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Driving Change in South Africa A Youth Network Approach to Development You Count Survey Report 2018

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Contents Executive summary

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Introduction 3 A! Network Profiling and Demographics

5

Economic Force 11 Social Force

17

Political Force

23

Key recommendations focusing on programming

28

Conclusion

28

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Executive Summary The YouCount 2018 Survey Report provides a holistic picture of the ACTIVATE! Network in South Africa. The A! Network, which currently consists of more than 2 500 young people, is a network of diverse individuals in communities who are driving positive social, political and economic change through a range of social tools and methodologies. At the core of the A! Network’s change philosophy is a strong belief to provide young people with a provocative platform to meet, connect and be inspired to actively contribute to the common good, to strengthen and develop their abilities and skills set. Once they receive this platform, THEN they can be innovative and active citizens who can drive positive social, economic, and political change for South Africa and the global good. This statement of intent rests on the foundation of a network to allow both intra-connections and inter-connections among young people and other members of communities.

At the core of the A! Network’s change philosophy is a strong belief to provide young people with a provocative platform to meet, connect and be inspired to actively contribute to the common good, to strengthen and develop their abilities and skills set. The YouCount 2018 Report is the second report where almost the same set of indicators were tested across the A! Network. The 2018 Report further cements the view that the interventions under the ACTIVATE! Change Drivers programmes to young people in South Africa are affecting young people in both rural and urban communities considerably. There is a significant difference between the A! Network and the general youth of South Africa regarding social, political and economic consciousness. In the absence of plausible exclusive issues to the youth, the results found that the differences in some aspects of the indicators are attributable to the ACTIVATE! Programme.

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This report further posits that the level of political consciousness among Activators (members of the A! Network) is high and their level of involvement in socio-economic activities in South Africa is deepening and extensive. The youth is progressing well in civic duties, active citizenry, and being pro-social. Although these Activators’ activities in communities are commendable, there is room for improvement to create sustainable pathways at both the personal and community level. This improvement would require further reflection by programme employees on how ACTIVATE! could support the effective growth of Activators in the depth of their work and sustainability in light of the dynamic global socio-economic order.

There is a significant difference between the A! Network and the general youth of South Africa regarding social, political and economic consciousness.


Introduction This Report begins by providing a summative view of the survey regarding the generic data on the entire A! Network that is in the data management system. As demonstrated in this section, the current survey is generally representative of both Network size (24%) and most of its characteristics such as location, provincial distribution, gender, education, race and programme-training year of the respondents. The current 2018 YouCount Survey, which only has 2012 to 2017 Activators, is thus the best fit for sample size and its representation to the whole Network.

As demonstrated in this section, the current survey is generally representative both in terms of Network size (24%) and most of its characters like location, provincial distribution, gender, education, race and programme training year of the respondents.

The Report concludes by providing recommendations as some important discussion points to further strengthening the Network. These recommendations should directly guide interventions and intentionally target specific Activator initiatives and projects. Developing targeted intervention measures could assist Activators to leverage resources and gain skills to manoeuvre in the current economic environment.

The Report further discusses the findings in terms of economic, social and political transformative forces, which are both crucial to our operating strategy and theory of change philosophy.

The Report further discusses the findings of economic, social and political transformative forces, which are crucial to the operating strategy and theory of change philosophy. As is widely demonstrated, the 2018 data are slightly subdued as compared to the 2017 findings across most indicators, which could be a result of the increase in sample size, which is double in the current survey. These findings have an effect of cooling off most indicators as they become more reflective of the A! Network population. However, the subdued indicators may also be attributable to the harsh socio-economic climate prevailing in the country, which is pushing many people out of employment and limiting business and income opportunities. These indicators usually set off negative spinoffs to social and political issues, as they tend to correlate with economic wellbeing. Fortunately, the whole set of indicators are well above national averages, demonstrating the efficacy of A! Network’s programmes.

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A! Network Profiling and Demographics

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Demographics The 2018 YouCount survey was completed by 594 Activators across the ACTIVATE! Network, reaching 24% of all Activators, which was almost double the size of the 2017 respondents. The YouCount survey was sent out via an SMS link as a fast form for all Activators to complete. Activators who completed the survey received 100 MB data and were entered into a competition to win one of four cameras or one of five Social Innovation Summit tickets to incentivise completion. After three weeks of sharing the survey link across various platforms, a call centre was hired to call the remaining Activators. The call centre team managed to call the remaining Activators and reached a final target of 594 completed surveys.

and 2016 Activators were overrepresented by 5%. Regarding gender, there was an overrepresentation of 4% in males and an underrepresentation of 4% in females. The racial profile of the survey respondents had a notable 2% variance, as the overall network already underrepresents minority races and the survey had in total a 4% minority feedback. The majority of the respondents are from Gauteng (29%) and KwaZulu-Natal (16%) and from urban areas (69%). Regarding education levels, 42% of the A! Network is studying, 29% part-time and 13% full time. The majority of the network’s highest level of education is matric (29%) or certificate (27%). Currently, 40% of Activators with matric as their highest level of education are studying.

