Issuu on Google+

QTmagazine AUTUMN 08

ESSENTIALLY QUEENSTOWN • ARROW TOWN • WANAK A

Memories of Sir Ed Hilary American Express Queenstown Winter Festival Fashion, food and wine

lifestyle

jacks point


2

EXCURSIONS

2

Southern New Zealand is a land of stunning diversity. The region’s beauty is internationally renowned - from Queenstown’s vibrant atmosphere and alpine lakes to the soaring mountains and dense rainforest of Fiordland. Real Journeys has been sharing the nature and history of this area with visitors for over 50 years.

a magical world

tss earnslaw

TE ANAU GLOWWORM CAVES

QUEENSTOWN

Hidden beneath the mountains on Lake Te Anau’s western shores is an underground network of caves lit by thousands of glowworms. Recently described by the Sydney Morning Herald as “one of the most unusual limestone cave experiences on the planet”, the Te Anau Glowworm Caves are a must-see. This underground world is surprisingly beautiful. By geological standards these caves are very young (12,000 years) and are still being carved out by the force of the river that flows through them. The result is a twisting network of limestone passages filled with whirlpools and roaring underground waterfalls. Deep inside the caves, beyond the roar of the water, the glowworms inhabit a silent hidden grotto. In the subterranean darkness, they produce a glittering display. The effect is nothing short of extraordinary. Guided tours into the caves depart several times daily, beginning with a scenic cruise across Lake Te Anau – a spectacular glacial lake. After disembarking on the western shores, a nature guide takes visitors through the caves by path and small boat. Groups are kept small (maximum of 14 per nature guide).

Launched in 1912, the TSS Earnslaw is the largest and grandest vessel ever to ply Lake Wakatipu. At 95 years old, this beautifully maintained vessel is an enduring Queenstown icon and is believed to be the oldest working coal-fired steamship in the southern hemisphere. The TSS Earnslaw departs from the Steamer Wharf daily, connecting with the Walter Peak High Country Farm excursions, where visitors can gain an entertaining insight into New Zealand high country farming. The TSS Earnslaw will be on survey from 29 May – 3 July 2008 and during this time a launch will substitute.

Explore Fiordland

milford sound

doubtful sound

NATURE AND OVERNIGHT CRUISES

EXPLORE PURE WILDERNESS

Milford Sound is a world-renowned natural wonder. Nowhere else in Fiordland do the mountains rise so high out of the sea. Real Journeys Nature Cruises explore the full length of this fiord on a relaxing and unhurried tour which takes you all the way to the Tasman Sea. Throughout the 2½ hour cruise, two specialist nature guides provide an engaging commentary about the fiord’s magnificent scenery and wildlife. Overnight Cruises offer another very special experience, allowing visitors to go kayaking or venture out in a tender craft with a nature guide. As twilight deepens, the vessel moors in a secluded cove for the evening, providing an idyllic setting for a three-course evening meal. Accommodation on the overnight vessels ranges from private ensuite cabins to bunk-style compartments. In the morning, awake to the awe-inspiring scenery of Milford Sound. Coach connections are available from Queenstown and Te Anau linking with Nature Cruises (all year) and Overnight Cruises (September to May). Fly-back options to Queenstown are also available.

Doubtful Sound is New Zealand’s premier wilderness destination. Located deep in the heart of Fiordland National Park - part of a World Heritage Area - Doubtful Sound is known for its rugged beauty and rich wildlife. A Real Journeys daytime excursion begins with a cruise across island-studded Lake Manapouri and a coach trip over Wilmot Pass. Upon arriving at Doubtful Sound, board the Patea Explorer for a three-hour cruise. As you cruise, an onboard nature guide will point out the area’s fascinating landscape and wildlife. Doubtful Sound is home to New Zealand fur seals and bottlenose dolphins – both of which are often seen. Fiordland crested penguins and blue penguins are also sometimes sighted. This fiord is three times longer than Milford Sound and has a surface area roughly ten times larger. Experiencing the “sound of silence” in this area is an incredible contrast with the modern world. Daytime and Overnight Cruises depart daily with coach connections from Queenstown and Te Anau.

Arrive in Style

Flying between Queenstown and Milford Sound is an experience of a lifetime. Soar over remote valleys, plunging waterfalls and snow-capped summits before connecting with a cruise in magnificent Milford Sound. Visitors can choose to fly both ways, or fly back to Queenstown after taking a luxury coach to Milford.

For further information please contact Real Journeys Visitor Centre, Steamer Wharf, Beach Street, Queenstown

Freephone 0800 65 65 03

www.realjourneys.co.nz


REAL ESTATE

26

IN THIS ISSUE

property potential

3

p.13 p.9

Ray White Real Estate Queenstown continues its steady climb as one of the leading real estate companies in the region. Margo Berryman talks to Cameron Reed about the current state of the property market. Fletcher Living at Jacks Point

p.15 news brief

wanaka

4. News from around the region

15. Memories of Sir Ed Hillary

wow dvd

cafés

5. The official Warbirds over Wanaka DVD

development 7. $ 2 billion Jacks Point development Commonage Close

The latest developments at the Queenstown branch include a rebranding exercise under the experienced management of Cameron Reed, who is leading a skilled team of agents actively working the national and global real estate markets. “We’ve taken over Ray White Queenstown because we believe it’s the right vehicle moving forward in the current fluctuating market place,” he says. “The Ray White brand has a significant presence internationally with a network across Australia, New Zealand and Asia and a massive annual turnover of 30 billion dollars across the group. So it allows us to be adaptable and gain strength from this solid corporate backing.” Getting the right advice when buying or selling property can be crucial during times of change and Cameron says his sales staff has the experience to market Queenstown correctly. “I am very pleased with the sales team we have here now at Ray White because there is diversity across the group and an ability to handle different sectors of the market from rural/lifestyle through to family homes, apartments and developments.”

Threepwood, Lake Hayes

Woodlot Properties - Chartres Green He says properties in the Queenstown area are some of the best in the country and despite recent headlines to the contrary it is not all doom and gloom, particularly in the local market. “We have seen this type of situation before and we will see it again. Queenstown is a strong investment but people will have to work to meet the market and take a long term view on their investments. We have a lot of confidence in this area and if you consider what developments are underpinning the region then we have a solid future.” He says unprecedented development over the past five years has seen Queenstown become a fully fledged international resort with developers providing infrastructural strength to the area with high quality designs. Cameron considers the town gains a lot from this type of property, making it a dynamic place to live where all businesses benefit from increased exposure to the international scene. “We have an amazing spread of property developments that have been put together by some very experienced and savvy teams who know what the market is looking for. Our expertise and networks particularly into the Australian and

Asian markets means we are talking with buyers all the time looking for this type of product.” Examples include the recently completed Commonage Close which offers a prestigious address on Queenstown Hill overlooking Queenstown Bay and the Esplanade Villas with their unrivalled lakefront location. “Another example is experienced developer Woodlot Properties David Broomfield who truly understands the Queenstown market, offering a portfolio of property that adds integrity and value to the area with products that meet all budgets.” Larger lifestyle sites like Jacks Point, Threepwood, Wyuna Station and Bendemeer are examples of long term developments that will continue to develop as the town grows and matures, he says.

fashion

restaurants lifestyle

10. Arrowtown Autumn Festival highlights 11. Gold fever resurfaces

24. Replica homes in the Southern Lakes Region

jewellery 12. Innovative design at The Opal Centre

25. Latest bathrooms, audio technology and interior design

festival

27. Ray White Real Estate makes mark in Queenstown

13. 2008 American Express Queenstown Winter Festival

Published by

QT Publishing PO Box 133, Queenstown Phone 03 442 6430 Fax 03 442 9386

Layout

Margo Berryman margo@actiontvnz.com

Editor Jenny McLeod mcleod@queenstown.co.nz

Print

Otago Daily Times www.odt.co.nz

Contributors

Jo Blick, Alan Brady, Jane Brooke, Andrea Deuchrass, Naomi Mentiplay, Penny Simpson, Laura Williamson,

QT Magazine is the number one lifestyle and tourism magazine for Queenstown, Wanaka, Arrowtown and Glenorchy.

Jo Ruthven jo@freshdesigns.co.nz

QT Magazine is available in all hotels and motels and informa-

Office/Manager

tion centres throughout the region and from distribution bins

info@actiontvnz.com

Queenstown • 1 Church Lane, Queenstown • PO Box 1011, Queenstown • Ph 03 450 2040 • Fax 03 441 7178 • queenstown.nz@raywhite.com • www.rwqueenstown.co.nz Arrowtown • 14 Buckingham Street, Arrowtown • PO Box 5, Arrowtown • Ph 03 442 1616 • Fax 03 442 1287 • arrowtown.nz@raywhite.com • www.rwarrowtown.co.nz wanaka • 123 Ardmore Street, Wanaka • Ph 03 443 7121 • Fax 03 443 8016 • wanaka.nz@raywhite.com • www.rwwanaka.co.nz

19. Alan Brady talks Central Otago wine

arrowtown

“At Ray White we have got the fundamentals right to be able to take properties of this magnitude to the market with confidence.”

Ray White Real Estate offices

art and wine

22. Tatler Queenstown 23. Finz Seafood Restaurant

Managing Editor/Sales

• JACKS POINT – 1200 hectare (3000 acre) nature preserve on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, Jacks Point comprises residential neighbourhoods, a waterfront village, harbour, an 18 hole championship golf course and extensive trail system. • WYUNA STATION - Wyuna is a sheep, cattle and deer farm historically a part of the original Ree’s station that occupied the entire eastern side of Lake Wakatipu and beyond. • THREEPWOOD - a unique rural lifestyle development centred on a traditional working farm in the heart of Queenstown’s stunning Wakatipu Basin. Sites up to 1.3 ha (3.21 acres) take in all round sweeping views of Lake Hayes and the surrounding mountains. • COMMONAGE CLOSE – Homes are located on a ridge for privacy and have sweeping views of the spectacular Remarkables Mountain range, the crystal clear waters of Lake Wakatipu and cosmopolitan Queenstown. • BENDEMEER - Eight magnificent 220m2 villas, built in two complexes, adjoining The Lodge or build your own home on superb rural sites ranging from 1- 5 hectares (2.5-12.5 acres). Individual freehold homes designed by several of New Zealand’s foremost architects including Warren and Mahoney, Fearon Hay and Crossen Clarke.

16. Queenstown’s café scene

9. Seasonal fashion in Arrowtown

“These are outstanding properties that will stand the test of time here and deliver some stunning lifestyle options that we will all be proud of in the years to come.”

DEVELOPMENT FACT BOX

p.20

in the CBD.


NEWSBRIEF

4

Queenstown Tourism Stacking Up

with Jenny McLeod

Welcome to Newsbrief – QT Magazine’s news column is a regular quarterly feature highlighting current issues and events around the Queenstown and Wanaka region.

Queenstown’s tourist growth is still above the national average, according to official 2007 statistics recently released, which tourism experts say is encouraging in the light of global uncertainty in the market. Queenstown recorded a 4.5% visitor night growth in 2007 while the national average was 3.8% according to Statistics New Zealand. Destination Queenstown CEO David Kennedy says it’s good news for the resort. “Queenstown has had a golden run over the past nine years with huge demand for our destination. The supply part of that equation has resulted in massive growth, particularly in our accommodation sector. We’re now settling down to a more measured pace of growth and need to ensure we hold our position as a premier international destination.” But he says there are challenges ahead. “Fluctuating currencies, environmental concerns and the carbon zero debate will continue to provide challenges that will be met by the continued promotion of compelling reasons to visit.”

Otago have been carrying out archeological recording and excavation work. “Archaeological work is about the careful excavation and analysis of hundreds or thousands of tiny bits of information, often meaningless on their own, and then putting them together in a way that tells a story or answers a specific question,” says Chris Jacomb, a Director of the Southern Pacific Archaeological Research Department of Anthropology at the University of Otago. “The students have worked carefully to preserve clues to the former hotel’s illustrious past.” The original building dates back to the 1880s and operated as a hotel, before being converted to restaurants and retail shops in the 1980s. “We have recorded the use of a brick veneer wall in one part of The Mountaineer which we believe is a pre-1900 section of the building. Brick veneer construction was not common until the 1930s. If we’re able to confirm the age of the wall then that will be a significant discovery for the history of architecture in New Zealand and a milestone for the students involved.”

Landmark Hotel Reveals Its Past

Sporting Future for Wanaka

Exciting discoveries have been unearthed linking the landmark Mountaineer hotel site with the 1880s in Queenstown. The site is being redeveloped and anthropology students from the University of

snippets PALACE FOR QUEENSTOWN The 2008 American Express Queenstown Winter Festival (June 27-July 6) will have the Pacific Crystal Palace as its focal point. The palace will cover a downtown carpark and will be the central venue for many of the festival events. “This is the first time we’ve been able to bring all our major events into one downtown venue, “ says festival director Sally Feinerman. “The palace is one of New Zealand’s most incredible event facilities. It’s such an impressive structure in such a great location and it’s going to add an unforgettable dimension to Festival 2008.”

The future of sporting facilities is in the limelight in Wanaka but it will require wide spread community consultation, according to Upper Clutha Sports Facilities chairman Mike Saunders.

X GAMES MEAL FOR WANAKA SKIER Seventeen-year-old Wanaka free skier Jossi Wells put his name up in lights internationally when he won a silver medal at the prestigious Winter X Games in Aspen in January. Jossi is New Zealand’s top free skier and displayed his huge talent when he won the silver medal in the slopestyle and took out fifth place in the superpipe. New Zealand Free Ski Coach Nick Draxel says its New Zealand’s first X Games medal and the win highlights the incredible skiing talent which is still largely unrecognised. photo

Shirley Emilio (left) and Amanda Mortimer

Green Screen Movies For Queenstown The producers of the movie Wolverine, which is being shot in the Queenstown Lakes District, are helping the region develop a film industry waste strategy. Film Queenstown manager KJ Jennings says the local film industry is committed to a “green screen” philosophy and the Wolverine production team has agreed to a joint venture with the district council to help provide guidelines for a “green screen” ethic. Recycling systems have been put in place on the sets and will provide a template for future productions in the area. “It is an important development for the film industry to reduce it environmental impact, “says Wolverine producer John Palermo. “ The natural beauty of the region attracted us to film here in the first place so it is important we work with the local authorities to help preserve the environment.”

Check out Channel 5 your information station

Mark Hill (left) at blessing

Broadcasting 24 hours a day in your hotel or motel room

WWW.2GIRLS2RUN.COM Queenstown’s Amanda Mortimer will take on the challenge of a lifetime when she and fellow English woman Shirley Emilio attempt to run from the Spanish frontier to the West Coast of Portugal in seven days along the Algarves Ecovia Route (May 4-10). It has never been done before but the two women and their extensive support crew want to celebrate the life of British charity campaigner Jane Tomlinson who died from breast cancer two years ago. Amanda says she was inspirational and despite her illness raised £1.25m. “We want to help increase that total to £2m and we are attracting support around the world. We never expected this idea to catch the imagination of so many people.”

A working party is putting together a discussion document on the options and he says it is critical that the Wanaka community, including absentee ratepayers, has its say. The central issue is the location of a new sports facility to meet the needs of Wanaka in the medium to long term and its possible links with the proposed aquatic centre and a proposed arts/community centre.

with a fun, informative look at activities, shopping, wining and dining in the Queenstown and Wanaka areas.

LIFESTYLE One of Queenstown’s newest businesses, Bespoke Bathrooms is focused on personalised delivery of high quality bathroom designs, fit outs, plumbing and tiling providing a one stop consultancy and service solution for clients. The driving force is owner operator Chris Cummins, who first started the business in 2004 in the UK, where fully qualified Kiwi plumbers were in huge demand. Bespoke Bathrooms was an instant success. Chris says if it worked in London the idea would work anywhere and the Queenstown business started almost a year ago, has grown quickly and already has a steady customer base. He says clients like the concept of dealing with just one person in the business. “The fundamentals behind Bespoke are to provide a seamless service where I deal directly with all aspects of the work and co-ordinate other trades people if they are required on the job.” It is a unique business with three distinct features -

25

bathrooms, tiling and plumbing. Chris specialises in designing modern and contemporary bathrooms for new homes, complete bathroom refits for older homes and renovations. “It’s great to be able to spend time with people, take their ideas and then custom design a bathroom that is feasible for both their budgets and building layouts. We have completed some beautiful contemporary designs in Queenstown along with cottage style refits in traditional styled homes.” Tiling is a key part of the business with steady demand for quality work. “The two jobs work well together because you know what fixtures and fittings will be used and can plan out well in advance any technical problems that need to be overcome.

NZ fashion at Vesta The change of season at Vesta Design Store + Espresso on the Queenstown waterfront has never looked better with a fabulous new addition of uber cool clothing from leading edge New Zealand designers.

home, Vesta Design is hot property. Its has been listed as the “editors choice” in Lonely Planet and is a treasure trove of turn of the century architecture and sublime New Zealand designed art, objects and furniture.

Co-owner Alex Turner, a design student at Canterbury, has established the “Only Child” room at Vesta to showcase a selection of pieces from the current collections from some of New Zealand’s crème de la crème - Adrian Hailwood, World, Amok, Richard…son plus jewellery from Karen Walker, D-Luxe and Meadowlark.

Hanging in the hallway of the quaint old cottage Vesta has an exhibition of Poster Prints entitled “Charming” by Wellington graphic designer Xanthe Harrison. Vesta stocks the Cinnamon Swan range of cards produced by Xanthe.

“There are some great designer pieces that our regular clients will covet while it’s a good opportunity to expose these particular designers to our international visitors who want gorgeous new fashion from New Zealand.”

Definitive and beautiful ceramics by Katherine Smyth make perfect gifts while a range of lampshades, linen and cushions by the likes of Esther Diamond are tempting homeware additions. Beautiful hand loomed New Zealand woollen blankets by Stansborough confirm that design is both form and function.

Housed in Williams Cottage which is Queenstown’s oldest

Delicious and scrumptious new items are on the café menu

music master

Vesta Design Store+Café has a key location in its historic premises on Queenstown’s lakefront and a browse in the store is a must for the Queenstown itinerary.

business run by Bob Tachikawa, the son of the original founder who is still active in the business. As specialists in audio products, the company’s manufacturing ethos is to produce equipment that will be both reliable and efficient, producing superior music sound.

Sleek and sophisticated this system comprises a CD player, DAB tuner, no less than three intergrated amplifiers and a pre-power amplifier combination.

