. ROCK OUT. A FITNESS WATCH WITH HOURS OF MUSICAL MOTIVATION INSIDE. + MUSIC

ON BOARD + ACTIVITY TRACKER + GPS + HEART RATE MONITOR + MULTISPORT MODE

SPARK CARDIO + MUSIC GPS FITNESS WATCH


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Darn Tough lifestyle socks are built every bit as tough as our hike, ski and run socks. Put them on and forget they’re on thanks to superior fit and comfort. Merino wool construction means allseason comfort in both cold and warm weather. Made in Vermont and guaranteed for life. (MSRP $22) #32150 www.darntough.com

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Ultralight and durable, Zerogram’s ZERO 1 Trekking Pole Tent weighs only 1lb. 6oz. Featuring 15D Rainfly PU/Sil coating and 30D PU nylon flooring, this tent measures nearly 7ft. long and rises nearly 4ft. in the rear. It also features two doors, with a vestibule for storing backpacks and shoes. (MSRP $219.99) www.zerogramgear.com

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A rugged all-season hiker, the Infil Hike GTX brings to the trail some of the best of Under Armour’s innovation technology. It’s a loadbearing boot, featuring AnaFoam molded structural support, tuned medial & lateral support wings with a negative heel cavity, TPU tuned fork shank, Gore-Tex allweather protection and a Vibram outsole. (MSRP $219) #38148 www.underarmour.com

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La Sportiva’s Spectre 2.0 is 5 percent stiffer than the original, while maintaining the largest range of cuff rotation in its class. The patented design allows for a full 60 degrees of ankle movement while the vertebra construction provides support on downhill descents. It’s compatible with all tech., TR2 and step-in bindings. (MSRP $679) #15027 www.sportiva.com

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Combining the P190 Nano base, an increased sidecut, and lightweight construction, the Madshus Terrasonic provides a stable, responsive feel at unbeatable quality and value. Fully integrating the IntelliGrip skin into the base of the Terrasonic Classic ensures grip and glide in all conditions, taking the guessing out of ski prep. (MSRP $370) #35103 www.madshus.com


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One of our newest backpacks this season, the Sakroots Cargo Backpack in uncoated canvas features a structured silhouette with two exterior pockets on either side for easy access on the go. Available in new Teal Treehouse. (MSRP $79) #BR649 www.sakroots.com

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Royal Robbins’ All Season Merino Thermal Full Zip is a versatile thermal knit in a merino (55%) and cotton (45%) blend. This multi-generational hoody has an excellent warmth-to-weight ratio and a very soft hand. It features front hand pockets and knit ribbing detail. (MSRP $110) #8017 www.royalrobbins.com

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Metolius Climbing’s morphology climbing hold series is a series made for steeps: bomber roof jugs, incut edges, giant threads and positive footholds. These positive grips are enhanced by countless pinch and thumb-catch combinations that make them ideal for overhangs and routes of all difficulties. (MSRP Varies) #3027 www.metoliusclimbing.com

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When a pint simply won’t do, Stanley is raising the bar with the new Classic Vacuum Stein. Twentyfour ounces of your favorite beer will stay cold for 9 hours and carbonated all day with a latching lid and vacuum insulated stainless steel construction. Dishwasher safe and built for life. (MSRP $35) #14001 www.stanley-pmi.com

WE’RE not afraid of getting weT come see our rain shells

come visit us at

BOOTH #28010 january 10, 2016 / day 4

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Platypus has made a water bottle that adapts with you— whether it’s the flexible, spacesaving and packable design, the ease of disassembly for full cleaning, or the ability to use it as a backcountry-ready water filter, the Meta Bottle meets your everyday hydration needs from the city to the trail. Available in 2 sizes: .75L and 1.0L; Meta Bottle + Microfilter in 1.0L. (MSRP $19.95-$49.95) #20027 www.cascadedesigns.com/ platypus

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Lorpen’s most advanced sock technology is now available for the youngest skiers. This thin sock has light cushioning in the shin and foot with Primaloft and Merino. New LorpeNRG technology improves durability and warmth, the T3 Spider Net design keeps the sock in place. (MSRP $15) #32164 www.lorpen.com

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The Astrum is the newest addition to the Marmot active insulation collection featuring the new Thermal R Active stretch insulation. This highly technical jacket is made for movement with a durable lightweight 40 denier stretch shell and a new stretch AirExchange lining. Put it on in the morning, and leave it on all day. (MSRP $250) #34037 www.marmot.com

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Kresta 20 is Osprey’s first-ever, women’s specific, backcountry ski/snowboard pack. Designed for quick backcountry trips, sidecountry excursions or inbounds runs, Kresta 20 features gender-specific fit, quick-access avalanche safety kit pocket, an easily accessible dry compartment, dual position helmet carry, adjustable ski/snowboard lasso carry, and tuckaway ice tool loops. (MSRP $150) #4011 www.ospreypacks.com

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Salomon’s iconic trail master is now in its 4th generation. The Speedcross 4 GTX has the weatherproof protection of Gore-Tex. The same aggressive Wet Traction Contagrip compound now has improved traction with refined lug geometry and shapes for better grip on the trail. Improvements to the silhouette include a wider collar and lower cut. (MSRP $160) #36126 www.salomon.com


FACE UP TO WINTER, FEET FIRST Step lively around the city this winter. And don’t worry about ending up on your back. Our stylish new 3-season boot, the Now 2 BUGweb®, comes with patented BUGweb technology—removable studs for the surest footing on snow, ice, and slick pavement. See all our new traction products at icebug.com/us. BECOME AN ICEBUG DEALER: INFO@ICEBUGINC.COM • 855.201.7694

Learn more about 3-season traction. Visit us at OR, booth 23013.

NOW2 BUGweb • MSRP $184.95


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Toad&Co’s Telluride Heritage Collection traces back to early designs from our formative years, reinterpreted and redesigned with modern materials and refined fit. It features durable polyester fleece reminiscent of Shetland wool yarns and a highly efficient hollow-core poly/wool blend. We’re paying homage to our Telluride legacy while pointing to a future committed to sustainability. (MSRP $99) #30051E www.toadandco.com

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Evolv’s Kronos is a truly adjustable and versatile performance climbing shoe, with anatomically engineered design that provides a comfortable fit without sacrificing performance. A single buckle and cinch strap for convenience and a customizable fit for the modern climber making them the best technical all-around shoes on the market. (MSRP $130) #1033 www.evolvsports.com

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The Skhoop Sammy Mini Skirt adds the perfect dash of performance and fashion to our line. From hitting the trails to wearing over a pair of tights after yoga, the Sammy Mini Skirt keeps your backside warm and protected from the elements with 40g insulation and 100 percent windproof and water-resistant nylon fabric. (MSRP $98) #23014 www.skhoop.us

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The OlovesM Belle Cross-body purse is made from Yoga Mats. Eco-friendly and made in the USA, the Belle is an everyday purse that is perfect to adventure with. It has lots of pockets and is lined and made using re-purposed materials. (MSRP $45) #23050 www.olovesm.com

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Hot Chillys’ new Sublimated Print Helmet Liner is made with MTF4000 fabric featuring UPF 30+, 4-way stretch and moisture wicking properties. The fitted cap reduces bulk under helmets and is fleece-lined for added warmth and comfort. Available in prints from Hot Chillys Fiesta Collection. (MSRP $22) #18018 www.hotchillys.com


EXPLORE THE NEW AMERICAN

ORIGINAL COLLECTION

THE NE W

CROSS OVER I S HE R E .

With style that crosses over from the pavement to the path, you’ll always be dressed for adventure when you wear AXT.®

CUSHIONED SOLE ADDS COMFORT

REINFORCED TO LAST LONGER

SEE FOR YOURSELF

BOOTH #23043 FOXSOX.COM 800-247-1815


Q&A

Stacy Bare, Director of Sierra Club Outdoors

Stacy Bare Seeking world peace by getting people outside

WE’RE not afraid of getting weT come see our rain shells

As the Director of Sierra Club Outdoors, Stacy Bare is tasked with getting people outside. The Iraq War veteran oversees three broad program categories: Military Outdoors, which serves veterans, Inspiring Connections Outdoors, which connects more than 15,000 people who otherwise might not have a chance to get outdoors and the popular Local Outings. WHAT DO YOU DO HERE AT THE OUTDOOR RETAILER SHOW?

 We’re here to talk to brands and partners about what’s going on with the Sierra Club and grow our community of partners and supporters. I’m also excited about the discussions about diversity and inclusivity in the outdoor industry. We’re seeing some changes, but we all need to work harder and speed up the pace in which our tribe here begins to look more like the demographics of America. There’s a huge opportunity here and I hope we can figure out how to really engage with folks who aren’t, well, typically white and male.

HOW ARE VETERANS CONSERVATIONISTS? WHAT MAKES THEM CARE SO MUCH ABOUT WILD LANDS?

 Lots of people choose to serve their country in a myriad of ways. One of the ways veterans chose to do it was to defend the country in uniform and we take an oath to protect the Constitution. A lot of people may have a hard time thinking about the Constitution and the ideals it espouses in concrete terms, but we can find all that in our public lands, wild or not. The very literal, physical country we fought to defend is the very literal and physical country we’re still

Committed. The outdoor industry thrives on innovation and for 20 years, we've been leading the way. Whether it's mentoring, research, or sharing best practices, we are your partner in business sustainability through workplace equity.

Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition

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Join at oiwc.org.

fighting for in a second act of service through conservation. I think a lot of us find real healing and power in the outdoors and we want to make sure those places stay safe for those in and out of uniform. I think it’s important to remember that veterans aren’t the only ones who find great solace in the outdoors — we all do. What’s more patriotic than fighting for access and protection to our public lands? ARE WE HEADING FOR A NEW DAWN OF CONSERVATION?

conservationists. Right now, we have to figure out how to make conservation more open to the full demographics of America, and we have to ask ourselves if the word “conservation” is even helpful anymore. There was, unfortunately, a huge amount of racism and prejudice that went along with some of the great conservation victories in our history. We’ve got to get more people outside, a lot of young people, people of color — and that’s one place where we as veterans can help lead — and not just get them outside, but also empower them to lead in the outdoors and as employees and owners in our brands.

come visit us at

 Every generation, every few years, we have to embrace that new dawn of

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OutdoorRetailer

WHERE AM I?

Winter Market Tradeshow

All Mountain Demo

January 7-10, 2016 • Salt Lake City, UT

January 6, 2016 • Solitude Mountain Resort, UT Note: This map is not to scale

ENERGY SOLUTIONS ARENA

13

WEST ENTRANCE

1

RADISSON

7 5

6

NORTH ENTRANCE

1

4 9 10

SALT PALACE CONVENTION CENTER

13

ABRAVANEL HALL

3

UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

11

12

REGISTRATION BADGE HOLDER PICKUP

2

OU@OR EDUCATION*

3

FASHION SHOW* INDUSTRY PARTY* OUTDOOR INSPIRATION AWARDS*

2

CITY CREEK CENTER

EAST ENTRANCE

MARRIOTT

SOUTH ENTRANCE

1

13

1

1

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8

4

THE CAMP (Formerly New Product Zone)

8

TREND + DESIGN CENTER

12

SHUTTLES

5

VENTURE OUT

9

PRESS ROOM

13

PARKING

6

THE CAFÉ ON THE MEZZ

10

RETAILER LOUNGE

7

YOGA WELLNESS STUDIO

11

ONLINE LOUNGE

* See show schedule of events for dates & times


NEW Aegis Excalibur inhibits and captures odors ™

SNOWBALL FIGHT WITH THE KIDS

SKI RESORT FOR THE HOLIDAYS

EVENING WALK WITH THE DOG HOCKEY GAME WITH THE FAMILY

ICE SKATING VERMONT HIKING TRIP WITH FRIENDS

STAY ODOR FREE Wherever adventure takes you... Find out more at booth 155-406 www.microban.com Microban® antimicrobial technologies are designed to keep textiles fresher by inhibiting the growth of odors caused by bacteria, mold and mildew. ©2015 All Rights Reserved. MICROBAN is a registered trademark of Microban Products Company


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Te m pl e

Airport Line $2.50 one-way to downtown

Sq ua re

(S al tP al ac e

C .C .)

OutdoorRetailer


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restaurant guide

Eat up

Some of Salt Lake City’s best places to eat & drink

Don’t get ‘hangry’ at Outdoor Retailer. We’ve scoured Yelp, Urbanspoon, TripAdvisor and Zagat to find the highest-rated restaurants and bars to help keep you well fed and hydrated.

American (New)

Belgian

Bambara Restaurant 202 S Main St. 801-363-5454 $$$ Bistro 222 222 S Main St. 801-456-0347 $$ Copper Onion 111 E Broadway 801-355-3282 $$ Caffé Niche 779 E 300 S 801-433-3380 $$ Em’s Restaurant 271 N Center St. 801-596-0566 $$ Forage 370 E 900 S 801-708-7834 $$$$ Garden Café 555 S Main St. 801-258-6708 $$$ Grand America Hotel 555 S Main St. 800-304-8696 $$$ Pago 878 S 900 E 801-532-0777 $$$ Pallet 237 S 400 W 801-935-4431 $$ Tin Angel Café 365 W 400 S 801-328-4155 $$

Bruges Waffles and Frites 336 W Broadway 801-363-4444 $

Asian Fusion Asia Palace 1446 S State St. 801-485-1646 $ J. Wong’s Asian Bistro 163 W 200 S 801-350-0888 $$ Sapa Sushi Bar and Asian Grill 722 S State St. 801-363-7272 $$ Zao Asian Cafe 639 E 400 S 801-595-1234 $

Barbeque Kaiser’s Bar-B-Q 962 S 300 W 801-355-0499 R&R BBQ 307 W 600 S 801-364-0443

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$$

Breakfast/Brunch Alchemy Coffee 390 E 1700 S 801-322-0735 Eggs in the City 1675 E 1300 S 801-581-0809 Park Café 604 E 1300 S 801-487-1670 Penny Ann’s Café 1810 S Main St. 801-935-4760 Pig & A Jelly Jar 401 E 900 S 385-202-7366 Rye 239 S 500 E 801-364-4655 Straw Market 390 4th Ave. 801-935-4420

$ $$ $ $ $ $$ $$

$$ $$ $$ $$

Burgers Crown Burger 377 E 200 S 801-532-1155 Lucky 13 135 W 1300 S 801-487-4418 Rich’s Burgers & Grub 30 E Broadway 801-355-0667

$ $$

The Bayou 645 S State St. 801-961-8400

$ $$ $$ $

Even Stevens 200 S 414 E 385-355-9105 $ Moochie’s Meatballs and More 232 E 800 S 801-596-1350 $ Robin’s Nest 311 S Main St. 801-466-6378 $ Siegfried’s Delicatessen 20 W 200 S 801-355-3891 $ Toasters 151 W 200 S 801-328-2928 $ Tony Caputo’s Market & Deli 314 W 300 S 801-531-8669 $$

Ethiopian Mahider Ethiopian Restaurant 1465 S State St. 801-975-1111

$

Food Trucks Bento Various locations Bentotruck.com Chow Truck Various locations Chowtruck.com

$ $

Himalayan/Nepalese Himalayan Kitchen 360 S State St. 801-328-2077

$$

Caffé Molise 55 W 100 S 801-364-8833 Café Trio 680 S 900 E 801-533-8746

Cucina Toscana 307 Pierpont Ave. 801-328-3463 $$$ Faustina 454 E 300 S 801-746-4441 $$ Stoneground Kitchen 249 E 400 S 801-364-1368 $$ Valter’s Osteria 173 W Broadway 801-521-4563 $$$$ Vinto 418 E 200 S 801-539-9999 $$

Indian Kathmandu 212 S 700 E 801-355-0454 $$ Saffron Valley East India Cafe 26 E St. 801-203-3325 $$

Japanese/Sushi Kyoto Japanese Restaurant 1080 E 1300 S 801-407-3525 $$ Naked Fish Japanese Bistro 67 W 100 S 801-595-8888 $$$ Takashi 18 W Market St. 801-519-9595 $$$

Mediterranean

$$

Italian $

Cajun/Creole $$

Café Anh Hong 1465 S State St. 801-486-1912 Chef Gao 488 E 100 S 801-363-8833 Mom’s Kitchen 2233 S State St. 801-486-0092 Red House 1465 S State St. 801-821-3622

Deli

Breweries Epic Brewing Co. 825 S State St. 801-906-0123 Red Rock Brewing Co. 254 S 200 W 801-521-7446 Squatters Pub Brewery 147 W Broadway 801-363-2739 Uinta Brewing Co. 1722 Fremont Dr. 801-467-0909

Chinese

$$ $$

Atlantic Café & Market 325 S Main St. 801-524-9900 Eva 317 S Main St. 801-359-8447

$$ $$

Middle Eastern Curry Fried Chicken 660 S State St. 801-924-9188 Curry N’ Kabobs 268 S Main St. 801-363-0300 Mazza 912 E 900 S 801-521-4572

$

$

$$

Pizza From Scratch 62 E Gallivan Ave. 801-961-9000 Pie Hole 344 S State St. 801-359-4653 Rusted Sun Pizzeria 2010 S State St. 801-483-2120 Settebello Pizzeria Napoletana 260 S 200 W 801-322-3556 Stoneground 249 E 400 S 801-364-1368 The Pie Pizzeria 1320 E 200 S 801-582-5700

$$

$

$

$$

$$

$$

Thai Chanon Thai Café 278 E 900 S 801-532-1177 Ekamai Thai 1405 E 2100 S 801-906-0908 My Thai Asian Cuisine 1425 S 300 W 801-505-4999

Mexican

Vegetarian/Vegan

Alberto’s Mexican Food 511 S 300 W 801-531-0411 $ Chungas 180 S 900 W 801-953-1840 $ Frida Bistro 545 W 700 S 801-983-6692 $$$ Red Iguana 736 W N Temple 801-322-1489 $$ Red Iguana 2 866 W S Temple 801-214-6050 $$

Frisch Compassionate Eatery 779 S 500 E 801-532-2216 Sage’s Café 234 W 900 S 801-322-3790

$$

$$

$

$

$$

Vietnamese La-Cai Noodle House 961 S State St. 801-322-3590 Pho Tay Ho 1766 S Main St. 801-466-3650

$$

$


Inside Dish Wondering how to best navigate the food and drink scene in this city? We asked Salt Lake City locals in the outdoor industry for their dining recommendations.