Overall, the YouCount survey represented the A! Network population across year, gender, race, province, location and education level. On average, there was a 2% variance across all demographic indicators; the most notable ones being year where 2012 Activators were underrepresented by 5%

YEAR & PROVINCE

16%

3%

18%

On average, there was a 2% variance across all demographic indicators; the most notable ones being year where 2012 Activators were underrepresented by 5% and 2016 Activators were overrepresented by 5%.

2012-2017 A! NETWORK

YOUCOUNT 2018

19%

16%

17%

21%

23% 18%

20%

22%

7%

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

29% 29%

16% 8%

5%

FREE STATE

6

19%

11% 10%

EASTERN CAPE

GAUTENG

KWA-ZULU NATAL

11% 12%

LIMPOPO

8%

6%

MPUMALANGA

10% 4% 4%

2% 3%

NORTH WEST

NORTHERN CAPE

12%

WESTERN CAPE


GENDER

58%

42%

54%

YOUCOUNT 2018

LOCATION TYPE

FEMALE

MALE

46%

2012-2017

RACE BLACK

69%

31%

URBAN

RURAL

EDUCATION COLOURED

WHITE

INDIAN

MATRIC (29%) HIGHER CERTIFICATE (27%)

95%

3% 2% 0%

93%

BACHELORS DEGREE B/TECH (19%)

5% 1% 0%

NATIONAL DIPLOMA (18%) POSTGRADUATE DEGREE (5%)

YOUCOUNT 2018

2012-2017

OTHER (3%)

29% 58%

13%

NO FULL-TIME PART-TIME

Are you studying?

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A! Network Profiling Activators described being Activator or being part of the A! Network as being a change driver, people who are informed and drive positive change in their communities. It means being part of a greater network of young innovative leaders who has a common goal of bettering South Africa. The overwhelming majority (96%) of Activators feel they are part of the A! Network, which is significant as the ACTIVATE! Mandate is the creation of the A! Network and having a sense of belonging heightens the motivation needed to address the Activators’ problems. Further scrutinising the data revealed that participants who completed the programme in 2013 had the highest percentage of no answers (11%) as well as participants from the Western Cape (8%).

Activators described being Activator or being part of the A! Network as being a change driver, people who are informed and drive positive change in their communities.

The YouCount survey sought to understand how Activators felt about the A! Network’s effectiveness. A large percentage (30%), primarily the 2014 Activators (31%) felt that no changes were necessary. Activators recommended to have more follow-ups (8%), engage with rural Activators or communities (7%), increase overall interaction (7%), have a platform for connection and communication (6%), expand the A! brand (6%), be more inclusive (6%), and have more annual/regional gatherings (5%). First, Activators felt it would be motivating to have more interaction and follow-ups from the organisation, as well as an annual or regional gathering where Activators could have face-toface interaction. They felt that this would aid in networking, give them a sense of belonging and further inspire them. In general, there was an overall

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request for more personalised interaction and communication. Second, Activators felt that the A! Network needs to be more visible specifically in rural communities, universities and on social media. They feel that there is a great need for both the .org and Activators to expand their work in rural communities, as most people in rural communities have not heard about ACTIVATE! or about the effect that it could have in these communities. Activators feel that ACTIVATE! should be more visible, specifically in universities and schools, and a few mentioned across social and traditional media. Third, Activators felt that there is a need for inclusivity, and some felt that workshops and training concentrated on the same areas and that the same group of Activators was constantly selected by the .org to take part in campaigns or programmes. There was a further request for more transparency around the selection processes, as well as engaging with minority groups as a few of them expressed that they do not feel that ACTIVATE! is interested in their communities. Finally, Activators requested a structured and safe platform for connection, communication and to access resources. Surprisingly, many requested the Activator map, which already exists, as a means of connecting with Activators in their focus area. There was no trend evident when trying to identify the characteristics of these Activators.

