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Art Riot

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is now a time to be resilient, or to riot?

After Care

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Resilience Resistance


Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon

Editor: Dr Marsha Bradfield Design, illustration, picture editor, & layout: Joshua Y’Barbo Printing: Chelsea College of Arts Cover image: Calum F. Kerr participating in Art Riot


Table of Contents: Introduction by Lana Locke

Section 1:

Art Riot and Resilience

Art Riot by James Lander Visual Essay by David Goldenberg Reflection by Keunhye Lee My Experience of Art Riot by Lana Locke Pulling Strings and Tying Knots by Joshua Y’Barbo Anywhere with a Desk by Francesca Peschier

Section 2:

After Care Lesson Plans

Syllabus by Dr Marsha Bradfield Mapping and Managing Your Creative Practice by Francesca Peschier Can Art Sustain You as a Lifelong Project? by Lana Locke Not Knowing Salon by Joshua Y’Barbo Resilience 365 by James Lander Bios and Acknowledgments


INTRODUCTION: LANA LOCKE

In the aftermath of the shock Conservative Party victory in May 2015, Art Riot called on artists and art students to bring or perform an artwork on 20th June 2015 at the Bank of England in a gathering and marching of a multitude of artworks as part of the End Austerity Now march. Any kind of portable, wearable or performable artwork was acceptable. The idea of Art Riot followed on from the digital project Riotous Cities from our same PhD year group at Chelsea College of Arts. Whereas Riotous Cities took a broad interpretation of riot in terms of artists’ responses to an abstract urban environment, Art Riot had a much more direct interpretation, moving the riot out of the digital and into the physical and performative. The project rejected the direct and indirect limitations imposed on the role of art and the artist by the Austerity Government, who seemed to see our value solely in terms of economics - from art as a commodity, to our ability to enhance London property value, to our growing tuition fee value five years on from the 2010 student protests. Beyond the cause of art itself, Art Riot was not intended as a form of protest for a particular body or interest group, nor to incorporate slogans or banners to that effect. Rather, the gathering and marching of artworks provided a performative platform to facilitate an unmediated engagement between the singularities of the individual artworks and a moving, public space that was equally inharmonious. The End Austerity route started at Bank and ended at Parliament Square. However, we continued on to Millbank Tower, retracing the failed 2010 student protests. A year later, a number of our group reflected on Art Riot during Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School’s Year of Resilience, a theme it adopted for the academic year 2015/16 in response to global warming, the mass migration and displacement of people and ongoing cuts to public funding, which will hit the Graduate School’s research programme hard in the coming years. We were participating in the Graduate Teaching Scheme, aimed at sharing PhD students’ research interests and ethos with the taught courses, whilst giving us paid teaching experience. Professor Malcolm Quinn asked our group, under the leadership of Dr Marsha Bradfield, to put together lesson plans to teach ‘resilience’ to students, with a particular focus on existential aftercare for those about to graduate. We sought to develop curriculum that would help students to engage with, survive, and thrive in a future beyond their degree shows. In formulating strategies for teaching resilience to others we found renewed resilience in our historical intention as a group to document the Art Riot project, and to carry out our own aftercare following the event’s conclusion. Whilst the period of rioting was defined within an event, sustaining the will to keep rioting is a longterm project that does indeed require resilience. We share our lesson plans here alongside a conversational and pictorial account of Art Riot, exploring these intertwined strategies, as we continue to ask the question: is now a time to be resilient, or to riot?


Section 1:

Art Riot and Resilience


James Lander: Art Riot David Goldenberg: Visual Essay Keunhye Lee: Reflection Lana Locke: My Experience of Art Riot Joshua Y’Barbo: Pulling Strings and Tying Knots Francesca Peschier: Anywhere with a Desk


Art Riot 20th June 2015 James Lander Prior to being invited to join the Art Riot rally at the End Austerity Now march in June 2015 I had been working with the T-shirt, a well-established medium used by activists, artists, brands, designers etc. For the artists’ Open Studios at Balfron Tower in the summer of 2014, I had industrially printed T-shirts with a black and white photograph of Balfron Tower as it originally looked when built in 1968, beneath it the BALFRON TOWER logo which mimicked the signage on the front entrance of the building. I had planned to gauge public interest in the T-shirts and wanted to find a way of distributing them, which disrupted the capitalist model of the production and consumption of artworks. I resolved to donate them to my audience in return for something they made or did themselves. It could be to cook dinner or measure me up for a suit. What it was would be less important than that they had chosen it and cooked or measured it themselves. This reversal of the roles of the artist as producer and the audience as consumer, even if only temporary, was important in thinking about how to approach the Art Riot rally at the End Austerity Now march a year later. At the time of the march it seemed urgent and pressing to speak up against the government imposed cuts which affected public/social housing and funding for artists and students. As an artist, PhD research student and resident living and working at Balfron Tower, a former local authority housing block that is currently awaiting refurbishment to the exclusion of any future social housing provision within it, I was well placed to carry my personal voice into a public context. I acknowledge that it is not possible to speak for others unless nominated to do so. However my use of the plural in the slogan on the T-shirt I designed and wore to the march in 2015 was intended to show solidarity with all those who have been, are being and will be affected by the decision to sell off the valuable asset that Balfron Tower was originally designed and built to be, by the lifelong Socialist, Hungarian émigré Architect Ernö Goldfinger. The slogan, ‘SAVE OUR BALFRON TOWER’ printed in red over the original black and white photograph of the tower, was intended to further disrupt the capitalist model of production and consumption critiqued by the Balfron Tower T-shirts I had printed the year before. While the T-shirts made in 2014 were seen and distributed on site, their wider circulation was not achievable due to lack of funding. The conversation and debate were restricted to being between the social demographic typical of a contemporary art and architecture audience.


A year later, wearing the ‘SAVE OUR BALFRON TOWER’ T-shirt at the march, shifted the context of the work to a geographically distinct location, removed from the site of the subject. Instead of industrially producing T-shirts that would be exchanged with my audience and which would then circulate as artworks, the one-off ‘SAVE OUR BALFRON TOWER’ T-shirt, which I manually circulated, was to be photographed by others and redistributed via online media and in print.

Image by Toby Paton


However I had a clear agenda for going to the protest to join together a political event on austerity, a state of emergency, Neo liberalism as one of the few backdrops to address these issues within the framework of art at a point when that framew I only decided to go to the protest at the very last minute

A discourse as art about political art against the backdrop of a pro

I had intended to bring a camera to document the march but in my haste and nerves to rush to get to the event on time I left my camera behind, instead I decided to collect leaflets and posters along the route of the march. Bu

How do we talk about art and the political today, gi

During the march various members of the group randomly came together and dispersed to talk over the route of th


when that framework and material form is difficult to pin down

B

There is from the start a dilemma, why talk about politics when we ought we assume to be involved directly in political acts

backdrop of a protest

e of the march. But i think that this was a good thing, which allowed me to be inside the event and to concentrate on the discussions with other

One of the difficult problems is how to recognise the form the State has mutated into, and the type of power we have to Can the protest itself be said to constitute the political when it appeared to be stage managed, A token gesture, ritualised protest and civil disobediance?

political today, given that its such an overfamiliar issue, but at the same time it ia difficult to locate an example of a practice that fullfils what we understand by a political art practice

ver the route of the event an unprogrammed and unscripted range of issues, most of the small talk, introductions etc I have forgotten, apart from simple philosophical, political, art production issues,


But the key question, which makes sense within the context of the protest, is whether it is possible for art under the Neo Liberal reigme, to address Neo Liberalism, when art and education itself is part of

We discussed why there

It is almost possible to say that today since it is very difficult to dertermine a precise definition an

One of the difficult problems is how to recognise the form the State has mutated into, and the type of power we have to address, and which tools do we have at our disposal to understand and address whatever this power is that we are confronting?

cal when it appeared to be stage managed, A token gesture, ritualised protest and civil disobediance?

d by a political art practice

losophical, political, art production issues,

A number of people looked at the protest as an opportunity to test out the idea of an open air exhibition or ideas of public art

This led to a discussion on Claire Fontaine, negative critique, and the idea that to discuss and look at the political and society you can’t use it’s representations, it is ne


n art and education itself is part of that reigme. Yet if we are required to address Neo Liberalism and states of emergency, is it feasible and possible for art to rise to the occasion? And do what? Is it able to do more than the current tokenistic empty gestures or appropriation of politics and its actions?