Chip Smith SOAR Communications guru www.soarcomm.com “If you need to stay close to downtown, one of my favorite places is Eva’s Small Plates and Drinks on 317 S Main Street, between 2nd and 3rd South. They serve great tapas dishes. Get the “shrimp and grits” and even the sautéed Brussels sprouts are really good. If you want to get away from downtown and the crowds, Yellowfinn Grill & Sushi Bar in Sugarhouse (1166 E 2100 S) has reasonably priced sushi, and the occasional comfort food macaroni special. Try the Crunchy Groove. It’s made of spicy tuna, jalapenos, avocado, and includes spicy mayo and “crunchies” on top. It’s run by exQuicksilver managers Greg and Susan Mooney. Ask for Greg. He’ll set you up. Back in town, a small quiet place is Pallet Bistro on 237 South 400 West. It’s housed in an old loading dock, hence the name. They have really unique food that’s hard to describe — a must-eatat-place, if you’re staying downtown.”

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OutdoorRetailer

Outdoor Retailer Winter Market 2016 Attendance Guidelines

Registration Hours

Only qualified members of the trade are invited to attend.

Tuesday, Jan. 5 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 6 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 7 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 8 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 9 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 10 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Tradeshow Thursday, Jan. 7 - Saturday, Jan. 9 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 10 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Salt Palace Convention Center 100 South West Temple Salt Lake City, Utah, 84101

Parking Underground parking is available for $10 per day. The entrances are located on 200 South/200 West and 300 West/90 South. Additional parking is located across the street from the Salt Palace Convention Center at City Creek Mall.

ISPO Online Lounge Located on the upper level concourse of the South Lobby Open daily before and during show hours. The Online Lounge will also be fully operational on the day before the show opens (Day Zero) and during the last day of set-up for all exhibitors.

Business Center The Business Center is located on the upper concourse in the northeast corner of the building.

Show Management Office

No Photos

Paperless Press Room

Unauthorized photography is not permitted. Photo files and/or devices may be confiscated and your badge will be revoked for the current and all future shows if an infraction occurs. Call 801-534-4705 to report name and company on badge, if possible. Approved media photographers will have a flag on their badge to help easily identify them.

Located in MR 254 C

Registration Now there are more full registration locations to serve you: West Entrance (across from Energy Solutions Arena) East Entrance (across from the Marriott City Creek) Badge printing only (approved, preregistered): North Entrance (near the Radisson) South Entrance (across from Holiday Inn Express)

Located in MR 257

The Retailer Lounge Located in MR 254 B Overlooking the show floor, the Retailer Lounge is a quiet respite from everything going on below. Open to retailers and reps only, the Retailer Lounge will have plenty of seating, free WiFi, charging stations, refreshments and — above all else — quiet. Located just beyond the Business Center.

Children at Outdoor Retailer Children are welcome on the show floor during show hours only. All children must be registered as guests with Outdoor Retailer and they must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Childcare is not provided. Children under the age of 16 are not allowed on the show floor during move-in and/or move-out.

First Aid and Mother’s Room Medical staff will be located near

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MR 150 (located under the triple escalator) to treat minor health problems such as blisters, headaches, hangovers, etc. A Mothers Room is located in the same area.

Dogs at Outdoor Retailer We encourage you to use the awardwinning facility Camp Bark-a-Lot (www.campbarkalot.com). If you are planning to bring your dog to the show, please be sure to follow these simple rules: ➞ Animals are not allowed on the show floor during move-in/-out. ➞ Register your dog at the registration counter at the East entrance. ➞ Sign a waiver agreeing to the rules and requirements. ➞ Make sure to walk your dog outside regularly to avoid any accidents. ➞ If an accident does occur, please notify Show Management immediately in MR 257 or call 801-534-4705.

Transportation There are a variety of transportation options available. The TRAX line runs directly from the airport to downtown Salt Lake, Uber and Lyft are widely available, and Salt Lake has three private taxicab companies and many private car and shuttle services.

Shuttle Service Shuttles will run to and from select hotels and the Salt Palace Convention Center every 15 (from downtown and airport areas) to 30 to 40 minutes (from Sandy) from 7:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Afternoon/evening shuttles run continuously as needed during the times indicated below. Shuttles will pick up and drop off at the both the West and East entrances.

Saturday, Jan. 9 3:30 – 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 10 12:30 – 3 p.m. *Service from Industry Party until 8:30 p.m. For a complete list of hotels with shuttle service please visit: www.outdoorretailer.com/shuttles Sandy Hotels — use TRAX for afterhours transportation needs.

TRAX The TRAX light-rail system has service to and from the airport. Trains run from 5:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m., every day, (see map, page 54), or find schedules and plan routes at www.rideuta.com.

Taxi Cabs Taxis are no longer regulated by the government in Salt Lake City. Please be sure to establish your cab fare before you start your ride. Utah Yellow Cab www.utahyellowcab.com • 801-783-1556 Ute Cab Co. www.utecabco.com • 801-359-7788 City Cab Co. www.citycabut.com • 801-363-5550

Ride Sharing Get the UBER app – now an option for convenient and reliable transportation in Salt Lake City. For more information please visit www. uber.com. Please note, UBER is not available from SLC Airport.

See You in Summer

FROM HOTELS: Thursday, Jan. 7 - Sunday Jan. 10 7:30 – 11 a.m.

Outdoor Retailer Summer Market will take place in Salt Lake City, Utah on the following dates:

FROM SALT PALACE: Thursday, Jan. 7 4 – 8:30 p.m.* Friday, Jan. 8 3:30 – 7 p.m.

Open Air Demo August 2, 2016 Tradeshow August 3–6, 2016


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OutdoorRetailer

Stay connected to the digital conversation @ OR

TWITTER

YOUTUBE

15,500

80,000

INSTAGRAM

FACEBOOK

7,400

21,000

@OutdoorRetailer

followers

@OutdoorRetailer

followers

Outdoor Retailer brings together thousands of people for a week of gear, education and entertainment in Salt Lake City. And in today’s digital world, the show’s buzz and reach isn’t limited to the confines of the Salt Palace. Thousands more join the event and stay connected year-round virtually, following the Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube feeds from Outdoor Retailer, exhibitors and media. So ready those hashtags and make sure your brand is part of the conversation:

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#ORShow – share show happenings #WeAreOutdoor – share your outdoor adventures #ORFirst – share first-time experiences at the show #ORNewbie – share newattendee experiences with a selfie #NewatOR – share new gear you see on the show floor #SinceReno – industry insider since Reno #BadAssador – Outdoor Retailer and Rep ambassadors #ORDaily – share what you read in the show’s only official news publication

Get Social @ Venture Out Relay the story of Outdoor Retailer’s fastest growing neighborhood and the hippest new styles of the season on the Outdoor Retailer social media sites. ➞ Text “ASKOR” to 66746 during show hours to get any show question immediately answered. ➞ Visit the SmartBar for help and charging stations near the Salt Palace’s East entrance, at the top of the ramp just beyond the triple escalator.

➞ Check out the digital editions of the O.R. Daily, available online every show morning at www.snewsnet. com/ordaily ➞ Scan the QR code to download the Outdoor Retailer Mobile App. Find the most up-to-date exhibitor listings, sync your calendar, navigate the show floor and post photos.

@OutdoorRetailerShow

view

@OutdoorRetailer

followers

Once downloaded, follow these steps to sync your mobile app: 1. Click the settings (gear) icon at the top of the home page. 2. Click the “Winter Market Show Planner” button. 3. Enter your badge number (located on your confirmation email, and at the show, on your badge) and last name, and select “Submit.” 4. Return to the home page and click on the “My Schedule” icon for your personal schedule to be displayed.


WE HAVE A PROBLEM In one year, Americans use 58 billion to-go cups and 35 billion plastic water bottles.

#BringYourOwn


news

QUESTION OF THE DAY

At ORWM 2015, REI’s Jerry Stritzke announced a major grant for the Outdoor Industry Women’s Coalition and joined dozens of other CEOs in pledging to get more women into leadership positions. One year later, has the pledge made any impact?

Committed. The snow industry thrives on innovation and for 20 years, we’ve been leading the way.