The Rotel 06 series delivers all of this without breaking the budget. Building on the design and success of the awardwinning 02 series, which it replaces, the 06 series has been exhaustively tested and includes new instrument upgrades, additional features and functionality. A front panel media player input makes it quick and easy for connecting to MP3 or iPod devices. The Rotel 06 series can be assembled in many different ways to suit the home or work environment and is an outstanding option for affordable style and superb sound.

AIRPORT ARTWORK

Rotel 06 Series: A new standard in affordable hi-fi separates.

COLLEGE CELEBRATION Queenstown Resort College Hospitality Management students raised over$3,000 for the Children’s Protection Studies Trust through a fundraising dinner planned and implemented by the students as part of their course curriculum. Celebrity chef Jason Dell from Blanket Bay personally designed the three course meal for the charity dinner. The College which is New Zealand’s first ecotourism institute recently celebrated its second birthday and has full classes in both its Hospitality Management and Adventure Tourism diploma programme April intakes. Further intakes are scheduled for July and October.

for autumn including a mouthwatering array of gluten free cakes and sweets plus perennial favourites such as cheese rolls and chocolate walnut brownies. It’s hard to pass up the seriously good coffee and fine selection of loose teas and organic juices.

Some of the best audio technology on the market is now available at Gary Andersons in the Mall, Cromwell. In particular the latest Rotel 06 series which packs a punch of sound and sophistication is a popular choice for people wanting a new standard in affordable hi-fi separates.

Finished in a smart silver finish, the series is an international combination designed by teams from Japan and the United Kingdom, who collaborated on the entire design process for Rotel. Experts say it is a smart concept to select some of the best audio technology from around the world and piece it together to create an integrated system. Rotel as a brand and company has been in existence for 45 years and is a family owned A recently unveiled sculpture at the entrance to Queenstown Airport is receiving rave reviews. The work by Arrowtown sculptor Mark Hill consists of three tall structures which have a Maori influence and celebrate the manawhenua or the people of the land. Entitled “welcome o visitors from afar” the artwork is seen as a striking welcome to Queenstown with the Remarkables Mountain range as the backdrop.

bespoke bathrooms

solutions for sound and vision 0800 4 PLASMA 0800 4 752 768 www.GaryAnderson.co.nz


LIFESTYLE

24

WARBIRDS

ambitious architecture

5

aviation dvd spectacular

Replica Homes has strong foundations in the Southern Lakes region offering a comprehensive design and build service with stunning results. Naomi Mentiplay talks to the directors about their ongoing success.

Clark ‘Scotty’ Scott

Replica is headed by directors Graham Duckworth and Grant McKenzie, who have a strong passion for the Southern Lakes and close links with the area.“The region has always had something to offer- skiing, fishing, camping and exploring,” Grant says reminiscing of holidaying in the area as a boy. Later he and his wife Sue spent all their spare time transforming a shed on a family property at Lake Hayes into a home. Grant recalls building the stone walls by hand. “We formed great friendships from building the house.” Grant says building the Lake Hayes home was a turning point in his future career path. “Building was something I enjoyed. It was a toss up between building and the tourism industry.” Grant took on the role of managing Replica Homes. “I really had to start from scratch and rebuild the business.” “We’ve evolved because we are happy to provide a service. It’s a team effort from the design phase to the project management. We take it right through.” It wasn’t until the 1980s Replica began to expand its business into the Southern Lakes. The Replica name has become well known for quality and service and their profile was boosted further after completing the luxury Fairway homes at the five star Millbrook Resort near Queenstown. “About 30 percent of our business is currently in the lower South Island,” says Graham. “We have a genuine interest in developing business in the region. Even though we are based in Christchurch one of us will be in Queenstown every week. This is really effective for our clients as we are their eyes and ears on the ground, particularly when they cannot be here.” The ease of building a home with Replica at the helm has strong appeal to the majority of their clients who are based overseas. “We can advise on new building code requirements, site issues and the complexity of building on a site, particularly if it’s a difficult or steep section. We know how best to manage the terrain and work with resource consents.” “A number of our clients are building their dream house and are happy to pay a little extra for the comfort of knowing it will be done right.” says Graham.

Replica predominantly works with Jason Scott Builders in Queenstown. Jason grew up in Southland, knows the region well and has the resources to complement the Replica product. “Jason Scott builders are a great fit for us because they provide the full service to complete a home – from the site excavation to the landscaping and fitting of appliances and furniture.” Replica has a key liaison role with clients and suppliers. “Every client is different, problems do arise during the building process which we address so all parties involved are satisfied.” Grant admits they often hold back final photos to overseas clients. It is not uncommon for clients to have their first experience of their home only once its completed. “My biggest pleasure is when a home is completed and we have exceeded what the client has expected.” Graham considers the Replica experience is equal to spending money on an extensive overseas holiday or wedding. “Building a house costs a huge amount of money, so you want to be able to enjoy it. It’s worth spending more for a nice experience.” “We take away the hassles and headaches, and engage professionals to take clients through the process.”

Top: Quail Rise residence, Queenstown Top Right: Graham Duckworth and Grant McKenzie Middle: Contemporary Hensman Road home, Queenstown Bottom: Aspen Grove home, Queenstown

With its 18-year history as the premier Warbirds aviation show in Australasia this year’s Warbirds Over Wanaka International Airshow at Easter was no exception when more than 70,000 people converged on Wanaka for the three day spectacular. From vintage aircraft to war vehicles and pyrotechnics, every spectacular moment of the three day event was captured on high definition video and used to create the official 2008 souvenir DVD. Produced by leading Queenstown production company Action Productions Ltd, the DVD showcases the incredible air to ground highlights and records fascinating and in depth interviews with pilots and aviation experts. Included is a special interview with surviving NZ fighter pilot veteran, 86-year-old Jack Stafford. Three times Emmy award winning producer Julian Grimmond of Action Productions says the DVD is a lasting souvenir of one of the best warbird displays ever seen. “The real passion of these aviators is awe inspiring and combined with a unique display of historic aircraft makes this DVD a very special memento of one of the world’s most iconic aviation events.” The WOW 2008 DVD includes extraordinary aerobatic displays by world champion pilot Yurgis Karys and his team of crazy Air Bandits, plus stunning footage of unique aircraft such as the Lockheed LC-130 Polar Hercules

Hercules, the largest ski equipped aircraft in the world. The F-111 supersonic long range strike aircraft is screened in its all glory including the signature “Dump and Burn” which thrilled the crowds and Australia’s RAAF newest acquisition, the C-17 Globemaster, a high wing four jetengine heavy transport aircraft. Show favorites such as the venerable DHC-4 Caribou twin piston-engine light transport employed in Vietnam. Never before seen footage on the DVD includes video shot from the Royal New Zealand Air Force Lockheed C-130 Hercules, after the production crew were given permission to mount a Cineflex V1 4 HiDef gyro-stabilised camera system onto the edge of the aircrafts back ramp and film some of the Warbird aircraft. “Its only possible to get this extraordinary detail of flying Warbirds with a unique combination of precision flying by the RNZAF pilots, the talented warbird pilots and the state of art camera attached to the Hercules,” says Julian. Camera operator and owner, Peter Thompson from Aeroptics says it was a unique opportunity to capture Warbirds footage. “Previously its been difficult on a fixed wing to get this close to the aircraft but we were able to get tighter angles on the pilots in their cockpits from the side and also film directly back at them. This was a chance for old and new aircraft to fly in formation together.” The official 2008 Warbirds Over Wanaka DVD is online at www.wowdvd.co.nz and will be in all major bookstores and DVD outlets by May 08. Captions - Top Right: Air Bandits Team Below: Andrew Hillman of Action Productions


EVENTS

6

april April 1 – 12 The Queenstown Farmers’ Market offers a variety of affordable, seasonal and fresh produce from local producers every Saturday morning. Venue: Queenstown Primary School, Robins Rd, Queenstown Contact: Sharlene Inch Email:sharlene_inch@yahoo.com

may May 16 - 24 Grease - after 30 years Grease is still one of the world’s most popular musicals.  Venue: Queenstown Memorial Hall Organisation: Showbiz Queenstown Contact: Hilary Finnie Phone: 03 442 0441

RESTAURANTS

finz seafood restaurant A decision to leave the rarefied world of academia for the heat of the Finz Restaurant kitchen has paid off for Terri Corsan as Jo Blick found out.

April 13 Meridian Energy Kids Bike Jams - only national mountain bike series for kids aged 5 – 13 years. Venue: Cromwell Speedway Track Contact: Annie Shan Phone: 04 389 4496

Dining at Wai

April 18 – 20 The Great New Zealand Craft Show - for those who make crafts and those who love to buy them. Venue: Queenstown Events Centre Contact: Fiona Dunkley Phone: 03 348 0572 April 24 – May 1 Arrowtown Autumn Festival - a community based festival with over 65 events. Venue: Arrowtown Contact: Julie Hughes Phone: 03 442 0809 April 26 Contact Epic Mountain Bike Race - Inaugural, 125km circumnavigation of Lake Hawea.  Venue: Lake Hawea, Wanaka Contact: Danielle Nicholson Phone: 03 443 6090

23

Terri Corsan

june June 27 – July 6 American Express Queenstown Winter Festival. A 10-day non-stop programme of over 60 events encompassing sport, art, music, comedy, food and wine.  Contact: Sally Feinerman Phone: 03 441 2453

what’s on

Terri started her food career studying for a Food Science degree at the University of Otago but it wasn’t long before she wanted a more hands on role and swapped her lab coat for chef’s whites - a move that now sees her in charge of her own restaurant as one of the partners in Queenstown’s Steamer Wharf seafood restaurant Finz. Finz has become a favoured haunt for Queenstown locals with its reputation for deliciously fresh seafood. Terri has been an integral part of the restaurant’s operation since it opened three year ago. She was lured away from her previous role at Fishbone Bar and Grill by the opportunity to run a new restaurant and the chance to invest in if it was a success. A year ago the time was right and Terri is now a fully fledged partner. She says it has been excellent to see the restaurant grow over the last three years and describes her relationship with her business colleagues Alex Boyes, Jan Rae Robertson and Martin and Megan James as a “mentorship as well as a partnership”. The name Finz neatly encapsulates the restaurant’s philosophy, offering as it does fresh seafood done in a superb Kiwi way. However Terri is quick to point out it’s not just a seafood restaurant. The menu offers chicken, steak and lamb options and there’s a great selection of vegetarian dishes. Many of the dishes are gluten free and diners need only ask if they have special dietary needs. The menu lends itself to adding things in and taking things out and she points to her own favourite on the menu, the

Fish of the Day, which can be cooked any way you like with three choices of accompaniments. For the record, Terri’s favourite is to have her fish grilled and served on a bed of greek salad. Fish served in the restaurant is delivered fresh six days a week and mostly comes from the southern port of Bluff. The most popular dish is battered blue cod and sometimes even the boss herself will cook it. Terri is by no means a sleeping partner and still cooks or works on the floor, keeping an eye on proceedings and making sure the customers are enjoying the Finz experience. The restaurant itself is stylish, with bright orange lamp shades and walls providing the interior with a warm glow. The suede covered banquette style seats are ideal for lounging and the restaurant’s informality makes it children friendly. Finz is family oriented and this is underscored by the children’s menu (for “Mini Moas and Little Sprats”) which has puzzles to keep the kids amused while they wait. The children’s menu also offers an excellent value combo option at just $12 which includes a main, a soft drink, an ice cream sundae and a chocolate fish, making an affordable meal out for the whole family. Although Finz has a comprehensive wine list including a cellar selection provided by sister restaurant Wai, next door Finz also welcomes BYO wines. A full selection of New Zealand Beers and juices gives something for everyone. There’s nothing fishy about the Finz recipe for success -exceptionally good food at great prices in an appealing waterfront location.


RESTAURANTS

22

food french style High profile Queenstown restaurant Tatler has refreshed its style by entering into an exciting new collaboration with Encore Cuisine. Margo Berryman tested the menu. Tatler Restaurant has stood the test of time in Queenstown’s restaurant scene. Previously operating as the Moa, Tatler has always been a venue for a range of functions – from large parties involving Hollywood stars to intimate gatherings for a dedicated local clientele. Tatler has a key location in the lower part of The Mall and owner Mark Jessop is excited about the food team and new menu at the French style brasserie. Enter Stephen Mills of Encore Cuisine whose international cooking experience includes Michelin Star properties in Europe, Boutique Australian hotels, cult Restaurants in the Channel Islands, the French ski resort of Chamonix and large scale catering operations in outback Australia. “When Mark first approached me about Tatler it was from a consultancy position but we could see the potential to put our own team of professionals into the restaurant and deliver the goods ourselves,� says Stephen.

“Callum’s venison is simply the best example of fresh product direct from New Zealand’s heartland. We work hard to deliver that and all our beef is Hereford prime and our salmon comes from both Akaroa and Stewart Island, so it’s a real showcase of what this country produces so well.�

It is a unique relationship which sees Stephen’s team of highly experienced chefs serving up his style of simple, elegant modern food using fresh New Zealand produce.

With a refreshed team in the kitchen and a new enticing menu Tatler is once again a rising star in Queenstown’s busy restaurant scene.

As Queenstown’s premier catering company Encore Cuisine has created a niche in the market for professional and personalised cuisine service for any size event.

The talents of the new team at Tatler, together with the new and enticing menu is an outstanding combination ensuring the restaurant’s on going status as one of Queenstown’s foremost eating spots.

The team also operates the popular Traffic CafĂŠ in downtown Queenstown and the Steak House upstairs at the World Bar in Shotover Street. “My philosophy was to handpick a team of well qualified chefs and staff who can deliver consistent high quality food and stylish service with everything we do.â€? “They all have top skills and work to a high standard. They also have the ability to move between all our products from personal chefing through to weddings, the cafĂŠ and the restaurants, which helps to motivate them and ensures no one gets restless.â€? Which obviously means Tatler is in very good hands. Diners now get to choose from a single all day menu including new options such as appealing breakfast pancakes and the lunchtime club sandwich – a best seller. Spanish style tapas are served in the afternoons – a tasty snack option with a glass of local pinot or champagne at the bar. “The tapas menu fills the gap for those who want to enjoy the atmosphere without having to sit through a full menu, or it makes a great introduction to dining,â€? says Stephen. The new dinner menu is expansive and includes French favourites such as garlic snails and fish en papilotte. Seafood dishes including Morton Bay bugs wrapped in paper, fresh blue cod and crayfish enhance the menu.

8BUFSGSPOU 3FTUBVSBOU 4VQFSC 4FBGPPEBOE 0ZTUFST /FX;FBMBOE #FFGBOE-BNC "XBSE 8JOOJOH 8JOF-JTU 4UVOOJOH 7JFXT 0QFO%BZT

"with food this good it's easy to overlook the water"

SFTFSWBUJPOTFTTFOUJBMQIPOFUPSFTFSWFZPVS XBUFSGSPOUUBCMFPQFOEBJMZGSPNQN Absolute Waterfront, Ground Floor, Steamer Wharf, Beach St Queenstown

Wild venison is one of the most popular dishes and is sourced from local hunter Callum Hughes of Fare Game who hunts deer in the Fiordland wilderness area. Stephen says the meat is packed full of flavour.

Top Left: Lamb cutlets with pistachio crust Top Right: Belgium chocolate and berries Below: Individual chocolate brownie cake

DEVELOPMENT Key facts about Jacks Point • The  entire zone covers 1200ha (3000 acres). It will encompass a community of 5000 residents in approximately 1800 homes, a village and a living environment centred on open space, natural values and recreation.

7

living at jacks point

A new residential community is emerging in one of the Wakatipu’s most spectacular locations below the Remarkables Mountain range and overlooking Lake Wakatipu. Jenny McLeod visited Jacks Point to find out more about the $2billion development where 5,000 people will eventually live.

•T  he Jacks Point zone was originally part of Remarkables Station, farmed by the Jardine family for three generations. •T  he development is set below The Remarkables mountain range, on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, reached from SH 6, 10 minutes’ drive from Queenstown International Airport, 15 minutes from Queenstown, 20 minutes from Arrowtown, and adjacent to the entrance to The Remarkables Ski Area. . •T  he Jacks Point 18-hole par 72 championship golf course and golf club is opening summer 2008/09. •T  he Jacks Point philosophy is to tread lightly, carefully integrating a new community and activities into the land, without disturbing its intrinsic values. The rugged, dramatic and open nature of the grassland and mountain landscape is protected and there is a strong emphasis on retaining and regenerating native vegetation •T  he Jacks Point village is set beside a four hectare (10 acre) lake. It will include a golf clubhouse and a mixture of retail, commercial and residential elements similar to central Queenstown. The village centre design will focus on pedestrian landscaping, public walkways and a relaxed waterfront atmosphere. •J  acks Point has 35km of public walking tracks and there is public access to the golf course through membership or green fees.

