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HUNGER 30 YEARS OF ACTION


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FOREWORD 30 YEARS CLOSER TO A WORLD WITHOUT HUNGER he broad reach of Action Against Hunger | ACF International is a testament to the audacity of our vision and the effectiveness of our approach. For the past 30 years, we have worked tirelessly to save millions of lives threatened by malnutrition all across the globe. Today, in a world where hunger affects more than a billion people, our fight continues.

T

Why such determination? First, there is nothing more powerful than saving a life. Second, our long journey has equipped us with the experience to be effective in our actions. Finally, this journey through the years has taught us that hunger need not be a death sentence.

 Š V. Burger/Phanie – Liberia, 2008

2

For these reasons, Action Against Hunger has become a vital organization for vulnerable communities around the world. Since our inception, we have taken the fight against hunger to areas inaccessible by road, served by few other international organizations, and outside the media spotlight. Our integrated

programs in nutrition, food security, and water & sanitation serve as a model for the humanitarian community at large. Each year, we respond to an ever-shifting environment by launching new programs and fine tuning others. Recently, we opened a training center in Nairobi, Kenya, which will serve as a resource for ACF programs across East Africa and bring us one step closer to preventing future outbreaks of hunger in the region. We look forward to the day when our struggle ends and hunger no longer leaves victims in its wake. Although there is a long way to go before we awaken to a world without hunger, our principles are sound and our dedication unwavering. Far from forgetting the commitment of our founders, far from forgetting the victims, far from giving up, we are more committed than ever to continuing the fight against the most serious of injustices, against the unacceptable, against hunger.

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FOREWORD 30 YEARS CLOSER TO A WORLD WITHOUT HUNGER he broad reach of Action Against Hunger | ACF International is a testament to the audacity of our vision and the effectiveness of our approach. For the past 30 years, we have worked tirelessly to save millions of lives threatened by malnutrition all across the globe. Today, in a world where hunger affects more than a billion people, our fight continues.

T

Why such determination? First, there is nothing more powerful than saving a life. Second, our long journey has equipped us with the experience to be effective in our actions. Finally, this journey through the years has taught us that hunger need not be a death sentence.

 Š V. Burger/Phanie – Liberia, 2008

2

For these reasons, Action Against Hunger has become a vital organization for vulnerable communities around the world. Since our inception, we have taken the fight against hunger to areas inaccessible by road, served by few other international organizations, and outside the media spotlight. Our integrated

programs in nutrition, food security, and water & sanitation serve as a model for the humanitarian community at large. Each year, we respond to an ever-shifting environment by launching new programs and fine tuning others. Recently, we opened a training center in Nairobi, Kenya, which will serve as a resource for ACF programs across East Africa and bring us one step closer to preventing future outbreaks of hunger in the region. We look forward to the day when our struggle ends and hunger no longer leaves victims in its wake. Although there is a long way to go before we awaken to a world without hunger, our principles are sound and our dedication unwavering. Far from forgetting the commitment of our founders, far from forgetting the victims, far from giving up, we are more committed than ever to continuing the fight against the most serious of injustices, against the unacceptable, against hunger.

3


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE HISTORY OF A FIGHT AGAINST HUNGER ➤ 1979 to 1990: Action Against Hunger ➤ 1991 to 1999: ACF Expands to Meet the Challenges of a New Era ➤ 2000 to 2009: Fighting the Root Causes of Hunger

9 13 17

THE PHILOSOPHY AT THE HEART OF THE ACTION ➤ Helping the Most Vulnerable Communities ➤ Staying Behind After the Cameras Leave ➤ Acting Against Indifference

25 28 31

30 YEARS OF ACTION

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 © D. Guerchois – Sudan, 2008

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE HISTORY OF A FIGHT AGAINST HUNGER ➤ 1979 to 1990: Action Against Hunger ➤ 1991 to 1999: ACF Expands to Meet the Challenges of a New Era ➤ 2000 to 2009: Fighting the Root Causes of Hunger

9 13 17

THE PHILOSOPHY AT THE HEART OF THE ACTION ➤ Helping the Most Vulnerable Communities ➤ Staying Behind After the Cameras Leave ➤ Acting Against Indifference

25 28 31

30 YEARS OF ACTION

34

 © D. Guerchois – Sudan, 2008

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THE HISTORY OF A FIGHT

AGAINST HUNGER

© L. Vander Stokt/Gamma – Kosovo, 1990.


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THE HISTORY OF A FIGHT

AGAINST HUNGER

© L. Vander Stokt/Gamma – Kosovo, 1990.


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1979 TO 1990 ACTION AGAINST HUNGER It’s all very well discussing hunger and misery in the world from our armchairs; it would be far more effective if we actually did something about it.”

These words of Françoise Giroud sum up the resolve taken by a group of French intellectuals to stand up and take action against hunger. A number of journalists and doctors—including Giroud, Jacques Attali, Maret Halter, Guy Sorman, and Bernard-Henri Levy—joined together, and on November 15, 1979, Action contre la Faim (ACF), or Action Against Hunger, was born. A month later, Afghanistan became the scene of one of the last Cold War conflicts. As Soviet troops invaded the country, thousands of Afghans fled to the border with Pakistan. A refugee doctor in France told his story to the ACF founders, and an emergency intervention was quickly set up. Aid workers, doctors and volunteers were sent to the region to supply tents and food items. In January 1980, ACF was the only French organization present in the region.

 © ACF – Pakistan, 1984.

8

Encouraged by their capacity to intervene, the organization began to challenge hunger on all fronts: fighting for the survival of the people of Cambodia, attempting to address the famine that was ravaging Uganda, improving water and sanitation in Haiti’s shantytowns, and re-launching agricultural production in Chad. On all these fronts, ACF questioned and intervened. The group quickly gained prominence and attracted widespread support from the French public. During the Ethiopian famine of the mid-1980s, government authorities orchestrated the transfer of a huge number of refugees from the large camps in the North to the South. An Action Against Hunger volunteer in Ethiopia later recalled: “They were death camps, with thousands, tens of

thousands of people sitting on the ground, and when someone died they would sing. Every five to ten minutes, a collective voice would begin, a lamentation growing louder, and we would know that somebody had just died.” Action Against Hunger

 © ACF – Pakistan, 1984.

9


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1979 TO 1990 ACTION AGAINST HUNGER It’s all very well discussing hunger and misery in the world from our armchairs; it would be far more effective if we actually did something about it.”

These words of Françoise Giroud sum up the resolve taken by a group of French intellectuals to stand up and take action against hunger. A number of journalists and doctors—including Giroud, Jacques Attali, Maret Halter, Guy Sorman, and Bernard-Henri Levy—joined together, and on November 15, 1979, Action contre la Faim (ACF), or Action Against Hunger, was born. A month later, Afghanistan became the scene of one of the last Cold War conflicts. As Soviet troops invaded the country, thousands of Afghans fled to the border with Pakistan. A refugee doctor in France told his story to the ACF founders, and an emergency intervention was quickly set up. Aid workers, doctors and volunteers were sent to the region to supply tents and food items. In January 1980, ACF was the only French organization present in the region.

 © ACF – Pakistan, 1984.

8

Encouraged by their capacity to intervene, the organization began to challenge hunger on all fronts: fighting for the survival of the people of Cambodia, attempting to address the famine that was ravaging Uganda, improving water and sanitation in Haiti’s shantytowns, and re-launching agricultural production in Chad. On all these fronts, ACF questioned and intervened. The group quickly gained prominence and attracted widespread support from the French public. During the Ethiopian famine of the mid-1980s, government authorities orchestrated the transfer of a huge number of refugees from the large camps in the North to the South. An Action Against Hunger volunteer in Ethiopia later recalled: “They were death camps, with thousands, tens of

thousands of people sitting on the ground, and when someone died they would sing. Every five to ten minutes, a collective voice would begin, a lamentation growing louder, and we would know that somebody had just died.” Action Against Hunger

 © ACF – Pakistan, 1984.