“ The engagement that OIWC has seen has been more multitiered, from the entry level to the CEO. One big thing is just having visible role models so women can see other women leading.” Deanne Buck, Executive Director, OIWC

Whether it’s mentoring, research, or sharing best practices, we are your partner in business sustainability through workplace equity. Join at oiwc.org. “ The subject has picked up momentum, and the OIWC breakfast is becoming a mustattend meeting. But changing the numbers [of female executives] is a long journey. We can’t afford to take our eyes off the ball.” Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition

Jerry Stritzke, President and CEO, REI

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“ It’s an important first step. You have to start somewhere. Making a pledge helps keep you accountable.” Liz Song, Founder of Snow Queen & Scout, a website dedicated to recruiting and teaching backpacking to women

“ I’m not sure how many people paid attention to it. I’d say there’s probably more women’s product in the market now, but otherwise I haven’t noticed a difference. Kristin Davis, Trade Marketing Manager for Dakine


showtraveler

Off the Mat

1

Don't miss the Yoga and Wellness Zone. Here you'll find happy faces and brands with mindful ambitions. 1. Julie Ethington flashes a smile that put us in the bliss state. The Utah-based founder of Little J is showing her unique headband wraps at her first Outdoor Retailer show. 2. They love Lucy. A crowd of show attendees seeking bargains swarmed the sample sale at the women's active wear brand's booth. The only problem? Too many size mediums. 3. Manduka Marketing Coordinator Marissa Hirtzel Archimbaud is living the dream, showing off the brand's Go Play mat carrier. 4. Minneapolis-based Soul Gear made its first trip to the show with a range of shirts featuring art created by its in-house team. Many of the designs were done by hand.

2

3

Photos by Emma Light

4

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news

Avy Savvy  Toting a beacon, shovel and probe in the backcountry increases your chances of surviving an avalanche by 45 percent. Add an avalanche airbag pack to the mix, and the window increases to fiftyfifty. “That’s like flipping a coin for my life,” said Cody Hughes (pictured at right), an avalanche educator for the Utah Avalanche Center, and speaker at Friday’s multimedia “Know Before You Go” presentation at The Camp. Hughes stressed that while safety gear is essential, the right skills and mindset are the most important tools for venturing into the backcountry in winter. The first key skill is terrain assessment—knowing which terrain to traverse. Most avalanches occur on slopes steeper than 30 degrees, and 25 percent of avalanche deaths are caused by trauma during the fall, so identifying dangerous terrain features like rocks and cliffs is critical. In addition, you must evaluate snow conditions—like checking the snowpack, letting the snow set, and considering environmental factors such as wind slabs or sun baked slopes. This set of skills is one of the five “Know Before You Go” pillars for the backcountry and

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sidecountry (12 percent of avalanche fatalities occur after a skier leaves a resort’s boundary.) After you get the gear, training and forecast, the next rule of thumb is to stay out of harm’s way, or, avoid the slide path. But once an avalanche strikes, the debris sets up like cement—the other 75 percent of lives taken from an avalanche are from carbon dioxide poisoning while being buried beneath the snow. Uncovering our friends within 15 minutes increases their chances of

survival to 45 percent. Whether you’re snowshoeing, snowmobiling, skiing, snowboarding—or “just making extreme snow angels”—you must practice, practice, practice the rescue drills, as professional snowboarder Travis Rice stresses in the film. “It’s about having your friend’s back and him having yours.” Catch today’s Know Before You Go presentation at 9:30 a.m. at The Camp. 

—MORGANTILTON

Photo by Emma Light

Get your snow safety primer (or tune-up) at The Camp


news

Down prices lowdown  The price of down has dropped by as much as half over the last 12 to 24 months, following both increases in the supply and dropping demand as North America, Asia and Europe have seen back-to-back warm winters. “It’s a market that reacts fairly quickly to demand,” said Matthew Betcher, creative director for Allied Feather & Down. A price drop of 30 to 50 percent hit almost two years ago, he says, and per-kilo prices are close to 2005 levels. While weather is one of the most critical factors, increasing urbanization and dietary habits also affect the price. Just 10 percent of the value of the bird is in its feathers; the rest is its meat. “The price just got too high,” said Daniel Guigui, president of Sustainable Down Source. He likewise reports a drop to half the price, nearly to 2010 levels, and expects the current low rates to hold for the next six to nine months. “The only thing we could see causing the price to come back up would be avian flu.” The last round of avian flu precipitated extensive culling, and a repeat could spike prices 30 to 50 percent, he said. Some down prices may continue decreasing, particularly duck. Demand for duck as a food source in China is up, according to Chad Albaier, vice president of sales at Downlite, whose sales include a large quantity of duck down. Having identified duck as a cheap protein source, the Chinese government decided to

serve it to school children in cafeterias across the country. Outdoor consumers in the U.S. market have yet to see a drop in prices of jackets and sleeping bags. That’s partly due to the staying power of the higher-end goose down used in many of the backpacking and mountaineering products shown at ORWM. High-fill-power down typically comes from big European geese, though duck is increasingly a source of super-lofty down. Still, the highest end of the market hasn’t suffered as much, according to Betcher. “The lower the fill power,” he noted, “the steeper the price drop.” —ELIZABETH MILLER

High flow SuperCap. Sometimes simple is better.

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BOOTH #24035

Photo by Andrew Bydlon / Caveman Collective

Suppliers say prices have dropped sharply, but the savings haven’t reached consumers yet


news

Waterproof war warms up Gore and Columbia introduce dueling DWR-free raingear technologies  Last November, W.L. Gore took the outdoor industry by surprise with a sudden announcement about its radical new fabric technology: Active Shell with Permanent Beading Surface, a lightweight, two-layer material that places the waterproof/breathable membrane on the outside of the jacket. By eliminating the face fabric, Gore says it’s made the new fabric lighter and more breathable. And because the membrane faces out, there’s no need to use a DWR that will eventually wear off and need to be reapplied. In other words: A shell that won’t ever wet out. Even more surprising: Consumers wouldn’t have to wait long to try the new tech. The North Face introduced the first Active Shell with Permanent Beading Surface to retail stores on December 15. TNF calls the HyperAir Jacket (MSRP $249, pictured at right), which is aimed at road cyclists and runners, “our most breathable waterproof jacket.” Arc’teryx plans to follow suit with the limited release of its Norvan SL (MSRP $299), a minimalist running piece, in mid-March. Why the surprise? “We had something that was exciting and we felt like the time was right,” said Andre Tiffany, retail marketing associate for W.L. Gore. “So we thought, ‘Let’s hurry up a bit.’” Arc’teryx had been working with Gore to develop and test the technology for the past three years, said Manager of North American PR Jo Salamon. The brand decided not to wait until fall ’16 to introduce the Norvan SL, so they settled on a midseason spring launch (a first for Arc’teryx) of just 800 jackets.

“Having the spring ’16 launch was a little fast for us, but because we have our own manufacturing in Vancouver, we were able to turn it around,” Salamon said. In spring ’16, Columbia will begin selling shells made from its new OutDry Extreme technology—another two-layer material that places the membrane on the jacket’s exterior and was introduced at last summer’s Outdoor Retailer. Though Columbia’s shells are burlier, more durable and better-suited to backcountry use than the much more delicate new Active Shell, the quick turnaround begs the question: Was the release timing influenced by a desire to beat Columbia to market? “No, we’ve had this technology in the bucket for a while,” Gore’s Tiffany said. “We think it’s great somebody else is doing something [similar]. The outcomes are very different.” “OutDry Extreme is a revolutionary approach to rainwear, and it’s not surprising to see other brands following in our footsteps,” said Columbia VP of Design and Innovation Woody Blackford in an email statement. “And we’re just getting started. We’ll continue to lead the industry in developing innovative solutions to keeping people warm and dry in the outdoors.” —ELISABETH KWAK-HEFFERAN

View the

New ColleCtioN at Booth 30178w

o r c o n t a c t u s a t t: 64 6 7 1 0 4 5 0 4 e: usa.showroom@∆oules.com

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Jeremy Collins, founder, Meridian Line

HOW DO YOU SEE MERIDIAN LINE AS A DIFFERENT KIND OF BUSINESS?

 Usually a business starts with a business plan, and you see a niche and a hole you can fill. And you go and fill that niche. The way that I tell stories and the art that I create and the travel that I do is authentically me. I’m not filling a niche. I am my own niche. With Meridian Line, we are not looking to go fill a hole made by someone else. We are just being ourselves, and I think that authenticity is core to who we are. This is what I do well, what resonates with people. AND YOU SAY THAT MERIDIAN LINE “IS NOT A BRAND.”

 I say “we’re not a brand, we’re a conversation.” In some ways, that’s hyperbole and me not wanting to admit that we are a brand. We have a logo, and we sell stuff. By definition, we are a brand, but people are not coming up and talking about product to me. They are talking about their trips, their ideas, their dreams. They ask “what was the inspiration behind this art?” And, for me, that’s so much more exciting as a business owner. So our approach to engaging with an audience is about their story, our story and our conversation about where we are going. Maybe it’s hyperbole, but it’s also saying we are not just a business plan. HOW DO YOU BREAK AWAY FROM THE USUAL CLICHÉS OF CLIMBING IN YOUR ART AND BUSINESS?

Jeremy Collins How do you turn climbing into art and a brand into a conversation? For Jeremy Collins, life is art. The climber and illustrator broke conventional boundaries in Drawn, a film that combines art and live action to tell a story of seeking meaning through climbing, friends and beauty. The book version, Drawn: The Art of Ascent, won the Banff Mountain Book Competition’s Adventure Travel Award. His apparel company, Meridian Line (#32078), expands his philosophy on how all of these outdoor passions do not exist in a vacuum: The shirts feature his drawing of icons such as John Muir and appeal to everyone from in-the-know climbers to people far from the outdoor industry who aspire to big things in the wild.