We discussed why there isn’t a language to discuss politics today and why so called political art isnt poltical but is instead popularist art or State art

to dertermine a precise definition and role of art and equally difficult to pin point a precise political role of art has led to the rethinking of the very ontology of art itself

eas of public art What form does art have to assume to be effective?

can’t use it’s representations, it is necessary to look for new concepts and ideas, or to resist existing ideas and concepts in the manner of a comprehensive Human strike. Then we discussed the Austrian group Wochenklauser as a model who do made concrete small changes to society

Visual essay by David Goldenberg


Art Riot, 20th June 2015 Keunhye Lee Art Riot은 CCW의 같은 학년 PhD 학생들이 기획한 프로젝트 중 하나인 ‘Riotous Cities’에서 발전되었다. ‘Riotous Cities’는 오프라인 전시를 통해서 이루어지는 기존의 전시 개념이 아닌 웹을 이용해 디지털 공간을 통해 전시공간을 제공하는 프로젝트이다. 어떻게 하면 경제적, 공간적 압박에서 벗어나서 좀 더 효과적으로 더 자유로운 형태로 우리의 리서치와 작업들을 전시할 수 있을지… 또는 어떻게 더 효과적으로 예술을 공부하는 학생들 더 나아가 대중들과 공유할 수 있을지에 대해 토론을 하면서 발전 되었다. 유학생 신분으로 전시등을 기획하면서 경제적 물리적으로 어려움을 겪을때가 가끔 있기에 ‘ Riotous Cities ’ 는 나에게 흥미로운 프로젝트였다. 작업들을 온라인을 이용해 자유로운 방식으로 전시하기 때문에 다소 복잡한 형태로 보여 질 수도 있지만 좀 더 많은 학생들과 대중들이 쉽게 접근 할 수 있을 것이라 생각했다. ‘Art Riot’은 ‘Riotous Cities’의 일환으로써 좀 더 적극적이고 자유로운 개념의 아트 프로젝트이다. 기존의 슬로건이 적힌 배너등을 사용하는 것이 아니라, 이동가능한 형태의 작업들이나 퍼포먼스 등을 통해 공공 공간인 거리에서 자신들의 작업들의 가치와 의도를 알리는 형태로, 일종의 무브먼트 형식의 프로젝트였다. 예를 들어, 같이 참여했던 James Lander는 1996년 Ern Goldfinger에 의해 디자인된 Balfron Tower가 그려진 티셔츠를 입고 나왔다. 아티스트이자 Balfron Tower에 대해 공부하는 PhD 리서쳐이자 영국 거주자로서 그는 이 타워처럼 가치가 있는 소셜 하우징을 헐 값에 팔아 넘긴것에 대한 이야기를 직접 디자인한 티셔츠를 입고 나와 거리에서 행진을 하면서 대중에게 전하고자 했다. ‘Riotous Cities’가 디지털 공간에서 이루어진다면 ‘Art Riot’은 물리적인이고 실질적인 공간에서 다양한 형태로 이루어지는 것이었다. ‘Art Riot’은 학교 근처 펍에서 우리의 리서치와 작업을 보여주는 형태에 대한 어려움에 대해서 자유롭게 토론을하다 나온 첫번째 프로젝트써 ‘End Austerity’에 초대받아 2015년 6월 20일 Bank Station에서 시작되었다. Bank Station에서 내려 우리의 모임 장소로 갔을 때, 생각 보다 훨씬 더 많은 사람들로 놀랐다. 수 많은 사람들로 구성된 수많은 단체들은 저마다 자신들의 의견을 내세운 슬로건과 배너를 들고 자신들의 모임장소에 모여있었다.


Art Riot은 CCW의 같은 학년 PhD 학생들이 기획한 프로젝트 중 하나인 ‘Riotous Cities’에서 발전되었다. ‘Riotous Cities’는 오프라인 전시를 통해서 이루어지는 기존의 전시 개념이 아닌 웹을 이용해 디지털 공간을 통해 전시공간을 제공하는 프로젝트이다. 어떻게 하면 경제적, 공간적 압박에서 벗어나서 좀 더 효과적으로 더 자유로운 형태로 우리의 리서치와 작업들을 전시할 수 있을지… 또는 어떻게 더 효과적으로 예술을 공부하는 학생들 더 나아가 대중들과 공유할 수 있을지에 대해 토론을 하면서 발전 되었다. 유학생 신분으로 전시등을 기획하면서 경제적 물리적으로 어려움을 겪을때가 가끔 있기에 ‘ Riotous Cities ’ 는 나에게 흥미로운 프로젝트였다. 작업들을 온라인을 이용해 자유로운 방식으로 전시하기 때문에 다소 복잡한 형태로 보여 질 수도 있지만 좀 더 많은 학생들과 대중들이 쉽게 접근 할 수 있을 것이라 생각했다. ‘Art Riot’은 ‘Riotous Cities’의 일환으로써 좀 더 적극적이고 자유로운 개념의 아트 프로젝트이다. 기존의 슬로건이 적힌 배너등을 사용하는 것이 아니라, 이동가능한 형태의 작업들이나 퍼포먼스 등을 통해 공공 공간인 거리에서 자신들의 작업들의 가치와 의도를 알리는 형태로, 일종의 무브먼트 형식의 프로젝트였다. 예를 들어, 같이 참여했던 James Lander는 1996년 Ern Goldfinger에 의해 디자인된 Balfron Tower가 그려진 티셔츠를 입고 나왔다. 아티스트이자 Balfron Tower에 대해 공부하는 PhD 리서쳐이자 영국 거주자로서 그는 이 타워처럼 가치가 있는 소셜 하우징을 헐 값에 팔아 넘긴것에 대한 이야기를 직접 디자인한 티셔츠를 입고 나와 거리에서 행진을 하면서 대중에게 전하고자 했다. ‘Riotous Cities’가 디지털 공간에서 이루어진다면 ‘Art Riot’은 물리적인이고 실질적인 공간에서 다양한 형태로 이루어지는 것이었다. ‘Art Riot’은 학교 근처 펍에서 우리의 리서치와 작업을 보여주는 형태에 대한 어려움에 대해서 자유롭게 토론을하다 나온 첫번째 프로젝트써 ‘End Austerity’에 초대받아 2015년 6월 20일 Bank Station에서 시작되었다. Bank Station에서 내려 우리의 모임 장소로 갔을 때, 생각 보다 훨씬 더 많은 사람들로 놀랐다. 수 많은 사람들로 구성된 수많은 단체들은 저마다 자신들의 의견을 내세운 슬로건과 배너를 들고 자신들의 모임장소에 모여있었다. 우리의 약속장소에는 아티스트들과 예술을 공부하는 학생들이 자신들의 작업을들고 모여있었다. 시간이 되자 장소에 모인 사람들은 도로를 점령하고 일제히 국회의사당을 향해 걸어갔다. 아주 평화로운 행진에 많이 놀랐다. 거리를 지나가는 행인들과 건물에서 내려다 보는 사람들 모두 응원을 해주었고, 경찰들의 보호아래 평화롭게 국회의사당 까지 걸어 갈 수 있었다. 걸어가는 내내 사람들과 수많은 이슈들에 관해 대화를 나누었고, 다른 사람들의 작업들? 배너들?을 통해 사회 곳곳의 울림들에 대해서도 알 수 있었던 좋은 기회가 되었다. 출발한지 두시간? 세시간? 정도 흘렀을때, 마침대 국회의사당에 도착했다. 우리 일행은 학교 근처 Millbank까지 더 걸어가서 기념 촬영을 하고, 첫 아이디어가 나왔던 펍으로 가서 우리의 대화를 마저 이어 나갔다. 비록 예상 했던 사람들보다 적은 사람들이 우리의 그룹에 참가 했고, 비록 짧은 시간 동안이었지만, 수 많은 사람들 속에서 아트워크를 통한 우리들의 목소리를 낼 수 있어서 좋은 경험이었다.

Images by Keunhye Lee


My Experience of Art Riot Lana Locke It started in the Grosvenor Pub in Pimlico. <<Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have an actual riot! With our art!>> We all agreed. But how? But when?