Activators felt that having more interaction and follow up would be motivating as well as having an annual or regional gathering where Activators could have face to face interaction.


Being an Activator means

FEEL LIKE PART OF THE NETWORK

4%

YES NO

96%

Activators described being Activator or being part of the A! Network as being a change driver, people who are informed and drive positive change in their communities

Key recomendations to make the network more effective MORE FOLLOW UP 8%

ENGAGE WITH RURAL ACTIVATORS 7%

MORE INTERACTION 7%

Platform for connection and communication 6%

Expand the A! brand 6%

Be more inclusive 6%

Annual/regional gathering 5%

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10


Economic Force

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Economic Force The Activate Change Drivers programme seeks to entrench two main objectives, namely to build a mindset of entrepreneurialism and innovation that can be applied to both national and local socioeconomies, and to expand prospects for economic participation by young leaders from marginalised communities. Developing a critical mass of young leaders who are actively participating in the economy is not only a pathway out of poverty, but may open up various economic frontiers to young people across the country.

A closer analysis of the nature of employment reveals that the bulk of the employed Activators work full-time (33%) followed by those working part-time (11%) and those who are self-employed earning an income (11%). Flipping the coin of employment reveals that unemployment in the A! Network has shot up to 29%, more than the second quarter national unemployment rate of 26,6%. The year 2018’s unemployment rate remains higher than the previous years’, begging for serious efforts to improve the condition in the Network.

Employment is a powerful indicator of socioeconomic status within any population group. Employed individuals are likely to afford basic needs and therefore live above poverty levels. Young people who are employed are likely to shun social delinquency crimes and engage productively in the development of their communities and the nation at large. Employed people are likely to have positive behaviours and shun social ills such as prostitution. The 2018 YouCount Report shows that 64% of the A! Network is employed opposed to the 72% and 67% employed in 2017 and 2016 respectively. The number of employed Activators has decreased by more than 5 percentage points since 2017, which can be attributed to the general economic conditions prevailing in the country.

Unemployed Activators are likely to be males who live in Gauteng followed by those in KwaZuluNatal. Female Activators who contribute to the unemployment rates are likely to live in KwaZuluNatal followed by the Eastern Cape. Activators who have a Grade 12 certificate are likely to be unemployed followed by those who have a national certificate. These statistics correlate with national trends in unemployment where the higher the level of education the higher the chances are to find employment in South Africa.

YOUCOUNT 2018

TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYER

33%

29% 24%

12

25%

29%

31%

28% 18%

Middle Management

Entry Level Position

NGO

GOVERNMENT BODY

FOR PROFIT

Unemployed and NOT looking for work

Internship

10% 10%

4% 6% Unemployed and looking for work

Self-employed (No income yet)

Self-employed (Earning an income)

11% 9% 11% 10% 9%

Employed (part-time)

Employed (full-time)

14%

POSITION LEVEL

40%

40% 35%

39%

49% 48%

11%

13% 7%

8%

Prefer not to answer

YOUCOUNT 2017

Senior Management

OCCUPATION

Developing a critical mass of young leaders who are actively participating in the economy is not only a pathway out of poverty, but may open up various economic frontiers to young people across the country.


JOB TYPE SERVICES (39%)

OTHER (28%)

RETAIL (11%)

MANUFACTURING (9%)

AGRICULTURE (5%)

FOOD RETAIL (4%)

MINING (3%)

CLOTHING RETAIL (1%)

39%

28%

The majority of the Activators are employed by private companies (40%) followed by nongovernmental organisations and the government at 31% and 29% respectively. From 2017, there has been a positive shift of 4% of Activators currently working for Government, which might be important in terms of positions of influence to government policy. Regarding position level, employed Activators are mainly dominating entry-level positions (48%), although there has been a significant shift in middle management employment from 18% in 2017 to 28% in 2018. The rise of the proportion of Activators in middle management is significant, as it further cements the economic force of Activators and improved positions of authority as leaders. From the 40% of the A! Network that is employed by the private sector, the majority is employed by the services sector and other sectors (38% and 28% respectively). A significant portion of those whom are employed are working in the services (39%) and retail sectors (11%). It is important to note that the high skill sectors are also employing a significant number of Activators. Income is an important variable in determining the economic force of the A! Network. There are wide variations to the income of individual Activators,

DOES YOUR INCOME COVER YOUR MONTHLY EXPENSES?