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 I am purposeful about that. I just did this piece I am so excited about, my John Muir t-shirt. Talk about a cliché. I mean, quoting John Muir on social media happens every five seconds— “The mountains are calling and I must go.” Personally, John Muir’s story is very important to me. I have read all of his books. My daughter’s middle name is Muir. But I didn’t want to jump on the cliché. I wanted to bring him into the line in my own way when the time was right. Everyone at the show is talking about the national parks and what we are going to do. #NPS100! So what’s my voice in that? My voice is my relationship to the story of this

guy and how he has influenced me as a storyteller, as someone who not only cares about what is going on with the planet, but also just wants to go out and enjoy it. The authenticity of John Muir’s voice is what I hope to accomplish in my own work. MERIDIAN LINE IS ABOUT MORE THAN CLIMBING, RIGHT?

 Eve r yo n e t h o u g ht we were going to start a t-shirt brand based on rock climbing. Absolutely not. That’s like selling bagels to fish. I saw that was not the right path to go down. But following stories and trying to find a universal voice was my North Star for the brand—the “not-a-brand brand.” A moment of arrival for me was when in eight out of 10 airports I went to this summer, I saw a Meridian Line product. The demographics went from a 16-year-old kid to a 60-year-old hiker. That’s when I knew it was not limited to a particular graphic. ONE OF THE THINGS I NOTICE MOST ABOUT THE SHIRTS IS JUST HOW GOOD THEY FEEL WHEN YOU WEAR THEM.

 We are the only tri-blend cutand-sewn concept-to-rack shirt in the U.S. We have done that in South Carolina, and it’s a huge part of our business. The graphics are going to come and go, but if you run your hand along a rack you are going to like the feel. And that has forced us to find new techniques. We opened a new factory in Union, S.C., and the brass ring is to have 100 people working there on a number of brands. We have 45 people working there now. IS CLIMBING A SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE?

 I have been reflecting a lot recently on the self-indulgence of climbing, not as a negative thing but accepting that fact. For me, climbing is art. Sitting and drawing is the same as climbing up a route gracefully and purposefully and maintaining composure and minimizing your impact on the world and maximizing your impact on your soul. Absolutely, it’s a spiritual experience to leave the ground. —DOUG SCHNITZSPAHN

Photo by Andrew Bydlon / Caveman Collective

Q&A


January 6, 2015 • Solitude Mountain Resort, Utah

From bootcamp to backpacks ENTRY 3 NORDIC

SierraClub’s StacyBare

Solitude Nordic Center

A new network connects talented veterans to brands seeking battle-tested leadership third panelist, Petri and Bare addressed the array of complex issues that surround the hiring process and job hunt for veterans and reserve soldiers—which are, in great part, rooted in misled fears and stigmas. “One fear of hiring reserves is that [they’ll] be deployed,” said Petri. “I wouldn’t look at it as a challenge, but as an opportunity,” said Petri, explaining that employers should view the time overseas as a bonus. Ultimately, communication skills, cultural exposure through travel, and problemAPEX EXPRESS solving are all valuable skills soldiers acquire (free of cost) while training and fighting. Another common misconception is that veterans coping with PostTraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are undependable or erratic. For every veteran with PTSD, the panel said, there are five non-veterans with PTSD, so plenty of individuals learn to manage and recover, shared Bare, RESS MOONBEAM EXP who was diagnosed with PTSD after serving in the Iraq War with the United States Army. As a 2014 National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, rock climber and

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 One similarity between military and outdoor industry culture is the camaraderie, said Dave Petri, vice president of marketing at Farm to Feet and panelist at Friday’s seminar: “From Boot Camp to 2 Board Room—How Military Experience Translates to Success in the Outdoor Industry.” “That commonality becomes a hug,” Petri said, “And it creates a lot of dark humor,” joked Sierra Club outdoors director Stacy Bare, a panel participant and veteran. Organized by the Outdoor Industry ENTRY 2 Association Military Veterans, an informal but growing VILLAGE group of about 100 former soldiers who now “serve” in outdoor businesses, the panel drew an audience of 50. Its purpose was to steer networking by connecting veterans within the industry and discussing how to invite more veterans from beyond the industry. 4 comfortable 9 being “I want to see veterans identifying as veterans, supporting each other and hiring veterans,” said Bare. Alongside the Combat Flip REGISTRATION Flops co-founder, Mathew Griffin, a veteran and the TO NW

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The North Face Ambassador, Bare—a multitalented individual and community builder—exemplifies another central message in the discussion: “Veterans are put on a pedestal as just that, but their identity is more,” Bare said. To get involved, email veterans@ outdoorindustry.org. 

—MORGANTILTON

Solitude Mountain Resort

8 January 6, 2015 • Solitude Mountain Resort, Utah

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Q&A

Dana Gleason and Dana Gleason III, founder/pack designer, Mystery Ranch

Dana Gleason and Dana Gleason III For this father/son duo, pack design is family affair

THREE OF YOUR FOUR CHILDREN WORK IN THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY. HOW DID PACK DESIGN BECOME A FAMILY BUSINESS?

much, worked pretty well. It had its weird kinks, but it was something I always wanted to get back into and play with.

 Dana: Mystery Ranch started in 1999, and it started with some big ideas, not all of which worked out. We pulled out of the outdoor market around 2003 and things were hard that year. When D3 and his brother graduated from high school, I asked them to give me a year, and by “give me a year,” I meant you’ll get lunch and some pocket money and you’re still living at home, but the family needs you. And they answered, god bless them, because it made a huge difference. Later, they chose not to go on to college and apprenticed within the business. D3 was out there selling stuff; his twin brother was doing fabric cutting, and between them, they did every job in the place. D3: Except accounting. Dana: We always had someone competent for that.

HOW HAS YOUR DEAL WITH THE NAVY SEALS INFORMED YOUR REGULAR PACK DESIGNS?

D3, WHAT FIRST INSPIRED YOU TO UPDATE YOUR DAD’S ORIGINAL KLETTERWERKS LINE?

 D3: I was always spoiled going through school being able to have a new backpack every year. Dana: Every year? What do you mean? More like whenever you wanted. D3: I wou ld ro ck weird prototypes, but there was one point in high school when I found an old Kletterwerks pack, one of the old Flips. I was just enjoying having that pack. It was super-simple, didn’t need

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 Dana: There has been a lot of technology development on the military side, and we have been able to apply pieces to the outdoor side. One of the things we really had to do is recognize that you have to build the pack the way people will actually use it. It’s more complex for us as pack designers, but it means that [the customer] doesn’t have to learn to use the gear properly. D3, WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM YOUR DAD OVER THE YEARS?

 That it’s important to be a flexible yet stubborn idealist. He does what he loves, he does what he believes, but he’s not an idealist about how it needs to be done. He will be flexible about how it gets done and the style it is. He’ll be wrong about things and be OK with that. But he’s really stubborn in that he’s still doing it, still having the company. He’s had companies fail and goes right back into it. DANA, WHAT LEGACY DO YOU HOPE TO LEAVE FOR THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY?

 The Ranch is my legacy. I’ve done the best I could, and if my kids continue doing the best they can and making a difference for the people who use our gear, we’ve done a little something. —COURTNEY HOLDEN

Photo by Emma Light

This family tree has a rare knack for packs. From his original Kletterwerk haulers to the legendary Dana Designs brand and most recently with Mystery Ranch, Dana Gleason has been innovating pack design for 40 years. Now his son, Dana III, or D3, is following in the family tradition. Thursday, the younger Gleason took home his first Backpacker Editors’ Choice Award, an honor his dad earned back in 1999. The legendary Gleason’s response: “Alright, kid. Let’s see how many more you’ve got.”


news

Head to Party Mountain

Photo by Lauren Danilek

Best booth at the show?

 Some booths at the show have their own gravity. They draw a wide range of athletes, entrepreneurs, journalists and other thought leaders. Here, they discuss the real problems the outdoor space faces—from climate change to diversity in the outdoors—and come up with solutions on how to move forward. Pit Viper (#39073) is not one of those booths. It may, however, be the booth most likely to be monitored by security. Can you can claim your season pass to “Party Mountain” in the Ballroom or Yoga Zone? Um, no. But at Pit Viper, you simply pick up a provided prop (anything from a fish head to a novel for the 1980s classic ski flick Hot Dog), sit in the photo booth and post that bad boy to Instagram tagged @pit_viper. Your ride to a magical kingdom is just beginning, and it may have more in common with micro-dosing than perfluorinated-chemical-free DWR. Located near the coffee station at the north entrance to the Salt Palace and lathered with New Wave tackiness, the booth has been both attracting and frightening showgoers who wander mistakenly out of the main hall. In point of fact, its line of adjustable, military design sunglasses (think Pantera meets Kenny Powers) and Weird Science-era soundtrack are stickier than pork rinds at a stag party. “They put us in the part of the show that people hate,” said co-founder and virgin exhibitor* Chuck Mumford (no relation), “and we love it.” That fits right into Utah-based Pit Viper Worldwide’s philosophy. Mumford created the brand and sunglasses after he broke a high-end pair of shades in the Tetons. The concept? According to the company website, Pit Vipers can “be shot, sat on, shoved in pockets, run over, and they’ll mostly maintain their sun and wind-bucking ability.” Mumford, who raised $38,648 on Kickstarter to bring his vision to life, stands by their quality, as does the company warranty: “Just send us a video of you breaking them, or a dramatic reenactment of how they broke. Make us laugh.” Not surprisingly, Pit Viper cultivates its own unique flavor of crowdsourcing to promote the brand. Tag a disturbing photo of you in the shades on Instagram, and you can become one of their “Key Players.” Some of the images give a whole new meaning to “viral.” For all of the zaniness, one should not underestimate the consumer allure of the sunglasses. Mumford confirmed that the biggest complaint he receives from customers is that Pit Vipers get stolen—a lot. In fact, a passing attendee at the booth interrupted our interview to rant, “Dude, some crazy mofo stole my Pit Vipers and I need a new pair or I’ll go blind!”