9


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

intervened, putting in place programs to combat hunger among the displaced. After several months in the region, a controversy erupted. The emergency medical organization Médecins sans Frontières accused the Ethiopian regime of misdirecting aid and urged all NGOs present to leave the country. ACF weighed the merits of its colleague’s argument with the undisputed enormity of human suffering that plagued Ethiopia. After careful deliberation, ACF decided to maintain the programs, reaffirming its commitment to the primacy of action and its obligation to provide assistance whenever and wherever lives were threatened. uring this period, the organization continued to develop and grow until it was running programs in some 20 countries across the world and supported by a wide network of volunteers in France.

D

‘‘

Action Against Hunger reaches the most vulnerable and neglected populations through programs in nutrition, water, sanitation, food security, and basic health care. What makes them unique is that they not only address emergency needs and save lives, but they also help people regain their autonomy.

‘‘  © ACF – Afghanistan, courtesy B. Reynol.

Susan Sarandon, Award-Winning Actor 10

11


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

intervened, putting in place programs to combat hunger among the displaced. After several months in the region, a controversy erupted. The emergency medical organization Médecins sans Frontières accused the Ethiopian regime of misdirecting aid and urged all NGOs present to leave the country. ACF weighed the merits of its colleague’s argument with the undisputed enormity of human suffering that plagued Ethiopia. After careful deliberation, ACF decided to maintain the programs, reaffirming its commitment to the primacy of action and its obligation to provide assistance whenever and wherever lives were threatened. uring this period, the organization continued to develop and grow until it was running programs in some 20 countries across the world and supported by a wide network of volunteers in France.

D

‘‘

Action Against Hunger reaches the most vulnerable and neglected populations through programs in nutrition, water, sanitation, food security, and basic health care. What makes them unique is that they not only address emergency needs and save lives, but they also help people regain their autonomy.

‘‘  © ACF – Afghanistan, courtesy B. Reynol.

Susan Sarandon, Award-Winning Actor 10

11


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1991 TO 1999 ACF EXPANDS TO MEET THE CHALLENGES OF A NEW ERA ith the fall of the Iron Curtain, the1990s marked the beginning of a new era for hunger. The promise of a “new world order” quickly gave way to outbreaks of civil conflict and violence that dramatically intensified humanitarian needs. ACF opened missions in Kurdistan, Liberia, Bosnia, Somalia, and Rwanda where crumbling regimes, wars, and complex humanitarian catastrophes threatened the lives of millions. At the same time, the HIV pandemic began to sweep across Africa, further complicating the treatment and prevention of acute malnutrition.

W

ACF quickly realized that it needed to professionalize the organization and increase its capacity to respond to multiple crises. Focusing on the areas of water and nutrition, it began to recruit permanent professional staff while continuing to add to its roster of volunteers. Research into more effective treatments for acute malnutrition became an important priority. Guided by a scientific advisory committee consisting of some of the top international experts on nutrition, ACF pioneered F-100, a therapeutic milk formula used to treat acute malnutrition in children. Thanks to this new, highly effective

 © I. Eshraghi/VU – Afghanistan, 2005.

12

13


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1991 TO 1999 ACF EXPANDS TO MEET THE CHALLENGES OF A NEW ERA ith the fall of the Iron Curtain, the1990s marked the beginning of a new era for hunger. The promise of a “new world order” quickly gave way to outbreaks of civil conflict and violence that dramatically intensified humanitarian needs. ACF opened missions in Kurdistan, Liberia, Bosnia, Somalia, and Rwanda where crumbling regimes, wars, and complex humanitarian catastrophes threatened the lives of millions. At the same time, the HIV pandemic began to sweep across Africa, further complicating the treatment and prevention of acute malnutrition.

W

ACF quickly realized that it needed to professionalize the organization and increase its capacity to respond to multiple crises. Focusing on the areas of water and nutrition, it began to recruit permanent professional staff while continuing to add to its roster of volunteers. Research into more effective treatments for acute malnutrition became an important priority. Guided by a scientific advisory committee consisting of some of the top international experts on nutrition, ACF pioneered F-100, a therapeutic milk formula used to treat acute malnutrition in children. Thanks to this new, highly effective

 © I. Eshraghi/VU – Afghanistan, 2005.

12

13


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

treatment protocol, the mortality rate for children diagnosed with acute malnutrition dropped dramatically, and it became possible to reach many more of those suffering from this serious condition before it was too late. Action Against Hunger, bolstered by these advances in treatment and its successes in saving lives, earned a reputation as the leading humanitarian organization for nutrition. During this time, parallel research efforts in the field of water & sanitation provided complementary advances. In partnership with a Thai NGO, ACF developed a new sourcing technique adapted to isolated intervention areas. These innovations are just a couple examples of ACF’s commitment to improving techniques used during humanitarian interventions. As the number of complex humanitarian crises continued to multiply, ACF expanded its operational capacity by opening new headquarters offices—first in Madrid, then in New York and

HUNGER, 30 YEARS OF ACTION

London —which enhanced its ability to secure funds from a broader range of institutional and individual donors. The offices in Spain and the UK took over the management of programs in several African nations, including Angola, Mali, and South Sudan, while opening new ones in Latin America. When emergencies broke out in Bosnia, Rwanda, Somalia, and Cambodia, the U.S. office launched new programs to ensure that distressed communities received immediate, life-saving assistance. rawing on its wide-ranging experiences as one of the very first international organizations to specialize in the treatment and prevention of acute malnutrition, Action Against Hunger began to share its expertise and analysis. It contributed to the publication of reference materials for training humanitarian personnel and released

D

The Geopolitics of Hunger: Using Hunger as a Weapon. To engage the general public in the fight against hunger, ACF also developed public awareness campaigns.

 © I. Gantner – Liberia, 2003.

14

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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

treatment protocol, the mortality rate for children diagnosed with acute malnutrition dropped dramatically, and it became possible to reach many more of those suffering from this serious condition before it was too late. Action Against Hunger, bolstered by these advances in treatment and its successes in saving lives, earned a reputation as the leading humanitarian organization for nutrition. During this time, parallel research efforts in the field of water & sanitation provided complementary advances. In partnership with a Thai NGO, ACF developed a new sourcing technique adapted to isolated intervention areas. These innovations are just a couple examples of ACF’s commitment to improving techniques used during humanitarian interventions. As the number of complex humanitarian crises continued to multiply, ACF expanded its operational capacity by opening new headquarters offices—first in Madrid, then in New York and

HUNGER, 30 YEARS OF ACTION

London —which enhanced its ability to secure funds from a broader range of institutional and individual donors. The offices in Spain and the UK took over the management of programs in several African nations, including Angola, Mali, and South Sudan, while opening new ones in Latin America. When emergencies broke out in Bosnia, Rwanda, Somalia, and Cambodia, the U.S. office launched new programs to ensure that distressed communities received immediate, life-saving assistance. rawing on its wide-ranging experiences as one of the very first international organizations to specialize in the treatment and prevention of acute malnutrition, Action Against Hunger began to share its expertise and analysis. It contributed to the publication of reference materials for training humanitarian personnel and released

D

The Geopolitics of Hunger: Using Hunger as a Weapon. To engage the general public in the fight against hunger, ACF also developed public awareness campaigns.

 © I. Gantner – Liberia, 2003.

14

15


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2000 TO 2009 TACKLING THE ROOT CAUSES OF HUNGER uring the past decade, Action Against Hunger has continued to refine and test new approaches that tackle the root causes of hunger, while expanding its capacity to respond whenever and wherever the threat of malnutrition arises. From Eastern Europe to Central Asia, across Africa, and in Latin America, ACF has adapted its strategies for eradicating hunger to meet the challenges of diverse and changing contexts, including the rapid urbanization of developing countries, climate change, and global food and economic crises—all of which have become major contributing factors to hunger.

To improve its ability to recruit highly qualified staff and keep them abreast of the latest methodologies and advances in the humanitarian field, ACF opened a new headquarter office in Canada in 2005, and established its first regional training center in Nairobi, Kenya in 2009.