We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get it together for May Day. Besides, May Day was just before the General Election, when all was unknown, something of a lull. Then suddenly there was all the more reason for people to take to the streets.


Travelling underground on 20th June 2015 to Bank station, a stop before it I put on my wearable artwork of recycling bag-dressmelded-withold-footballvia-dripped l a t e x.


We arrived at the platform and I sprinted out the door, and ran up the stairs through the crowds. Having roped him into filming the event for us, I shouted at my husband Toby Paton to <<hurry!>> We were late for our agreed rioting-meeting-time.


Outside, bumbling to find our meeting point at the corner of Bucklersbury and Walbrook, between the Student Bloc and Smaller Blocs. There was no one there.


I put up our black umbrella painted with leftover-domestic-house-painttest-pot-and-brush the words <<Art Riot>>, and looked around anxiously for any of the forty-five who said they would come. Slowly, most of our core group showed up, plus a few more interested people - less than ten in total.


Did the gooey ball dropping from my already pregnant belly have any meaning in the crowds as we assembled? People asked me what this worn artwork meant, but without a definitive binary my explanation didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t assist them in pinpointing an issue: <<It relates to the excess that austerity doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have room for>>.


There were so many people around, seemingly itching to get out of the blocks and M A R C H as anticipation grew in the wait for a cue from End Austerity Now.


One of our number joined at the meeting point but became so impatient that he had left us before this waiting period was over. He found another party to join, he preferred to march alone than with us.


Finally we walked. We walked and talked. We took photos of each other and interesting people and signs we saw along the way.


People in buildings along the route poked their heads out of the windows and doorways to have a look, some to cheer us on.


It was all quite jolly, except for the depressing topic of conversation that we kept coming back to of this new, fully Conservative Government and what they would do to further devalue Art.


There were murmurings of excitement as we approached Waterloo Bridge, tension building, talk of a violent breakaway group. The Real Rebels? The Black Bloc?


<< Maybe â&#x20AC;&#x153;black blocâ&#x20AC;? is a bit of an overstatement: it was very scattered and not very aggy... Nothing happened, the cops took control of the situation, and that was that...


Aside from the black bloc thing, as far as we’re aware there were no other autonomous actions going on besides the A to B march. Not even “non violent” civil disobedience stuff like we used to see from UK Uncut etc. on big demos >> (Rabble, 2015).


Just past that point, we lost two more of our number, not to violence but to go have tea and cake somewhere on the Strand. We reached the end at Parliament Square only to find quiet dispersal of the crowds.


Julia Kristeva (2002, p.84) says that << ...incapacity to rebel is the sign of national depression>> and <<whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll rebel if human people are either undervalued or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t value themselves either, or where the self has fragmented so you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bear it?>>


We carried on along Millbank, observed by a policeman as we photographed the building that had been stormed in the 2010 student protests. Then we continued on to the Grosvenor pub, left with each other and our conversations, and talked about what had happened (or not happened).


The 2010 protests were a failure, the 2015 protest was also guaranteed to be a failure in terms of changing anything, the austerity agenda so clearly fixed.


It also felt like something of a failure not to have excited more people to join us in our party, not to have had a greater riot of artworks permeating the crowds. However, there was a solidarity between our core group, and we agreed to continue our conversations beyond the day, i n s p o k e n a n d w r i t t e n RIOT.


images by Joshua Y’Barbo References: Kristeva, J. (2002) In: Lotinger, S. ed. ‘Revolt, She Said’. Los Angeles, CA: Semiotext(e). Rabble (2015) ‘Yesterday’s A to B March,’ 21 June 2015 [online], available: http://rabble.org.uk/ yesterdays-a-to-b-march/ [accessed 23 May 2016].


Graduate PLUS Loan 1-01 $21,515.84 8.5% $0.00 07/17/2017 Stafford 1-02 02/17/2017 Stafford 1-03 02/17/2017 Stafford 1-04 02/17/2017 Stafford 1-05 02/17/2017

$8,888.34

6.8%

$0.00

$16,848.91

6.8%

$0.00

$8,840.03

6.8%

$0.00

$15,800.74

6.8%

$0.00

8.5%

$0.00

Graduate PLUS Loan 1-06 $8,003.38 07/17/2017 TOTAL

Stafford $8,888.34 $0.00

1-02 6.8% 02/17/2017 Stafford 1-03 $16,848.91 6.8% $

Stafford 1-05 $15,800.74 $0.00 02/17/2017 Graduate PLUS Loan 1-06 $8,003.38 8.5% $0.00 07/17/2017 TOTAL

TOTAL

Graduate 1-01 $21,515.84 $0.00 07/17/2017

Stafford 1-05

$15,800.74

Graduate PLUS Loan 1-06 $8,003.38 $79,897.24

Stafford 1-02 $8,888.34 6.8% $0.00 02/17/2017

6.8%

Stafford 1-03 $16,848.91 02/17/2017 Stafford 1-04 02/17/2017

Graduate PLUS Loan 1-01 $21,515.84 8.5% $0.00 07/17/2017

6.8%

$16,848.91 02/17/2017

$8,840.03 $0.00

6.8%

PLUS Loan 8.5%

Stafford 1-02 $8,888.34 $0.00 02/17/2017

Stafford 1-03 $0.00

Stafford 1-04 6.8% 02/17/2017

$79,897.24 $0.00

6.8%

$0.00

$8,840.03

6.8%

$0.00

6.8%

$0.00

02/17/2017

8.5%

$0.00

07/17/2017

$0.00


Pulling Strings and Tying Knots Joshua Y’Barbo 2016

When I reflect on being a practitioner and a research student, I would describe my academic and professional practice as pulling multiple strings together, which then often require someone else to tie the knot. So who does this? Working in collaboration, or with one’s neighbours in a particular community or institutional context, has become part of a wide array of practices included under the term ‘social practice’. It is not uncommon for practitioners (artists-educators-others) to work together in order to realise complex initiatives with aims and motivations that vary between projects and individuals. Symptoms of this process include a constant negotiation between different commitments, accessing and re-appropriating resources, and self-reflection by individuals on their place within a particular community, institution or project. This publication is a result of two tiers of social practice: Art Riot, a failure in one aspect that is in keeping with the reoccurring theme of failure through experimentation in art pedagogy; and After Care, curriculum development by PhD students for the Graduate Teaching Scheme which aims to provide some support for recent graduates transitioning out of art schools while feeding into a concomitant programme, the Year of Resilience. Some on the graduate teaching assistants involved in both Art Riot and After Care have left art school on more than one occasion; others have chosen never to leave, regardless of enrolment status. It is from this perspective that we hope to create a useful account based on our experience and also provide practical tools for creating alternative educational exchanges through informal networks inside and outside of art school.

As an artist-educator-researcher, my practice-led research inhabits a space within the intersection of institutional critique, critical pedagogy and the educational turn. From this position, I’m exploring what I’ve come to term ‘interstitial pedagogy’, which refers to educational exchanges in spaces between structures. It combines interstitial institutional critique with critical pedagogy that form what Irit Rogoff refers to as a ‘double occupation’ (2003). I am using interstitial pedagogy to theorise a particular kind of relationship between art and pedagogic practices that shifts institutional contexts. Through this lens, I hope this publication will aid others in creating their own spaces of criticality in relation to the institutional context of art’s pedagogy. To return to Art Riot and some of the reflections presented in this publication, I would like to highlight the parallels between the performance this involved and issues at stake in the austerity march and the socialpolitical-economic concerns surrounding the contemporary art school in the UK. One of the many wider issues affecting this are the structural changes to the studios and curricular practices caused by demands on institutions of education linked to fees, a problem that is being caused by deep cuts in public funding. Felicity Allen (2011) refers to phases of creative destruction in arts and education policy as ‘cultural apartheid’ where ‘purchasing higher education individually at source rather than socially through tax reinforces the social “distinction” (and exclusion) of those studying - and, by extension, producing art, segregating class through cultural divisions’ (2011, p.15). There is a limited range of possibilities for radical pedagogy in a product-driven and deregulated art school market where consumer expectations and institutional obligations leave little room for radical experimentation.


Within Neoliberal policy ‘Periodic episodes of growth interspersed with phases of creative destruction, usually registered as severe financial crises’ (Harvey, 2007, p.34). ‘...the discussion should not be about what form the artist will provide the institution with but what political discussion they are entering into by doing so’ (Helguera, 2009).