I N T R O D U C I N G L I F E S T R AW S T E E L

would have made Richie Tenenbaum proud. Another attendee queried if the Stormtrooper model T H E N E X T E VO L U T I O NHas I N any PER S O Nmanufacturer A L WAT E Rachieved F I LT R AT I Olevel N other that was still in the line. engagement anywhere else at ORWM? Nah, The booth has attracted some celebrity attention VISIT US: BOOTH 82of|brand LEARN MORE: LIFESTRAW.COM didn’t think so. But it’s not too late for a psychedelic as well. Our investigative team found the one and trek to the top of Party Mountain. Unleash your inner only Chris Denny, principal and founder of Denny snake, friend. You won’t regret the journey. Ink., sniffing around the booth. He immediately bro’d down with Mumford and donned a headband that  —DOUGLASSCHNITZSPAHN

*As in, first-time exhibitor. We’re pretty certain Chuck is a widely experienced and generous lover. january 10, 2016 / day 4

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Booze, buffets, busted resolutions—how it all adds up 1

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ENTRY countless 3 and Fitbits. The average step-counting  From the happy-hour HOW’D WE DO? BY MORGAN TILTON NORDIC showgoer in our 14-person sample pours to the Yeti-like PerkySolitude Jerky guy The night before the All Mountain Demo Day, we sat in Nordic the ORD newsroom with pizza and more beer than 15 aboutlodging 12,965 steps, or 6 miles, handing free bites, there were VILLAGE AT SOLITUDE • Food,walked shopping, 2 out Center 2 people could responsibly drink in five days. Were our in an average day. plenty of munchies and libations to New Year’s resolutions already dead, less than a week Good news: 93 percent of those keep us fueled at the show—perhaps into 2016? I volunteered to keep track of my steps POLARIS eBIKE FAT Year’s TIRE ZONE • eBike Challenge 3 great walkers said they walked as many or not such news for our New and my calories. Since I’ve been busy writing all week, more steps than their at-home average. resolutions, holiday weight gain and spending most of my days upstairs in our newsroom, APEX EXPRESS Even better news: They may have lost new PR goals. As a general guideline for I’ve2 been more sedentary than usual. However, I’ve ENTRY VILLAGE MOONBEAM LODGE • Food, restrooms, lodging weight. As our experiment revealed (at daily4physical activity, the American consumed less food than normal (and far less than 2 my fair share of said beer). The result: a net weight right), a healthy-eating, light-imbibing Heart Association recommends loss over six days from burning 7,260 more calories than consumed. My new reporter walked more than enough 10,000 steps a day, which has become resolution: Go to more trade shows! 5 BACKCOUNTRY TOURSfor • Sign-up inthe thesedentary Chill Zone milesbooth to offset hours and the 24-hour-distance goalpost 4 9 food tempations. Beer is certainly a big most fitness trackers. For an average RESS MOONBEAM EXP variable, but walking the aisles may be person, those steps equal roughly 5 REGISTRATION MSR SNOW • Snowshoe obstacle course, Dig Zone – Shovel Testing Area 6which Calories burned Calories burned the thing thatAPEsaves miles, burns onlyPARK 400 calories, X EXPRESSyour waistline. ENTRY 2 according to the United Kingdom —MORGAN TILTON & COREY BUHAY 3 VILLAGE Solitude 1 Mountain Resort 1 National Health Service. Does all of the 10,556 steps + 2.5-mileENTRY run, 9,215 steps, burning 400 calories AMD 7 BEACON PARK • Backcountry skills courses 6 burning 650 calories (plus (plus52,200 calories at basal rate) schmoozing and snacking at OR really EARN YOUR BEER CHILL 2,200 calories at basal rate) ZONE set back our fitness and health marks? Source: USDA 8 Calories consumed Calories consumed ® Or does walking the floor help us burn 8 GORE-TEX WASATCH4SKI MOUNTAINEERING RACE it off—or at least break even? 9 RESS Net calories burned MOONBEAM EXP To find an answer, we tracked Net calories burned S 7 EAGLE EXPRES Steps required to burn off each To Salt Lake City down attendees wearing•Apple LIMITED PARKING Utilize Salt Palace shuttles or carpool 9show REGISTRATION 12-oz. brew consumed * SUBLECT TO CHANGE Watches, Jawbone UP fitness bands C OT

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“Pincher”

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“Queen diva” type always looking for a good party to crash! You bring your friends and• Snowshoe I will obstacle bring anDigarmy! SNOW PARK course, Zone – Shovel Testing Area 6 MSR

2

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Mottos:

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“A pinch for luck”

WASATCH SKI MOUNTAINEERING RACE 8 GORE-TEX A good conga line is hard to beat Favorite Dance: ®

Want kids: 9 Enjoys:

LIMITED PARKING • Utilize Salt Palace shuttles or carpool Yes, thousands!

A nice romantic hike or picnic with a body close to mine!

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@theshow free stuff & donations BEGIN YOUR DAY WITH US 8 – 9:30 #MR150F Please join us, Noble Biomaterials/X-STATIC, for a pre-show coffee. FREE STURDIWHEAT PANCAKES 9 – 10:30 am #12001 Fuel up for a long day on the show floor with free pancakes! Stop by Vasque any day to enjoy Sturdiwheat pancakes, maple syrup and a variety of healthy toppings. Eating pancakes has been proven to heighten OR attendees’ overall show experience. COFFEE & WAFFLES 9 – 11 am #15051 Enjoy waffles from Honey Stinger and coffee from Kicking Horse Coffee every morning of the show. DAILY GRAND TRUNK GIVEAWAYS 9 am – 1 pm #14015 Enter at the Grand Trunk booth to win daily giveaways! Be among the first to experience our limited-edition, US-made hammocks, debuting at ORWM. Plus 40% off pro deals on our award-winning line of hammocks and adventure travel gear. CRAGHOPPERS LOST AND FOUND: WHERE’S PADDINGTON? 9 am – 3 pm #36133 Keep your eyes peeled for our friendly Paddington Bears. They’ve wandered off from the booth and

gotten lost. They need to find their way back to us! Bring them back to Craghoppers, where you will be warmly rewarded. There are all sorts of great prizes on offer, plus the opportunity to put your business card into a daily drawing to win one of our fabulous AW15 Heritage Jackets.

IBEX WOOLIES SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 1 pm #8000 Ibex is selling its men’s and women’s Woolies Crew to benefit The Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last). ICEBREAKER MERINO WOOL SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 2 pm #32085 Icebreaker sells its Oasis Long Sleeve Crewe for men and women to benefit The Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last).

EAGLE CREEK ROLLING DUFFEL SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 1 pm #24017 Eagle Creek is selling its medium-sized No

Dig into our highlights of Winter Market’s events, education and more

Matter What Duffle to benefit The Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last). CAMELBAK CUSTOM BOTTLE SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION

ALLIANCE 9 am - 1 pm #16027 Camelbak is selling its custom logo’d bottles to benefit The Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last).

Want to list an event here for ORSM 2016? Don’t miss promoting your happy hour or giveaway! SNEWS subscribers receive an early-bird notice when we start collecting event info for the next show. Go to snewsnet.com to sign up.

TOSS & WASH 9 am - 3 pm #19045 Stop by Nikwax to test your hoop skills and learn about gear care. Win a sample of Nikwax and we’ll also donate $1 for each successful shot to Bay Area Wilderness Training’s Gear Lending Library. BIG AGNES SHOW SALE 9 am – 3 pm #12041 Deeply discounted apparel, Helinox Chairs and more to benefit High Fives Foundation. STONEWEAR DESIGNS DAILY GIVEAWAYS 9 am – 3 pm #4042 Drop a business card and win! Daily giveaways of women’s activewear for climbing, hiking, running and more. Plus 50% Off Pro Deal cards to shop our premium, US-made apparel. You do not have to be present to win. RUFFWEAR SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 1 pm #32069 Ruffwear is selling its TurnUp and Huckama dog toys to benefit The Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last).