To ensure that relief arrives at the onset of a crisis, when lives are in greatest jeopardy, Action Against Hunger launched an emergency team able to deploy at a moment’s notice. Staffed by public health professionals with technical expertise in nutrition, water & sanitation, food security, and logistics, this crisis

To extend the impact of its treatment programs for acute malnutrition, ACF adopted a community-based outpatient model. It also sought more effective ways to prevent malnutrition, including widespread distributions of ready-to-usefoods in targeted regions threatened by hunger.

D

 © Doury/VU – Mongolia, 2005.

16

team rapidly assesses and organizes an emergency response in the aftermath of natural disasters like tsunamis, earthquakes, or cyclones — whether in Peru, Pakistan, Indonesia, or Bangladesh.

17


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2000 TO 2009 TACKLING THE ROOT CAUSES OF HUNGER uring the past decade, Action Against Hunger has continued to refine and test new approaches that tackle the root causes of hunger, while expanding its capacity to respond whenever and wherever the threat of malnutrition arises. From Eastern Europe to Central Asia, across Africa, and in Latin America, ACF has adapted its strategies for eradicating hunger to meet the challenges of diverse and changing contexts, including the rapid urbanization of developing countries, climate change, and global food and economic crises—all of which have become major contributing factors to hunger.

To improve its ability to recruit highly qualified staff and keep them abreast of the latest methodologies and advances in the humanitarian field, ACF opened a new headquarter office in Canada in 2005, and established its first regional training center in Nairobi, Kenya in 2009.

To ensure that relief arrives at the onset of a crisis, when lives are in greatest jeopardy, Action Against Hunger launched an emergency team able to deploy at a moment’s notice. Staffed by public health professionals with technical expertise in nutrition, water & sanitation, food security, and logistics, this crisis

To extend the impact of its treatment programs for acute malnutrition, ACF adopted a community-based outpatient model. It also sought more effective ways to prevent malnutrition, including widespread distributions of ready-to-usefoods in targeted regions threatened by hunger.

D

 © Doury/VU – Mongolia, 2005.

16

team rapidly assesses and organizes an emergency response in the aftermath of natural disasters like tsunamis, earthquakes, or cyclones — whether in Peru, Pakistan, Indonesia, or Bangladesh.

17


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HUNGER, 30 YEARS OF ACTION

Steadfast in its commitment to assist the most vulnerable, Action Against Hunger has conducted life-saving interventions in some of the most serious humanitarian crises of the new millennium. In Darfur, Sudan, where conflict forced millions to flee their homes, ACF launched one of its largest relief efforts to-date. From treating children with acute malnutrition, to distributing seeds and tools to families, to constructing and rehabilitating safe water points, ACF provided life-saving assistance to hundreds of thousands who had nowhere else to turn. Even after Sudanese authorities expelled the organization —along with 15 other aid groups—from Darfur in March 2009, ACF has continued to seek opportunities to return and resume its relief efforts. In Mongolia, a country with deep-seated urban and rural poverty that has long been neglected by the international community, Action Against Hunger did not hesitate to respond. When drought decimated livestock and acute malnutrition threatened thousands of people who had lost their livelihoods, ACF brought life-saving assistance to communities throughout the country and launched a public information campaign to raise awareness among the donor nations.

 © ACF – Nepal, courtesy S. Remael.

18

In Bogolay, Myanmar, ACF’s emergency response immediately after Cyclone Nargis provided crucial assistance to thousands whose homes were destroyed. The timely distribution of more

than 5,600 tons of emergency supplies, including protein biscuits, water pumps, and purification kits, helped to prevent what could have been a catastrophic loss of life. In Kenya, Action Against Hunger responded rapidly to the post-electoral violence by opening a new base in the provincial capital of Nakuru, where more than 30,000 people sought shelter in camps or with relatives. ACF secured clean water, provided sanitation facilities, and distributed essential non-food items such as soap, blankets, and clothing. Once the situation stabilized, ACF’s food security experts developed an innovative program to help the displaced regain self-sufficiency as rapidly as possible. Partnering with a local bank, ACF provided small cash grants to revive livelihoods or rebuild small businesses destroyed during the conflict. The grants supported a wide variety of microenterprise activities, from women’s cooperatives that purchased spinning wheels for a textile business, to vegetable sellers who pooled funds to support a small shop. These income-generating activities enabled the displaced families to immediately improve their nutritional intake, thus avoiding the dangers of malnutrition while also helping to restore civil society. While ACF strived to strengthen its impact on global hunger and food insecurity through principled humanitarian action, its staff members remained on the front lines of conflicts where the notion of a safe, humanitarian space was not universally

19


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HUNGER, 30 YEARS OF ACTION

Steadfast in its commitment to assist the most vulnerable, Action Against Hunger has conducted life-saving interventions in some of the most serious humanitarian crises of the new millennium. In Darfur, Sudan, where conflict forced millions to flee their homes, ACF launched one of its largest relief efforts to-date. From treating children with acute malnutrition, to distributing seeds and tools to families, to constructing and rehabilitating safe water points, ACF provided life-saving assistance to hundreds of thousands who had nowhere else to turn. Even after Sudanese authorities expelled the organization —along with 15 other aid groups—from Darfur in March 2009, ACF has continued to seek opportunities to return and resume its relief efforts. In Mongolia, a country with deep-seated urban and rural poverty that has long been neglected by the international community, Action Against Hunger did not hesitate to respond. When drought decimated livestock and acute malnutrition threatened thousands of people who had lost their livelihoods, ACF brought life-saving assistance to communities throughout the country and launched a public information campaign to raise awareness among the donor nations.

 © ACF – Nepal, courtesy S. Remael.

18

In Bogolay, Myanmar, ACF’s emergency response immediately after Cyclone Nargis provided crucial assistance to thousands whose homes were destroyed. The timely distribution of more

than 5,600 tons of emergency supplies, including protein biscuits, water pumps, and purification kits, helped to prevent what could have been a catastrophic loss of life. In Kenya, Action Against Hunger responded rapidly to the post-electoral violence by opening a new base in the provincial capital of Nakuru, where more than 30,000 people sought shelter in camps or with relatives. ACF secured clean water, provided sanitation facilities, and distributed essential non-food items such as soap, blankets, and clothing. Once the situation stabilized, ACF’s food security experts developed an innovative program to help the displaced regain self-sufficiency as rapidly as possible. Partnering with a local bank, ACF provided small cash grants to revive livelihoods or rebuild small businesses destroyed during the conflict. The grants supported a wide variety of microenterprise activities, from women’s cooperatives that purchased spinning wheels for a textile business, to vegetable sellers who pooled funds to support a small shop. These income-generating activities enabled the displaced families to immediately improve their nutritional intake, thus avoiding the dangers of malnutrition while also helping to restore civil society. While ACF strived to strengthen its impact on global hunger and food insecurity through principled humanitarian action, its staff members remained on the front lines of conflicts where the notion of a safe, humanitarian space was not universally

19


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

As the decade draws to a close, the combination of the global financial downturn and high food prices have resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of people who suffer from malnutrition worldwide: For the first time ever, more than 1 billion — one in every six people on the planet—are threatened by hunger. For the poor, the economic crisis has been particularly devastating. Declining wages and reduced economic opportunities make purchasing food increasingly difficult, especially in developing countries where the cost of food remains stubbornly high. hirty years after its founding, ACF and its mission to treat and prevent acute malnutrition remain more crucial than ever.

T 20

‘‘

Action Against Hunger is among the first to respond when tragedies unfold, ensuring that communities have a fighting chance to get back on their feet. It’s important to remember there are effective ways to fight hunger, and along with groups like Action Against Hunger, you can become part of the solution.

Anderson Cooper, Award-Winning Journalist

➤ Action Against Hunger is at the forefront of efforts to treat and prevent childhood acute malnutrition and is doing so in ways that lay the groundwork for solutions to hunger and malnutrition long after the organization leaves.

‘‘

respected. These recent years have seen an unsettling increase in violence targeting humanitarian workers. By 2008, the number of deadly attacks on aid workers surpassed the fatality rate of UN peacekeeping troops. Action Against Hunger responded by enhancing its security protocols and training for all field staff. Unfortunately, no security measure could fully guarantee safety in many parts of the world where the threat of hunger looms largest. As a result, ACF staff have been included in this tragic statistic of aid worker fatalities: On more than one occasion, and in various contexts, our staff have been the victims of violence. But in spite of these aberrations, Action Against Hunger remains steadfast in its resolve to prevent hunger from claiming future lives.