‘The wave of creative destruction neoliberalization has visited across the globe is unparalleled in the history of capitalism. Understandably, it has spawned resistance and a search for viable alternatives’ (Harvey, 2007, p.39).


I am particularly troubled over issues concerning rising tuition fees and student debt in the UK. Much like the threat to the NHS, student debt evidences an alarming shift from a social serving society that promotes a healthy and educated populous to one that is quantified by capital and subject to market competition. Privatising academic institutions influences the political position of the student entering these hallowed halls of learning and a graduate’s position in society. Crisis has led to a search for ‘viable alternatives’ that include contemporary movements founded in 2010, such Occupy and Arts Against Cuts. We can also think about alternative models of art education like Open School East founded in 2013. All of these reference the 1968 Hornsey College occupation and 1968 Antiuniversity London. The relationship between Art Riot and After Care can be drawn from the accounts provided by those involved, the curriculum developed for After Care and the vehicle for delivering both through this publication. Art Riot arose from the online project, Riotous Cities. I see this as a return to the physicality and performativity of art practice in response to post-studio practice. Poststudio practice is arguably encouraged by institutions as a clever way to deal with limited studio space and the restrictions that physical space has on student admission numbers and the tuition funds they provide. Performativity in art practice and teaching practice are fundamental aspects of both Art Riot and After Care. Austerity measures against education was but one topic of discussion within the march where Art Riot took place. As Lana mentions in the introduction to this publication, for the participants of Art Riot (and contributors to After Care), the value of art (and education) is greater than what can be quantified by economic measure.

I would instead encourage the more diverse and complex social value of both art and education within cultural production as a means to promote understanding and well being within a society. As I draw these brief reflections to a conclusion, I am beginning to tie off the many strings running through my account in an attempt to fasten my own knot. Art Riot started as a conversation and inspired an urge to do something, to show up and participate. How and what would come is reflected a year later in the accounts provided, the curriculum developed, and this publication as both a hardcopy and an online resource. In my account I have tried to encapsulate the various issues and types of social interaction that were engaged through Art Riot while also acknowledging its transition into the curriculum developed for After Care, as set of lesson plans. ‘Aftercare’ was chosen as a theme specifically for students as they enter a disorienting, self-doubting and self-reflective post-study period. The curriculum is a very familiar academic tool, which can be enacted and developed inside and outside of established institutions. When used in more informal spaces of art’s pedagogy, the curriculum provides the opportunity for communities of practice to develop their own educational networks. When used within the established institution of art’s pedagogy, the curriculum has the potential to challenge university claims and produce spaces of criticality for individuals to reflect on the affect that institutional contexts have on their own self-awareness and abilities to act. The publication operates as a written and visual account of social practice, one built on resourcefulness, sustainability of art and design practice and self-care. The medium of publication is common to activist and DIY culture, as James has shown with his T-shirts or Lana and her wearable sculpture.


The DIY publication can be used to circulate images and ideas utilising the formats of established media, publishing and communication industries but with added subversive qualities. What better place to end my reflection than on failure? Art Riot, the 2010 student protests, and the 2015 austerity march have all been reflected on as failures to rebel, failures of protest to bring about change, and failures to resist oppositions. The failure of Art Riot participants to show up and maintain solidarity throughout the march reflects a similar apathy, which students show within the university towards any activities, such as talks and seminars, that shift the focus away from their individual studio practice. Failure is a familiar aspect of art pedagogy, where we are taught (or teach) to experiment with ideas and practices in order to fail. Yet another gift an art education provides. Failure can be used to avoid the obvious answers to conceptual and practical

problems confronted in studio (or post-studio) practice and to produced something new or unexpected. I believe that individuals studying in art schools are affected by the institutional thinking produced within and by these institutions of learning. The institutional thinking of the art school directly impacts the work students make and the identity they build as artists. images and illustrations by Joshua Y’Barbo References: Allen, F. (2011) In: ed. Allen, F. Education. London: Whitechapel / MIT Press. Harvey, D. (2007) Neoliberalism as Creative Destruction. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 610 (1), pp. 21-44. Helguera, P. (2009) ‘Transpedagogy: Contemporary Art and the Vehicles of Education: a panel discussion curated by Pablo Helguera’ [online] Tania Brugera, available: http://www.taniabruguera.com/cms/2390- On+transpedagogy.htm [accessed 10 November 2013]. Rogoff, I. (2003) From Criticism to Critique to Criticality [online] European Institute for Progressive Social Politics, available: http://eipcp.net/ transversal/0806/rogoff1/en [accessed 1 February 2016].


(fig.1)

Anywhere with a Desk by Francesca Peschier

There are many layers to the crossover projects that spawned this publication; both branched from more official narratives of UAL sanctioned projects. Art Riot germinated from CCW PhD student’s Riotous Cities (2015), an online research project using the web as an open studio. A pub conversation followed as to how many of us felt under pressure from the austerity measures to education and the changing face of British higher education under the Tories, and how we wished we could have an actual riot... As a theatre designer and PhD student whose research is concerned with scenography, space, place and identity, these two projects (Art Riot and After Care) have held particular interest for me in how they use alternative spaces to exhibit and create practice. Web space is on the whole, un-curated space. In my section of the This Time Next Year seminar on the 17th May 2016, we discussed how online is the closest an artist can get to a crit outside of the art school – a somehow anarchic space where the artwork is presented, often without context and always without ego, to be subject to a myriad of subjective opinion. These opinions are often given as much in competition with one another, as in reply to the original. By using the Internet as such an open studio, Riotous Cities engaged with the very ‘un-curatable-ness’ of online space taking control of this to the artist’s seemingly natural flair for organised chaos.


Art Riot takes this one step further, the tradition of placards and banners as a portable exhibition where every artwork has something important to say and no value judgment is made in their selection or coherence as to their display. When Josh, Lana, James and I were invited to take part in This Time Next Year as a branch of the UAL Year of Resilience the parallels with Art Riot were immediately obvious. I think it was Lana who quickly voiced â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Resistance or Resilience?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Having thought about the spaces in Art Riot and a primary problem faced by art students on graduation, how to manage both your professional space (as in how you are perceived, you advertise and promote) and finding an actual studio space to practice,


this is the direction I wanted to take my seminar. My plan was to lead a discussion about the different sorts of Space / Place that we inhabit as students, artists and educators, looking at some of the key theorists and how there is more to scenography than just pretty scenery. Then we would walk UAL inspired by Guy Debordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s psychogeographic maps of Paris, re-mapping our space by use and influence. What was public? What was private? Where did we actually get the most done? What would our ideal studio look like? If we were online, what would that space look like if we could make it physical?


However, although our seminar raised some interesting discussions, we faced a problem that was also inherent to Art Riot: a lack of audience. Again, as a theatre designer this is something that couldn’t fail to interest me. The dynamics in the room of course shifted as our student cohort dwindled to one, and then none, and suddenly a walking tour seemed impossible, my introduction to theorists pointless and my role in the room as ‘seminar leader’ suspect and questionable. This also has meant that the outcome of the session, a psychogeographic map after Debord’s of Paris (Fig 1.), is not as I would have planned. It is instead something more like a mind map than a flaneur’s journey. This, slightly neatened version of the sketches I made during our discussion tries to explore some of the shapes and words we associate with the public / official / private aspects of an artist’s life and how creative practice intersects this. I am quite happy with panoptiocon of lego which symbolises the balance between the official gaze of Bentham’s prison (aka: Chelsea parade ground) and the glare of our family and friends in the balance of art/research and real life. Thus what remains is a failed seminar on my part, but perhaps no the less interesting for that? Lana’s session lead us all to question what is a successful artist, and perhaps further to this then, what is a successful seminar? Perhaps I should add to James’ calendar ‘teach yourself something’...


Section 2:

After Care Lesson Plans


Dr Marsha Bradfield: Syllabus Francesca Peschier: Mapping and Managing Your Creative Practice Lana Locke: Can Art Sustain You as a Lifelong Project? Joshua Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Barbo: Not Knowing Salon James Lander: Resilience 365 (after Don Boyd)


aftercare: noun

1. care of a patient after a stay in hospital or of a person on release from prison.