I N T R O D U C I N G L I F E S T R AW S T E E L T H E N E X T E VO L U T I O N I N P E R S O N A L WAT E R F I LT R AT I O N

VISIT US: BOOTH 82 | LEARN MORE: LIFESTRAW.COM

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schedule ARMADILLO LT GAITER GIVEAWAY! 9 am - 3 pm #34096 Hillsound Equipment, the leading producer of highperformance gaiters, is giving away 5 pairs of Armadillo LT Gaiters every day of the show! Swing by booth 34096 once a day to enter. Winners will be contacted by email at the end of each day. Showgoers can also fill out a pro form to receive a 50% discount on Hillsound products. LIGHT MY FIRE SPORK SALE FOR BIG CITY MOUNTAINEERS

9 am – 3 pm #38 Stop by and pick up the Light My Fire Spork original (spoon-fork-knife combo) for only $1. All proceeds benefit Big City Mountaineers. FREE BADGE HOLDER 9 am - 3 pm #22039 Stop by the One Source Apparel booth to pick up a free badge holder. While supplies last! PATAGONIA WORN WEAR REPAIR CENTER 9 am – 3 pm #13027 Bring your used clothing

to the Patagonia booth to be repaired! We will have a team on hand throughout the show to fix your well-loved pieces. Patches and iFixIt Guides available as well. We repair: busted zippers; rips & tears; buttons, snaps & pulls. Not exclusive to Patagonia clothing. First come, first serve. EXOFFICIO GIVEN-GO SPORT MESH UNDERWEAR BENEFIT SALE 9 am - 3 pm #12027 Help humanitarian efforts by World Concern

to meet the urgent needs of refugee families in the Syrian region that are without a home. Your purchase helps provide shelter materials, medical care, and emergency supplies. Daily. Men’s and women’s styles, $10-$15.

Wardrobe improvement program: Daily throughout the show, Mountain Khakis is selling $10 accessories, $30 pants & shirts, $40 sweaters, $50 outerwear (while supplies last). Sales benefit OIWC.

SAXX UNDERWEAR SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 3 pm #BR329 SAXX Underwear is selling assorted styles of its men’s briefs and boxer briefs to benefit The Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last).

KLEAN KANTEEN 9 am to 3 pm #3009 Klean Kanteen sells its 27-oz Reflect bottle with mirror finish and a Conservation Alliance customized bamboo cap with sales to benefit The Conservation Alliance (while supplies last).

REJUICE YOUR BOOTS 9 am – 3 pm #24027 Stop by the McNett booth to clean, condition and waterproof your leather boots with Gear Aid ReviveX Leather Gel. A magical formula that keeps your kicks lasting longer. FARM TO FEET SOCK SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 3 pm #BR409 Farm to Feet is selling its Bend Mid-Weight Hiker Sock to benefit The Conservation Alliance (Daily while supplies last). GEAR AID DOWN JACKET REPAIR 9 am - 3 pm #24027 Got a hole in your down jacket? Stop by the McNett booth for a free puffy patch. Tenacious Tape Gear Patches in new colors and shapes. Put a patch on it.

BOOTH #19015

MOUNTAIN KHAKIS WARDROBE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 9 am - 3 pm #21001

LIVE THE DREAM. JOIN OUR TEAM.

VAPUR SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 3 pm #24035 Vapur is selling its Mossy Oak Break-Up Infinity Bottle to benefit The Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last). TOAD & CO SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 3 pm #30051 Toad & Co is celebrating 20 years as The Original Trail to Tavern brand! Swing by our booth to celebrate with us and snag a limited-edition heritage fleece Toque Hat and an Outdoor Retailer exclusive Trail to Tavern T-shirt to benefit The

Intrigue us!

Apply online at thenorthface.com/careers

Photo: Andrew Miller

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THOMAS BATES RAFFLE 9 am – 3 pm #20014 Daily raffle of Thomas Bates belts, bags and shoes made from American Bison leather to fabric. New American Bison Collection of shoes and accessories for men. Stop by to pick up your Friends & Family VIP card for 20% discounts on online shopping.

Is your store connecting with customers in a unique way? Giving back to the community or providing new experiential events? Tell us your story at snewsedit@aimmedia.com.

Conservation Alliance (daily while supplies last). ADVENTURE-LOVING DOGS SEEKING ADVENTURE COMPANIONS 11 am – 3 pm #32069 Ruffwear is bringing back the dogs with the help of Best Friends Animal Society and Salt Lake’s Rescue Rovers. Be on the lookout for adorable, adoptable dogs walking the show floor including active, outdoor-loving, adventure-seeking males and females. Adoption and travel fees from SLC to the nearest major airport are covered by Ruffwear, along with a welcome-home package of Ruffwear gear. Applications will be available from the individual handlers walking the dogs and at the Ruffwear booth. MAPLE BACON CREAMEES 12 – 3 pm #32105 Darn Tough brings a taste of Vermont to Utah – get a delicious (and free!) Maple Bacon Creamee. Available everyday – or until the goodness is gone. BOOK SALE TO SUPPORT AHS 12 – 3 PM #32090 All books from Keen Communications $5 or less. All proceeds to support American Hiking Society. GOAL ZERO GIVEAWAY 2 pm #BR601 Swing by Goal Zero just before 2 pm each day for your chance to win free solar gear! From phones to fridges and everything in between, Goal Zero helps you power anything, anywhere.


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No 1527 Large Double Wall Cup

No 4708 Volcano Stove

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KODIAK COLD & WET WEATHER

KODIAK KIDS KLONDIKE

Mens/Womens: Ruggedly elegant with a waterproof, lightweight design, withstanding -20°C / -4°F temperatures and below!

BOOTH #34139

Girls/Boys: MORE TRACTION. MORE FUN. RATED TO -30°C / -22°F

kodiakboots.com

STAY ODOR FREE

WHEREVER ADVENTURE TAKES YOU...

NEW Aegis Excalibur™ inhibits and captures odors.

Find out more at booth 155-406

OR SUMMER MARKET 2016

www.microban.com

Special Advertising Section

Mens/Womens: Manufactured with premium waterproof leathers. Attention to detail in style, quality and functionality.

BOOTH 29151W // KHOMBU.COM


SuperEye

ONE OF A KIND

Special Advertising Section

Metal Detectors

GO FOR IT! VISIT US AT BOOTH

29188W

• Superior Cushioning • Long Lasting • 100% Made In USA

insoles-sorbothane.com

Super Eye Products Co. • 1-877-436-7876 www.SuperEyeUSA.com, Sales@SuperEyeUSA.com

BOOTH 40159


masthead masthead Group Production Director DESIGN

EXPLORE

Barb Van Sickle Art Director Prepress MikeManager Leister

Joy Kelley OUTDOOR OUTDOOR RETAILER RETAILER DAILY DAILY

Designer Ad Coordinator

www.snewsnet.com/ordaily 5720 Flatiron Parkway Boulder, CO 80301 (303) 253-6401 EDITORIAL www.snewsnet.com/ordaily

Photo Editor Graphic Designer

Editorial Director

SALES AND MARKETING

Kristin Hostetter EDITORIAL khostetter@aimmedia.com Editorial Director 617-921-5126

Kristin Hostetter

Managing Editor khostetter@aimmedia.com Jonathan Dorn 617-298-7670

Genny Fullerton Jackie Medina Andrew Bydlon

Group Production Director Vice President, General Manager

Joy Kelley Gregg Thayer

Account Representative

Assistant Editor Assistant Editor

Sharon Burson

SALES AND MARKETING DESIGN

Jennifer Emma LightHall

jhall@aimmedia.com Photo Intern 303-253-6419

Lauren Danilek

i-Fit TECH

Kneecap Stabilizer

VISIT US AT BOOTH #39191

sburson@aimmedia.com 970-485-0846

ROM-TECH

Sales Assistant

ZK-7 Knee support

Jennifer Hall

V-TECH

jhall@aimmedia.com Chairman & CEO 303-253-6419 Efrem Zimbalist III

Melissa Arnot Everest Guardian

HA-1 Foot support

President & COO

Andrew W. Clurman

BOOTH 40159

Executive Vice President & CFO

Zamst Xtreme Team

ZAMST.US 877-ZAMST.US

Brian Sellstrom Executive Vice President, Operations

Patricia B. Fox Senior MCMANUS, Vice President, Digital & Data REED Jonathan Dorn 1956-2016 Vice President, General We dedicate this issue to aManager fallen Kent Ebersole comrade. A writer/editor for the Sierra Club for almost 30 years, Reed was an eloquent advocate for the environment. He passed away in his hotel room on Wednesday night at OR.

Eco-friendly technology. Sustainable practices. Ultra-lightweight gear.