Fletcher Living home The Jacks Point township below the Remarkables Mountain range and overlooking Lake Wakatipu is the largest single development in the history of the Queenstown Lakes District and capable of housing a community of 5,000 residents. Jenny McLeod visited the site. The 1200ha (3000 acres) zone has been master planned by Darby Partners Ltd and will have approximately 1800 homes, a village and a living environment focused on open space, recreation and natural values. “It’s pristine never before settled land,� says developer John Darby. “What we’re doing is developing it as a place for people while retaining the nature of the site and adding to it.� Fletcher Living, which is a division of Fletcher Residential, is developing 200 sections at Jacks Point and more than 40 architecturally designed homes have already been built, with the first residents now living on site. “The homes are inspired by the rugged alpine setting and the architects have integrated the landscape with the houses by using natural materials such as cedar, copper, granite and local stone,� says manager Neville Dennis. Jacks Point is north facing and houses are built for all year round sun with alpine views taking in the Remarkables Mountain range and Coronet Peak Ski Area. Building at Jacks Point is limited to just five per cent of the total land and the remaining area is a natural parkland which includes a 18 hole 72 par championship golf course and a 35kilometre network of walking, cycling and bridle trails combined with diverse recreational facilities. “The majority of our houses look out over reserve areas and the open space is a significant feature for our buyers,� says Neville. “All the properties have high ceilings emphasising the

spectacular alpine views, open plan living, modern interiors and beautifully landscaped gardens which reflect the natural environment which is the hallmark of Jacks Point.� Fletcher Living is “creating a community within the Jacks Point community� and a range of village facilities are being developed alongside a feature four hectare (10 acre) lake. The village centre is being developed with the assistance of internationally renowned Canadian company Intrawest, and will include retail and commercial space, a strikingly designed golf clubhouse and other amenities for residents. Early Jacks Point buyers are excited about being part of a new, quality residential development. Tristan and Julia Franklin purchased their Fletcher Living home after just one visit to Jacks Point. “When we first arrived at Jacks Point we were overwhelmed with the location and the quality of the development. The golf course is clearly exceptional in terms of the beautiful, dramatic landscape and the stunning layout and design of the course,� says Tristan. “Fletcher Living made the decision easy for us with a well designed contemporary home looking out over a protected reserve and all within walking distance to the clubhouse and the future village. Getting in early gives us the chance to secure our piece of paradise before the rest of the world discovers it!�


INSTYLE

styledirectory NEW ERA FOR BOUTIQUE HOTEL One of Queenstown’s luxury boutique hotels has opened a new chapter with a change of ownership, management and a new name. Central Ridge Boutique Hotel, formerly Mount Vista, is an exciting new venture for the Hyslop and Roy families, both of whom have strong ties with the areas. Taking over the day to day management of the property is experienced hotelier Annabel Fafeita who says their aim is to provide true southern hospitality. “I’ve handpicked the team for their local knowledge, service skills, absolute discretion, and sincere interest in making each guest’s visit a success.  They’re skilled at conversing easily with guests, advising on and booking activities, assisting with special requirements and anticipating all possible needs. Being passionate about Central Otago, we’re keen to promote local businesses and products. We offer guests homemade jams and preserves and fresh salmon smoked onsite as part of their complimentary gourmet breakfast as well as featuring local brands and specialties where possible.” Central Otago wines are also on show and Annabel says independent travellers enjoy the chance to get to know more about the region they are visiting. Centrally located adjacent to the Queenstown gardens and just three minutes walk from downtown, Central Ridge Boutique Hotel is ideal for both winter and summer guests and can also cater for small conferences and executive retreats.

8

ENTERTAINMENT

21

botswana butchery

Laura Williamson samples Wanaka’s newest boutique restaurant, Botswana Butchery, which is turning heads not just for its unusual name but also for its outstanding food and service. Chef Leungo Lippe

MAKING MEMORIES Downtown Queenstown Goldfields Jewellers at the entry of O’Connell’s Shopping Centre on the corner of Camp and Beach Streets is a haven for people in search of beautiful jewellery that will last a lifetime. Director and head jeweller Trond Johansson has a long history of jewellery making, having trained in his native Sweden before heading down under first to Australia and then New Zealand 20 years ago. His expertise is widely recognised and his team of in-house jewelers specialise in a broad range of jewellery to suit all occasions from engagements and weddings to friendship and special events. “We have just completed our new in-store workshop which is upstairs above the retail store and an ideal space to be able to take clients for personalised consultations for bespoke jewellery,” says Trond. Customised jewellery is an important part of the Goldfields venture where the team creates designs to suit all types of contemporary and classic styles dependent on a client’s wishes. Bridal couples are encouraged to spend time discussing ideas and jewellery designs from a selection of readymade rings on display in Goldfields Jewellers. Size adjustments can be made and finishing touches added as desired. Goldfield Jewellers has an extensive range of precious and semi precious stones, rubies, emeralds, sapphires and gold, silver and platinum jewellery. Beautiful gifts can be chosen from a range of jade carvings and jewellery and traditional Pounamu (greenstone).

GO WITH THE FLOW Street and urban clothing capturing the essence of New Zealand on t-shirts and hoodies has mushroomed from a simple idea into a fully fledged retail store for a Queenstown couple. Russ Tilsley and Jo Ruthven began experimenting with the idea back in 2005 after Russ taught himself to screen print and Jo, a qualified graphic designer, created some original designs. They trialled the first of the line in a shop in the original Mountaineer complex in Queenstown’s CBD and Jo says the concept took off. “We had done a road trip around the South Island a few years earlier and decided that New Zealand needed more contemporary and unique designs for t-shirts that would appeal to both Kiwis and tourists. Since the first set of designs sold we haven’t looked back.” Inspired by the strong initial response the couple have developed a clothing label ‘Flow’, opening a dedicated store in Queenstown’s Shotover Street. ‘Flow’ is continually working on new designs and is keen to introduce new products including an expanded range of 100% New Zealand Merino clothing and kids t-shirts that will be available this winter. Flow also offers design and screen-printing services for local businesses with a good range of t-shirts and hoodies in a diverse range of colours.

It’s the name that you’ll notice first, but lasting memories of Botswana Butchery are of the food. Perched above the courtyard in Wanaka’s Post Office Lane, Botswana Butchery has a menu that has the town talking - quality a la carte and superior cuts of meat, at a price that suits everyone. It’s a formula that works. The restaurant opened almost a year ago and now welcomes a steady stream of Wanaka residents and out-of-towners through its doors. Head Chef Leungo Lippe says it is the restaurant’s broad appeal that keeps it humming. “The prices and food appeal to everybody, from backpackers to business owners, from farmers to real estate agents to tourists.” The menu reflects this. It is split in two with one side offering a tempting a la carte selection, which Lippe bases on “classical marriages” featuring traditional combinations of flavours and textures, such as basil with tomato and mozzarella, or beetroot with soft cheese. The other half is a meat lover’s dream. Fine cuts of steak and venison are accompanied by a choice of sauces, such as jus made with thyme and local pinot noir, or butters laced with flavours such as anchovy or sundried tomatoes. There is a selection of potatoes, vegetables and salads, so that each meal reflects a customer’s individual tastes. The menu changes monthly, ensuring that all produce is seasonal. Leungo, who also co-owns Botswana Butchery has a diverse background. He spent his childhood in Africa and studied hotel management in Switzerland before training at the Culinary Institute of America. He went on to work in New York City, London and Washington DC gaining his first head chef position at just 24.

who all have a background in hospitality, aim for top-notch service holding regular tastings to keep up with the evolving menu and to guide diners through the menu options.

“Every customer is an individual and we don’t forget that,” says Leungo.

Through this international experience, Leungo developed an approach to cooking that explores its subtleties. “I learnt how to treat food, not just cook it.”

And the name Botswana Butchery? Looking for something appealing and memorable the owners held a contest to name the new restaurant. While there were a few standouts such as “Grazed and Confused” top polling went to “The Butchery.” Add Leungo’s heritage, being born in Botswana and likely Wanaka’s only speaker of Setswana, and the Botswana Butchery was born.

Botswana Butchery has a strong focus on service. While the restaurant has a relaxed, informal ambience, the staff

Botswana Butchery is open seven nights a week, from 5pm - 11pm. Bookings are recommended.


OUTDOORS

20

SHOPPING

9

nz designer winter wardrobe Arrowtown fashion destination Wallace and Gibbs is once again hitting the mark for the style-conscious with sophisticated and edgy winter fashion from top New Zealand designers. The new season collections from high fashion labels such as Obi, Chocolat and Andrea Moore have filled the store with rich winter colour tones and fresh originality in style and design and an extensive range of beautiful knitwear styles. Layered garments from Obi provide a high level of versatility and warmth with soft winter wools and textured patterns. For trans seasonal travellers this collection can be easily mixed and matched to suit conditions anywhere in the world. The Obi cropped jacket with wider sleeves makes a bold statement as does winter’s key look of dresses and tunics with short hemlines perfect for wearing over skinny pants or tights. For the curvy figures and larger sizes the Chocolat range personifies elegance and beauty with sizing ranging from 10 – 22. The 08 collection has beautiful pieces that will take you from work to a café or out to dinner and the theatre.

helicopter adventures Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters is one of Queenstown’s foremost helicopter companies flying hundreds of people every year around the South Island’s scenic wilderness. Jane Brooke found out what it takes to run such an operation.

Six passengers arrive at once, a group of four Americans and an Irish couple. Gerry Conlan, Scenic Flight Manager for Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters is juggling four tasks at once, greeting his arrivals, taking phone calls, managing bookings and advising the pilots of their schedule for the day. “It can get hectic,” he says, “but it’s not hard to make people feel welcome, find out where they are from and how they are enjoying their trip.” It’s this simplistic approach to customer service, combined with a professional approach to business that has given the company such an excellent reputation. Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters CEO and chief pilot Pat West is modest about their success. “We’ve been around a long time, and just get on and do it. We’ve formed good relationships and have a good product which has resulted in a lot of repeat business.” Pat’s career began as an automotive engineer in the North Island. A love for hunting led him to study for his pilot’s licence and sell up and move to the South Island. Pat instructed at the Nelson Aviation College and worked as a pilot on the West Coast before taking over Glacier Southern Lakes in 1992. “It evolved from there.” “Tourism is our core business and we’ve got access into protected areas such as the Fiordland National Park. We hold the concession for the most landings at the Juno and Clarke Glaciers where only a few companies are allowed to fly.” The Department of Conservation’s concession system regulates the number of landings allowed by each helicopter company to ensure minimal impact on the environment. Glacier Southern Lakes has concessions to fly into pristine remote locations in the Mt Aspiring Park, to Lake Quill to visit the Southern Falls or to Mt Tutoko in the Fiordland National Park. Landing on a glacier, flying to Milford Sound or landing in the snow are the most popular excursions. A number of Milford options are available combining a glacier landing with a cruise of the stunning fiord and a landing on the

And men’s fashion statements include the latest looks from Cutler in winter shirts and jackets with a wide range of designer jeans and dress pants for work and play. For friendly and informative fashion advice and impeccable service, Wallace & Gibbs deliver this plus more in their beautiful stylish store in the heart of Arrowtown.

winter’s hottest looks

beach on the remote West Coast. During the winter Glacier Southern Lakes teams up with heliskiing operators Southern Lakes Heliski and Harris Mountain Heliski.

The latest winter street wear is filling the shelves at Ikon in Arrowtown reflecting up-to-the-minute fashion.

“We do also branch out into other areas,” says Pat. The company is involved in the busy film industry in the region, working on films such as Vertical Limit and more recently, 10,000BC. The company is also part of the Lakes District Air Rescue Trust, and does medivac work, hospital transfers and assists in search and rescue operations.

This season’s Workshop collection is all about colour with Rocket Red, Bottle Green, Indigo and Mars Orange adding punch to winter hues of graphite, trench and brown. It’s a defining mix that combines elegance with attitude and works well with the Workshop denim range that features elements of cool military styling, streettough fabrics, work wear and rock’n’roll-meets-punk shapes.

While the focus is on the Southern Lakes region, the company flies to Stewart Island, Fox and Franz Joseph, Christchurch and even Auckland. Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters currently employs four full time pilots and a number of casual staff with thousands of flying hours experience between them. Their helicopter fleet consists of four helicopters, three six-seaters and a three-seater. Gerry has been with the company for four years, and has an excellent rapport with not only customers, but other tourism businesses. “We focus on the top end.” he explains. “It’s quite normal to pay anything from $655 to $11,000 for a flight and that’s per person.” Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters does however cater for all budgets, with a landing on The Remarkables costing only $170 per person. “You never know who might walk through the door. Many of our clients are millionaires and have had opportunities to do some amazing things, yet they often come back from one of our trips saying it’s the best thing they’ve ever experienced.”

Exclusive fashion pieces straight out of Italy make up the Diesel Winter 08 collection which has a superb selection of winter coats and jackets to keep the big freeze at bay. Bright colours and edgy styling on jeans, shirts and tops for men and women plus a selection of dresses – Diesel never disappoints with some very cool accessories to boot. The Denny Rose winter range has chunky knits and scarves for women to wrap up in while the new label Scotch and Soda all the way from Amsterdam, is dressing guys in style this winter with high quality fabrics and tailored finishes. Ikon is a fashion haven for fashionistas on the hunt for that perfect item to enhance their leading edge wardrobe this winter.


festival frolics Autumn in Arrowtown is marked by an annual festival celebrating the changing colours. Penny Simpson reports. For the first time in many years the Arrowtown Autumn Festival coincides with school holidays making it a great time for families. Festival organiser Julie Hughes says there is a lot of community spirit in this years event. “We have an exciting variety of kids workshops including cooking,circa art and skateboarding. The kids variety show is always fun and new this year is an amazing magic show with magician Elgrego who performs incredible illusions and tricks.” The traditional festival parade takes place on Saturday April 26 with the day being all about markets, parades and family fun. The Arrowtown Fire Service celebrate its 75th jubilee. Julie says over 1200 people from community groups Plunket, Age Concern and Scouts are represented during the week for annual fundraising. The 10 day calendar runs from Friday April 25 - Sunday May 4 and features several new events such as a light hearted musical ‘The Importance of Being Earnslaw” featuring local talent on stage in the Arrowtown Hall. The ‘QuickTime Cuisine Challenge’ will pit four top chefs against the clock to produce dishes from a mystery food box. Well known Arrowtown entertainer, Kevin Lynch will step out on stage with his unique Kiwi character ‘Len the Loser’ guaranteeing a night of high comedy and laughter. The ‘Arrowtown Proposition’ is a new mayoral debate involving the Mayors of Dunedin, Invercargill and Queenstown. With close to 70 events on the calendar there is something for everyone including daily entertainment on the Buckingham

Arrowtown Festival kids

Green, the popular Miners Band and Buckingham Belles, the old fashioned tea dance and the Mind Body and Soul Expo. “These are iconic events which reflect our heritage and the old world charm of Arrowtown and it’s wonderful to incorporate entertainment that has been there since the beginning,” says Julie. The Nomad Safaris Exploration day focuses on the greater outdoors and once again this local company will do its bit for a cleaner greener environment with a rubbish pick-up at the Arrow River. The annual Rilean Ball is back again and promises to be a night of glitzy glamour, delicious food, jazz, swing and boogy to wrap up a heady week of festivities. Many of the events are free or have a gold coin donation and tickets for ticketed events are available from the Lakes District Museum. For more information go to www. arrowtownautumnfestival.org.nz

WINE

19

central otago - star performer Alan Brady is a pioneer of Central Otago’s wine industry and a veteran journalist. This column reflects his views of the industry. Central Otago wine is now firmly established on the world stage.  In just 20 years since the first commercial release, the tiny new region has gone from presumptuous upstart to star performer in highly competitive export markets all over the world.   No serious tasting of pinot noir in London, New York, Tokyo or Singapore would be complete without one or more Central Otago labels.  In competitions in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, wines from this region are consistently collecting the top medals and trophies.  The world’s top wine writers beat a path to our cellar doors and Australians, not generally lavish in their enthusiasm for things Kiwi, acknowledge that this is one area of winemaking where we have them licked.   In a couple of decades the region has built the sort of reputation it has taken some of the other great wine producing regions centuries to achieve.   I’m writing this in Singapore where, in the short time I’ve been here, Central Otago pinot, riesling and pinot gris have all featured on several of the wine lists in restaurants I’ve eaten at.  In one good wine shop stocking several prominent Central Otago labels I was told the wines were “a must” for anyone serious about pinot noir.   It’s the same from Melbourne to Moscow.  In that exclusive, high end niche where quality pinot noir sits, the wines from Central Otago are up there with the best.   So what’s behind this remarkable success story?  And can the momentum be maintained?  The answer to the second question is - “absolutely” (with some provisos).  The answer to the first is a bit more complex.   Audacity and a bit of luck played a part in our early progress.  I cringe when I look back at some of those early wines.  In our

enthusiastic naivety we thought they were pretty damned good.  Today we’d probably pour them down the drain.   But Mother Nature was on our side and we had unstoppable self belief.  Pinot noir was planted as part of our search for suitable grape varieties and quickly displayed its liking for conditions here.  It’s one variety you simply can’t put in the ground anywhere and expect it to succeed.  Central Otago is one of the very few places in the world where it shines.   By the mid-90s wine writers and consumers were beginning to take notice.  Our wines were displaying characteristics which reflected a sense of place, that uniqueness in structure and flavour that comes from “terroir”, the environment in which the grapes are grown.   We began to attract some fine young winemakers, lured by early signs that something special was going on in the region.  And more importantly we attracted some serious investors, people with a passion that matched that of the winemakers, driven by a dream of great wine rather than the promise of a quick buck.   It’s been a powerful mix - environment, passion, capital and skill - and it has laid the foundation for a long and potentially glorious winemaking future.   A unity of purpose - often the envy of other regions - has been our other great strength.  But the one thing which will set us apart, in an age of uniformity and globalisation, will be our ability to express our individuality - the extent to which we are able to resist commercial or critical pressure to produce wines of a particular style.    When consumers around the world can put their noses in a glass and say with confidence: “This is Central Otago pinot noir,” our future is assured - because the wine will be unique. Left & Right: Fulcrum Sculpures

amisfield art Amisfield Winery at Lake Hayes is the backdrop for New Zealand’s most ambitious exhibition of outdoor kinetic sculpture created by sculptor Phil Price. The Nelson born sculptor has spent the past 18 months putting together the Fulcrum exhibition which consists of ten small works, six medium size works and three large pieces which are ideally suited to the Amisfield environment. Phil describes the sculptures as surreal, but with references to nature. “You can labour over them in the workshop and do everything you need, but as soon as you take them outside and actually get some wind, they take on their own life and you have no control over them.” He says the exhibition is like “a forest of sculpture” which people can walk amongst. While some are on a smaller personal scale others tower above them. Fulcrum was commissioned by Connells Bay Centre for Sculpture and trustee John Gow says that at every opportunity Phil Price lifts the bar with his sculpture. “His works are complete in so many senses. They are well engineered, they have the unexpected surprise of movement, his choice of colour is innovative, the quality of construction is outstanding and his works require virtually no maintenance.” Amisfield Wine Company general manager Fleur Caulton says it is a coup for the winery to host such a significant exhibition. “Our setting is the perfect stage for the Fulcrum pieces and we are so pleased to be able to showcase Phil’s talents along with our own exceptional environment. We believe art and wine have a lot of synergy and this exhibition certainly reflects that.”

PH 03 442 0556 OPEN 10AM - 8PM, 7 DAYS, BISTRO CLOSED MONDAY

10

AMISFIELD WINERY & BISTRO. 10 LAKE HAYES ROAD, RD1, QUEENSTOWN

ARROWTOWN

WWW.AMISFIELD.CO.NZ


ARTS

18

ARROWTOWN

11

going for gold

Angus Watson

He spent three years in a tent, trapping possums in winter when the river was too icy to prospect for gold. “It was a great adventure, “Most of the prospectors were former prisoners of war and they used to sit and tell stories around the camp fire. They also used to like blowing things up.”