TACKLING CHILDHOOD MALNUTRITION AT THE COMMUNITY LEVEL

At the community level, ACF trains Village Health Teams to identify malnourished children and refer them for outpatient treatment, or if the cases are very severe, to local Stabilization Centers. For example, over the course of one year, ACF staff in rural Ethiopia trained nearly 700 community volunteers and another 850 local health workers to screen for acute malnutrition and refer children for further treatment. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, ACF has trained roughly 20,000 of these health workers. These Stabilization Centers are set up in local and regional hospitals so they are integrated into pre-existing national health care systems. In addition, ACF works with Ministries of

Health to train and equip doctors and nurses to identify and treat children on the brink of starvation. In the DR Congo, for instance, Action Against Hunger has trained 60 doctors and over 400 nurses to identify severely malnourished children and return them to full health. In the Stabilization Centers and outpatient therapeutic programs Action Against Hunger operates around the world, 90 percent of children recover fully from acute malnutrition– a remarkable rate. But the organization’s success is also measured by its ability to transfer nutrition programs over to local authorities so that communities can continue to fight malnutrition well into the future. Action Against Hunger consider this its legacy, and it is one that endures.

21


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

As the decade draws to a close, the combination of the global financial downturn and high food prices have resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of people who suffer from malnutrition worldwide: For the first time ever, more than 1 billion — one in every six people on the planet—are threatened by hunger. For the poor, the economic crisis has been particularly devastating. Declining wages and reduced economic opportunities make purchasing food increasingly difficult, especially in developing countries where the cost of food remains stubbornly high. hirty years after its founding, ACF and its mission to treat and prevent acute malnutrition remain more crucial than ever.

T 20

‘‘

Action Against Hunger is among the first to respond when tragedies unfold, ensuring that communities have a fighting chance to get back on their feet. It’s important to remember there are effective ways to fight hunger, and along with groups like Action Against Hunger, you can become part of the solution.

Anderson Cooper, Award-Winning Journalist

➤ Action Against Hunger is at the forefront of efforts to treat and prevent childhood acute malnutrition and is doing so in ways that lay the groundwork for solutions to hunger and malnutrition long after the organization leaves.

‘‘

respected. These recent years have seen an unsettling increase in violence targeting humanitarian workers. By 2008, the number of deadly attacks on aid workers surpassed the fatality rate of UN peacekeeping troops. Action Against Hunger responded by enhancing its security protocols and training for all field staff. Unfortunately, no security measure could fully guarantee safety in many parts of the world where the threat of hunger looms largest. As a result, ACF staff have been included in this tragic statistic of aid worker fatalities: On more than one occasion, and in various contexts, our staff have been the victims of violence. But in spite of these aberrations, Action Against Hunger remains steadfast in its resolve to prevent hunger from claiming future lives.

TACKLING CHILDHOOD MALNUTRITION AT THE COMMUNITY LEVEL

At the community level, ACF trains Village Health Teams to identify malnourished children and refer them for outpatient treatment, or if the cases are very severe, to local Stabilization Centers. For example, over the course of one year, ACF staff in rural Ethiopia trained nearly 700 community volunteers and another 850 local health workers to screen for acute malnutrition and refer children for further treatment. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, ACF has trained roughly 20,000 of these health workers. These Stabilization Centers are set up in local and regional hospitals so they are integrated into pre-existing national health care systems. In addition, ACF works with Ministries of

Health to train and equip doctors and nurses to identify and treat children on the brink of starvation. In the DR Congo, for instance, Action Against Hunger has trained 60 doctors and over 400 nurses to identify severely malnourished children and return them to full health. In the Stabilization Centers and outpatient therapeutic programs Action Against Hunger operates around the world, 90 percent of children recover fully from acute malnutrition– a remarkable rate. But the organization’s success is also measured by its ability to transfer nutrition programs over to local authorities so that communities can continue to fight malnutrition well into the future. Action Against Hunger consider this its legacy, and it is one that endures.

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THE PHILOSOPHY

AT THE HEART OF THE ACTION

© D. Guerchois – Somalia, 2007.


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THE PHILOSOPHY

AT THE HEART OF THE ACTION

© D. Guerchois – Somalia, 2007.


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HELPING THE MOST VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES ction Against Hunger’s commitment to treating and preventing malnutrition in vulnerable populations compels the organization to work in some of the most remote parts of the world and in places served by few other humanitarian groups. In the wake of the tsunami that hit Southeast Asia in 2004, for example, Action Against Hunger targeted vulnerable populations in the isolated rural areas to the West of Aceh, Indonesia, where little other international support was available.

A

ACF’s philosophy of fighting malnutrition wherever communities are affected also brought it to the impoverished island of Haiti.

Wracked by decades of political turmoil and environmental problems that have degraded soils and diminished agricultural yields, Haiti’s population has long been vulnerable to natural disasters. In 2008, conditions only worsened as Haiti was struck by three successive hurricanes— Gustave, Hanna, and Ike. Aware of the country’s vulnerability to severe weather patterns, Action Against Hunger had already prepared for such disasters by pre-positioning stocks of water and sanitation supplies in the cities of Port de Paix and Port-au-Prince. After the hurricanes, ACF was able to rapidly ship emergency equipment to the hard-hit city of Gonaives, which was inundated and cut off from the rest of Haiti.

 © ACF – Niger, 2005

24

25


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HELPING THE MOST VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES ction Against Hunger’s commitment to treating and preventing malnutrition in vulnerable populations compels the organization to work in some of the most remote parts of the world and in places served by few other humanitarian groups. In the wake of the tsunami that hit Southeast Asia in 2004, for example, Action Against Hunger targeted vulnerable populations in the isolated rural areas to the West of Aceh, Indonesia, where little other international support was available.

A

ACF’s philosophy of fighting malnutrition wherever communities are affected also brought it to the impoverished island of Haiti.

Wracked by decades of political turmoil and environmental problems that have degraded soils and diminished agricultural yields, Haiti’s population has long been vulnerable to natural disasters. In 2008, conditions only worsened as Haiti was struck by three successive hurricanes— Gustave, Hanna, and Ike. Aware of the country’s vulnerability to severe weather patterns, Action Against Hunger had already prepared for such disasters by pre-positioning stocks of water and sanitation supplies in the cities of Port de Paix and Port-au-Prince. After the hurricanes, ACF was able to rapidly ship emergency equipment to the hard-hit city of Gonaives, which was inundated and cut off from the rest of Haiti.

 © ACF – Niger, 2005

24

25


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

‘‘

President Nelson Mandela 26

 © D. Guerchois – Sudan, 2008.

A

Action Against Hunger… assists local populations and refugees at the most fundamental level in the most dangerous locales. They provide nutrition, healthcare, sanitation, and food sustainability. They train populations to be self-sufficient. Although these dedicated men and women want to eliminate the need for their services, humanity is not willing and forces them to witness the most heinous actions.

‘‘

s the crisis wore on, communities were increasingly hard-pressed to access food. Action Against Hunger responded by launching several interventions to bolster income and distribute food— establishing feeding centers for young children, setting up cash-for-food programs that employed Gonaive residents in digging buildings out from the mud, and distributing 11 tons of food to people in need of immediate assistance.

27


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

‘‘

President Nelson Mandela 26

 © D. Guerchois – Sudan, 2008.

A

Action Against Hunger… assists local populations and refugees at the most fundamental level in the most dangerous locales. They provide nutrition, healthcare, sanitation, and food sustainability. They train populations to be self-sufficient. Although these dedicated men and women want to eliminate the need for their services, humanity is not willing and forces them to witness the most heinous actions.

‘‘

s the crisis wore on, communities were increasingly hard-pressed to access food. Action Against Hunger responded by launching several interventions to bolster income and distribute food— establishing feeding centers for young children, setting up cash-for-food programs that employed Gonaive residents in digging buildings out from the mud, and distributing 11 tons of food to people in need of immediate assistance.