11%

5%

4%

ranging from no income at all to a maximum of R45 000 per month. Perhaps the median income of R3 000 and the average income of R5 856 per month are worthy to note. As compared to 2017 results, there has been a slight positive movement of income from a dominating R0–R2 000 category per month to more than R3 000. The figures reflect that the bulk of the Activators are well above the upper-poverty line of R980 in South Africa (Statistics SA, 2017). One limitation of the current income figures from the survey is its lack of completeness, as some Activators did not specify their income. It is necessary therefore to rely on other proxy measures to understand the income of the A! Network. Concerning income covering living costs of Activators, 15% of the A! Network’s income always covers living costs, while 12% very often and 26% sometimes covers their living costs. A worrying combined 41% rarely and never covers their living costs, which points to the precarious state of the income of most Activators. Income determines people’s risk behaviours, as well as how they perceive their lives, particularly regarding social diseases and behaviours.

36% 26%

YOUCOUNT 2017 YOUCOUNT 2018

9%

3% 1%

26% 20%

15% 15%

14%

15%

12%

11% 4% 6%

ALWAYS

VERY OFTEN

SOMETIMES

RARELY

NEVER

PREFER NOT TO ANSWER

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NO

YES

financially responsible for other family members 50% LIVE WITH PARENTS/FAMILY

47%

Fifty-three per cent (53%) of the A! Network is breadwinners, signifying the enormous financial responsibilities of Activators.

49%

53%

receive financial support from family member(s) 34% have a second job or supplementary income 24%

Are you the breadwinner?

OWN OR CO-OWN PROPERTY 15% PREFER NOT TO ANSWER 12%

Activators’ financial responsibilities are an essential proxy measure of the economic health of Activators. Fifty-three per cent (53%) of the A! Network is breadwinners, signifying the enormous financial responsibilities of Activators. Further analysis shows that 50% of those in the A! Network are financially responsible for other family members, while 49% of them live with their parents or siblings. Thirtyfour per cent (34%) of the A! Network still receives financial support from their family members, further showing the weak finances of Activators. On a positive note, 24% has a supplementary occupation to earn income and 15% of the A! Network co-owns or owns property. Property ownership denotes a high level of income stability and economic force.

Business ownership further demonstrates economic force. Thirty-nine per cent (39%) of the A! Network runs or owns businesses, one percentage point higher than in 2017, with 23% of them running for-profit business enterprises. The number of Activators running social enterprises increased to 16% by 3 percentage points showing a pro-social business approach by Activators. The results show an increase from 6% to 18% of A! Network Activators who do not want to start their own businesses, resulting in a decrease from 2017’s 56% to 2018’s 42% of those who want to start their own businesses. This decrease could indicate a lack of enthusiasm into businesses due to prevailing economic hardships in the country.

RUNNING OWN BUSINESS

BUSINESS FUNDING

YOUCOUNT 2017

YOUCOUNT 2018 56%

25%

23% 13%

YES (FOR PROFIT AND SOCIAL ENTERPRISE)

YES (FOR PROFIT)

18%

16%

YES (SOCIAL ENTERPRISE)

LOAN FROM FAMILY/FRIENDS

DONOR FUNDING

USED OWN SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS

GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

PREFER NOT TO ANSWER

INVESTMENT FROM INVESTORS

42%

38% 39%

BANK LOAN

2%

6% 3%

6% NO (I WANT TO)

NO (I DON’T WANT TO)

7% 76%

YOUCOUNT 2017

14

2% 8% 1% 5%

4% 1% 6% 7%

73%

YOUCOUNT 2018


The surge to negative business perceptions requires serious reflection, particularly to the youth’s economic participation provoke sector and the social enterprises. For those who own or run their own businesses, the majority was primarily funded by their own savings and capital (73%), followed by donor funding (8%) and undisclosed sources (7%). The major funding sources such as banks and government all contributed to less than 5% each, showing a biased policy against young people’s business initiatives. Regarding Activators who want to start their own businesses, a lack of funding was the chief impediment (57%), followed by a lack of time (16%) and skills and knowledge (10%). The analysis of these impediments reveals there are areas that programme interventions might affect such as skills development and project planning and management.

KEY BARRIERS TO STARTING YOUCOUNT 2017

The 2018 YouCount survey asked Activators to list a skill that they thought would help them generate income. The most mentioned skills were Marketing and Finance, including financial management and financial skills. It was interesting to note that 15% of Activators who are unemployed and looking for work requested no skills, which is equal to those who are employed full time. The two groups that requested the most skills were Activators who are unemployed and not looking for work (92%) and self-employed and not earning an income (91%). Overall, the skills mentioned primarily concerned business and finance skills, as well as accredited facilitation courses. These skills would be the focus for capacity building in the year ahead.