2. support or advice offered to a customer following the purchase of a product or service.


After Care Title: After Care Syllabus Graduate Teaching for the Year of Resilience Tutor: Coordinated by Dr Marsha Bradfield

m.bradfield@chelsea.arts.ac.uk

Graduate Teaching Assistants: Francesca Peschier Lana Locke Joshua Y’Barbo James Lander Key Words: aftercare art & design pedagogy community of practice curriculum development practice-led research resilience resourcefulness self-care social practice survival sustainability Duration: variable - distributed across online exchange, preparatory meetings, teaching practicum and peer-to-peer feedback sessions

Syllabus: Graduate Teaching for the Year of Resilience 2016 Spring Term Rationale and Overview: The Graduate Teaching Scheme (GTS) is an opportunity for doctoral students of the Chelsea, Camberwell, Wimbledon Graduate School of University of the Arts London (UAL) to gain teaching experience through paid work on BA and MA courses. The scheme creates platforms for these emerging researchers to work as graduate teaching assistants (GTAs), sharing their growing expertise while developing the educational reach of their practice. In addition to investing in these theorists and practitioners, the GTS aims to invest research in the curriculum, embedding and enhancing an ethos of enquiry across both graduate and postgraduate courses. UAL’s forthcoming Creative Attributes Framework will identify enquiry as bar none the most vital and transferable skill acquired through its art and design curricula. But BA and MA students often fail to recognise their terrific capacity to undertake critical and creative investigation in the service of ‘figuring things out. Nor do they recognise the vital role this plays in their experience as learners and practitioners. The GTS counters this by both demystifying and validating research as the lynchpin of art and design practice while at the same time demonstrating, often by way of example, what distinguishes doctoral and post-doctoral research in its capacity to generate new insights. This depends on reaching an understanding of knowledge production that equips both GTAs and their students with a sense of what the world of practice is like, how they position research within their approach to art and design and what is expected of them as innovative cultural producers with the skills, curiosity and confidence to tackle complex problems. Focus on Resilience in the GTS of 2015/2016: Since its founding in 2013/2014, the GTS has promoted research in response to broader social, cultural and other concerns that outstrip subject-specific agendas. Four themes anchor this, with the Graduate School seeking to prioritise Environment, Technologies, Social Engagement and Identities. Prompted by literal sea changes arising from global warming and figurative but no less impactful ones from ongoing austerity measures, Resilience emerged as a fifth and overarching theme for the 2015/2016 academic year.


Dr Marsha Bradfield

Year of Resilience Graduate Teaching Syllabus

The Year of Resilience (YoR) is a loosely knit programme that aims to support the Graduate School’s ongoing adaptation as this community determines what, in practice, it means to absorb shocks and disruption, how they can trigger creative regeneration and, crucially, where the thresholds--especially the limits--of these reside. Core here is an insight by Professor Malcolm Quinn (Dean of Research and Director of the Graduate School) that can be likened to resilience being a ‘strong gene’ in the DNA of UK-based creative education. The first art school in England, the School of Design, was founded in 1837 on a mandate to be resilient. It was established as an institution that would respond to the rampant effects of industrialisation by ensuring the continuous production and development of culture as integral to social, economic and other forms of progress. As Quinn goes on to observe in the Graduate School Directory 2015/2016, the challenge to art and design education today remains the same: ‘what is the appropriate response to these shocks?’ (2015, p.5) This question is a touchstone in the four lesson plans that were created as part of the curriculum development in the After Care stream of GTS 2015/2016 that fed into the Year of Resilience. Each takes a very different approach to resilience as a psychosocial capacity to consider ways that recent graduates can sustain their practice as they transition out of art school. The lesson plans are shared here as a syllabus of sorts, though this is not imagined as a course per se, or even a programme that is comprehensive or cohesive in its approach. Marked by the diverse sensibilities of the GTAs who authored them, these resources variously embody the GTS’s learning outcomes, with more specific ones discussed in relation to each workshop or seminar. GTS Learning Outcomes Upon completing the programme, GTAs will be able to: • Recognise why and how learning strategies support different types of learning. • Design a lesson plan related to resilience that is informed by their subject area. It should also be suitable for public dissemination so that others might benefit from this teaching resource. • Draw on their lesson plan to deliver a workshop or other kind of session related to resilience that is informed by their subject area and is appropriate for BA and MA students. • Formulate and receive constructive feedback on both their lesson plan and the delivery thereof. • Evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching and be able to revise their approach for improvement. • Document their development as a researcher-teacher through creating a teaching portfolio comprised of their peer-reviewed lesson plan and reflections on their teaching practice. • More effectively monitor their own personal and professional resilience and be able to better attend to their wellbeing and that of their communities. Purpose of the GTA Role To deliver learning and teaching and related support to students on designated course(s) under the direct supervision of relevant academic staff, with an emphasis on communicating the value of research and its integration with practice. To contribute up to


Dr Marsha Bradfield

Year of Resilience Graduate Teaching Syllabus

date knowledge and skills and to undertake informal, formative assessment in a specialist subject area. GTA Duties and Responsibilities To undertake sole delivery of small group teaching (e.g. seminars and workshops), and to contribute to preparation and joint delivery (with academic staff) of lectures as appropriate. • To resource their critical and creative training in research as a knowledge base for subject-specific teaching. • To promote awareness of resilience in its many forms (i.e. personal, professional, organisational) and to consider how these interrelate. • To establish a resilient community of practice as a peer-to-peer network to support GTAs after they complete their doctoral work. • To contribute to teaching in the context of integrating the research ethos into the prevailing curriculum and learning and teaching methodology, working as part of the course team. • To assist more experienced academic and technical staff in the maintenance of proper conduct in studios and workshops. • To undertake related academic administration (e.g. attendance registers). • To undertake appropriate staff development (e.g. Teaching and Learning Exchange courses) to support these responsibilities. • To perform such duties consistent with your role as may from time to time be assigned to you anywhere within the University. • To undertake health and safety duties and responsibilities appropriate to the role. • To work in accordance with the University’s Equal Opportunities Policy and the Staff Charter, promoting equality and diversity in your work. • To undertake continuous personal and professional development, and to support it for any staff you manage through effective use of the University’s Planning, Review and appraisal scheme and staff development opportunities. • To make full use of all information and communication technologies in adherence to data protection policies to meet the requirements of the role and to promote organisational effectiveness. • To conduct all financial matters associated with the role in accordance with the university’s policies and procedures, as laid down in the Financial Regulations. Assessment This is an extracurricular opportunity and hence is not formally assessed. Formative and summative feedback is instead provided through peer review. This takes two forms: GTAs are invited to engage in peer-to-peer exchange via group critiques. They are encouraged to provide each other with written feedback (i.e.comments and annotations) on their lesson plans in advance of them being published as teaching resources for others to use. The programme coordinator will also feedback in writing and more informally, through ongoing conversations that flow across the various sessions comprising this programme. Programme Prerequisites Developing Academic Practice Unit which is run by TLE (Teaching & Learning Exchange). The DAP Unit is a two-day course held twice per year in the Spring Term. The course fee will be UAL funded.