27


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

STAYING BEHIND AFTER THE CAMERAS LEAVE ction Against Hunger’s mission goes far beyond responding to emergencies. Long after the cameras have turned their attention to another part of the world, ACF stays to ensure that communities have the tools and skills they need to rebuild their lives and regain self-sufficiency for the long term.

A

In Cambodia, for example, Action Against Hunger stayed after setting up nutrition, food security, and water & sanitation programs to implement a risk-reduction strategy intended to mitigate the effects of recurrent flooding caused by the annual swelling of the Mekong River. In very close collaboration with the affected communities, ACF teams set up an early warning system that monitored weather reports, provided training on good practices, and established infrastructure appropriate for the river. Together with the Cambodian Red

Cross, ACF trained designated representatives from each village to operate the system, and by 2007, the organization had successfully handed over all aspects of the program to the local community. stablished according to strict criteria, ACF’s programs, which rely on full community participation and work to boost existing markets and economies, have helped hundreds of thousands of families begin a new life with access to adequate food, safe water, and opportunities to generate income well into the future. ACF’s integrated approach to tackling the underlying causes of malnutrition helps prevent future outbreaks of hunger, and because over 90 percent of its staff is local, the knowledge and systems put in place by Action Against Hunger will endure long after its departure.

E

 © ACF – Cambodia, courtesy J. Austin.

28

29


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

STAYING BEHIND AFTER THE CAMERAS LEAVE ction Against Hunger’s mission goes far beyond responding to emergencies. Long after the cameras have turned their attention to another part of the world, ACF stays to ensure that communities have the tools and skills they need to rebuild their lives and regain self-sufficiency for the long term.

A

In Cambodia, for example, Action Against Hunger stayed after setting up nutrition, food security, and water & sanitation programs to implement a risk-reduction strategy intended to mitigate the effects of recurrent flooding caused by the annual swelling of the Mekong River. In very close collaboration with the affected communities, ACF teams set up an early warning system that monitored weather reports, provided training on good practices, and established infrastructure appropriate for the river. Together with the Cambodian Red

Cross, ACF trained designated representatives from each village to operate the system, and by 2007, the organization had successfully handed over all aspects of the program to the local community. stablished according to strict criteria, ACF’s programs, which rely on full community participation and work to boost existing markets and economies, have helped hundreds of thousands of families begin a new life with access to adequate food, safe water, and opportunities to generate income well into the future. ACF’s integrated approach to tackling the underlying causes of malnutrition helps prevent future outbreaks of hunger, and because over 90 percent of its staff is local, the knowledge and systems put in place by Action Against Hunger will endure long after its departure.

E

 © ACF – Cambodia, courtesy J. Austin.

28

29


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

ACTING AGAINST INDIFFERENCE ction Against Hunger understands that advocacy and public engagement must play a vital role in the fight against hunger. Whether addressing obstacles to life-saving assistance, insisting on needs-based assessments, or defending humanitarian principles, ACF’s on-the-ground perspectives keep policy-makers informed of operational realities and help ensure outcomes consistent with humanitarian values. Because ACF works where populations suffer from ongoing deprivation of fundamental human needs—access to food, drinking water, land and livelihoods—advocacy strategies can help address the underlying causes of hunger while our field staff deliver direct assistance to those in need.

A

 © ACF – Uganda, courtesy T. Frank.

30

The organization’s 30th anniversary marks the beginning of an ambitious new initiative called The Challenge to End Malnutrition, a multi-year campaign with an ultimate goal of ending child deaths from hunger. The campaign will build a broad base of international support to make acute malnutrition a global public health priority. Recent breakthroughs in the treatment and prevention of malnutrition suggest that it’s now possible to save millions of young children who lives would otherwise end prematurely from hunger-related causes. By rallying the support of millions of people around the globe, ACF’s Challenge of End Malnutrition hopes to transform this possibility into an inevitability.

31


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ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

ACTING AGAINST INDIFFERENCE ction Against Hunger understands that advocacy and public engagement must play a vital role in the fight against hunger. Whether addressing obstacles to life-saving assistance, insisting on needs-based assessments, or defending humanitarian principles, ACF’s on-the-ground perspectives keep policy-makers informed of operational realities and help ensure outcomes consistent with humanitarian values. Because ACF works where populations suffer from ongoing deprivation of fundamental human needs—access to food, drinking water, land and livelihoods—advocacy strategies can help address the underlying causes of hunger while our field staff deliver direct assistance to those in need.

A

 © ACF – Uganda, courtesy T. Frank.

30

The organization’s 30th anniversary marks the beginning of an ambitious new initiative called The Challenge to End Malnutrition, a multi-year campaign with an ultimate goal of ending child deaths from hunger. The campaign will build a broad base of international support to make acute malnutrition a global public health priority. Recent breakthroughs in the treatment and prevention of malnutrition suggest that it’s now possible to save millions of young children who lives would otherwise end prematurely from hunger-related causes. By rallying the support of millions of people around the globe, ACF’s Challenge of End Malnutrition hopes to transform this possibility into an inevitability.

31


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HUNGER, 30 YEARS OF ACTION

ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

‘‘

“Action Against Hunger is a remarkable organization with a staff of energetic, enthusiastic and deeply committed people who are determined to make a difference to the lives of thousands of people. Their training programmes are improving the quality of life and health and, above all, bringing hope to thousands in underdeveloped countries. I commend them for their outstanding work….

‘‘

32

Desmond Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus

 �� S. Rémaël – Nepal, 2008.

33


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HUNGER, 30 YEARS OF ACTION

ACTION AGAINST HUNGER

‘‘

“Action Against Hunger is a remarkable organization with a staff of energetic, enthusiastic and deeply committed people who are determined to make a difference to the lives of thousands of people. Their training programmes are improving the quality of life and health and, above all, bringing hope to thousands in underdeveloped countries. I commend them for their outstanding work….

‘‘

32

Desmond Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus

 © S. Rémaël – Nepal, 2008.

33


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30 YEARS OF ACTION

1980

Uganda: ACF launches emergency programs to address the ravages of famine in northern Uganda, distributing emergency food rations, providing needed farming inputs, and relaunching agricultural production.

Chad: ACF responds to problems of desertification, harnessing water supplies for cultivation and village and household use. Pakistan: ACF continues to provide emergency medical and nutritional care to the Afghan refugees in the camps; a hospital is opened in Pishin, Balochistan.

Haiti: ACF launches water and sanitation programs to address humanitarian problems rooted in poor sanitary conditions in La Tannerie shantytown of Gonaives.

1981

1982

 © ACF – Pakistan

1979

 © ACF — Uganda

Global figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry”people in the world: 927 million.

Thailand: ACF protests attempts by Vietnamese troops to control distributions of food aid after overthrowing the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia. The occupying forces threaten to withhold emergency assistance destined for the refugee camps until international recognition is bestowed on the new government installed in Phnom Penh.

 © T. Rannou/Gamma – Chad

➤ November 15th: Official conference launches Action International contre la Faim with Nobel Laureate Alfred Kastler as its first President. AICF is later shortened to Action contre la Faim, or Action Against Hunger | ACF International.

Th a i l a n d : ACF provides emergency assistance to Cambodian nationals seeking refuge in Thailand as Vietnamese troops pursue Khmer Rouge forces. Once the crisis stabilises, ACF works with refugees to strengthen existing medical systems.

Sahel, Africa: As famine surfaces in the Sahel, ACF responds with emergency nutrition programs while calling on the international community for support. United States: ACF creates the U.S.-based American Friends of ACF in Washington D.C.—the first of ACF’s international offices.

Ethiopia: After an alarming on-the-ground assessment, ACF launches emergency programs to address a massive nutritional crisis— the first time since Biafra (Nigeria), 1968 that such widespread famine hits with full force.

ACF’s Impact: A budget of 1.2 million euros in support of life-saving programs in 20 countries.

S u d a n : ACF intervenes in Sudan to counter the cumulative impact of drought and the prospect of famine for hundreds of thousands of Sudanese.