For those who own or run their own businesses, the majority was primarily funded by their own savings and capital (73%), followed by donor funding (8%) and undisclosed sources (7%).

TOP SKILLS REQUESTED MARKETING

YOUCOUNT 2018

12%

57%

FINANCE

49%

10% BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 7% ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS 6%

15% 16% 8%

12%

14%

10%

MANAGEMENT 9%

Prefer not to answer

Not brave enough

Lack of funding

Don’t possess the skills/knowledge

3% Don’t have time

Can’t think of a good idea

3%

5%

4% FACILITATION 3% Proposal writing 3% Project Management 3% Fundraising 2%

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Social Force

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Social Force The development of a positive social force is a principal objective for the ACTIVATE! Network with recruitment demonstrating an interest in community development. The ACTIVATE! Change Drivers (ACD) training provides participants with tools and methodologies to aid them in positive social action. Further, they are introduced to the Network, which in itself presents the possibility of collaboration and support to expand the positive impact they are having. This year, the World Bank named South Africa the most unequal country in the world. Out of 149 countries, South Africa scored high on income and wealth inequality, with over half of the country’s population living below the national poverty line. The effects of high inequality are poor public healthcare facilities, high crime rates, lower average education levels and increased political inequality. This highlights the need for community service in the country to address these social ills.

Activators are involved in an array of prosocial activities. Eighty-seven per cent (87%) is actively engaging with young people, 68% is volunteering, 38% is running their own campaigns, and 23% is running their own NGOs. There was a slight drop when compared to the YouCount 2017 statistics, most notably in running campaigns that saw a 32% decrease. Ninety per cent (90%) of all Activators are involved in at least one of the mentioned prosocial activities, 43% is involved in two activities and 18% involved in three activities. The Activators who are doing no activities are primarily employed full time (44%) and from the 2013 programme year (43%). Activators most active in prosocial activities are 2014 Activators as well as Activators from the Limpopo province, this would a good point to further investigate in a qualitative study to understand the differences between the 2013 and 2014 years.

SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT

VOLUNTEERING

PRO-SOCIAL ACITIVITIES

volunteering ACTIVELY

YOUCOUNT 2017

YOUCOUNT 2018 84% 87%

73%

70%

68%

30%

VOLUNTEERING

38%

NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES 2 ACTIVITIES (43%) 3 ACTIVITIES (18%)

18

50%

32%

YES (FULL-TIME)

YES (PART-TIME)

NO

23%

RUNNING OWN NGO

1 ACTIVITY (29%)

18%

RUNNING OWN CAMPAIGN

18% 43%

ACTIVELY ENGAGING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE

Activators are volunteering via

57%

22%

21%

ORGANISATION

DIRECTLY

BOTH

29%


YES

NO

19%

NGO’S ARE FUNDED BY LOCAL DONATIONS 34%

81%

PREFER NOT TO ANSWER 23% SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP 14%

Receiving stipend

YES

NO 23% 77%

RUNNING OWN NGO

GOVERNMENT SUBSIDY 12% MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS 11% INTERNATIONAL FUNDING 4% SALES 2%

Half of all Activators are volunteering part-time (50%) and 18% volunteering full time. Compared to national statistics, this is well above the youth volunteer rate that is at 6% (StatsSA, 2015). The act of volunteering has various benefits such as improving self-confidence and greater benefits for the community. Those volunteering are primarily doing so through an organisation (57%), 22% is volunteering directly, and 21% is volunteering both through an organisation and directly. The organisations that Activators are volunteering through are primarily NGOs (85%) and Government organisations (12%). Participants from KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga show a higher instance of volunteerism, with 74% of Activators from KZN volunteering and 87% of Activators in Mpumalanga volunteering. Participants from rural areas are slightly more likely to volunteer (7%) and 10% more likely to be volunteering full time. Gender is often a variable in the likelihood of volunteering with females generally more likely to do so. There, however, was a small variance across gender in the Network, with slightly more males (70%) than females (66%) who volunteer. Regarding the programme year, Activators from 2014 and 2017 were more active in volunteering, 78% and 74% respectively. Activators from 2013

The results show that 43% of Activators whom are unemployed and looking for work and volunteering (16% of the network) are not receiving any stipend.