Dr Marsha Bradfield

Year of Resilience Graduate Teaching Syllabus

Programme Readings and Other Resources Beltman, S., Mansfield, C. and A. Price (2011) Thriving Not Just Surviving: A Review of Research on Teacher Resilience. Educational Research Review 6(3): pp.185-207. Cole, D. and Tibby, M. (2013) Defining and developing your approach to employability: A framework for higher education institutions. York: The Higher Education Academy. [online] available: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resource/defining-and-developingyour-approachemployability-framework-higher-education-institutions [accessed 10 June 2016]. Evans, B. and Reid, J. (2014) Resilient Life: The Art of Living Dangerously. Cambridge: Polity Press. Hinchliffe, W. and Jolly, A. (2011) Graduate identity and employability. British Educational Research Journal 37(4): pp. 563-584. Radical Education Forum (2012) The Radical Education Workbook. London: Radical Education Forum. Raven, D. (2013) What Makes a Resilient Designer? London: London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London. [online] available: http://www.academia.edu/3825404/ What_Makes_a_Resilient_Designer [accessed 10 June 2016]. Orr, S. et al. (2015) Creative Attributes Framework for Enterprise and Employability (Version Three). London: University of the Arts London. [online] available: http:// process.arts.ac.uk/sites/default/files/creative_attributes_framework_for_enterprise_ and_employability__-_report_v3.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016]. Quinn, M. (20015) Introduction. In: Wainwright, C. ed. CCW Graduate School Directory 2015/2016. London: CCW Graduate School, University of the Arts London, pp. 5-9. University of the Arts London (2010) Personal & Professional Development (PPD) Principles and Guidelines for Implementation [online] University of the Arts London, available: http://digitalpresent.myblog.arts.ac.uk/files/2012/10/CLTAD_PPD_ guidelines_2011.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016]. University of the Arts London (2014) Student Charter [online] University of the Arts London, available: http://www.arts.ac.uk/media/arts/study-at-ual/student-support/ documents/StudentCharter1415.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016]. University of the Arts London (2016) Equal Opportunity Policy [online] University of the Arts London, available: http://www.arts.ac.uk/about-ual/diversity/equality-law-andreports/ [accessed 10 June 2016]. University of the Arts London (2016) Research Degrees Handbook and Regulations 2016/2016 [online] University of the Arts London, available: http://www.arts. ac.uk/media/arts/research/research-degrees/Research-Degrees-Handbook-andRegulations-2015-16.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016].


Dr Marsha Bradfield

Year of Resilience Graduate Teaching Syllabus

University of the Arts London (n.d.) Code of Practice on Research Ethics [online] University of the Arts London, available: http://www.arts.ac.uk/media/arts/research/documents/ UAL_Code_of_Practice_on_Research_Ethics.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016]. University of the Arts London (n.d.) Code of Good Conduct in Research. [online] University of the Arts London, available: http://www.arts.ac.uk/media/arts/research/documents/ Code-of-Good-Conduct-in-Research-_2___1_.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016]. Academic Integrity GTAs are expected to abide by UAL policy, including but not limited to the University’s Code of Practice on Research Ethics and Code of Good Conduct in Research. Penalty for violation of this Code may include University disciplinary action. Any work submitted for this programme will be the GTAs own work, with the exception of that which is developed in collaboration with others involved in the GTS. GTAs are encouraged to work together and to discuss information and concepts covered in the programme and beyond. Accommodations for GTAs with Disabilities In compliance with UAL’s Equal Opportunities Policy and the Staff Charter, the GTS coordinator will be available to discuss appropriate accommodations that may be required for GTAs with disabilities. Requests for academic accommodations should be lodged early in the programme, except for unusual circumstances, so arrangements can be made. Students are encouraged to register with Student Disability Services to verify their eligibility for appropriate accommodations. Inclusivity Statement UAL celebrates the fact its students represent a rich variety of backgrounds and perspectives. The Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School is committed to not only providing an atmosphere for learning that respects diversity. We also recognise this abundance as indispensable to cultural and community resilience. While working together to build this ethos of diversity, UAL asks its staff and students to: • Work in accordance with the University’s Equal Opportunities Policy and the Staff Charter, promoting equality and diversity in their work. • Share their unique experiences, values and beliefs. • Be open to the views of others. • Honour the uniqueness of their cohorts and colleagues. • Appreciate the opportunity that we have to learn from each other in this community. • Value each other’s opinions and communicate in a respectful manner. • Keep confidential discussions that the community has of a personal (or professional) nature. • Use this programme as an opportunity together to discuss ways in which we can create an inclusive environment in the Graduate School and across the UAL community.


Francesca Peschier

Year of Resilience Lesson Plan

After Care

Mapping and Managing Your Creative Practice

Title: Mapping and Managing Your Creative Practice

Description: The plan is to lead a discussion about the different sorts of Space/Place that we inhabit as students, artists and educators, looking at some of the key theorists and how there is more to scenography than just pretty scenery. Then we walk UAL inspired by Guy Debord’s psycho-geographic maps of Paris, re-mapping our space by use and influence.

Graduate Teaching Assistant: Francesca Peschier Participants: up to 20 students / artists Key Words: panopticon psychogeographic public / private? scenography Duration: two-hours practical workshop Supporting Materials: Debord, G. Bentham, J. Massey, D.

What was public? What was private? Where did we actually get the most done? What would our ideal studio look like? If we were online, what would that space look like if we could make it physical? Learning Objectives: • To introduce scenography to students in re-addressing how they think about their own learning and artistic space. • Through a kinesthetic workshop, for students to • imaginatively re-configure their space and place in thinking about how their use reflects their purpose. • To consider their own resilience in terms of how they navigate the physical and ideological space of the neoliberal art school (including personal studio space, and ideas of ‘public’ and ‘private’ space. • For students to engage with ideas of spatial theory and scenography in a politically active way. Outcomes: • Students to gain an understanding of scenography beyond theatre design. • Students to gain an introduction, and a practical application of spatial theory. • Students to interrogate the space of their practice, both physically and online, considering how the power and social relations present. • Students to think about how to best manage and organise their spaces to maximum productivity both within and out of the art school. • Students to constructively question the authority of spaces and how they reflect the art school system and the wider political context.


Francesca Peschier

Year of Resilience Lesson Plan

Supporting Materials: Bentham Project, The (2016) ‘The Panopticon’ [online] University College London, available: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/Bentham-Project/who/panopticon [accessed 11 June 2016]. Massey, D. (1991) A Global Sense of Place. Marxism Today (38): pp. 24-29 Ridgway, M. (2014) ‘Introduction to Psychogeography’ [online] The Double Negative, available: http://www.thedoublenegative.co.uk/2014/12/an-introduction-topsychogeography/ [accessed 11 June 2016]. Sequence of Activities: 0 – 35 minutes • Discuss the basics of spatial theory and scenography in terms of understanding space. Introduce theorists and difference between the terms. • Discuss how students feel about their learning spaces, both in terms of Chelsea College of Arts and outside. Particularly in terms of the degree show. • Ten-minute activity: students reconfigure the room as to how they like to learn in the following given situations ‘seminar’, ‘lecture’, ‘crit’ and ‘studio’. This can be done all together or in groups. 35 – 65 minutes • Talk about the spaces within Chelsea College of Arts; how are they used? Are any used unexpectedly? How are they scenographically constructed to reflect these uses (e.g. formality of the lecture theatre vs. canteen) what do they truly need to do their work? • Include with this the digital spaces they inhabit, professionally, in education (Moodle etc.) and socially. How do these overlap? How can they be best used? • Introduce the section of ‘A Global Sense of Place’ where Doreen Massey describes the global space of Kilburn High Street. • Discuss the national and global influences on art schools, and their local-resistance (if there is any to it). How has the neoliberal system changed the use of spaces? How has globalised education affected their space? Referring back to the power relationships visualised through configuring the room for different sorts of lessons, how are these power relationships visualised through the architecture, the design of college spaces? 65 – 90 minutes • Introduce Guy Debord’s situationist maps of Paris (they are probably more aware of his work as ‘culture jamming’). • Re-walk the spaces of Chelsea College of Arts using tips from Guy Debord (although not drunk, which was one of his favourites) to think about the relationship of these spaces to them and to other spaces. 90 -115 minutes • Using LX tape and post-it notes, students create a new floor plan map, re-configuring the key university spaces as to their use (e.g. if they do the most work in the canteen, make that bigger, maybe individual tables etc.) after Debord’s maps. 115 - 120 minutes • Feedback and summing up.


What was public? What was private? Where did we actually get the most done? What would our ideal studio look like? If we were online, what would that space look like if we could make it physical?