P r o g r a m s : In less than 10 years, ACF is present in some 20 countries: Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mexico, Uganda, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Sudan, Chad, Haiti, Ecuador, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Thailand, Togo, Uruguay and Zaire.

1984

1985

1987

 © L. Delahaye – Ethiopia

Pakistan: ACF launches its first relief mission in the Afghan refugee camps in Pakistan, providing maternal and infant medical care in the Surkhab and Pir Alizai camps for 180,000 and 120,000 refugees, respectively. ACF’s programs also provides latrines and income-generating activities.


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30 YEARS OF ACTION

1980

Uganda: ACF launches emergency programs to address the ravages of famine in northern Uganda, distributing emergency food rations, providing needed farming inputs, and relaunching agricultural production.

Chad: ACF responds to problems of desertification, harnessing water supplies for cultivation and village and household use. Pakistan: ACF continues to provide emergency medical and nutritional care to the Afghan refugees in the camps; a hospital is opened in Pishin, Balochistan.

Haiti: ACF launches water and sanitation programs to address humanitarian problems rooted in poor sanitary conditions in La Tannerie shantytown of Gonaives.

1981

1982

 © ACF – Pakistan

1979

 © ACF — Uganda

Global figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry”people in the world: 927 million.

Thailand: ACF protests attempts by Vietnamese troops to control distributions of food aid after overthrowing the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia. The occupying forces threaten to withhold emergency assistance destined for the refugee camps until international recognition is bestowed on the new government installed in Phnom Penh.

 © T. Rannou/Gamma – Chad

➤ November 15th: Official conference launches Action International contre la Faim with Nobel Laureate Alfred Kastler as its first President. AICF is later shortened to Action contre la Faim, or Action Against Hunger | ACF International.

Th a i l a n d : ACF provides emergency assistance to Cambodian nationals seeking refuge in Thailand as Vietnamese troops pursue Khmer Rouge forces. Once the crisis stabilises, ACF works with refugees to strengthen existing medical systems.

Sahel, Africa: As famine surfaces in the Sahel, ACF responds with emergency nutrition programs while calling on the international community for support. United States: ACF creates the U.S.-based American Friends of ACF in Washington D.C.—the first of ACF’s international offices.

Ethiopia: After an alarming on-the-ground assessment, ACF launches emergency programs to address a massive nutritional crisis— the first time since Biafra (Nigeria), 1968 that such widespread famine hits with full force.

ACF’s Impact: A budget of 1.2 million euros in support of life-saving programs in 20 countries.

S u d a n : ACF intervenes in Sudan to counter the cumulative impact of drought and the prospect of famine for hundreds of thousands of Sudanese.

P r o g r a m s : In less than 10 years, ACF is present in some 20 countries: Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mexico, Uganda, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Sudan, Chad, Haiti, Ecuador, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Thailand, Togo, Uruguay and Zaire.

1984

1985

1987

 © L. Delahaye – Ethiopia

Pakistan: ACF launches its first relief mission in the Afghan refugee camps in Pakistan, providing maternal and infant medical care in the Surkhab and Pir Alizai camps for 180,000 and 120,000 refugees, respectively. ACF’s programs also provides latrines and income-generating activities.


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➤ ❂Breakthrough: F-100 Milk Formula: ACF’s Scientific Committee —and nutritionist Michael Golden, specifically— creates two revolutionary therapeutic milk formulas, F-75 and F-100, that reduce mortality rates by 75% among children in treatment for severe acute malnutrition. Unpatented and field tested by ACF, these nutrition products and their protocols are eventually adopted by the UN’s World Health Organization as the industry standard.

Somalia: Wracked by civil war, Somalia is in chaos as 800,000 Somalis flee the country and famine becomes a reality for those who remain. ACF launches emergency nutrition and water and sanitation programs.

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

 © A. Nosten – Burundi

L a o s : One of the poorest countries in Southeast Asia, ACF launches programs to counter widespread health problems among 120,000 ethnic minorities dependent upon contaminated water sources.

 © N. Benchallal/Contact Press Images – Burma

Cambodia: ACF launches programs to help develop pastoral and village water points in Takéo Province in the south of Cambodia.

Kurdistan: The First Gulf War results in the flight of Kurdish refugees into the hills along the Turkish border. ACF launches programs to restore food security in these camps.

Rwanda & Burundi: Working among the displaced as Rwanda’s second war draws to a close, ACF is positioned to respond to the chaos unleashed when neighbouring Burundi’s first Hutu president is assassinated in October of 1993. ACF launches emergency programs as millions of Burundi refugees pour into Rwanda to escape fighting.

 © ACF – Cambodia

Bosnia: As the war in former Yugoslavia wages on, ACF launches an array of medical, nutritional, and hygiene programs for refugees and the displaced with outposts with outposts in Bosnia, Belgrade, and Serbian Bosnia.

 © ACF – Cambodia, J. Austin

Liberia & Sierra Leone: ACF responds in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Liberia is in the throes of a bloody civil war, and the world discovers child soldiers and the savagery of a war waged for diamonds. ACF advances its medical-nutritional expertise with the launch of the Therapeutic Feeding Center, and rolls out expansive water drilling programs.

Cambodia: As Cambodian refugees begin to return home from Thailand, ACF is in place to support their relocation to the Siem Reap and Preah Vihear provinces. ACF’s water and sanitation programs provide returning families with access to clean water. Sudan: As the North-South conflict continues, some 100,000 Sudanese flee fighting as food insecurity and hunger threaten hundreds of thousands with malnutrition in the South. ACF responds with a range of emergency programs and calls on the international community for increased assistance. Global Figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry” people in the world falls to 884.4 million.

Rwanda: As ACF works with Burundi refugees in Rwanda, the agency must now turn its attention to grappling with the tragic genocide that begins in April of 1994 — a crisis in which 800,000 people are killed. Security conditions ultimately force ACF and other humanitarian actors to leave the country until after the crisis subsides. Burundi & Tanzania: ACF manages nutrition programs for refugees fleeing violence in Burundi and end up in the Benako refugee camps in Tanzania.

1994

 © Buisson – Abkhazia

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Burma: As Rohynga refugees return home from Bangladesh, ACF’s teams help them resettle their ancestral lands in Rakhine State, which, given their minority status (and routine discrimination), becomes a complex and delicate undertaking. ACF’S Impact: A budget of 29.4 million euros in support of life-saving programs in 25 countries.


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➤ ❂Breakthrough: F-100 Milk Formula: ACF’s Scientific Committee —and nutritionist Michael Golden, specifically— creates two revolutionary therapeutic milk formulas, F-75 and F-100, that reduce mortality rates by 75% among children in treatment for severe acute malnutrition. Unpatented and field tested by ACF, these nutrition products and their protocols are eventually adopted by the UN’s World Health Organization as the industry standard.

Somalia: Wracked by civil war, Somalia is in chaos as 800,000 Somalis flee the country and famine becomes a reality for those who remain. ACF launches emergency nutrition and water and sanitation programs.

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

 © A. Nosten – Burundi

L a o s : One of the poorest countries in Southeast Asia, ACF launches programs to counter widespread health problems among 120,000 ethnic minorities dependent upon contaminated water sources.

 © N. Benchallal/Contact Press Images – Burma

Cambodia: ACF launches programs to help develop pastoral and village water points in Takéo Province in the south of Cambodia.

Kurdistan: The First Gulf War results in the flight of Kurdish refugees into the hills along the Turkish border. ACF launches programs to restore food security in these camps.

Rwanda & Burundi: Working among the displaced as Rwanda’s second war draws to a close, ACF is positioned to respond to the chaos unleashed when neighbouring Burundi’s first Hutu president is assassinated in October of 1993. ACF launches emergency programs as millions of Burundi refugees pour into Rwanda to escape fighting.

 © ACF – Cambodia

Bosnia: As the war in former Yugoslavia wages on, ACF launches an array of medical, nutritional, and hygiene programs for refugees and the displaced with outposts with outposts in Bosnia, Belgrade, and Serbian Bosnia.

 © ACF – Cambodia, J. Austin

Liberia & Sierra Leone: ACF responds in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Liberia is in the throes of a bloody civil war, and the world discovers child soldiers and the savagery of a war waged for diamonds. ACF advances its medical-nutritional expertise with the launch of the Therapeutic Feeding Center, and rolls out expansive water drilling programs.