Justin met his future wife, Kaye, while working on the nearby Branches Station and after finding “a very rich patch of gold,” he achieved his goal and bought a farm at Arrow Junction. But striking gold was not just good luck. “It takes technique and perseverance,” warns Justin. Today Justin and Kaye’s three children all enjoy being outdoors and he says mining is great for the family. “The opportunity is still there and the kids don’t mind getting a bit of pocket money from it. New Zealand is one of the few countries where you can safely go mining. There’s no political unrest or snakes, there is water and it’s accessible.”

English born artist David John has been living and working in Arrowtown since 1979 and his fine art work includes some great sporting moments from his Changing Room series. The rugby scene ‘The Winners’ has been New Zealand’s top selling print for the past decade. His new purpose built gallery shows off a wide range of work including his popular paintings of musical instruments, landscapes, still life and portraiture. David has also written and directed three successful plays and is a poet and author of several books. You can visit David’s website: www.davidjohn.info Tel: 03 442 1760

Distinctive Style

Justin Eden (inset). Justin Edin shows Markus Rohr (Switzerland) the technique of gold panning

Arrowtown’s history is inspired by gold and gold fever is on the rise as Andrea Deuchrass discovered. Gold prices rose to record levels early in 2008, pushed up by the prospect of a recession in the oil economy and a fluctuating US market.

Queenstown artist Angus Watson’s distinctive and innovative paintings have a national and international following and his latest work highlights a fresh, bolder approach using bright, vibrant colours.

gold panners. “It’s a most popular thing to do, especially for a family activity.” Panning also attracts international visitors who travel to New Zealand specifically to find gold. “We had an English woman visit this summer who had read about gold and all she wanted to do while she was here was get to work at Macetown and Skippers,” says Justin.

With an ounce fetching around NZ$1200, or $34 for a gram, gold is luring an increasing number of prospectors and curious tourists to try their luck in the Arrow River.

And Swiss national Markus Rohr’s “gold burn” started in Canada, but soon brought him to New Zealand’s West Coast and Arrowtown. Now he regularly travels to the historic town to hunt for gold.

“My work tends towards impressionist and currently show cases some of my favourite subjects such as people, horses, boats and mustering sheep. People who visit my studio like the mix of subjects and the mix of mediums I use.”

“It’s a good time to find gold, the price has virtually doubled in the last two years,” says Justin Eden who together with his wife Kaye owns The Gold Shop in Arrowtown. They say almost every day someone strikes gold.

Gold fever can be all consuming, says Justin. “People forget about the weather, being hungry, the sandflies – in the search for gold.”

Although best known as a watercolour artist Angus has begun to paint in acrylics particularly focusing on local landscapes. Angus has been a professional artist for more than 20 years and his work is widely recognised. “I receive a lot of overseas visitors at my gallery but people are also increasingly buying my art through the internet. I enjoy knowing that my work hangs on walls around the world, as well as at home.”

“Just a few flakes on average. People are fascinated. It’s a huge attraction, which is why we put together a collection of the largest nuggets we could find, for people to look at in our store.” In good weather the banks of the Arrow River is lined with

He should know. Just as early settlers flocked to the area when gold was discovered in the early 1860s Justin was attracted to the Wakatipu in 1975, after reading about the gold mining era and wanting to experience it for himself. “I went up the Shotover with a sluice box and a shovel and met some old prospectors.”

Angus Watson’s rustic home, studio and garden, nestled around a feature pond, reflects his artistic talents which have created a superb rural environment. “I enjoy sharing my place with visitors particularly in autumn. It’s all part of the experience of visiting my studio.” Tel: 03 442 8486

ARTIST IN STONE

Ray Wade

Arrowtown artist Ray Wade is a renowned Wakatipu artist who works innovatively with beautiful stones — lapis lazuli, piemonite schist, garnets, agate and moonstone. As a specialist jeweller his work is individually crafted. He cuts and polishes the stones setting them in gold and silver which appeals to both international and local visitors. Ray works from his home based studio in central Arrowtown set in a charming cottage garden. Visitors find it fascinating to watch him at work and among his limited edition collections are examples of polished petrified wood and fossils, many millions of years old, and distinctive silver rings cast with significant koru and wave designs. Ray Wade’s studio is within easy walking distance from Arrowtown’s main street and visitors are welcome to call in or phone for an appointment. Tel: 03 442 1672

Ray Wade s garden cottage gallery and studio in Arrowtown

Built on the foundations of gold, Arrowtown was once a lively hub with a 7,000-strong population mostly living in tents and shanties. Gold attracted a rush of people once the news spread. Within weeks, the early miners were reported to have taken out around 200lb of gold from the Arrow Gorge. The town’s fascinating history will always be linked with gold – and new chapters are continually being opened.


PROFILE

12

the opal centre

MARKET PLACE CULTURE

Thirty years ago The Opal Centre was established in Queenstown. Today it remains in the same family and has an international reputation for quality and innovative design as Jenny McLeod reports.

The picturesque Earnslaw Park beside Lake Wakatipu is the location for Queenstown’s weekly art and craft market displaying a host of hand crafted art by artists from all over the South Island. Rain, hail or shine every Saturday between 9.00am and 4.30pm Earnslaw Park is alive with the sound of music and the hustle of a busy market place which highlights the diversity of work and talent amongst the local and South Island artist community. Over 30 stall holders display an extensive variety of work including sculpture, pottery, paintings, jewellery and greenstone and bone carvings. Fun and colourful collections of clothing, hats and knitwear provide flair along with a wide selection of wood turning, glassware, photography and even handmade musical instruments. Each artist personally attends their own stalls, allowing for visitors to buy art and talk to the artists themselves about their work. Well known local musicians perform on market day adding flavour to the popular and well established event. For further information - www.marketplace.net.nz

Rob Lynes and Ian Caldwell have developed and expanded the business founded by Rob’s father, Dennis, in small Queenstown premises on a high profile location on the Rees and Beach Street intersection.

Sadly the property was destroyed by fire late last year and while The Opal Centre has relocated to temporary premises the store will eventually return to its original site once rebuilding is complete.

“We have such strong links with that site and we are looking forward to re-establishing ourselves there,” says general manager Beau Rapley. ”But in the meantime our new premises on Beach Street is continuing to provide the same quality service, opals, jade and diamond jewellery.”

Rob Lynes is responsible for the signature and exclusive opal and jade creations on display, which he has been crafting for the past 21 years, after learning the skill from his father.

The Opal Centre is also a full time manufacturing jeweller with goldsmiths working from the studio on site.

CAFE DIRECTORY

Gallery Café and Bar Gallery Café and Bar is the new kid on the block and beginning to make a name for itself. Just opened in the newly redeveloped Novotel Gardens, this delightful little café is best accessed via the hotel’s Earl Street entrance. Take a left past reception and you’re there. We love the light that floods in from floor to ceiling windows that provide great views out over the rose gardens. Gallery Café and Bar is situated in a tall, airy atrium. Sit at the counter and order your food or head into the adjacent stylish lounge area for a comfortable seat. You’ll see the reason for the name Gallery all around you, with stunning pieces of art on display by leading New Zealand photographer Mike Langford. There is a good breakfast menu; $15 for a Bacon and Egg Panini, a muffin and a coffee. The all day snack menu is simple with dishes that don’t need explaining and the Cajun Chicken Burger at $14.50 and Vege Nachos at $13.50 are good examples of this. Their coffee is Piazza d’Oro, however if it’s something a little stronger you’re after, take a look at Gallery’s cocktail menu which offers some of the best value drinks in town. Try a classic martini or how about a quaintly named Gin Bramble? Watch out for Bob. He’s responsible for the magnificent rose gardens which frame Gallery’s view down to the lake. Too cold to be outside? Snuggle up by the fire and get the staff to bring you something delicious and warming. Overall we think Gallery is a hidden gem that’s destined for big things.

“We create all our own designs and we are appealing as much to the domestic market as visitors with our quality range of diamond jewellery,” says Beau. Co-general manager Andy Mills is a creative jeweller/ designer and many of the distinctive pieces in the Opal Centre have been designed by him. “His work and that of Rob’s is sought after and attracts buyers particularly from America and Europe as well as New Zealand.” The Opal Centre prides itself on having one of the finest selections of black opals in the world. “Our black opal is sourced from Lighting Ridge, New South Wales Australia. We personally handpick the raw opals from the mines in Australia and they are cut and polished at our Queenstown premises.” The store showcases an extensive collection of jade carvings by the company’s in house jade carver Jason Harcourt. Native wood carvings by leading New Zealand carver John Collins are also on display. The Opal Centre is one of Queenstown’s oldest established businesses and an integral part of the resort’s history –its commitment to quality ensures its future as a leading advocate of investment jewellery, jade and opal. Top: A selection of Opal Centre jewellery Top left: The Opal Centre temporary new store in Beach St Bottom: The Opal Centre’s original premises destroyed by fire.

Vudu Café Vudu is very easy to find. Head down Beach Street and it’s about halfway down. Parking is impossible on Beach Street so leave the car and take a stroll. We love the polished floorboards, retro style counter and the booth seating- very welcoming. Vudu’s window tables offer a great view of the passing parade and the small garden courtyard is a surprising and welcome find amongst the clutter of the CBD. We planned to order a toasted sandwich but were enticed by a slice of vegetarian lasagne and a banana smoothie off the tasty home style menu. Other temptations included the chicken noodle bowl and the breakfast quesadilla. Vudu is open from 8am till late and there’s a cabinet full of delicious quiches, muffins, cakes and biscuits to choose from. Coffee lovers will appreciate the freshly ground beans from award winning local company Bean Around the World. Vudu is licensed with a specials board for evening dining in a relaxed atmosphere. We were too busy watching the people walking past to need any other form of distraction but there’s a good selection of high quality fashion, design and food magazines. Overall Vudu will lure you back. We can vouch for that, we returned the next day for that toasted sandwich.

Traffic Café Traffic Café is a great little hangout but you need to look for it in busy Shotover St or it can be easy to overlook the location. Tucked away in the back of the Global Gossip at 27 Shotover Street keep your eyes open for the blue Traffic Café signs and head on in past the internet area. We love the stylish décor and glass separation that divides the hustle and bustle of the internet area and the cafe. It gives you the option of relaxing in the café while still feeling part of a whirlwind of activity. We liked the look of the sandwiches and salads. Traffic offers customers the chance to build their own sandwiches ($8 for Vege/$9 for Carnivores) with a selection of fresh fillings and an extensive bread menu; an excellent service for the picky eater and great fun for those who like to try new taste combinations. It’s the same deal for salads, both eat in and take away. It’s open from 8.30 till 5pm daily and the breakfast burritos (the Dave is exceptional) offer a solid carb fix first thing. We recommend the pain au chocolat; perfect, buttery flaky pastry with a generous filling of glorious dark chocolate. Team it up with a coffee, plonk a beret on your head and pretend you’re in Paris. Speaking of coffee, Traffic is the only place in Queenstown to serve Zee coffee, an excellent brew. They also have a fine selection of loose teas. Great hospitality and service from the friendly Traffic team make this little café a must on the itinerary.

17


CAFE DIRECTORY

16

WINTER FESTIVAL

13

The American Express Queenstown Winter Festival line up includes some major musical acts for 2008 and topping the bill and topping the charts is Kiwi sensation Evermore.

JAZZING IT UP

Evermore will be supported by other leading New Zealand acts The Checks and Opshop, both names that have made their mark at home and overseas. Opshop will open the Big Night Out and fans will be able to enjoy their singles such as ‘Maybe’ that has helped make a household name. Radio-friendly and still cutting-edge, the band’s current line-up ensures a dynamic and explosive kick off to the night. The Checks have never needed any introduction. Their music speaks for itself, as it did when REM booked them as support on a first hearing from a magazine giveaway CD. From there the only way has been up for the former Takapuna Grammar friends. Festival director Sally Feinerman says the bands will make the Big Night Out the biggest on record for Winter Festival. This is the first time the band has played at the festival and they will be the headlining act during the annual Big Night Out at Queenstown Events Centre on July 5. The alternative indie/rock band originally from Fielding has enjoyed enormous success in NZ and across the Tasman and was recently nominated for five awards at the NZ Music Awards, one award at Australia’s ARIA Awards plus the Vodafone People’s Choice Award. The trio of brothers now has bases in both Seattle and Sydney and is working alongside Foo Fighters producer Barret Jones.

Sally Feinerman

“We’re expecting these tickets to be in very high demand as we’re just not on the circuit when bands of this magnitude put their tours together. Securing any one of them would be a major coup for Festival but having a trio like this on the same bill, it’s a must-see.”

Hollie Smith

One of the most popular events on the American Express Winter Festival calendar is the Jazz Night where locals and visitors come out in huge numbers to enjoy a dynamic mix of the hottest names in this musical genre. This year is proving to be no exception with award-winning singer and songwriter Hollie Smith performing as the featured artiste at Skyline Gondola and Restaurant. The former Auckland College student has been making headlines around the world since signing with the prestigious American label Manhattan Records in May of last year. She topped off 2007 by winning Best Female Solo Artist, Breakthrough Artist and Best Aotearoa- Roots Album at the New Zealand Music Awards. The versatility of Skyline Restaurant’s mountaintop complex at the top of the gondola, means nobody need miss any of the sets, and with a line-up that includes the sparkling reggae of Katchafire, the funk-fuelled grooves of Tahuna Breaks, pop-jazz fusion from the inspired Anna Whitaker and the Company Band, and smooth stylings from Locean, it promises to be a great night out for music and jazz lovers alike.

NEW FACE OF FESTIVAL The American Express Queenstown Winter Festival is this year being led by new festival director, Sally Feinerman who is no stranger to the organisation. Sally has worked on the internationallyrenowned festival for four years, the last as festival manager and this year has enjoyed developing new ideas and options for one of the resort’s busiest week of the year. “We have really worked hard this year to come up with some fresh new angles that will add sparkle and fun to our already jam packed week of festival. There are some

big entertainment acts coming to town that we know people are going to love.” Destination Queenstown CEO David Kennedy supports the changes and says Sally has years of experience and knowledge that is an asset to festival.

The American Express Queenstown Winter Festival is a major internationally recognised event on Queenstown’s event calendar and each year attracts national and international headlines that promote the resort as an exciting winter resort destination.

“The festival is a complex event which requires a high level of understanding of opportunities and challenges and it’s great to have Sally in the leadership role, given her early involvement, as its important for continuity and future ongoing success.”

Sally has been joined this year by Corrina Horrell as festival manager with an extended team of volunteer support that will ramp up as the 34th annual festival gets underway from Friday June 27 to Sunday July 6 2008.


WANAKA

14

WANAKA

15

youth culture Wanaka is fast becoming a backyard for families seeking an outdoor lifestyle. Mount Aspiring College teacher Laura Williamson checked out some of the local youth programmes catering to this mushrooming sector of the community.

Captions - L to R: Sir Ed, Sir Ed in Dunedin in 1953, Guy Cotter, Sir Ed, Lady June Hillary & Guy Cotter. Photos Otago Daily Times www.otagoimages.co.nz

legendary mountaineer

Freephone (within NZ)

0800 108 311

The late Sir Edmund Hillary who was internationally renowned for his climbing feats had a vital link with Wanaka. Andrea Deuchrass talks to those who were close to the man behind the Everest legend. It is evident from the lake, the mountains, the tracks and the parks that Wanaka is a great town to grow up in. But it’s not just the surroundings that make it a special place for young people. If you spot a group of kids cruising the lake in cardboard boats, competing in a medieval joust or splattered happily with paintball rounds they have probably joined in on one of the many programmes for children and youth. “There’s everything for kids in this town. They are so lucky,” says Jo McArthur, Upper Clutha Education Coordinator for the Central Otago Rural Education Activities Programme (REAP), a government-funded organisation providing extramural learning to the community. REAP coordinates programmes like the One Day School for gifted and talented primary student, and has launched after school classes in subjects such as art, pottery and writing that have become educational staples for children in the region. This autumn, REAP is staging an Early Childhood Expo, an exhibition of everything on offer in Wanaka for the underfive set, including Early Childhood Education Centres, playgroups, gymnastics, dance and sport. “Each stall will be interactive and activity-based, including storytelling and displays. It’s about going and being involved,” says Jo. Community Networks Wanaka offers a School Holiday Programme for older children. These sessions for 5 to 12-year-olds offer everything from plaque-making and pool parties to outdoor games and boat building. A popular event is the Knights’ Day, where children make their own armour and compete in a knights’ tournament. The Kahu Youth Charitable Trust provides Adventure Clubs for girls and boys in the Year 7 to 10 classes. The clubs meet once a week for two hours after school taking on adventurebased activities and arts and crafts, while developing selfconfidence and teamwork skills. Older teenagers who have attended the programme in the past assist with the classes.

Sir Ed, as he was affectionately known, was greatly mourned when he died in January this year. Beyond his legendary conquest of Mt Everest in 1953, people admired and respected an adventurous, determined and modest family man. Wanaka was a special place for the Hillary family. Sir Ed, his first wife, the late Louise and children Sarah, Peter and the late Belinda, would regularly camp at Albert Town for summer holidays and head for the hills in Mt Aspiring National Park.

“We like to foster relationships between older and younger kids in the community,” says Kahu Youth Worker Tarn Felton, “because this kind of role modelling is invaluable to young people finding their way in the world.” Through Kahu Youth Tarn also coordinates the Wanaka Youth Council, a group of 13- to 24-year-olds who meet once a week to discuss the needs of youth in Wanaka. “It’s for all young people who want to have a voice in the community,” she says. Members get an opportunity to take on issues that matter to them such as sponsoring a child in India or lobbying for a youth venue. Kahu Youth also works closely with Mount Aspiring College, Wanaka’s only high school. Tarn recently facilitated a visit by revolutionary American graffiti artist Eric Orr to the college. He worked with several students to produce a beautiful urban art inspired landscape. Wanaka cares about its young people and whatever their passion –whether its art, academics, drama, sport or adventure, it is a good place to be young. Top: Mt Aspiring College students with Erick Orr Bottom: Wanaka children working with flax in the holiday programme

They would often call in on Mt Aspiring Station owners Phyllis and the late Jerry Aspinall. “It was more or less automatic for people going into the park to call in,” says Phyllis. With children the same age, she relished the Hillarys’ friendship. “I enjoyed my friendship with Louise in particular. They were doing very important work with the Himalayan Trust in Auckland and I greatly valued hearing about it.”