Lana Locke

After Care Title: Can Art Sustain You as a Lifelong Project? Graduate Teaching Assistant: Lana Locke Participants: students / artists Key Words: art education austerity criticality degree show experimentation lifelong practice / learning resilience sustainability Duration: variable depending on participants and venue Supporting Materials: Kelly, M. Badiou, A. Sisley, D. YouTube clip

Resilience Resistance Seminar:

Can Art Sustain You as a Lifelong Project? Seminar Format: Students are asked to sit and form a circle as they arrive. They are thanked for coming and before the topic is introduced are told that the seminar is intended to be a rigorous discussion, that the plan is for everyone to partake in the conversation, and that to facilitate this individual students may be picked out and asked for their thoughts, if they are not otherwise forthcoming. [Over-dominant voices may similarly have to be managed by bringing in other students who have not spoken.] Learning Objectives: • To encourage students to think of the life of their practice beyond their degree show and prepare students for the reality of what it might be like after graduation. • To consider the theme of resilience/resistance in terms of protecting and maintaining one’s artistic practice – alone or in collaboration with others. • To separate out the notion of financial investment and ‘success’ from artistic investment and the ‘success’ in maintaining that. • For students to question what their own lifelong art project might be, and what sacrifices they would or would not be willing to make for such a project. Introduction – Basic Script: Thinking about the theme of resilience, today I would like you to consider how resilient or resistant you might be in your own art practice following graduation. Rather than looking at this from the point of view of employability and careers following graduation, I would like us to think about: 1. The resilience of art and creativity in the climate of austerity politics – for example working on your practice whilst maintaining a day job; and 2. The resilience of experimentation and criticality versus the pressures of the market, leading up to and after the final degree show.


Lana Locke

Resilience Resistance Seminar:

We might also consider going beyond being resilient. I put to the group the question: does resilience mean avoiding conflict and just putting up with austerity politics, gentrification, unaffordable housing and studio space, cuts in student grants, increased student fees? If so, might we then go further and be resistant, defending and contesting a territory for art where we are afforded space to think and experiment, not just toeing the line of someone else’s business plan? My best take on resilience relates to an idea put forward by Mary Kelly (‘the mother of feminist art’) when interviewed by Hans Ulrich Obrist in 2015 and asked what her advice would be to a young artist in the present day. [Play clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhGAElRO6mA (Question at 1:41:48)] [Full quotation: I think it’s the importance of what you think is your project. That’s the thing that sustains you over everything that kind of happens in the professional world, right?... What’s important is to kind of hang on very closely to what your project is, and I would say that can only be in some way defined by what constitutes an event for you. I mean something that’s life changing. I’m not going to go into the Badiou although that’s very important in my thinking... it’s like something that, a moment you didn’t expect that just kind of changes your life but he says it instigates the truth procedure which is not like looking for the truth but holding true to something. So as he says whether that experience is so literally in a political movement, it could be, as he says, in art, it could be in love, it could be in science, but that’s the thing to capture, to make your lifelong project, right, that sustains you, no matter what the market does to you.] Whilst I am not myself invested in Alain Badiou’s truth procedure, which you can read more about in his Handbook of Inaesthetics (2005), Kelly’s take on it as she presents it tallies with my feelings about how art practice can become a form of research. The fact that I’m doing a practice based-PhD is part of discovering my own long-term project. As the degree shows approach, I’d like to test that point of view in discussion with you today. Firstly to see if people agree that this is enough to sustain you as an artist, and secondly to see what practical lengths we would be willing to take to pursue art as a lifelong project if we think of the extremes of what the market could do to us: from completely ignoring us for the rest of our careers to offering us different more profitable directions that might sustain us on a more practical level. What do people think of this? [Discussion.] [At some point to introduce as a counter position:] A recent article on the student strikes in London on paying rent (Sisley, 2016), one UCL student was quoted as saying ‘I’m most afraid that I won’t be able to validate having gone to university because of the cost, I like to look at it as an economic gamble; people with degrees typically and statistically get higher salaries later on in life. The debt that you incur [is] part of that gamble’.


Lana Locke

Resilience Resistance Seminar:

Do we think of our art degrees in the same way? Is anyone similarly afraid of not being able to validate it? [To gauge the temperature of the room] Show of hands - who here is thinking of the debt they have taken on, and/or money they have invested in their degree as a gamble towards their future? Possible further questions to put to the group: Do you make your degree show to please yourself, or in an age of debts and high cost art education, is it more important to try to capture the market? Who is counting on their final show work being picked up by a big gallery in order for their art degree to pay off? Or for those of you who aren’t expecting that – what are you expecting after graduation? [Ask a few different people. Ask for counter examples depending on what comes up.] Is it worthwhile to produce art even if it is not recognised? If so, why? What constitutes success? What is failure and is it OK? How can we be resilient and how can we be resistant in order to protect our art practices? Resources: Badiou, A. (2005) Handbook of Inaesthetics. Standford: Stanford University Press. ‘Mary Kelly in Conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist’ (2015) [online] YouTube, available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhGAElRO6mA [accessed 17 May 2016]. Sisley, D. (2016) ‘Students in London Are Now Refusing to Pay Their Rent’ [online] Dazed, available: http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/30617/1/students-inlondon-are-now-refusing-to-pay-their-rent [accessed 23 May 2016].


Sample Publication made during the Not Knowing Salon 2013 Image: Laura Carew Design & Layout: Joshua Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Barbo


Joshua Y’Barbo

After Care Title: Not Knowing Salon Salonnière(s): Barbara Steveni, David Cross, Joshua Y’Barbo & Laura Carew Participants: MA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts Institutional Context: APG; Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School; Chelsea Salon Key Words: APG citicality codified objects critical pedagogy didactic material institutional critique not knowing publication show and tell socially engaged art subjectivity Duration: three sessions and independent studio work carried out over a week Supporting Materials: video interview reading digital slide presentation

Counter Lesson Plan

Not Knowing Salon Description: The Not Knowing Salon is a counter lesson that aims to create spaces of criticality within an institutional context. The salon encourages participants to use the Artist Placement Group (APG) method of ‘not knowing’ in order to question assumptions about roles and structures within an art school context. The salon aims to refine understanding of the changes produced by, and happening in, higher education in art and design. Individual participants are placed in groups and asked to create a ‘publication’. The salon addresses institutional and spatial thinking by introducing theories of critical pedagogy, socially engaged art practice and institutional critique. Salon participants are to engage with practical artistic skills that produce conversation through codified objects by presenting personal items to one another in a group ‘show and tell’. Learning objectives: • Participants are asked to devise and produce a ‘publication’ for exhibition. Whether based on text, image, or any combination; hard copy or digital; collaboration or a compilation of individual works, the ‘publication’ can be anything your group decides. • Participants are asked to bring an object, image, text, gesture, or other thing that represents an interest of influential moment outside of their practice. • Participants will take part in a ‘show and tell’ exchange of these things as a way to develop the content for their group ‘publication’. Outcomes: By taking part in discussion and working creatively with others, participants will: • Exchange different interpretations of roles: focusing on student, staff, artists / designer and academic functions and responsibilities. • Clarify and define concepts: key points of enquiry are the relationships between knowledge and exploration, practice and research, teaching and learning. • Develop a position in the debates around practice.


Joshua Y’Barbo

Counter Lesson Plan

Supporting Materials: The participants will be presented with supporting material that includes a selection of texts, videos and interviews. Interview: FROM CFU TO FUNEN: INTERVIEW WITH JAKOB JAKOBSEN [online] Digicult, available: http://www.digicult.it/hacktivism/from-cfu-to-funen-interview-with-jakob-jakobsen/ [accessed 10 June 2016]. Video: ‘Céline Condorelli - The company she keeps (2014) [online] YouTube, available: https:// www. youtube.com/watch?v=jo4oMDFR4q4 [accessed 10 June 2016]. Note: This short video considers space, conditions and friendship. Artist Publication: Sekula, A. (n.d.) School is A Factory [online] Monoskop, available: https://monoskop. org/images/4/4d/Sekula_Allan_School_is_a_Factory_1978-80.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016]. Reading: Raven Row (2012) ‘Education: Not Knowing Tuesday 13 November 2012, 2–6pm’ - event announcement for the exhibition, The Individual and the Organisation: Artist Placement Group 1966-79 [online] Raven Row, available: http://www.ravenrow.org/events/ education_not_knowing/ [accessed 10 June 2016]. Fraser, A. (2005) Critique of the Institution to Institution of Critique. Artforum 44 (1) pp.278 - 285. [version online] Marginal Utility, available: http://www.marginalutility. org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Andrea-Fraser_From-theCritique-of-Institutions-to-anInstitution-of-Critique.pdf [accessed 10 June 2016]. Sequence of activities: Three sessions and independent studio work carried out over a week. Participants are to review the supporting material and select a personal object as prescribed in the Learning Objectives. The salonnière is to produce a short presentation on the material and the learning aims, objectives, outcomes and time line. In the first session, the salonnière is to deliver a presentation then divide individuals into groups for presentation and discussion of personal objects. Following the ‘show and tell’, groups are to work to develop criteria for their ‘publication’ and devise their own form of outcome and time line for completion outside of the session. End of first session. The second session is a short mid-week update held to monitor group progress and answer any questions or address issues that have arisen from the group discussion. The third session is a presentation and exhibition of the ‘publications’.