Cambodia: As Cambodian refugees begin to return home from Thailand, ACF is in place to support their relocation to the Siem Reap and Preah Vihear provinces. ACF’s water and sanitation programs provide returning families with access to clean water. Sudan: As the North-South conflict continues, some 100,000 Sudanese flee fighting as food insecurity and hunger threaten hundreds of thousands with malnutrition in the South. ACF responds with a range of emergency programs and calls on the international community for increased assistance. Global Figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry” people in the world falls to 884.4 million.

Rwanda: As ACF works with Burundi refugees in Rwanda, the agency must now turn its attention to grappling with the tragic genocide that begins in April of 1994 — a crisis in which 800,000 people are killed. Security conditions ultimately force ACF and other humanitarian actors to leave the country until after the crisis subsides. Burundi & Tanzania: ACF manages nutrition programs for refugees fleeing violence in Burundi and end up in the Benako refugee camps in Tanzania.

1994

 © Buisson – Abkhazia

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Burma: As Rohynga refugees return home from Bangladesh, ACF’s teams help them resettle their ancestral lands in Rakhine State, which, given their minority status (and routine discrimination), becomes a complex and delicate undertaking. ACF’S Impact: A budget of 29.4 million euros in support of life-saving programs in 25 countries.


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➤❂New ACF Headquarters: A fourth operational ACF headquarter office is opened in New York City, replacing the earlier established “American Friends of ACF.”

Georgia & Abkhazia: The war between Georgia and the break-away province of Abkhazia leads to an influx of refugees into Georgia. ACF responds with emergency food and nutrition programs along with an emphasis on livelihoods and incomegenerating activities.

Liberia: When ACF’s teams reach the isolated populations of Tubmamaburg, a mere 45 miles from the capital of Monrovia, some 20,000 starving individuals are found trying to survive on leaves, 4,000 of whom are children on the brink of death.

 © ACF – Chechnya

1996

 © ACF – Laos

1995

Somalia: ACF’s humanitarian programs are now concentrated in and around Mogadishu, but security conditions deteriorate and Somalia becomes the first ACF program to be managed “remotely” by ACF’s teams in Nairobi, Kenya.

1997

Mongolia: With Mongolia in a state of crisis that garners little interest from the international community, ACF mobilizes private funds to provide humanitarian assistance to these forgotten populations grappling with an unrecognized nutritional crises.

Kosovo: ACF launches a series of new programs along the KosovoMacedonia border, in Montenegro, and in Albania, distributing emergency non-food items, food rations, and clean water among the displaced.

N o r t h K o r e a : ACF withdraws from North Korea citing the manipulation of international assistance and the inability to independently access the communities receiving aid. The Pyongyang regime denies the true scale of the crisis and refuses to support independent humanitarian efforts.

ACF’S Impact: A budget of 36.8 million euros in support of life-saving programs reaching two million beneficiaries.

North Caucasus: ACF launches programs in the North Caucasus to assist Chechen refugees in Ingushetia.

Algeria: After an earthquake kills 10,000 people in Algeria, ACF brings its relief programs to Bab el Oued to assist the survivors and support the recovery.

1999

2000

2001

Mozambique: ACF mounts an emergency response in Mozambique following the destructive flooding that left thousands homeless.

 © ACF – Georgia, courtesy J. Austin

➤❂Sphere Project: ACF participates in the development of the Sphere Project in the wake of the Rwandan genocide as civil society worked to ensure greater coordination among humanitarian actors. The Sphere Project aims to develop common principles and set minimum international standards for providing assistance in emergencies.

Chechnya: ACF launches emergency programs during the first Chechen war with Russia. Increasingly violent banditry complicates things for the humanitarian community: ACF staff are taken hostage in 1996 and humanitarian personnel are assassinated (ICRC 1998), in addition to a growing number of civilian casualties.

➤❂B r e a k t h r o u g h : Plumpy’nut: The revolutionary nutritional product Plumpy’nut is created: nutritionist André Briend, working with Nutriset, repackages the F-100 formulation as a more stable peanut butter-based product, making this life-saving formula available without the need for preparation, clean water, or refrigeration. ACF carries out field tests to help develop protocols for using Plumpy’nut in the treatment of severe acute malnutrition.

 © J. Langevin/Deadline – Somalia

➤❂New ACF Headquarters: Two new ACF headquarters are founded in London and Madrid as ACF’s international network expands.

A n g o l a : A s A n g o la ’s long-standing civil war rages on, ACF carries out food distributions in Caconda and sets up training programs for healthcare personnel tasked with a broad vaccination campaign targeting 210 , 0 0 0 individuals in Cafuno and Huila.

Page 38

➤ Breakthrough: Community Therapeutic Care: Valid International introduces Community Therapeutic Care (CTC), a concept that adopts a public health approach to managing acute malnutrition and aims to maximize impact and coverage. CTC, which is later known as CMAM (Community Management of Acute Malnutrition), uses therapeutic ready-to-use-foods and an outpatient model to ensure broader access to treatment—a model with the potential to expand access to life-saving treatment for millions of children in need.


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➤❂New ACF Headquarters: A fourth operational ACF headquarter office is opened in New York City, replacing the earlier established “American Friends of ACF.”

Georgia & Abkhazia: The war between Georgia and the break-away province of Abkhazia leads to an influx of refugees into Georgia. ACF responds with emergency food and nutrition programs along with an emphasis on livelihoods and incomegenerating activities.

Liberia: When ACF’s teams reach the isolated populations of Tubmamaburg, a mere 45 miles from the capital of Monrovia, some 20,000 starving individuals are found trying to survive on leaves, 4,000 of whom are children on the brink of death.

 © ACF – Chechnya

1996

 © ACF – Laos

1995

Somalia: ACF’s humanitarian programs are now concentrated in and around Mogadishu, but security conditions deteriorate and Somalia becomes the first ACF program to be managed “remotely” by ACF’s teams in Nairobi, Kenya.

1997

Mongolia: With Mongolia in a state of crisis that garners little interest from the international community, ACF mobilizes private funds to provide humanitarian assistance to these forgotten populations grappling with an unrecognized nutritional crises.

Kosovo: ACF launches a series of new programs along the KosovoMacedonia border, in Montenegro, and in Albania, distributing emergency non-food items, food rations, and clean water among the displaced.

N o r t h K o r e a : ACF withdraws from North Korea citing the manipulation of international assistance and the inability to independently access the communities receiving aid. The Pyongyang regime denies the true scale of the crisis and refuses to support independent humanitarian efforts.

ACF’S Impact: A budget of 36.8 million euros in support of life-saving programs reaching two million beneficiaries.

North Caucasus: ACF launches programs in the North Caucasus to assist Chechen refugees in Ingushetia.

Algeria: After an earthquake kills 10,000 people in Algeria, ACF brings its relief programs to Bab el Oued to assist the survivors and support the recovery.

1999

2000

2001

Mozambique: ACF mounts an emergency response in Mozambique following the destructive flooding that left thousands homeless.

 © ACF – Georgia, courtesy J. Austin

➤❂Sphere Project: ACF participates in the development of the Sphere Project in the wake of the Rwandan genocide as civil society worked to ensure greater coordination among humanitarian actors. The Sphere Project aims to develop common principles and set minimum international standards for providing assistance in emergencies.

Chechnya: ACF launches emergency programs during the first Chechen war with Russia. Increasingly violent banditry complicates things for the humanitarian community: ACF staff are taken hostage in 1996 and humanitarian personnel are assassinated (ICRC 1998), in addition to a growing number of civilian casualties.

➤❂B r e a k t h r o u g h : Plumpy’nut: The revolutionary nutritional product Plumpy’nut is created: nutritionist André Briend, working with Nutriset, repackages the F-100 formulation as a more stable peanut butter-based product, making this life-saving formula available without the need for preparation, clean water, or refrigeration. ACF carries out field tests to help develop protocols for using Plumpy’nut in the treatment of severe acute malnutrition.