During their visits the Hillarys joined a community of climbers in Wanaka. “There were a lot of active climbers who spent holidays in Wanaka.” Images of those holidays at Albert Town were screened at Sir Ed’s funeral. Outside the Auckland church, around 40 New Zealand Alpine Club members held long, wooden ice axes as Sir Ed’s casket was carried out. Several Wanaka climbers were among them. “It was a privilege to be present,” according to Guy Cotter of Wanaka’s Adventure Consultants “It was a real celebration of his life and it was good to be at a funeral of a mountaineer that had a really long, positive life and died, as all people should, as an old person.” Guy knew Sir Ed “ever since I can remember.” His father Ed Cotter, was a Christchurch climber who was part of the first New Zealand expedition to the Himalayas in 1951, led by Earle Riddiford and included George Lowe and Edmund Hillary. The four Alpine New Zealand and Canterbury Mountaineering Club members had climbed the difficult Mt Elie de Beaumont at the head of the Tasman Glacier in preparation for the Himalayan expedition which saw Riddiford, Cotter and Sherpa Pasang reach the Mukut Parbat summit at 7242m. Later, the British Everest Reconnaissance Team invited just two Kiwis to join them. Hillary and Riddiford went after

much deliberation by the group and Hillary returned to the Himalayas on the 1953 expedition with Lowe.

“We’ve always had an association with the Hillary family,” says Guy. “I met him when I was knee-high to a grass hopper.” Later, when Guy began guiding in Nepal with Gary Ball and Rob Hall he would “run into Sir Ed on the odd occasion.”

But the relationship was not always easy. “Sir Ed was always so anti-commercialism in mountaineering,” says Guy. “I can totally understand that but I can also see that bringing professionalism to the mountains does reduce the impact, increases safety and provides employment.”

Guy and Sir Ed did communicate their different points of view. “We’ve always been quite open with one another.”

Guy’s respect for Sir Ed went beyond appreciating different opinions.

“He was an amazing character. He enjoyed climbing, and did it for his own satisfaction and enjoyment and somehow became super famous. He just thought he was a lucky fellow with the right skills and drive. It was true to a degree but the general public found that hard to grasp.”

Sir Edmund Hillary will always have a special place in the hearts of the people of Wanaka – and his special link with the area will never be forgotten.


WANAKA

14

WANAKA

15

youth culture Wanaka is fast becoming a backyard for families seeking an outdoor lifestyle. Mount Aspiring College teacher Laura Williamson checked out some of the local youth programmes catering to this mushrooming sector of the community.

Captions - L to R: Sir Ed, Sir Ed in Dunedin in 1953, Guy Cotter, Sir Ed, Lady June Hillary & Guy Cotter. Photos Otago Daily Times www.otagoimages.co.nz

legendary mountaineer

Freephone (within NZ)

0800 108 311

The late Sir Edmund Hillary who was internationally renowned for his climbing feats had a vital link with Wanaka. Andrea Deuchrass talks to those who were close to the man behind the Everest legend. It is evident from the lake, the mountains, the tracks and the parks that Wanaka is a great town to grow up in. But it’s not just the surroundings that make it a special place for young people. If you spot a group of kids cruising the lake in cardboard boats, competing in a medieval joust or splattered happily with paintball rounds they have probably joined in on one of the many programmes for children and youth. “There’s everything for kids in this town. They are so lucky,” says Jo McArthur, Upper Clutha Education Coordinator for the Central Otago Rural Education Activities Programme (REAP), a government-funded organisation providing extramural learning to the community. REAP coordinates programmes like the One Day School for gifted and talented primary student, and has launched after school classes in subjects such as art, pottery and writing that have become educational staples for children in the region. This autumn, REAP is staging an Early Childhood Expo, an exhibition of everything on offer in Wanaka for the underfive set, including Early Childhood Education Centres, playgroups, gymnastics, dance and sport. “Each stall will be interactive and activity-based, including storytelling and displays. It’s about going and being involved,” says Jo. Community Networks Wanaka offers a School Holiday Programme for older children. These sessions for 5 to 12-year-olds offer everything from plaque-making and pool parties to outdoor games and boat building. A popular event is the Knights’ Day, where children make their own armour and compete in a knights’ tournament. The Kahu Youth Charitable Trust provides Adventure Clubs for girls and boys in the Year 7 to 10 classes. The clubs meet once a week for two hours after school taking on adventurebased activities and arts and crafts, while developing selfconfidence and teamwork skills. Older teenagers who have attended the programme in the past assist with the classes.

Sir Ed, as he was affectionately known, was greatly mourned when he died in January this year. Beyond his legendary conquest of Mt Everest in 1953, people admired and respected an adventurous, determined and modest family man. Wanaka was a special place for the Hillary family. Sir Ed, his first wife, the late Louise and children Sarah, Peter and the late Belinda, would regularly camp at Albert Town for summer holidays and head for the hills in Mt Aspiring National Park.

“We like to foster relationships between older and younger kids in the community,” says Kahu Youth Worker Tarn Felton, “because this kind of role modelling is invaluable to young people finding their way in the world.” Through Kahu Youth Tarn also coordinates the Wanaka Youth Council, a group of 13- to 24-year-olds who meet once a week to discuss the needs of youth in Wanaka. “It’s for all young people who want to have a voice in the community,” she says. Members get an opportunity to take on issues that matter to them such as sponsoring a child in India or lobbying for a youth venue. Kahu Youth also works closely with Mount Aspiring College, Wanaka’s only high school. Tarn recently facilitated a visit by revolutionary American graffiti artist Eric Orr to the college. He worked with several students to produce a beautiful urban art inspired landscape. Wanaka cares about its young people and whatever their passion –whether its art, academics, drama, sport or adventure, it is a good place to be young. Top: Mt Aspiring College students with Erick Orr Bottom: Wanaka children working with flax in the holiday programme

They would often call in on Mt Aspiring Station owners Phyllis and the late Jerry Aspinall. “It was more or less automatic for people going into the park to call in,” says Phyllis. With children the same age, she relished the Hillarys’ friendship. “I enjoyed my friendship with Louise in particular. They were doing very important work with the Himalayan Trust in Auckland and I greatly valued hearing about it.”

During their visits the Hillarys joined a community of climbers in Wanaka. “There were a lot of active climbers who spent holidays in Wanaka.” Images of those holidays at Albert Town were screened at Sir Ed’s funeral. Outside the Auckland church, around 40 New Zealand Alpine Club members held long, wooden ice axes as Sir Ed’s casket was carried out. Several Wanaka climbers were among them. “It was a privilege to be present,” according to Guy Cotter of Wanaka’s Adventure Consultants “It was a real celebration of his life and it was good to be at a funeral of a mountaineer that had a really long, positive life and died, as all people should, as an old person.” Guy knew Sir Ed “ever since I can remember.” His father Ed Cotter, was a Christchurch climber who was part of the first New Zealand expedition to the Himalayas in 1951, led by Earle Riddiford and included George Lowe and Edmund Hillary. The four Alpine New Zealand and Canterbury Mountaineering Club members had climbed the difficult Mt Elie de Beaumont at the head of the Tasman Glacier in preparation for the Himalayan expedition which saw Riddiford, Cotter and Sherpa Pasang reach the Mukut Parbat summit at 7242m. Later, the British Everest Reconnaissance Team invited just two Kiwis to join them. Hillary and Riddiford went after

much deliberation by the group and Hillary returned to the Himalayas on the 1953 expedition with Lowe.

“We’ve always had an association with the Hillary family,” says Guy. “I met him when I was knee-high to a grass hopper.” Later, when Guy began guiding in Nepal with Gary Ball and Rob Hall he would “run into Sir Ed on the odd occasion.”

But the relationship was not always easy. “Sir Ed was always so anti-commercialism in mountaineering,” says Guy. “I can totally understand that but I can also see that bringing professionalism to the mountains does reduce the impact, increases safety and provides employment.”

Guy and Sir Ed did communicate their different points of view. “We’ve always been quite open with one another.”

Guy’s respect for Sir Ed went beyond appreciating different opinions.

“He was an amazing character. He enjoyed climbing, and did it for his own satisfaction and enjoyment and somehow became super famous. He just thought he was a lucky fellow with the right skills and drive. It was true to a degree but the general public found that hard to grasp.”

Sir Edmund Hillary will always have a special place in the hearts of the people of Wanaka – and his special link with the area will never be forgotten.


CAFE DIRECTORY

16

WINTER FESTIVAL

13

The American Express Queenstown Winter Festival line up includes some major musical acts for 2008 and topping the bill and topping the charts is Kiwi sensation Evermore.

JAZZING IT UP

Evermore will be supported by other leading New Zealand acts The Checks and Opshop, both names that have made their mark at home and overseas. Opshop will open the Big Night Out and fans will be able to enjoy their singles such as ‘Maybe’ that has helped make a household name. Radio-friendly and still cutting-edge, the band’s current line-up ensures a dynamic and explosive kick off to the night. The Checks have never needed any introduction. Their music speaks for itself, as it did when REM booked them as support on a first hearing from a magazine giveaway CD. From there the only way has been up for the former Takapuna Grammar friends. Festival director Sally Feinerman says the bands will make the Big Night Out the biggest on record for Winter Festival. This is the first time the band has played at the festival and they will be the headlining act during the annual Big Night Out at Queenstown Events Centre on July 5. The alternative indie/rock band originally from Fielding has enjoyed enormous success in NZ and across the Tasman and was recently nominated for five awards at the NZ Music Awards, one award at Australia’s ARIA Awards plus the Vodafone People’s Choice Award. The trio of brothers now has bases in both Seattle and Sydney and is working alongside Foo Fighters producer Barret Jones.

Sally Feinerman

“We’re expecting these tickets to be in very high demand as we’re just not on the circuit when bands of this magnitude put their tours together. Securing any one of them would be a major coup for Festival but having a trio like this on the same bill, it’s a must-see.”

Hollie Smith

One of the most popular events on the American Express Winter Festival calendar is the Jazz Night where locals and visitors come out in huge numbers to enjoy a dynamic mix of the hottest names in this musical genre. This year is proving to be no exception with award-winning singer and songwriter Hollie Smith performing as the featured artiste at Skyline Gondola and Restaurant. The former Auckland College student has been making headlines around the world since signing with the prestigious American label Manhattan Records in May of last year. She topped off 2007 by winning Best Female Solo Artist, Breakthrough Artist and Best Aotearoa- Roots Album at the New Zealand Music Awards. The versatility of Skyline Restaurant’s mountaintop complex at the top of the gondola, means nobody need miss any of the sets, and with a line-up that includes the sparkling reggae of Katchafire, the funk-fuelled grooves of Tahuna Breaks, pop-jazz fusion from the inspired Anna Whitaker and the Company Band, and smooth stylings from Locean, it promises to be a great night out for music and jazz lovers alike.

NEW FACE OF FESTIVAL The American Express Queenstown Winter Festival is this year being led by new festival director, Sally Feinerman who is no stranger to the organisation. Sally has worked on the internationallyrenowned festival for four years, the last as festival manager and this year has enjoyed developing new ideas and options for one of the resort’s busiest week of the year. “We have really worked hard this year to come up with some fresh new angles that will add sparkle and fun to our already jam packed week of festival. There are some

big entertainment acts coming to town that we know people are going to love.” Destination Queenstown CEO David Kennedy supports the changes and says Sally has years of experience and knowledge that is an asset to festival.

The American Express Queenstown Winter Festival is a major internationally recognised event on Queenstown’s event calendar and each year attracts national and international headlines that promote the resort as an exciting winter resort destination.

“The festival is a complex event which requires a high level of understanding of opportunities and challenges and it’s great to have Sally in the leadership role, given her early involvement, as its important for continuity and future ongoing success.”

Sally has been joined this year by Corrina Horrell as festival manager with an extended team of volunteer support that will ramp up as the 34th annual festival gets underway from Friday June 27 to Sunday July 6 2008.


PROFILE

12

the opal centre

MARKET PLACE CULTURE

Thirty years ago The Opal Centre was established in Queenstown. Today it remains in the same family and has an international reputation for quality and innovative design as Jenny McLeod reports.

The picturesque Earnslaw Park beside Lake Wakatipu is the location for Queenstown’s weekly art and craft market displaying a host of hand crafted art by artists from all over the South Island. Rain, hail or shine every Saturday between 9.00am and 4.30pm Earnslaw Park is alive with the sound of music and the hustle of a busy market place which highlights the diversity of work and talent amongst the local and South Island artist community. Over 30 stall holders display an extensive variety of work including sculpture, pottery, paintings, jewellery and greenstone and bone carvings. Fun and colourful collections of clothing, hats and knitwear provide flair along with a wide selection of wood turning, glassware, photography and even handmade musical instruments. Each artist personally attends their own stalls, allowing for visitors to buy art and talk to the artists themselves about their work. Well known local musicians perform on market day adding flavour to the popular and well established event. For further information - www.marketplace.net.nz

Rob Lynes and Ian Caldwell have developed and expanded the business founded by Rob’s father, Dennis, in small Queenstown premises on a high profile location on the Rees and Beach Street intersection.

Sadly the property was destroyed by fire late last year and while The Opal Centre has relocated to temporary premises the store will eventually return to its original site once rebuilding is complete.

“We have such strong links with that site and we are looking forward to re-establishing ourselves there,” says general manager Beau Rapley. ”But in the meantime our new premises on Beach Street is continuing to provide the same quality service, opals, jade and diamond jewellery.”

Rob Lynes is responsible for the signature and exclusive opal and jade creations on display, which he has been crafting for the past 21 years, after learning the skill from his father.

The Opal Centre is also a full time manufacturing jeweller with goldsmiths working from the studio on site.

CAFE DIRECTORY

Gallery Café and Bar Gallery Café and Bar is the new kid on the block and beginning to make a name for itself. Just opened in the newly redeveloped Novotel Gardens, this delightful little café is best accessed via the hotel’s Earl Street entrance. Take a left past reception and you’re there. We love the light that floods in from floor to ceiling windows that provide great views out over the rose gardens. Gallery Café and Bar is situated in a tall, airy atrium. Sit at the counter and order your food or head into the adjacent stylish lounge area for a comfortable seat. You’ll see the reason for the name Gallery all around you, with stunning pieces of art on display by leading New Zealand photographer Mike Langford. There is a good breakfast menu; $15 for a Bacon and Egg Panini, a muffin and a coffee. The all day snack menu is simple with dishes that don’t need explaining and the Cajun Chicken Burger at $14.50 and Vege Nachos at $13.50 are good examples of this. Their coffee is Piazza d’Oro, however if it’s something a little stronger you’re after, take a look at Gallery’s cocktail menu which offers some of the best value drinks in town. Try a classic martini or how about a quaintly named Gin Bramble? Watch out for Bob. He’s responsible for the magnificent rose gardens which frame Gallery’s view down to the lake. Too cold to be outside? Snuggle up by the fire and get the staff to bring you something delicious and warming. Overall we think Gallery is a hidden gem that’s destined for big things.

“We create all our own designs and we are appealing as much to the domestic market as visitors with our quality range of diamond jewellery,” says Beau. Co-general manager Andy Mills is a creative jeweller/ designer and many of the distinctive pieces in the Opal Centre have been designed by him. “His work and that of Rob’s is sought after and attracts buyers particularly from America and Europe as well as New Zealand.” The Opal Centre prides itself on having one of the finest selections of black opals in the world. “Our black opal is sourced from Lighting Ridge, New South Wales Australia. We personally handpick the raw opals from the mines in Australia and they are cut and polished at our Queenstown premises.” The store showcases an extensive collection of jade carvings by the company’s in house jade carver Jason Harcourt. Native wood carvings by leading New Zealand carver John Collins are also on display. The Opal Centre is one of Queenstown’s oldest established businesses and an integral part of the resort’s history –its commitment to quality ensures its future as a leading advocate of investment jewellery, jade and opal. Top: A selection of Opal Centre jewellery Top left: The Opal Centre temporary new store in Beach St Bottom: The Opal Centre’s original premises destroyed by fire.

Vudu Café Vudu is very easy to find. Head down Beach Street and it’s about halfway down. Parking is impossible on Beach Street so leave the car and take a stroll. We love the polished floorboards, retro style counter and the booth seating- very welcoming. Vudu’s window tables offer a great view of the passing parade and the small garden courtyard is a surprising and welcome find amongst the clutter of the CBD. We planned to order a toasted sandwich but were enticed by a slice of vegetarian lasagne and a banana smoothie off the tasty home style menu. Other temptations included the chicken noodle bowl and the breakfast quesadilla. Vudu is open from 8am till late and there’s a cabinet full of delicious quiches, muffins, cakes and biscuits to choose from. Coffee lovers will appreciate the freshly ground beans from award winning local company Bean Around the World. Vudu is licensed with a specials board for evening dining in a relaxed atmosphere. We were too busy watching the people walking past to need any other form of distraction but there’s a good selection of high quality fashion, design and food magazines. Overall Vudu will lure you back. We can vouch for that, we returned the next day for that toasted sandwich.

Traffic Café Traffic Café is a great little hangout but you need to look for it in busy Shotover St or it can be easy to overlook the location. Tucked away in the back of the Global Gossip at 27 Shotover Street keep your eyes open for the blue Traffic Café signs and head on in past the internet area. We love the stylish décor and glass separation that divides the hustle and bustle of the internet area and the cafe. It gives you the option of relaxing in the café while still feeling part of a whirlwind of activity. We liked the look of the sandwiches and salads. Traffic offers customers the chance to build their own sandwiches ($8 for Vege/$9 for Carnivores) with a selection of fresh fillings and an extensive bread menu; an excellent service for the picky eater and great fun for those who like to try new taste combinations. It’s the same deal for salads, both eat in and take away. It’s open from 8.30 till 5pm daily and the breakfast burritos (the Dave is exceptional) offer a solid carb fix first thing. We recommend the pain au chocolat; perfect, buttery flaky pastry with a generous filling of glorious dark chocolate. Team it up with a coffee, plonk a beret on your head and pretend you’re in Paris. Speaking of coffee, Traffic is the only place in Queenstown to serve Zee coffee, an excellent brew. They also have a fine selection of loose teas. Great hospitality and service from the friendly Traffic team make this little café a must on the itinerary.

17


ARTS

18

ARROWTOWN

11

going for gold

Angus Watson

He spent three years in a tent, trapping possums in winter when the river was too icy to prospect for gold. “It was a great adventure, “Most of the prospectors were former prisoners of war and they used to sit and tell stories around the camp fire. They also used to like blowing things up.”