Special Advertising Section

Sales Manager Art Director Gregg Thayer Mike Leister gthayer@aimmedia.com 303-253-6149 Assistant Art Director Giovanni Leone Account Representative Sharon Photo Editor Burson sburson@aimmedia.com Genny Fullerton 970-485-0846 Photographers Sales Assistant Andrew Bydlon

i

Prepress Manager Sales Manager

Elisabeth Kwak-Hefferan Doug Schnitzspahn

Contributors Contributors Jenna Blumenfeld, Eugene Jenna Blumenfeld Buchanan, Buhay, EugeneCorey Buchanan M.T.M.T. Elliott, Courtney Holden, Elliott Elizabeth Miller, Doug Courtney Holden Schnitzspahn, Andy Stonehouse, Andy Stonehouse Ryan Slabaugh, Morgan Tilton Ryan Slabaugh

Flyweight TECH

Barb Van Sickle Kent Ebersole

Ad Coordinator gthayer@aimmedia.com Caitlin O’Connor 303-253-6149

kcloos@aimmedia.com kcloos@aimmedia.com

INNOVATION DRIVEN SUPPORT: - KNEE - ANKLE - ICING - BACK - COMPRESSION - UPPER BODY

Exo-TECH QUAD

Photographer

Deputy Editor Editor Managing

Kassondra Cloos Kassondra Cloos

BEYOND YOUR LIMITS

Tech Deck:

Giovanni Leone Caitlin O’Connor

ZEROGRAM is coming to the US.

Meet the OR Team www.outdoorretailer.com Meet the OR Team www.outdoorretailer.com Vice President, Sr. Art Director Group Show Director Raymond Kang ViceMarisa President, Senior Art Director Nicholson raymond.kang@emeraldexpo.com Group Show Director Raymond Kang marisa.nicholson@emeraldexpo.com Production/Traffic Manager Marisa Nicholson raymond.kang@emeraldexpo.com Sales Director Laurie Stiglitz marisa.nicholson@emeraldexpo.com Production/Traffic Manager Krista Dill laurie.stiglitz@emeraldexpo.com Sales Director Laurie Stiglitz krista.dill@emeraldexpo.com Director of Operations Krista Dill laurie.stiglitz@emeraldexpo.com Sr. Account Executive Alicia Parsons krista.dill@emeraldexpo.com Director of Operations Paul Dillman alicia.parsons@emeraldexpo.com Senior Account Executive Alicia Parsons paul.dillman@emeraldexpo.com Director of Operations Paul Dillman alicia.parsons@emeraldexpo.com Sr. Account Executive & Publisher/ Cathy Griffith paul.dillman@emeraldexpo.com Director of Operations Outdoor Retailer Magazine cathy.griffith@emeraldexpo.com Senior Account Executive & Cathy Griffith Ryan Johnson Operations Director Publisher/Outdoor Retailer cathy.griffith@emeraldexpo.com ryan.johnson@emeraldexpo.com Julie Freedman Magazine Operations Director Account Executive julie.freedman@emeraldexpo.com

Ryan Johnson Dave Nielson ryan.johnson@emeraldexpo.com

dave.nielson@emeraldexpo.com

Account Executive Account Executive Dave Nielson

Robert O’Quinn dave.nielson@emeraldexpo.com robert.oquinn@emeraldexpo.com Account Executive Vice President, Marketing Robert O’Quinn

Liz Crawford robert.oquinn@emeraldexpo.com liz.crawford@emeraldexpo.com Vice President, Marketing Director LizMarketing Crawford

Margie Lelvis liz.crawford@emeraldexpo.com margie.lelvis@emeraldexpo.com Marketing Director Content Director Margie Lelvis

Jennifer Holcomb margie.lelvis@emeraldexpo.com jennifer.holcomb@emeraldexpo.com Content Director Marketing Coordinator Jennifer Holcomb

Sarah Langston jennifer.holcomb@emeraldexpo.com sarah.langston@emeraldexpo.com Marketing Coordinator Director of Public Relations Sarah Langston

Kate Lowery sarah.langston@emeraldexpo.com kate.lowery@emeraldexpo.com Director of Public Relations

Kate Lowery kate.lowery@emeraldexpo.com

Julie Freedman

Registration Operations Manager julie.freedman@emeraldexpo.com

Kristen Novick

Registration Operations Manager kristen.novick@emeraldexpo.com

Kristen Novick

Retail Relations Manager kristen.novick@emeraldexpo.com

Joe Bustos

Retail Relations Manager joe.bustos@emeraldexpo.com

Joe Bustos

Operations Manager joe.bustos@emeraldexpo.com

(Demo & Inspiration Awards) Operations JamieManager Kelley (Demo & Inspiration Awards) jamie.kelley@emeraldexpo.com

Jamie Kelley

Events Operations Coordinator jamie.kelley@emeraldexpo.com

Kara Knox

Events Operations Coordinator kara.knox@emeraldexpo.com

Kara Knox

Sponsorship Operations kara.knox@emeraldexpo.com

Coordinator Sponsorship Operations Mallory Denny Coordinator mallory.denny@emeraldexpo.com

Mallory Denny

Billing Manager mallory.denny@emeraldexpo.com

Sara Burns

Billing Manager sara.burns@emeraldexpo.com

Sara Burns

sara.burns@emeraldexpo.com

ZEROGRAMGEAR.COM

CONTACT: Sharon Burson sburson@aimmedia.com

Classifieds ®

to reserve your spot in the

Summer OR Daily

Product

Zone

Kodiak Group Holdings Co, an affiliate of Williamson-Dickie Mfg. Co, is a leading footwear company marketing quality safety and lifestyle footwear under Kodiak, Terra and Dickies brands. We’re looking to add to our team of Sales Agents within our Kodiak Lifestyle division in the U.S. starting October 2016. Available markets include Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Arizona, Nevada and California. You’ll be responsible for the sales process for Kodiak Lifestyle Footwear (Adult’s and Children’s) within assigned markets including developing retailer relationships, lead generation, opportunity conversion, distribution and sales growth. Please submit cover letter and resume to careers@kodiakboots.com.

january january 10, 2016 6, 2016 / day / day 4 95 0 83


showbuzz 3 QUE STIONS WITH …

Tim Anderson Pacific Flyway Supplies The 26-year old founder/owner/ buyer/chief bottle washer of this infant Sacramento, California, hunting and outdoor specialty store has some innovative ideas about using social media to ensure sales success.

Turn here every day for top news, gear picks, interviews and more from SNEWS/O.R. Daily Editor Kristin Hostetter.

 I worked for Lowe’s Home Improvement for 5 years and saved some money. I’ve always been that kid who wanted to get dirty and be outside, and my huge passion is waterfowl hunting. I thought, there’s gotta be a way to turn my passion into a paycheck. So I quit and opened my shop in June 2013 with the help of my parents. WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE?

 Having enough inventory and forecasting. It’s not an exact science. This is only my second OR

show (and first winter market). As a buyer, you can forecast very wrong in either direction. Like, that was a slamdunk and I wish I had another thousand units because I could make a lot of money there. Or, I bought way too many of these and I can’t unload them.

WHAT ROLE DOES SOCIAL MEDIA PLAY IN YOUR BUSINESS?

 It’s critical. If you’re not paying attention to what your customer is doing and talking about and asking for, you’re losing out on free advertising for the shop. I have almost 5,000 followers on Instagram (@pacificflywaysupplies)

and almost 3,000 on Facebook. But more importantly, I use social as market research. I follow almost 7,500 people on Instagram, most of them hunters, to stay in touch with what they’re talking about and interested in and doing. Then I use my social platforms to showcase hot items, announce sales, and even build suspense around future products. After this OR show, I’ll post photos of stuff I bought, and maybe offer a pre-order special. I have until September to get customers excited about what I’ll stock. If you’re not immediately thinking about how to sell the stuff you’ve just spent $50 to $100K on, what are you doing?

SIP ‘N’ SKI Hydrapak’s Arcticfusion ($18, #3000) is a TPU-insulated hose that clips into any brand’s bladder. Hydrapak claims it keeps water from freezing in -20°F temps for one hour, way longer than my old neoprene sleeve.

FROM THE AISLES

THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY IS LIKE THE

HOTEL CALIFORNIA. BUT

YO U C A N N E V E R L E AV E . SALLY MCCOY, ON HER UPCOMING RETIREMENT FROM CAMELBAK. (SEE PAGE 23 FOR MORE DETAILS.)

96 outdoor retailer daily

YOU CA N C H E C K OU T

CELEBRATING THIS YEAR’S WINNERS The hosts of last night’s Outdoor Inspiration Awards snapped an Ellen DeGeneres-inspired selfie from the stage. That’s me at left-center with the bright blue vest!

Photos by (clockwise from top left): Andrew Bydlon / Caveman Collective (2); Emma Light

WELCOME TO OUR INDUSTRY! WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO OPEN YOUR STORE?


PHOTO: KLAUS POLZER

ERIC HJORLEIFSON DT GAUNTLET (EMPYREAN COLLECTION)

GORDINI IS PROUD TO SUPPORT OUR TEAM ATHLETE: GLOVES:

FIND A RETAILER NEAR YOU AT

GORDINI.COM


THE FRESH FOAM 1080

UNDER EACH STEP, YOU CAN MAKE ANY ROAD YOURS. The pinnacle of cushioning. Its unique, sweet ride was designed directly from the data of runners like you. newbalance.com/freshfoam booth # 36165


INSIDE BACK

BOOTH 40159


OUTSIDE BACK

THE FRESH FOAM 1080

UNDER EACH STEP, YOU CAN MAKE ANY ROAD YOURS. The pinnacle of cushioning. Its unique, sweet ride was designed directly from the data of runners like you. newbalance.com/freshfoam booth # 36165 BOOTH 40159


SNEWS Outdoor Retailer Daily - Day 4