Almost a quarter of the Network (23%) is running their own NGOs

The province with the highest instance of Activators who have started their own NGOs is Limpopo (31%).

had the lowest instance of volunteerism with 55%, which is 13 percentage points less than that of the overall Network. Regarding the highest level of education, those with a certificate are more likely to be volunteering full time (25%). A high number of Activators with postgraduate degrees is volunteering full time (23%). Those unemployed and looking for work are also more likely to be volunteering (73%). Activators unemployed and not looking for work had the lowest occurrence of volunteering, most probably because they are the group with the highest number of Activators who are studying full time. On average, Activators whom are volunteering are volunteering for 49 hours per month. This gives an estimated network monthly value for volunteering of R2 588 557 and annual value for volunteering of R31 062 690.

Half of all Activators are volunteering part-time (50%) and 18% volunteering full time. Compared to national statistics, this is well above the youth volunteer rate that is at 6% (StatsSA, 2015). 19


The data also reveals that Activators who are volunteering full time are primarily those who are unemployed and looking for work. Overall, only 19% of Activators volunteering are receiving stipends with 39% of those volunteering full time and 12% of those volunteering part-time. The results show that 43% of Activators whom are unemployed and looking for work and volunteering (16% of the network) are not receiving any stipend. Further, the fact that 81% are volunteering and not receiving a stipend indicates a high level of social, moral, and ethical value for community service. One of the principal pro-social activities of young people is running their own non-governmental organisations to steer community development. Almost a quarter of the Network (23%) is running their own NGOs. Males are 13% more likely to be running their own NGOs. The province with the highest instance of Activators who have started their own NGOs is Limpopo (31%). There was also a trend with the 2015 Activators where 32% of this cohort had started their own NGOs. The recommendation is that Switch and Capacity building focus on these

YES

NO

two groups when recruiting or delivering workshops. The data further revealed that Activators who are employed full time are least likely to have started an NGO (17%) whereas Activators who have started their own business are most likely to be running their own NGOs (34%). Additionally, 22% of Activators who are unemployed and looking for work have started their own NGOs. NGOs are primarily funded by local donations (34%), social entrepreneurship (14%) and government subsidies (12%). Many young people also target other young people with their programming. Young people working with their peers have an increased likelihood of bringing about positive behavioural change. Eighty-seven per cent (87%) of the Network is engaging with young people; this figure was even higher with the 2014 Activators where 94% indicated that they are currently actively engaging or working with young people. The primary ages with which Activators are working are 15 to 25-year-olds (67%). They are also working with 26 to 35-year-olds (19%) and with children younger than 15 years (13%).

YES

NO

13%

38% 87%

62%

ENGAGING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE

RUNNING OWN CAMPAIGN

AGE GROUP

CAMPAIGN RUN AS

YOUNGER THAN 15

OWN INITIATIVE 34%

15-25

34% THROUGH AN ORGANISATION

23% 26-35

14%

20

23% BOTH/PARTNERSHIP 14%

Eighty-seven per cent (87%) of the Network is engaging with young people; this figure was even higher with the 2014 Activators where 94% indicated that they are currently actively engaging or working with young people.


Active citizenry also requires running effective campaigns to influence actions and decisions at both local and national governments. There was a decrease of Activators running their own campaigns or initiatives from the 2017 YouCount. In 2017, this was 70% whereas in 2018 only 38% of the network reported that they are running their own campaigns or projects. A factor behind this is that in 2017, the survey asked whether Activators had run a campaign since they completed the ACD training whereas in 2018 the survey was further specified to understand which Activators in the network are currently running campaigns.

Active citizenry also requires running effective campaigns to influence actions and decisions at both local and national governments. There was a decrease of Activators running their own campaigns or initiatives from the 2017 YouCount.

There was a slightly higher incidence of male-run campaigns (40%) than female (34%). Limpopo had the highest number of Activators who had started their own campaigns (46%). There were also slightly more Activators in rural communities who have started campaigns (41%) compared to urban areas (38%). Regarding education level, those with matric as their highest level of education had a lower instance of starting their own campaigns (34%). The most active programme years were 2014 (41%) and 2017 (38%). Self-employed Activators are most likely to be running their own campaigns, specifically those who are not yet earning an income (57%). 44% of Activators are involved in an HIV/Aids initiatives, with 77% of them focusing on HIV/AIDS prevention, awareness and education; 10% focusing on HIV/AIDS voluntary counselling and testing; 5% focusing on HIV/AIDS care and patient support; and 4% focusing on HIV/AIDS treatment adherence campaigns. Activators are also involved in other health related issues (57%), such as gender based violence (29%), drug substance abuse (27%), and TB (5%).