Justin met his future wife, Kaye, while working on the nearby Branches Station and after finding “a very rich patch of gold,” he achieved his goal and bought a farm at Arrow Junction. But striking gold was not just good luck. “It takes technique and perseverance,” warns Justin. Today Justin and Kaye’s three children all enjoy being outdoors and he says mining is great for the family. “The opportunity is still there and the kids don’t mind getting a bit of pocket money from it. New Zealand is one of the few countries where you can safely go mining. There’s no political unrest or snakes, there is water and it’s accessible.”

English born artist David John has been living and working in Arrowtown since 1979 and his fine art work includes some great sporting moments from his Changing Room series. The rugby scene ‘The Winners’ has been New Zealand’s top selling print for the past decade. His new purpose built gallery shows off a wide range of work including his popular paintings of musical instruments, landscapes, still life and portraiture. David has also written and directed three successful plays and is a poet and author of several books. You can visit David’s website: www.davidjohn.info Tel: 03 442 1760

Distinctive Style

Justin Eden (inset). Justin Edin shows Markus Rohr (Switzerland) the technique of gold panning

Arrowtown’s history is inspired by gold and gold fever is on the rise as Andrea Deuchrass discovered. Gold prices rose to record levels early in 2008, pushed up by the prospect of a recession in the oil economy and a fluctuating US market.

Queenstown artist Angus Watson’s distinctive and innovative paintings have a national and international following and his latest work highlights a fresh, bolder approach using bright, vibrant colours.

gold panners. “It’s a most popular thing to do, especially for a family activity.” Panning also attracts international visitors who travel to New Zealand specifically to find gold. “We had an English woman visit this summer who had read about gold and all she wanted to do while she was here was get to work at Macetown and Skippers,” says Justin.

With an ounce fetching around NZ$1200, or $34 for a gram, gold is luring an increasing number of prospectors and curious tourists to try their luck in the Arrow River.

And Swiss national Markus Rohr’s “gold burn” started in Canada, but soon brought him to New Zealand’s West Coast and Arrowtown. Now he regularly travels to the historic town to hunt for gold.

“My work tends towards impressionist and currently show cases some of my favourite subjects such as people, horses, boats and mustering sheep. People who visit my studio like the mix of subjects and the mix of mediums I use.”

“It’s a good time to find gold, the price has virtually doubled in the last two years,” says Justin Eden who together with his wife Kaye owns The Gold Shop in Arrowtown. They say almost every day someone strikes gold.

Gold fever can be all consuming, says Justin. “People forget about the weather, being hungry, the sandflies – in the search for gold.”

Although best known as a watercolour artist Angus has begun to paint in acrylics particularly focusing on local landscapes. Angus has been a professional artist for more than 20 years and his work is widely recognised. “I receive a lot of overseas visitors at my gallery but people are also increasingly buying my art through the internet. I enjoy knowing that my work hangs on walls around the world, as well as at home.”

“Just a few flakes on average. People are fascinated. It’s a huge attraction, which is why we put together a collection of the largest nuggets we could find, for people to look at in our store.” In good weather the banks of the Arrow River is lined with

He should know. Just as early settlers flocked to the area when gold was discovered in the early 1860s Justin was attracted to the Wakatipu in 1975, after reading about the gold mining era and wanting to experience it for himself. “I went up the Shotover with a sluice box and a shovel and met some old prospectors.”

Angus Watson’s rustic home, studio and garden, nestled around a feature pond, reflects his artistic talents which have created a superb rural environment. “I enjoy sharing my place with visitors particularly in autumn. It’s all part of the experience of visiting my studio.” Tel: 03 442 8486

ARTIST IN STONE

Ray Wade

Arrowtown artist Ray Wade is a renowned Wakatipu artist who works innovatively with beautiful stones — lapis lazuli, piemonite schist, garnets, agate and moonstone. As a specialist jeweller his work is individually crafted. He cuts and polishes the stones setting them in gold and silver which appeals to both international and local visitors. Ray works from his home based studio in central Arrowtown set in a charming cottage garden. Visitors find it fascinating to watch him at work and among his limited edition collections are examples of polished petrified wood and fossils, many millions of years old, and distinctive silver rings cast with significant koru and wave designs. Ray Wade’s studio is within easy walking distance from Arrowtown’s main street and visitors are welcome to call in or phone for an appointment. Tel: 03 442 1672

Ray Wade s garden cottage gallery and studio in Arrowtown

Built on the foundations of gold, Arrowtown was once a lively hub with a 7,000-strong population mostly living in tents and shanties. Gold attracted a rush of people once the news spread. Within weeks, the early miners were reported to have taken out around 200lb of gold from the Arrow Gorge. The town’s fascinating history will always be linked with gold – and new chapters are continually being opened.


festival frolics Autumn in Arrowtown is marked by an annual festival celebrating the changing colours. Penny Simpson reports. For the first time in many years the Arrowtown Autumn Festival coincides with school holidays making it a great time for families. Festival organiser Julie Hughes says there is a lot of community spirit in this years event. “We have an exciting variety of kids workshops including cooking,circa art and skateboarding. The kids variety show is always fun and new this year is an amazing magic show with magician Elgrego who performs incredible illusions and tricks.” The traditional festival parade takes place on Saturday April 26 with the day being all about markets, parades and family fun. The Arrowtown Fire Service celebrate its 75th jubilee. Julie says over 1200 people from community groups Plunket, Age Concern and Scouts are represented during the week for annual fundraising. The 10 day calendar runs from Friday April 25 - Sunday May 4 and features several new events such as a light hearted musical ‘The Importance of Being Earnslaw” featuring local talent on stage in the Arrowtown Hall. The ‘QuickTime Cuisine Challenge’ will pit four top chefs against the clock to produce dishes from a mystery food box. Well known Arrowtown entertainer, Kevin Lynch will step out on stage with his unique Kiwi character ‘Len the Loser’ guaranteeing a night of high comedy and laughter. The ‘Arrowtown Proposition’ is a new mayoral debate involving the Mayors of Dunedin, Invercargill and Queenstown. With close to 70 events on the calendar there is something for everyone including daily entertainment on the Buckingham

Arrowtown Festival kids

Green, the popular Miners Band and Buckingham Belles, the old fashioned tea dance and the Mind Body and Soul Expo. “These are iconic events which reflect our heritage and the old world charm of Arrowtown and it’s wonderful to incorporate entertainment that has been there since the beginning,” says Julie. The Nomad Safaris Exploration day focuses on the greater outdoors and once again this local company will do its bit for a cleaner greener environment with a rubbish pick-up at the Arrow River. The annual Rilean Ball is back again and promises to be a night of glitzy glamour, delicious food, jazz, swing and boogy to wrap up a heady week of festivities. Many of the events are free or have a gold coin donation and tickets for ticketed events are available from the Lakes District Museum. For more information go to www. arrowtownautumnfestival.org.nz

WINE

19

central otago - star performer Alan Brady is a pioneer of Central Otago’s wine industry and a veteran journalist. This column reflects his views of the industry. Central Otago wine is now firmly established on the world stage.  In just 20 years since the first commercial release, the tiny new region has gone from presumptuous upstart to star performer in highly competitive export markets all over the world.   No serious tasting of pinot noir in London, New York, Tokyo or Singapore would be complete without one or more Central Otago labels.  In competitions in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, wines from this region are consistently collecting the top medals and trophies.  The world’s top wine writers beat a path to our cellar doors and Australians, not generally lavish in their enthusiasm for things Kiwi, acknowledge that this is one area of winemaking where we have them licked.   In a couple of decades the region has built the sort of reputation it has taken some of the other great wine producing regions centuries to achieve.   I’m writing this in Singapore where, in the short time I’ve been here, Central Otago pinot, riesling and pinot gris have all featured on several of the wine lists in restaurants I’ve eaten at.  In one good wine shop stocking several prominent Central Otago labels I was told the wines were “a must” for anyone serious about pinot noir.   It’s the same from Melbourne to Moscow.  In that exclusive, high end niche where quality pinot noir sits, the wines from Central Otago are up there with the best.   So what’s behind this remarkable success story?  And can the momentum be maintained?  The answer to the second question is - “absolutely” (with some provisos).  The answer to the first is a bit more complex.   Audacity and a bit of luck played a part in our early progress.  I cringe when I look back at some of those early wines.  In our

enthusiastic naivety we thought they were pretty damned good.  Today we’d probably pour them down the drain.   But Mother Nature was on our side and we had unstoppable self belief.  Pinot noir was planted as part of our search for suitable grape varieties and quickly displayed its liking for conditions here.  It’s one variety you simply can’t put in the ground anywhere and expect it to succeed.  Central Otago is one of the very few places in the world where it shines.   By the mid-90s wine writers and consumers were beginning to take notice.  Our wines were displaying characteristics which reflected a sense of place, that uniqueness in structure and flavour that comes from “terroir”, the environment in which the grapes are grown.   We began to attract some fine young winemakers, lured by early signs that something special was going on in the region.  And more importantly we attracted some serious investors, people with a passion that matched that of the winemakers, driven by a dream of great wine rather than the promise of a quick buck.   It’s been a powerful mix - environment, passion, capital and skill - and it has laid the foundation for a long and potentially glorious winemaking future.   A unity of purpose - often the envy of other regions - has been our other great strength.  But the one thing which will set us apart, in an age of uniformity and globalisation, will be our ability to express our individuality - the extent to which we are able to resist commercial or critical pressure to produce wines of a particular style.    When consumers around the world can put their noses in a glass and say with confidence: “This is Central Otago pinot noir,” our future is assured - because the wine will be unique. Left & Right: Fulcrum Sculpures

amisfield art Amisfield Winery at Lake Hayes is the backdrop for New Zealand’s most ambitious exhibition of outdoor kinetic sculpture created by sculptor Phil Price. The Nelson born sculptor has spent the past 18 months putting together the Fulcrum exhibition which consists of ten small works, six medium size works and three large pieces which are ideally suited to the Amisfield environment. Phil describes the sculptures as surreal, but with references to nature. “You can labour over them in the workshop and do everything you need, but as soon as you take them outside and actually get some wind, they take on their own life and you have no control over them.” He says the exhibition is like “a forest of sculpture” which people can walk amongst. While some are on a smaller personal scale others tower above them. Fulcrum was commissioned by Connells Bay Centre for Sculpture and trustee John Gow says that at every opportunity Phil Price lifts the bar with his sculpture. “His works are complete in so many senses. They are well engineered, they have the unexpected surprise of movement, his choice of colour is innovative, the quality of construction is outstanding and his works require virtually no maintenance.” Amisfield Wine Company general manager Fleur Caulton says it is a coup for the winery to host such a significant exhibition. “Our setting is the perfect stage for the Fulcrum pieces and we are so pleased to be able to showcase Phil’s talents along with our own exceptional environment. We believe art and wine have a lot of synergy and this exhibition certainly reflects that.”

PH 03 442 0556 OPEN 10AM - 8PM, 7 DAYS, BISTRO CLOSED MONDAY

10

AMISFIELD WINERY & BISTRO. 10 LAKE HAYES ROAD, RD1, QUEENSTOWN

ARROWTOWN

WWW.AMISFIELD.CO.NZ


OUTDOORS

20

SHOPPING

9

nz designer winter wardrobe Arrowtown fashion destination Wallace and Gibbs is once again hitting the mark for the style-conscious with sophisticated and edgy winter fashion from top New Zealand designers. The new season collections from high fashion labels such as Obi, Chocolat and Andrea Moore have filled the store with rich winter colour tones and fresh originality in style and design and an extensive range of beautiful knitwear styles. Layered garments from Obi provide a high level of versatility and warmth with soft winter wools and textured patterns. For trans seasonal travellers this collection can be easily mixed and matched to suit conditions anywhere in the world. The Obi cropped jacket with wider sleeves makes a bold statement as does winter’s key look of dresses and tunics with short hemlines perfect for wearing over skinny pants or tights. For the curvy figures and larger sizes the Chocolat range personifies elegance and beauty with sizing ranging from 10 – 22. The 08 collection has beautiful pieces that will take you from work to a café or out to dinner and the theatre.

helicopter adventures Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters is one of Queenstown’s foremost helicopter companies flying hundreds of people every year around the South Island’s scenic wilderness. Jane Brooke found out what it takes to run such an operation.

Six passengers arrive at once, a group of four Americans and an Irish couple. Gerry Conlan, Scenic Flight Manager for Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters is juggling four tasks at once, greeting his arrivals, taking phone calls, managing bookings and advising the pilots of their schedule for the day. “It can get hectic,” he says, “but it’s not hard to make people feel welcome, find out where they are from and how they are enjoying their trip.” It’s this simplistic approach to customer service, combined with a professional approach to business that has given the company such an excellent reputation. Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters CEO and chief pilot Pat West is modest about their success. “We’ve been around a long time, and just get on and do it. We’ve formed good relationships and have a good product which has resulted in a lot of repeat business.” Pat’s career began as an automotive engineer in the North Island. A love for hunting led him to study for his pilot’s licence and sell up and move to the South Island. Pat instructed at the Nelson Aviation College and worked as a pilot on the West Coast before taking over Glacier Southern Lakes in 1992. “It evolved from there.” “Tourism is our core business and we’ve got access into protected areas such as the Fiordland National Park. We hold the concession for the most landings at the Juno and Clarke Glaciers where only a few companies are allowed to fly.” The Department of Conservation’s concession system regulates the number of landings allowed by each helicopter company to ensure minimal impact on the environment. Glacier Southern Lakes has concessions to fly into pristine remote locations in the Mt Aspiring Park, to Lake Quill to visit the Southern Falls or to Mt Tutoko in the Fiordland National Park. Landing on a glacier, flying to Milford Sound or landing in the snow are the most popular excursions. A number of Milford options are available combining a glacier landing with a cruise of the stunning fiord and a landing on the

And men’s fashion statements include the latest looks from Cutler in winter shirts and jackets with a wide range of designer jeans and dress pants for work and play. For friendly and informative fashion advice and impeccable service, Wallace & Gibbs deliver this plus more in their beautiful stylish store in the heart of Arrowtown.

winter’s hottest looks

beach on the remote West Coast. During the winter Glacier Southern Lakes teams up with heliskiing operators Southern Lakes Heliski and Harris Mountain Heliski.

The latest winter street wear is filling the shelves at Ikon in Arrowtown reflecting up-to-the-minute fashion.

“We do also branch out into other areas,” says Pat. The company is involved in the busy film industry in the region, working on films such as Vertical Limit and more recently, 10,000BC. The company is also part of the Lakes District Air Rescue Trust, and does medivac work, hospital transfers and assists in search and rescue operations.

This season’s Workshop collection is all about colour with Rocket Red, Bottle Green, Indigo and Mars Orange adding punch to winter hues of graphite, trench and brown. It’s a defining mix that combines elegance with attitude and works well with the Workshop denim range that features elements of cool military styling, streettough fabrics, work wear and rock’n’roll-meets-punk shapes.

While the focus is on the Southern Lakes region, the company flies to Stewart Island, Fox and Franz Joseph, Christchurch and even Auckland. Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters currently employs four full time pilots and a number of casual staff with thousands of flying hours experience between them. Their helicopter fleet consists of four helicopters, three six-seaters and a three-seater. Gerry has been with the company for four years, and has an excellent rapport with not only customers, but other tourism businesses. “We focus on the top end.” he explains. “It’s quite normal to pay anything from $655 to $11,000 for a flight and that’s per person.” Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters does however cater for all budgets, with a landing on The Remarkables costing only $170 per person. “You never know who might walk through the door. Many of our clients are millionaires and have had opportunities to do some amazing things, yet they often come back from one of our trips saying it’s the best thing they’ve ever experienced.”

Exclusive fashion pieces straight out of Italy make up the Diesel Winter 08 collection which has a superb selection of winter coats and jackets to keep the big freeze at bay. Bright colours and edgy styling on jeans, shirts and tops for men and women plus a selection of dresses – Diesel never disappoints with some very cool accessories to boot. The Denny Rose winter range has chunky knits and scarves for women to wrap up in while the new label Scotch and Soda all the way from Amsterdam, is dressing guys in style this winter with high quality fabrics and tailored finishes. Ikon is a fashion haven for fashionistas on the hunt for that perfect item to enhance their leading edge wardrobe this winter.


INSTYLE

styledirectory NEW ERA FOR BOUTIQUE HOTEL One of Queenstown’s luxury boutique hotels has opened a new chapter with a change of ownership, management and a new name. Central Ridge Boutique Hotel, formerly Mount Vista, is an exciting new venture for the Hyslop and Roy families, both of whom have strong ties with the areas. Taking over the day to day management of the property is experienced hotelier Annabel Fafeita who says their aim is to provide true southern hospitality. “I’ve handpicked the team for their local knowledge, service skills, absolute discretion, and sincere interest in making each guest’s visit a success.  They’re skilled at conversing easily with guests, advising on and booking activities, assisting with special requirements and anticipating all possible needs. Being passionate about Central Otago, we’re keen to promote local businesses and products. We offer guests homemade jams and preserves and fresh salmon smoked onsite as part of their complimentary gourmet breakfast as well as featuring local brands and specialties where possible.” Central Otago wines are also on show and Annabel says independent travellers enjoy the chance to get to know more about the region they are visiting. Centrally located adjacent to the Queenstown gardens and just three minutes walk from downtown, Central Ridge Boutique Hotel is ideal for both winter and summer guests and can also cater for small conferences and executive retreats.

8

ENTERTAINMENT

21

botswana butchery

Laura Williamson samples Wanaka’s newest boutique restaurant, Botswana Butchery, which is turning heads not just for its unusual name but also for its outstanding food and service. Chef Leungo Lippe

MAKING MEMORIES Downtown Queenstown Goldfields Jewellers at the entry of O’Connell’s Shopping Centre on the corner of Camp and Beach Streets is a haven for people in search of beautiful jewellery that will last a lifetime. Director and head jeweller Trond Johansson has a long history of jewellery making, having trained in his native Sweden before heading down under first to Australia and then New Zealand 20 years ago. His expertise is widely recognised and his team of in-house jewelers specialise in a broad range of jewellery to suit all occasions from engagements and weddings to friendship and special events. “We have just completed our new in-store workshop which is upstairs above the retail store and an ideal space to be able to take clients for personalised consultations for bespoke jewellery,” says Trond. Customised jewellery is an important part of the Goldfields venture where the team creates designs to suit all types of contemporary and classic styles dependent on a client’s wishes. Bridal couples are encouraged to spend time discussing ideas and jewellery designs from a selection of readymade rings on display in Goldfields Jewellers. Size adjustments can be made and finishing touches added as desired. Goldfield Jewellers has an extensive range of precious and semi precious stones, rubies, emeralds, sapphires and gold, silver and platinum jewellery. Beautiful gifts can be chosen from a range of jade carvings and jewellery and traditional Pounamu (greenstone).