Joshua Y’Barbo

Counter Lesson Plan

Conclusion and Analysis: To wrap up, the salonnière will discuss critical awareness of the conditions the participants have found themselves in and the effect those conditions may have on individual subjectivities. In order to reflect on the practical strategies used to create an extrainstitutional space, participants will be asked to make a proposition for a future project based on the aims and objectives of this salon but with a shift in emphasis of outcomes to include different spaces, institutions, methodologies and / or objects. These reflections will be used in future counter lessons. Notes: The salonnière should be prepared to support dialogue within individual groups and provide differentiation based on levels of understanding of theories and language proficiency of individual participants. In the case that groups are not easily engaging in dialogue, the salonnière needs to instigate strategies to encourage this. For example, if a participant finds speaking and presenting challenging, the salonnière may ask the them to write about their personal objects on note cards, which can be collated and selected randomly by the salonnière to present and discuss. • Additionally, the salonnière should be prepared to discuss the following points on the supporting material provided: • Jakobsen interview about the Copenhagen Free University and Funen Art Academy; • Video of Condorelli as she addresses institutional spaces, conditions within those spaces, and friendship; • Sekula’s School is a Factory used as an example of the production of a publication that uses a narrative to critique an institutional context.


James Lander

Resilience 365 (after Don Boyd)

JANUARY Share your calendar with someone else.

MARCH Compare your calendar to Don Boyd’s ‘A Performance Calendar (for El Derrida)’.

FEBRUARY Compare with a friend or colleague what kind of calendar you use, how and why.


James Lander

Resilience 365 (after Don Boyd)

After Resilience 365 Care (after Don Boyd) Description: A year on from the End Austerity Now march I devised a lesson plan that would take artist and former Fluxus West Director Don Boyd’s ‘A Performance Calendar (for El Derrida)’ published in 1989 as a starting point. The workshop is aimed at all students, particularly those who have just left formal education or who are about to. In the workshop students contribute to discussions in pairs and in groups, enabling them to share the ways they use their personal calendars and collectively design a resilience calendar in a day. Following discussions during and after a trial workshop, I have condensed the lesson plan into an artwork that reflects and reflects on Don Boyd’s ‘A Performance Calendar (for El Derrida)’.

JUNE Invent a patron saint to help look after you e.g. St. Blaise, patron Saint of not choking on fish bones.

APRIL Use a different way of measuring time.

MAY Meet in a group to consider what your calendar does not do that you would want it to.


James Lander

Resilience 365 (after Don Boyd)

SEPTEMBER Devise a calendar that would replace the date with another form of measure e.g. financial, medical, light, temperature.

JULY Ask a waiter to choose your dish for you.

AUGUST Meet in a group to discuss how your expectations of others affect the way you use your calendar and they use theirs.


James Lander

Resilience 365 (after Don Boyd)

OCTOBER Use your calendar as if you were a member of the opposite sex.

DECEMBER With a friend or colleague, develop a new calendar based on your discussions.

NOVEMBER Dedicate your calendar to another person or place, whether fictional or not.


in order of appearance...

Lana Locke:

James Lander:

She has exhibited widely in London and was selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries in 2013 and 2016 and the Creekside Open Selector’s Prize in 2013.

Since 2012, James’s archival research project has been located at Balfron Tower, the local authority housing estate designed by Hungarian Architect Ernö Goldfinger. Goldfinger named the tower after the village in Scotland in connection with the local Scottish community of Poplar, East London in 1968.

Lana Locke is an artist and practice-based PhD candidate at Chelsea College of Arts, supported by the University of the Arts London Research Studentship and supervised by Dave Beech and Mo Throp.

James Lander is an artist and PhD researcher at Chelsea College of Arts.

During her PhD she has taught regularly at Camberwell and Chelsea Colleges of Art, across BA and MA Fine Art courses.

James uses photography and interviews with residents, visitors, professionals and amateur enthusiasts in London, in Scotland and in Hong Kong, (following up a visit by workers from the Housing Authority, Hong Kong to Balfron Tower in 2015) to respond to a contested site.

David Goldenberg:

Keunhye Lee:

David Goldenberg is a London-based artist represented by The Studio: Glenda Cinquegrana, Milan, Italy. Education: MA Art & Architecture, KIAD, UK BA (Hons) Fine art painting, Wimbledon school of art, UK Foundation course, St Albans School of Art, UK Teaching: Fine art lecturer 1999 – Goldsmiths University, Wimbledon School of Art, St Martins School of Art, Sunderland School of art, Brighton School of Art, Reading University, Falmouth School of Art, Canterbury School of Art, The University for Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria, Sharjah School of Art, University City, UAE

Keunhye Lee is a practice-based PhD candidate working in Spatial Design at Chelsea College of Arts. Her practicebased research aims to investigate the relationship between trace and routine activity in the rituals of ‘everyday life’, focusing upon a Korean context. Her aim is to develop an interior spatial practice that reveals ritual repetition through the use of interactive technology and ’smart’ materials. Lee aims to develop spatial proposals, for a Korean context, which provoke and document communication between people and space, focusing on ideas of repetition, home and habit. The mapping of mundane actions of the everyday is conceived as a kind of performance, and Lee works to categorise these ordinary repetitive patterns.


Francesca Peschier:

Francesca Peschier is a Techne AHRC funded doctoral student at UAL studying contemporary regional scenography and identity with a focus on Liverpool. She is the editor of the award winning JAWS: The Journal of Arts Writing by Students, published by Intellect. JAWS is the first journal of its kind to solely be written, edited and peer reviewed by current students and first-year graduates. Francesca also sits on the board of the Society of British Theatre Designers and is the editor of their monthly newsletter ‘The Eye’. She is an associate lecturer at UAL and Royal Holloway, and a regular contributor and reviewer for ‘Blue Pages’. She has presented papers in the scenography working groups at TAPRA 2014 & 2015 and IFTR 2015 (Hyderabad) for which she received a new scholars bursary.

Dr Marsha Bradfield:

Marsha Bradfield is an artist, curator, writer, educator and researcher. She is currently a visiting scholar at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL and co-directs Pangaea Sculptors’ Centre. For the last decade, Marsha has worked almost exclusively in collaboration, exploring cultural production through co-authored projects. This research-based approach often results in experiences that Marsha later re-presents in publications and performative lectures. Her accounts combine the rhetorical styles of fact and fiction as she works with sites, objects, images, structures and processes. Marsha’s current body of work explores the intersection of economies and ecologies in co-production and has developed through practicing with Precarious Workers Brigade, Critical Practice Research Cluster and many others besides.

Joshua Y’Barbo:

Joshua Y’Barbo is an artist and practicebased PhD candidate at Chelsea College of Arts, supervised by Dave Beech and Dr Marsha Bradfield. His research is based on Chelsea Salon, which is an extra-curricular activity that has worked across the UAL post graduate community since 2009. His research interests include institutional critique, critical pedagogy and the educational turn. He is currently proposing the term of ‘interstitial pedagogy’ to describe a relationship between teaching and educational practices through an analysis of Chelsea Salon. Prior to and during his PhD he has worked extensively with the MA Fine Art programme at Chelsea College of Arts and the Postgraduate Community at UAL.

Acknowledgements:

Toby Paton (film and photography) Calum F Kerr (Art Riot drummer) Alex March & Katie Goodwin (Art Riot participants) Vanessa Saraceno (curator of Riotous Cities) Professor Malcolm Quinn Ellie Pitkin Darrell Naiker (printing) Nigel Bents (additional design guidance) Barbara Steveni & David Cross Dave Beech Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School


Art Riot / After Care

is now a time to be resilient, or to riot?

Spring / Summer 2016

Profile for Action Capsule

Art Riot / After Care  

Art Riot / After Care is a publication produced PhD students at Camberwell Chelsea Wimbledon Graduate School that is part of the Graduate S...

Art Riot / After Care  

Art Riot / After Care is a publication produced PhD students at Camberwell Chelsea Wimbledon Graduate School that is part of the Graduate S...

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