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22


Political Force

23


Political Force The A! Network has various positive indicators regarding civic duties, political consciousness and active citizenry. Perceptions of civic duties and active citizenry are essential, as they foster a sense of nationhood, which is at the heart of community and nation-state development. Without a vibrant voice of the people, especially young people who constitute over 60% of the African population, governments tend to shudder in development and become entangled in corrupt and unethical conducts, which further limits the pathways for development among young people.

vote but are eligible (11%) and who preferred not to answer (4%) in both 2017 and 2018. These constant metrics reflect that the Network perception on voting is generally representative and will not change with increases in sample sizes or by adding new members to the Network. The trend remains when it comes to possible voting perceptions for 2019. Ninety per cent (90%) of the A! Network affirmed to voting in 2019, which is one percentage point higher than the 2017 survey. This percentage is fairly higher than the 71% of youth who showed interest to vote in 2016 (Ipsos, 2016). Voting intentions in South Africa, however, are generally constrained by low voter registration by the youth and the poor perception of the electoral and governance perceptions in South Africa (Institute of Security Studies, 2016). Only one per cent of the A! Network will not be eligible to vote with a worrying 3% not willing to vote.

The YouCount 2018 Report shows that 79% of the A! Network has voted in the 2016 local government elections. This rating is one percentage point lower than in YouCount 2017 and can be explained by the bigger sample used in 2018, making the metric representative. Compared to national-level data for young people, this is way above the 59% of those who voted in 2013/4 elections. Of importance is the constant percentages of those who did not

Voted in previous local government elections 3%

YES NO (ELIGIBLE)

38% 59%

NO (NOT ELIGIBLE) DON’T KNOW / PREFER NOT TO ANSWER

IEC voter participation survey 2013/2014

3% 4%

6% 4%

11%

11%

82%

79%

YOUCOUNT 2017

YOUCOUNT 2018

Will vote in next national elections YES

2% 7% 2%

1% 6% 2%

NO (ELIGIBLE) NO (NOT ELIGIBLE) DON’T KNOW / PREFER NOT TO ANSWER

24

89%

90%

YOUCOUNT 2017

YOUCOUNT 2018

Ninety per cent (90%) of the A! Network affirmed to voting in 2019, which is one percentage point higher than the 2017 survey. This percentage is fairly higher than the 71% of youth who showed interest to vote in 2016


As to the duty to vote as a citizen, 90% affirmed to this duty, compared to the 84% in 2017 and the IECs 79% of the 2013/14 voter participation survey. A further significant number (84%) believes their voting will make a difference, which is well above the national average of 46% (IEC, 2014) and the 2017 YouCount Report’s 81%. Importantly, only 6% of Activators feel that their vote is not important compared to the 45% national average. Sixty-five per cent (65%) of the A! Network believes that they can influence what politicians do, opposed to 62% who thought so last year. These metrics, though high to represent political consciousness and active citizenry, also reflect the fact that a significant percentage of above 30% has a negative perception towards politicians, particularly on their ability

IEC voter participation survey 2013/2014

YOUCOUNT 2017

It is the duty of all citizens to vote 84%

to consider citizens’ concerns. This perception is worrying considering that the constitutional democracy places citizens’ participation at the heart of all government actions. It is refreshing that 78% of the A! Network is aware of how to participate in local governance, which confirms the deliberate actions of the Network’s residential training programme and the provoke influence programmes.

Importantly, only 6% of Activators feel that their vote is not important compared to the 45% national average.

YOUCOUNT 2018

MY VOTE MAKES A DIFFERENCE

90%

81% 84%

79%

46%

10% 9% AGREE

5%

NEUTRAL

11%

6% 4%

DISAGREE

45%

8% 11% 10%

1% 0% 1% DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

Know how to participate in local government 75% 78%

AGREE

NEUTRAL

DISAGREE

2% 2% 1% DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

Have you ever signed a petition before 70% 70% 46%

37% 19%

AGREE

6% 6%

11%

NEUTRAL

5%

9%

DISAGREE

23% 22%

15%

3% 6%

2% 1% DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

YES

NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO

2% 4% 2% DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

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IEC voter participation survey 2013/2014