GO WITH THE FLOW Street and urban clothing capturing the essence of New Zealand on t-shirts and hoodies has mushroomed from a simple idea into a fully fledged retail store for a Queenstown couple. Russ Tilsley and Jo Ruthven began experimenting with the idea back in 2005 after Russ taught himself to screen print and Jo, a qualified graphic designer, created some original designs. They trialled the first of the line in a shop in the original Mountaineer complex in Queenstown’s CBD and Jo says the concept took off. “We had done a road trip around the South Island a few years earlier and decided that New Zealand needed more contemporary and unique designs for t-shirts that would appeal to both Kiwis and tourists. Since the first set of designs sold we haven’t looked back.” Inspired by the strong initial response the couple have developed a clothing label ‘Flow’, opening a dedicated store in Queenstown’s Shotover Street. ‘Flow’ is continually working on new designs and is keen to introduce new products including an expanded range of 100% New Zealand Merino clothing and kids t-shirts that will be available this winter. Flow also offers design and screen-printing services for local businesses with a good range of t-shirts and hoodies in a diverse range of colours.

It’s the name that you’ll notice first, but lasting memories of Botswana Butchery are of the food. Perched above the courtyard in Wanaka’s Post Office Lane, Botswana Butchery has a menu that has the town talking - quality a la carte and superior cuts of meat, at a price that suits everyone. It’s a formula that works. The restaurant opened almost a year ago and now welcomes a steady stream of Wanaka residents and out-of-towners through its doors. Head Chef Leungo Lippe says it is the restaurant’s broad appeal that keeps it humming. “The prices and food appeal to everybody, from backpackers to business owners, from farmers to real estate agents to tourists.” The menu reflects this. It is split in two with one side offering a tempting a la carte selection, which Lippe bases on “classical marriages” featuring traditional combinations of flavours and textures, such as basil with tomato and mozzarella, or beetroot with soft cheese. The other half is a meat lover’s dream. Fine cuts of steak and venison are accompanied by a choice of sauces, such as jus made with thyme and local pinot noir, or butters laced with flavours such as anchovy or sundried tomatoes. There is a selection of potatoes, vegetables and salads, so that each meal reflects a customer’s individual tastes. The menu changes monthly, ensuring that all produce is seasonal. Leungo, who also co-owns Botswana Butchery has a diverse background. He spent his childhood in Africa and studied hotel management in Switzerland before training at the Culinary Institute of America. He went on to work in New York City, London and Washington DC gaining his first head chef position at just 24.

who all have a background in hospitality, aim for top-notch service holding regular tastings to keep up with the evolving menu and to guide diners through the menu options.

“Every customer is an individual and we don’t forget that,” says Leungo.

Through this international experience, Leungo developed an approach to cooking that explores its subtleties. “I learnt how to treat food, not just cook it.”

And the name Botswana Butchery? Looking for something appealing and memorable the owners held a contest to name the new restaurant. While there were a few standouts such as “Grazed and Confused” top polling went to “The Butchery.” Add Leungo’s heritage, being born in Botswana and likely Wanaka’s only speaker of Setswana, and the Botswana Butchery was born.

Botswana Butchery has a strong focus on service. While the restaurant has a relaxed, informal ambience, the staff

Botswana Butchery is open seven nights a week, from 5pm - 11pm. Bookings are recommended.


RESTAURANTS

22

food french style High profile Queenstown restaurant Tatler has refreshed its style by entering into an exciting new collaboration with Encore Cuisine. Margo Berryman tested the menu. Tatler Restaurant has stood the test of time in Queenstown’s restaurant scene. Previously operating as the Moa, Tatler has always been a venue for a range of functions – from large parties involving Hollywood stars to intimate gatherings for a dedicated local clientele. Tatler has a key location in the lower part of The Mall and owner Mark Jessop is excited about the food team and new menu at the French style brasserie. Enter Stephen Mills of Encore Cuisine whose international cooking experience includes Michelin Star properties in Europe, Boutique Australian hotels, cult Restaurants in the Channel Islands, the French ski resort of Chamonix and large scale catering operations in outback Australia. “When Mark first approached me about Tatler it was from a consultancy position but we could see the potential to put our own team of professionals into the restaurant and deliver the goods ourselves,� says Stephen.

“Callum’s venison is simply the best example of fresh product direct from New Zealand’s heartland. We work hard to deliver that and all our beef is Hereford prime and our salmon comes from both Akaroa and Stewart Island, so it’s a real showcase of what this country produces so well.�

It is a unique relationship which sees Stephen’s team of highly experienced chefs serving up his style of simple, elegant modern food using fresh New Zealand produce.

With a refreshed team in the kitchen and a new enticing menu Tatler is once again a rising star in Queenstown’s busy restaurant scene.

As Queenstown’s premier catering company Encore Cuisine has created a niche in the market for professional and personalised cuisine service for any size event.

The talents of the new team at Tatler, together with the new and enticing menu is an outstanding combination ensuring the restaurant’s on going status as one of Queenstown’s foremost eating spots.

The team also operates the popular Traffic CafĂŠ in downtown Queenstown and the Steak House upstairs at the World Bar in Shotover Street. “My philosophy was to handpick a team of well qualified chefs and staff who can deliver consistent high quality food and stylish service with everything we do.â€? “They all have top skills and work to a high standard. They also have the ability to move between all our products from personal chefing through to weddings, the cafĂŠ and the restaurants, which helps to motivate them and ensures no one gets restless.â€? Which obviously means Tatler is in very good hands. Diners now get to choose from a single all day menu including new options such as appealing breakfast pancakes and the lunchtime club sandwich – a best seller. Spanish style tapas are served in the afternoons – a tasty snack option with a glass of local pinot or champagne at the bar. “The tapas menu fills the gap for those who want to enjoy the atmosphere without having to sit through a full menu, or it makes a great introduction to dining,â€? says Stephen. The new dinner menu is expansive and includes French favourites such as garlic snails and fish en papilotte. Seafood dishes including Morton Bay bugs wrapped in paper, fresh blue cod and crayfish enhance the menu.

8BUFSGSPOU 3FTUBVSBOU 4VQFSC 4FBGPPEBOE 0ZTUFST /FX;FBMBOE #FFGBOE-BNC "XBSE 8JOOJOH 8JOF-JTU 4UVOOJOH 7JFXT 0QFO%BZT

"with food this good it's easy to overlook the water"

SFTFSWBUJPOTFTTFOUJBMQIPOFUPSFTFSWFZPVS XBUFSGSPOUUBCMFPQFOEBJMZGSPNQN Absolute Waterfront, Ground Floor, Steamer Wharf, Beach St Queenstown

Wild venison is one of the most popular dishes and is sourced from local hunter Callum Hughes of Fare Game who hunts deer in the Fiordland wilderness area. Stephen says the meat is packed full of flavour.

Top Left: Lamb cutlets with pistachio crust Top Right: Belgium chocolate and berries Below: Individual chocolate brownie cake

DEVELOPMENT Key facts about Jacks Point • The  entire zone covers 1200ha (3000 acres). It will encompass a community of 5000 residents in approximately 1800 homes, a village and a living environment centred on open space, natural values and recreation.

7

living at jacks point

A new residential community is emerging in one of the Wakatipu’s most spectacular locations below the Remarkables Mountain range and overlooking Lake Wakatipu. Jenny McLeod visited Jacks Point to find out more about the $2billion development where 5,000 people will eventually live.

•T  he Jacks Point zone was originally part of Remarkables Station, farmed by the Jardine family for three generations. •T  he development is set below The Remarkables mountain range, on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, reached from SH 6, 10 minutes’ drive from Queenstown International Airport, 15 minutes from Queenstown, 20 minutes from Arrowtown, and adjacent to the entrance to The Remarkables Ski Area. . •T  he Jacks Point 18-hole par 72 championship golf course and golf club is opening summer 2008/09. •T  he Jacks Point philosophy is to tread lightly, carefully integrating a new community and activities into the land, without disturbing its intrinsic values. The rugged, dramatic and open nature of the grassland and mountain landscape is protected and there is a strong emphasis on retaining and regenerating native vegetation •T  he Jacks Point village is set beside a four hectare (10 acre) lake. It will include a golf clubhouse and a mixture of retail, commercial and residential elements similar to central Queenstown. The village centre design will focus on pedestrian landscaping, public walkways and a relaxed waterfront atmosphere. •J  acks Point has 35km of public walking tracks and there is public access to the golf course through membership or green fees.

Fletcher Living home The Jacks Point township below the Remarkables Mountain range and overlooking Lake Wakatipu is the largest single development in the history of the Queenstown Lakes District and capable of housing a community of 5,000 residents. Jenny McLeod visited the site. The 1200ha (3000 acres) zone has been master planned by Darby Partners Ltd and will have approximately 1800 homes, a village and a living environment focused on open space, recreation and natural values. “It’s pristine never before settled land,� says developer John Darby. “What we’re doing is developing it as a place for people while retaining the nature of the site and adding to it.� Fletcher Living, which is a division of Fletcher Residential, is developing 200 sections at Jacks Point and more than 40 architecturally designed homes have already been built, with the first residents now living on site. “The homes are inspired by the rugged alpine setting and the architects have integrated the landscape with the houses by using natural materials such as cedar, copper, granite and local stone,� says manager Neville Dennis. Jacks Point is north facing and houses are built for all year round sun with alpine views taking in the Remarkables Mountain range and Coronet Peak Ski Area. Building at Jacks Point is limited to just five per cent of the total land and the remaining area is a natural parkland which includes a 18 hole 72 par championship golf course and a 35kilometre network of walking, cycling and bridle trails combined with diverse recreational facilities. “The majority of our houses look out over reserve areas and the open space is a significant feature for our buyers,� says Neville. “All the properties have high ceilings emphasising the

spectacular alpine views, open plan living, modern interiors and beautifully landscaped gardens which reflect the natural environment which is the hallmark of Jacks Point.� Fletcher Living is “creating a community within the Jacks Point community� and a range of village facilities are being developed alongside a feature four hectare (10 acre) lake. The village centre is being developed with the assistance of internationally renowned Canadian company Intrawest, and will include retail and commercial space, a strikingly designed golf clubhouse and other amenities for residents. Early Jacks Point buyers are excited about being part of a new, quality residential development. Tristan and Julia Franklin purchased their Fletcher Living home after just one visit to Jacks Point. “When we first arrived at Jacks Point we were overwhelmed with the location and the quality of the development. The golf course is clearly exceptional in terms of the beautiful, dramatic landscape and the stunning layout and design of the course,� says Tristan. “Fletcher Living made the decision easy for us with a well designed contemporary home looking out over a protected reserve and all within walking distance to the clubhouse and the future village. Getting in early gives us the chance to secure our piece of paradise before the rest of the world discovers it!�


EVENTS

6

april April 1 – 12 The Queenstown Farmers’ Market offers a variety of affordable, seasonal and fresh produce from local producers every Saturday morning. Venue: Queenstown Primary School, Robins Rd, Queenstown Contact: Sharlene Inch Email:sharlene_inch@yahoo.com

may May 16 - 24 Grease - after 30 years Grease is still one of the world’s most popular musicals.  Venue: Queenstown Memorial Hall Organisation: Showbiz Queenstown Contact: Hilary Finnie Phone: 03 442 0441

RESTAURANTS

finz seafood restaurant A decision to leave the rarefied world of academia for the heat of the Finz Restaurant kitchen has paid off for Terri Corsan as Jo Blick found out.

April 13 Meridian Energy Kids Bike Jams - only national mountain bike series for kids aged 5 – 13 years. Venue: Cromwell Speedway Track Contact: Annie Shan Phone: 04 389 4496

Dining at Wai

April 18 – 20 The Great New Zealand Craft Show - for those who make crafts and those who love to buy them. Venue: Queenstown Events Centre Contact: Fiona Dunkley Phone: 03 348 0572 April 24 – May 1 Arrowtown Autumn Festival - a community based festival with over 65 events. Venue: Arrowtown Contact: Julie Hughes Phone: 03 442 0809 April 26 Contact Epic Mountain Bike Race - Inaugural, 125km circumnavigation of Lake Hawea.  Venue: Lake Hawea, Wanaka Contact: Danielle Nicholson Phone: 03 443 6090

23

Terri Corsan

june June 27 – July 6 American Express Queenstown Winter Festival. A 10-day non-stop programme of over 60 events encompassing sport, art, music, comedy, food and wine.  Contact: Sally Feinerman Phone: 03 441 2453

what’s on

Terri started her food career studying for a Food Science degree at the University of Otago but it wasn’t long before she wanted a more hands on role and swapped her lab coat for chef’s whites - a move that now sees her in charge of her own restaurant as one of the partners in Queenstown’s Steamer Wharf seafood restaurant Finz. Finz has become a favoured haunt for Queenstown locals with its reputation for deliciously fresh seafood. Terri has been an integral part of the restaurant’s operation since it opened three year ago. She was lured away from her previous role at Fishbone Bar and Grill by the opportunity to run a new restaurant and the chance to invest in if it was a success. A year ago the time was right and Terri is now a fully fledged partner. She says it has been excellent to see the restaurant grow over the last three years and describes her relationship with her business colleagues Alex Boyes, Jan Rae Robertson and Martin and Megan James as a “mentorship as well as a partnership”. The name Finz neatly encapsulates the restaurant’s philosophy, offering as it does fresh seafood done in a superb Kiwi way. However Terri is quick to point out it’s not just a seafood restaurant. The menu offers chicken, steak and lamb options and there’s a great selection of vegetarian dishes. Many of the dishes are gluten free and diners need only ask if they have special dietary needs. The menu lends itself to adding things in and taking things out and she points to her own favourite on the menu, the

Fish of the Day, which can be cooked any way you like with three choices of accompaniments. For the record, Terri’s favourite is to have her fish grilled and served on a bed of greek salad. Fish served in the restaurant is delivered fresh six days a week and mostly comes from the southern port of Bluff. The most popular dish is battered blue cod and sometimes even the boss herself will cook it. Terri is by no means a sleeping partner and still cooks or works on the floor, keeping an eye on proceedings and making sure the customers are enjoying the Finz experience. The restaurant itself is stylish, with bright orange lamp shades and walls providing the interior with a warm glow. The suede covered banquette style seats are ideal for lounging and the restaurant’s informality makes it children friendly. Finz is family oriented and this is underscored by the children’s menu (for “Mini Moas and Little Sprats”) which has puzzles to keep the kids amused while they wait. The children’s menu also offers an excellent value combo option at just $12 which includes a main, a soft drink, an ice cream sundae and a chocolate fish, making an affordable meal out for the whole family. Although Finz has a comprehensive wine list including a cellar selection provided by sister restaurant Wai, next door Finz also welcomes BYO wines. A full selection of New Zealand Beers and juices gives something for everyone. There’s nothing fishy about the Finz recipe for success -exceptionally good food at great prices in an appealing waterfront location.


LIFESTYLE

24

WARBIRDS

ambitious architecture

5

aviation dvd spectacular

Replica Homes has strong foundations in the Southern Lakes region offering a comprehensive design and build service with stunning results. Naomi Mentiplay talks to the directors about their ongoing success.

Clark ‘Scotty’ Scott

Replica is headed by directors Graham Duckworth and Grant McKenzie, who have a strong passion for the Southern Lakes and close links with the area.“The region has always had something to offer- skiing, fishing, camping and exploring,” Grant says reminiscing of holidaying in the area as a boy. Later he and his wife Sue spent all their spare time transforming a shed on a family property at Lake Hayes into a home. Grant recalls building the stone walls by hand. “We formed great friendships from building the house.” Grant says building the Lake Hayes home was a turning point in his future career path. “Building was something I enjoyed. It was a toss up between building and the tourism industry.” Grant took on the role of managing Replica Homes. “I really had to start from scratch and rebuild the business.” “We’ve evolved because we are happy to provide a service. It’s a team effort from the design phase to the project management. We take it right through.” It wasn’t until the 1980s Replica began to expand its business into the Southern Lakes. The Replica name has become well known for quality and service and their profile was boosted further after completing the luxury Fairway homes at the five star Millbrook Resort near Queenstown. “About 30 percent of our business is currently in the lower South Island,” says Graham. “We have a genuine interest in developing business in the region. Even though we are based in Christchurch one of us will be in Queenstown every week. This is really effective for our clients as we are their eyes and ears on the ground, particularly when they cannot be here.” The ease of building a home with Replica at the helm has strong appeal to the majority of their clients who are based overseas. “We can advise on new building code requirements, site issues and the complexity of building on a site, particularly if it’s a difficult or steep section. We know how best to manage the terrain and work with resource consents.” “A number of our clients are building their dream house and are happy to pay a little extra for the comfort of knowing it will be done right.” says Graham.

Replica predominantly works with Jason Scott Builders in Queenstown. Jason grew up in Southland, knows the region well and has the resources to complement the Replica product. “Jason Scott builders are a great fit for us because they provide the full service to complete a home – from the site excavation to the landscaping and fitting of appliances and furniture.” Replica has a key liaison role with clients and suppliers. “Every client is different, problems do arise during the building process which we address so all parties involved are satisfied.” Grant admits they often hold back final photos to overseas clients. It is not uncommon for clients to have their first experience of their home only once its completed. “My biggest pleasure is when a home is completed and we have exceeded what the client has expected.” Graham considers the Replica experience is equal to spending money on an extensive overseas holiday or wedding. “Building a house costs a huge amount of money, so you want to be able to enjoy it. It’s worth spending more for a nice experience.” “We take away the hassles and headaches, and engage professionals to take clients through the process.”