YOUCOUNT 2017

Have you ever been an elections observer

YOUCOUNT 2018

Have you taken part in a demonstration 66%

30%

41%

53%

53% 41%

32%

NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO

16%

15% 14%

3% 5% YES

DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

Contacted politician about comm issues 75%

28%

15%

14% 14% YES

51%

NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO

2% 3% 5% DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

Contacted the media about comm issues

79% 58%

49%

39%

36% 18% 14%

13% YES

NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

5% 5% NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO

2% 2% 2% DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

Attended this years IDP meeting in ward

45%

36%

45%

35% 12% 13%

5% YES

NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO

1% 4% 4% DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

Engaged local councillor this year 68%

47%

52%

47%

55% 40%

39%

25%

YES

NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

4% 6%

2% 3 %

NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO

DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

The percentage of the A! Network that has signed a petition remained at 70% from 2018, with those who have participated in a demonstration increasing from 53% (2017) to 66% (2018). These percentages are way above the national averages of 15% (signed petition, IEC) and 15% (demonstrated, IEC). To demonstrate active citizenry of the A! Network, 79% has contacted a local politician about community issues, which is more than the 75% in 2017, and the 13% who did so nationally (IEC, 2015).

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YES

NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

4% 4%

2% 3 %

NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO

DON’T KNOW/ NO ANSWER

To demonstrate active citizenry of the A! Network, 79% has contacted a local politician about community issues, which is more than the 75% in 2017, and the 13% who did so nationally (IEC, 2015).


Forty-five per cent (45%) has also contacted the media on issues affecting their community in 2018, compared to 2017’s 39% and 5% national average (IEC, 2015). Sixty-eight per cent (68%) of the Network has engaged their local councillor compared to 55% who did so in 2017. Regarding local formal leadership, 33% is in some municipal structure leadership and 45% is willing to take up that kind of leadership. Regarding political activism, 25% are card-carrying members of a political party, up from 22% in 2017. Thirty-eight per cent (38%) of those affiliated in a political party has leadership positions in their

YOUCOUNT 2017

parties, with the majority dominating branch positions such as secretaries and chairpersons. The ability to gain access and take leadership positions in political parties further entrenches the Network’s core values of responsible and ethical leadership, creating a potential for enhancing positive leadership in South Africa.

Sixty-eight per cent (68%) of the Network has engaged their local councillor compared to 55% who did so in 2017.

YOUCOUNT 2018

Card carrying member of a political org 74%

69%

Voted in previous local government elections YES NO, BUT MAY IN FUTURE

22%

25% 4% 6%

YES

NO

PREFER NOT TO ANSWER

Do you hold a position in the party 64% 34%

60%

38%

NO, WOULDN’T WANT TO DON’T KNOW / PREFER NOT TO ANSWER

45%

15% 7%

33%

YOUCOUNT 2018

Thirty-eight per cent (38%) of those affiliated in a political party has leadership positions in their parties, with the majority dominating branch positions such as secretary and chairpersons

2% 2% YES

NO

PREFER NOT TO ANSWER

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Key recommendations focusing on programming The A! Network’s recommendations focus on the three main strands of its impacts. These are:

Economic •

Focus interventions towards higher employability within the A! Network by signposting opportunities and training to provinces where such is lacking.

The Youth Economic Participation (YEP) sector and social entrepreneurship programme mainstream activities and support towards business creation, funding signalling and sources as well as skills development.

Social •

Volunteerism should be targeted throughout the Network, especially after-training, as there are opportunities to enhance impact.

Targeted support to Activators running NGOs would lead to high impact community work.

Political •

The high proportion of Activators who are politically conscious require sustenance through targeted programming to specific national events such as the 2019 elections.

Activators who have engaged with local councillors, and are thus interested in local government issues should be targeted.

Conclusion The 2018 YouCount Report further confirms the impact our programmes are having to the A! Network community. There is convergence of the outcomes which our organisation seek to create and what the youth themselves are doing in their communities. It is apparent that young people in the Network are developing their personal skills, knowledge and capabilities not only to meet their social, economic, health and political aspirations but also of their communities. This work should be further cemented and sustained for the good of all South Africans.

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The high proportion of Activators who are politically conscious require sustenance through targeted programming to specific national events like 2019 elections.


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@Activate_ZA Activate! Change Drivers @ActivateZA 30

Profile for ACTIVATE! Change Drivers

The ACTIVATE! Change Drivers Network Survey 2018  

ACTIVATE! Change Drivers is a youth network of over 3250 diverse young people with the capacity to drive change for the public good across S...

The ACTIVATE! Change Drivers Network Survey 2018  

ACTIVATE! Change Drivers is a youth network of over 3250 diverse young people with the capacity to drive change for the public good across S...

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