Top: Quail Rise residence, Queenstown Top Right: Graham Duckworth and Grant McKenzie Middle: Contemporary Hensman Road home, Queenstown Bottom: Aspen Grove home, Queenstown

With its 18-year history as the premier Warbirds aviation show in Australasia this year’s Warbirds Over Wanaka International Airshow at Easter was no exception when more than 70,000 people converged on Wanaka for the three day spectacular. From vintage aircraft to war vehicles and pyrotechnics, every spectacular moment of the three day event was captured on high definition video and used to create the official 2008 souvenir DVD. Produced by leading Queenstown production company Action Productions Ltd, the DVD showcases the incredible air to ground highlights and records fascinating and in depth interviews with pilots and aviation experts. Included is a special interview with surviving NZ fighter pilot veteran, 86-year-old Jack Stafford. Three times Emmy award winning producer Julian Grimmond of Action Productions says the DVD is a lasting souvenir of one of the best warbird displays ever seen. “The real passion of these aviators is awe inspiring and combined with a unique display of historic aircraft makes this DVD a very special memento of one of the world’s most iconic aviation events.” The WOW 2008 DVD includes extraordinary aerobatic displays by world champion pilot Yurgis Karys and his team of crazy Air Bandits, plus stunning footage of unique aircraft such as the Lockheed LC-130 Polar Hercules

Hercules, the largest ski equipped aircraft in the world. The F-111 supersonic long range strike aircraft is screened in its all glory including the signature “Dump and Burn” which thrilled the crowds and Australia’s RAAF newest acquisition, the C-17 Globemaster, a high wing four jetengine heavy transport aircraft. Show favorites such as the venerable DHC-4 Caribou twin piston-engine light transport employed in Vietnam. Never before seen footage on the DVD includes video shot from the Royal New Zealand Air Force Lockheed C-130 Hercules, after the production crew were given permission to mount a Cineflex V1 4 HiDef gyro-stabilised camera system onto the edge of the aircrafts back ramp and film some of the Warbird aircraft. “Its only possible to get this extraordinary detail of flying Warbirds with a unique combination of precision flying by the RNZAF pilots, the talented warbird pilots and the state of art camera attached to the Hercules,” says Julian. Camera operator and owner, Peter Thompson from Aeroptics says it was a unique opportunity to capture Warbirds footage. “Previously its been difficult on a fixed wing to get this close to the aircraft but we were able to get tighter angles on the pilots in their cockpits from the side and also film directly back at them. This was a chance for old and new aircraft to fly in formation together.” The official 2008 Warbirds Over Wanaka DVD is online at www.wowdvd.co.nz and will be in all major bookstores and DVD outlets by May 08. Captions - Top Right: Air Bandits Team Below: Andrew Hillman of Action Productions


NEWSBRIEF

4

Queenstown Tourism Stacking Up

with Jenny McLeod

Welcome to Newsbrief – QT Magazine’s news column is a regular quarterly feature highlighting current issues and events around the Queenstown and Wanaka region.

Queenstown’s tourist growth is still above the national average, according to official 2007 statistics recently released, which tourism experts say is encouraging in the light of global uncertainty in the market. Queenstown recorded a 4.5% visitor night growth in 2007 while the national average was 3.8% according to Statistics New Zealand. Destination Queenstown CEO David Kennedy says it’s good news for the resort. “Queenstown has had a golden run over the past nine years with huge demand for our destination. The supply part of that equation has resulted in massive growth, particularly in our accommodation sector. We’re now settling down to a more measured pace of growth and need to ensure we hold our position as a premier international destination.” But he says there are challenges ahead. “Fluctuating currencies, environmental concerns and the carbon zero debate will continue to provide challenges that will be met by the continued promotion of compelling reasons to visit.”

Otago have been carrying out archeological recording and excavation work. “Archaeological work is about the careful excavation and analysis of hundreds or thousands of tiny bits of information, often meaningless on their own, and then putting them together in a way that tells a story or answers a specific question,” says Chris Jacomb, a Director of the Southern Pacific Archaeological Research Department of Anthropology at the University of Otago. “The students have worked carefully to preserve clues to the former hotel’s illustrious past.” The original building dates back to the 1880s and operated as a hotel, before being converted to restaurants and retail shops in the 1980s. “We have recorded the use of a brick veneer wall in one part of The Mountaineer which we believe is a pre-1900 section of the building. Brick veneer construction was not common until the 1930s. If we’re able to confirm the age of the wall then that will be a significant discovery for the history of architecture in New Zealand and a milestone for the students involved.”

Landmark Hotel Reveals Its Past

Sporting Future for Wanaka

Exciting discoveries have been unearthed linking the landmark Mountaineer hotel site with the 1880s in Queenstown. The site is being redeveloped and anthropology students from the University of

snippets PALACE FOR QUEENSTOWN The 2008 American Express Queenstown Winter Festival (June 27-July 6) will have the Pacific Crystal Palace as its focal point. The palace will cover a downtown carpark and will be the central venue for many of the festival events. “This is the first time we’ve been able to bring all our major events into one downtown venue, “ says festival director Sally Feinerman. “The palace is one of New Zealand’s most incredible event facilities. It’s such an impressive structure in such a great location and it’s going to add an unforgettable dimension to Festival 2008.”

The future of sporting facilities is in the limelight in Wanaka but it will require wide spread community consultation, according to Upper Clutha Sports Facilities chairman Mike Saunders.

X GAMES MEAL FOR WANAKA SKIER Seventeen-year-old Wanaka free skier Jossi Wells put his name up in lights internationally when he won a silver medal at the prestigious Winter X Games in Aspen in January. Jossi is New Zealand’s top free skier and displayed his huge talent when he won the silver medal in the slopestyle and took out fifth place in the superpipe. New Zealand Free Ski Coach Nick Draxel says its New Zealand’s first X Games medal and the win highlights the incredible skiing talent which is still largely unrecognised. photo

Shirley Emilio (left) and Amanda Mortimer

Green Screen Movies For Queenstown The producers of the movie Wolverine, which is being shot in the Queenstown Lakes District, are helping the region develop a film industry waste strategy. Film Queenstown manager KJ Jennings says the local film industry is committed to a “green screen” philosophy and the Wolverine production team has agreed to a joint venture with the district council to help provide guidelines for a “green screen” ethic. Recycling systems have been put in place on the sets and will provide a template for future productions in the area. “It is an important development for the film industry to reduce it environmental impact, “says Wolverine producer John Palermo. “ The natural beauty of the region attracted us to film here in the first place so it is important we work with the local authorities to help preserve the environment.”

Check out Channel 5 your information station

Mark Hill (left) at blessing

Broadcasting 24 hours a day in your hotel or motel room

WWW.2GIRLS2RUN.COM Queenstown’s Amanda Mortimer will take on the challenge of a lifetime when she and fellow English woman Shirley Emilio attempt to run from the Spanish frontier to the West Coast of Portugal in seven days along the Algarves Ecovia Route (May 4-10). It has never been done before but the two women and their extensive support crew want to celebrate the life of British charity campaigner Jane Tomlinson who died from breast cancer two years ago. Amanda says she was inspirational and despite her illness raised £1.25m. “We want to help increase that total to £2m and we are attracting support around the world. We never expected this idea to catch the imagination of so many people.”

A working party is putting together a discussion document on the options and he says it is critical that the Wanaka community, including absentee ratepayers, has its say. The central issue is the location of a new sports facility to meet the needs of Wanaka in the medium to long term and its possible links with the proposed aquatic centre and a proposed arts/community centre.

with a fun, informative look at activities, shopping, wining and dining in the Queenstown and Wanaka areas.

LIFESTYLE One of Queenstown’s newest businesses, Bespoke Bathrooms is focused on personalised delivery of high quality bathroom designs, fit outs, plumbing and tiling providing a one stop consultancy and service solution for clients. The driving force is owner operator Chris Cummins, who first started the business in 2004 in the UK, where fully qualified Kiwi plumbers were in huge demand. Bespoke Bathrooms was an instant success. Chris says if it worked in London the idea would work anywhere and the Queenstown business started almost a year ago, has grown quickly and already has a steady customer base. He says clients like the concept of dealing with just one person in the business. “The fundamentals behind Bespoke are to provide a seamless service where I deal directly with all aspects of the work and co-ordinate other trades people if they are required on the job.” It is a unique business with three distinct features -

25

bathrooms, tiling and plumbing. Chris specialises in designing modern and contemporary bathrooms for new homes, complete bathroom refits for older homes and renovations. “It’s great to be able to spend time with people, take their ideas and then custom design a bathroom that is feasible for both their budgets and building layouts. We have completed some beautiful contemporary designs in Queenstown along with cottage style refits in traditional styled homes.” Tiling is a key part of the business with steady demand for quality work. “The two jobs work well together because you know what fixtures and fittings will be used and can plan out well in advance any technical problems that need to be overcome.

NZ fashion at Vesta The change of season at Vesta Design Store + Espresso on the Queenstown waterfront has never looked better with a fabulous new addition of uber cool clothing from leading edge New Zealand designers.

home, Vesta Design is hot property. Its has been listed as the “editors choice” in Lonely Planet and is a treasure trove of turn of the century architecture and sublime New Zealand designed art, objects and furniture.

Co-owner Alex Turner, a design student at Canterbury, has established the “Only Child” room at Vesta to showcase a selection of pieces from the current collections from some of New Zealand’s crème de la crème - Adrian Hailwood, World, Amok, Richard…son plus jewellery from Karen Walker, D-Luxe and Meadowlark.

Hanging in the hallway of the quaint old cottage Vesta has an exhibition of Poster Prints entitled “Charming” by Wellington graphic designer Xanthe Harrison. Vesta stocks the Cinnamon Swan range of cards produced by Xanthe.

“There are some great designer pieces that our regular clients will covet while it’s a good opportunity to expose these particular designers to our international visitors who want gorgeous new fashion from New Zealand.”

Definitive and beautiful ceramics by Katherine Smyth make perfect gifts while a range of lampshades, linen and cushions by the likes of Esther Diamond are tempting homeware additions. Beautiful hand loomed New Zealand woollen blankets by Stansborough confirm that design is both form and function.

Housed in Williams Cottage which is Queenstown’s oldest

Delicious and scrumptious new items are on the café menu

music master

Vesta Design Store+Café has a key location in its historic premises on Queenstown’s lakefront and a browse in the store is a must for the Queenstown itinerary.

business run by Bob Tachikawa, the son of the original founder who is still active in the business. As specialists in audio products, the company’s manufacturing ethos is to produce equipment that will be both reliable and efficient, producing superior music sound.

Sleek and sophisticated this system comprises a CD player, DAB tuner, no less than three intergrated amplifiers and a pre-power amplifier combination.

The Rotel 06 series delivers all of this without breaking the budget. Building on the design and success of the awardwinning 02 series, which it replaces, the 06 series has been exhaustively tested and includes new instrument upgrades, additional features and functionality. A front panel media player input makes it quick and easy for connecting to MP3 or iPod devices. The Rotel 06 series can be assembled in many different ways to suit the home or work environment and is an outstanding option for affordable style and superb sound.

AIRPORT ARTWORK

Rotel 06 Series: A new standard in affordable hi-fi separates.

COLLEGE CELEBRATION Queenstown Resort College Hospitality Management students raised over$3,000 for the Children’s Protection Studies Trust through a fundraising dinner planned and implemented by the students as part of their course curriculum. Celebrity chef Jason Dell from Blanket Bay personally designed the three course meal for the charity dinner. The College which is New Zealand’s first ecotourism institute recently celebrated its second birthday and has full classes in both its Hospitality Management and Adventure Tourism diploma programme April intakes. Further intakes are scheduled for July and October.

for autumn including a mouthwatering array of gluten free cakes and sweets plus perennial favourites such as cheese rolls and chocolate walnut brownies. It’s hard to pass up the seriously good coffee and fine selection of loose teas and organic juices.

Some of the best audio technology on the market is now available at Gary Andersons in the Mall, Cromwell. In particular the latest Rotel 06 series which packs a punch of sound and sophistication is a popular choice for people wanting a new standard in affordable hi-fi separates.

Finished in a smart silver finish, the series is an international combination designed by teams from Japan and the United Kingdom, who collaborated on the entire design process for Rotel. Experts say it is a smart concept to select some of the best audio technology from around the world and piece it together to create an integrated system. Rotel as a brand and company has been in existence for 45 years and is a family owned A recently unveiled sculpture at the entrance to Queenstown Airport is receiving rave reviews. The work by Arrowtown sculptor Mark Hill consists of three tall structures which have a Maori influence and celebrate the manawhenua or the people of the land. Entitled “welcome o visitors from afar” the artwork is seen as a striking welcome to Queenstown with the Remarkables Mountain range as the backdrop.

bespoke bathrooms

solutions for sound and vision 0800 4 PLASMA 0800 4 752 768 www.GaryAnderson.co.nz


REAL ESTATE

26

IN THIS ISSUE

property potential

3

p.13 p.9

Ray White Real Estate Queenstown continues its steady climb as one of the leading real estate companies in the region. Margo Berryman talks to Cameron Reed about the current state of the property market. Fletcher Living at Jacks Point

p.15 news brief

wanaka

4. News from around the region

15. Memories of Sir Ed Hillary

wow dvd

cafés

5. The official Warbirds over Wanaka DVD

development 7. $ 2 billion Jacks Point development Commonage Close

The latest developments at the Queenstown branch include a rebranding exercise under the experienced management of Cameron Reed, who is leading a skilled team of agents actively working the national and global real estate markets. “We’ve taken over Ray White Queenstown because we believe it’s the right vehicle moving forward in the current fluctuating market place,” he says. “The Ray White brand has a significant presence internationally with a network across Australia, New Zealand and Asia and a massive annual turnover of 30 billion dollars across the group. So it allows us to be adaptable and gain strength from this solid corporate backing.” Getting the right advice when buying or selling property can be crucial during times of change and Cameron says his sales staff has the experience to market Queenstown correctly. “I am very pleased with the sales team we have here now at Ray White because there is diversity across the group and an ability to handle different sectors of the market from rural/lifestyle through to family homes, apartments and developments.”

Threepwood, Lake Hayes

Woodlot Properties - Chartres Green He says properties in the Queenstown area are some of the best in the country and despite recent headlines to the contrary it is not all doom and gloom, particularly in the local market. “We have seen this type of situation before and we will see it again. Queenstown is a strong investment but people will have to work to meet the market and take a long term view on their investments. We have a lot of confidence in this area and if you consider what developments are underpinning the region then we have a solid future.” He says unprecedented development over the past five years has seen Queenstown become a fully fledged international resort with developers providing infrastructural strength to the area with high quality designs. Cameron considers the town gains a lot from this type of property, making it a dynamic place to live where all businesses benefit from increased exposure to the international scene. “We have an amazing spread of property developments that have been put together by some very experienced and savvy teams who know what the market is looking for. Our expertise and networks particularly into the Australian and

Asian markets means we are talking with buyers all the time looking for this type of product.” Examples include the recently completed Commonage Close which offers a prestigious address on Queenstown Hill overlooking Queenstown Bay and the Esplanade Villas with their unrivalled lakefront location. “Another example is experienced developer Woodlot Properties David Broomfield who truly understands the Queenstown market, offering a portfolio of property that adds integrity and value to the area with products that meet all budgets.” Larger lifestyle sites like Jacks Point, Threepwood, Wyuna Station and Bendemeer are examples of long term developments that will continue to develop as the town grows and matures, he says.

fashion

restaurants lifestyle

10. Arrowtown Autumn Festival highlights 11. Gold fever resurfaces

24. Replica homes in the Southern Lakes Region

jewellery 12. Innovative design at The Opal Centre

25. Latest bathrooms, audio technology and interior design

festival

27. Ray White Real Estate makes mark in Queenstown

13. 2008 American Express Queenstown Winter Festival

Published by

QT Publishing PO Box 133, Queenstown Phone 03 442 6430 Fax 03 442 9386

Layout

Margo Berryman margo@actiontvnz.com

Editor Jenny McLeod mcleod@queenstown.co.nz

Print

Otago Daily Times www.odt.co.nz

Contributors

Jo Blick, Alan Brady, Jane Brooke, Andrea Deuchrass, Naomi Mentiplay, Penny Simpson, Laura Williamson,

QT Magazine is the number one lifestyle and tourism magazine for Queenstown, Wanaka, Arrowtown and Glenorchy.

Jo Ruthven jo@freshdesigns.co.nz

QT Magazine is available in all hotels and motels and informa-

Office/Manager

tion centres throughout the region and from distribution bins

info@actiontvnz.com

Queenstown • 1 Church Lane, Queenstown • PO Box 1011, Queenstown • Ph 03 450 2040 • Fax 03 441 7178 • queenstown.nz@raywhite.com • www.rwqueenstown.co.nz Arrowtown • 14 Buckingham Street, Arrowtown • PO Box 5, Arrowtown • Ph 03 442 1616 • Fax 03 442 1287 • arrowtown.nz@raywhite.com • www.rwarrowtown.co.nz wanaka • 123 Ardmore Street, Wanaka • Ph 03 443 7121 • Fax 03 443 8016 • wanaka.nz@raywhite.com • www.rwwanaka.co.nz

19. Alan Brady talks Central Otago wine

arrowtown

“At Ray White we have got the fundamentals right to be able to take properties of this magnitude to the market with confidence.”

Ray White Real Estate offices

art and wine

22. Tatler Queenstown 23. Finz Seafood Restaurant

Managing Editor/Sales

• JACKS POINT – 1200 hectare (3000 acre) nature preserve on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, Jacks Point comprises residential neighbourhoods, a waterfront village, harbour, an 18 hole championship golf course and extensive trail system. • WYUNA STATION - Wyuna is a sheep, cattle and deer farm historically a part of the original Ree’s station that occupied the entire eastern side of Lake Wakatipu and beyond. • THREEPWOOD - a unique rural lifestyle development centred on a traditional working farm in the heart of Queenstown’s stunning Wakatipu Basin. Sites up to 1.3 ha (3.21 acres) take in all round sweeping views of Lake Hayes and the surrounding mountains. • COMMONAGE CLOSE – Homes are located on a ridge for privacy and have sweeping views of the spectacular Remarkables Mountain range, the crystal clear waters of Lake Wakatipu and cosmopolitan Queenstown. • BENDEMEER - Eight magnificent 220m2 villas, built in two complexes, adjoining The Lodge or build your own home on superb rural sites ranging from 1- 5 hectares (2.5-12.5 acres). Individual freehold homes designed by several of New Zealand’s foremost architects including Warren and Mahoney, Fearon Hay and Crossen Clarke.

16. Queenstown’s café scene

9. Seasonal fashion in Arrowtown

“These are outstanding properties that will stand the test of time here and deliver some stunning lifestyle options that we will all be proud of in the years to come.”

DEVELOPMENT FACT BOX

p.20

in the CBD.


QT Magazine - Autumn 2008