 © J. Langevin/Deadline – Somalia

➤❂New ACF Headquarters: Two new ACF headquarters are founded in London and Madrid as ACF’s international network expands.

A n g o l a : A s A n g o la ’s long-standing civil war rages on, ACF carries out food distributions in Caconda and sets up training programs for healthcare personnel tasked with a broad vaccination campaign targeting 210 , 0 0 0 individuals in Cafuno and Huila.

Page 38

➤ Breakthrough: Community Therapeutic Care: Valid International introduces Community Therapeutic Care (CTC), a concept that adopts a public health approach to managing acute malnutrition and aims to maximize impact and coverage. CTC, which is later known as CMAM (Community Management of Acute Malnutrition), uses therapeutic ready-to-use-foods and an outpatient model to ensure broader access to treatment—a model with the potential to expand access to life-saving treatment for millions of children in need.


Iran: ACF launches a largescale emergency intervention after a massive earthquake causes significant infrastructure damage in Bam, Iran.

Zimbabwe: ACF mounts an emergency response as rates of acute malnutrition dramatically increase due to drought and a deep-rooted economic crisis.

Nepal: Significant rates of acute malnutrition are detected in Nepal, prompting ACF to roll out therapeutic nutrition and longer-term food security programs.

Asian Tsunami: Already on the ground in South and Southeast Asia—in Sri Lanka since 1996 and Indonesia since 1997—ACF is able to respond immediately after the Asian Tsunami wreaks havoc across the region. The scope of the tragedy, affecting so many in as many countries, triggers an outpouring of support from around the world.

Mali & Niger: A combination of widespread drought and perverse market forces cause a series of nutritional crises across Mali and Niger. ACF responds by ramping up existing programs to grapple with the new emergencies.

Muttur Massacre, Sri L a n k a : In an unprecedented development,17of ACF’s humanitarian workers are executed in their offices in Muttur, eastern Sri Lanka. The international community is outraged but the perpetrators escape justice as judicial inquiries become politicized. ACF withdraws from Sri Lanka fearing it can no longer protect its own workers.

P a k i s t a n : A massive earthquake devastates parts of northern Pakistan, killing upwards of 80,000 and leaving three million homeless as winter snows threatened to cut off entire communities from assistance. ACF responds with emergency programs aimed at restoring water infrastructure and stopping the spread of water-borne diseases.

Darfur, Sudan: As security conditions deteriorate and rebel movements multiply, the Gereida refugee camp in Darfur is attacked with serious consequences for ACF staff and the beneficiaries in their care. ACF is forced to withdraw from the rural parts of northern Darfur, deploying programs to address needs in the south.

2004

 © Doury/VU – Mongolia

2002

Darfur, Sudan: After carrying out an alarming on-the-ground assessment, ACF launches large-scale emergency measures to address the dire conditions in Darfur: acute malnutrition, violence, and widespread food insecurity require international attention as western Sudan implodes and entire communities are forced to flee for their lives.

2005

 © ACF – Sudan

I r a q : A month after the American-led coalition invades Iraq, ACF sets up emergency nutrition programs. As insecurity mounts and the lines blur between military and humanitarian action, ACF ends up withdrawing towards the end of 2004.

Page 40

ACF’s Impact: A budget of 92.6 million euros in support of life-saving programs reaching four million beneficiaries.

2006

 © Reuters – Bangladesh

11:24 AM

 © G. Korganov/Rapho – Sudan

11/3/09

 © ACF – Indonésia

3749JF_r1_30YearsBrochure.qxd:Mise en page 1

Capacity-Building: D.R. Congo: In collaboration with Ministries of Health in a range of countries, ACF works directly with government agencies to build local capacity for managing acute malnutrition and cycles of relief and recovery— collaborative initiatives that ensure sustainable public health capacity for the long-term. ACF’s efforts alongside the D.R. Congo’s Ministry of Health has helped ensure significant regional capacity. Global Figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry”people in the world stands at 854 million.


Iran: ACF launches a largescale emergency intervention after a massive earthquake causes significant infrastructure damage in Bam, Iran.

Zimbabwe: ACF mounts an emergency response as rates of acute malnutrition dramatically increase due to drought and a deep-rooted economic crisis.

Nepal: Significant rates of acute malnutrition are detected in Nepal, prompting ACF to roll out therapeutic nutrition and longer-term food security programs.

Asian Tsunami: Already on the ground in South and Southeast Asia—in Sri Lanka since 1996 and Indonesia since 1997—ACF is able to respond immediately after the Asian Tsunami wreaks havoc across the region. The scope of the tragedy, affecting so many in as many countries, triggers an outpouring of support from around the world.

Mali & Niger: A combination of widespread drought and perverse market forces cause a series of nutritional crises across Mali and Niger. ACF responds by ramping up existing programs to grapple with the new emergencies.

Muttur Massacre, Sri L a n k a : In an unprecedented development,17of ACF’s humanitarian workers are executed in their offices in Muttur, eastern Sri Lanka. The international community is outraged but the perpetrators escape justice as judicial inquiries become politicized. ACF withdraws from Sri Lanka fearing it can no longer protect its own workers.

P a k i s t a n : A massive earthquake devastates parts of northern Pakistan, killing upwards of 80,000 and leaving three million homeless as winter snows threatened to cut off entire communities from assistance. ACF responds with emergency programs aimed at restoring water infrastructure and stopping the spread of water-borne diseases.

Darfur, Sudan: As security conditions deteriorate and rebel movements multiply, the Gereida refugee camp in Darfur is attacked with serious consequences for ACF staff and the beneficiaries in their care. ACF is forced to withdraw from the rural parts of northern Darfur, deploying programs to address needs in the south.

2004

 © Doury/VU – Mongolia

2002

Darfur, Sudan: After carrying out an alarming on-the-ground assessment, ACF launches large-scale emergency measures to address the dire conditions in Darfur: acute malnutrition, violence, and widespread food insecurity require international attention as western Sudan implodes and entire communities are forced to flee for their lives.

2005

 © ACF – Sudan

I r a q : A month after the American-led coalition invades Iraq, ACF sets up emergency nutrition programs. As insecurity mounts and the lines blur between military and humanitarian action, ACF ends up withdrawing towards the end of 2004.

Page 40

ACF’s Impact: A budget of 92.6 million euros in support of life-saving programs reaching four million beneficiaries.

2006

 © Reuters – Bangladesh

11:24 AM

 © G. Korganov/Rapho – Sudan

11/3/09

 © ACF – Indonésia

3749JF_r1_30YearsBrochure.qxd:Mise en page 1

Capacity-Building: D.R. Congo: In collaboration with Ministries of Health in a range of countries, ACF works directly with government agencies to build local capacity for managing acute malnutrition and cycles of relief and recovery— collaborative initiatives that ensure sustainable public health capacity for the long-term. ACF’s efforts alongside the D.R. Congo’s Ministry of Health has helped ensure significant regional capacity. Global Figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry”people in the world stands at 854 million.


Myanmar: Cyclone Nargis touches down in Myanmar (Burma), destroying harvests, uprooting communities, and devastating livelihoods. ACF responds with rapid assessments and launches programs to restore clean water and restart agricultural production.

➤❂Breakthrough: Rufs & Prevention: To prevent the seasonal spikes in malnutrition that occur each year during the “hunger gap”—when food stocks are consumed before new harvests are ready—ACF is field testing preventive distributions of non-therapeutic RUFs to at-risk children in need of a micronutrient boost during this period of seasonal h u n g e r. AC F i s te s t i n g t he non-therapeutic RUF Plumpy’doz in Northeastern Kenya in conjunction with TUFTS University and the Kenyan Research Institute.

Kenya: ACF pilots an innovative cash-based relief program in partnership with a national bank to empower communities displaced by post-electoral conflict in Kenya. The program becomes a model for cash-based emergency responses elsewhere. Hostages: Security conditions deteriorate in Afghanistan and two expatriates are taken hostage. In Somalia, four staff and their two pilots are taken hostage. A crisis cell is mobilised and their release is secured in 2009.

2008

 © ACF – Peru

2007

Global Food Crisis: A global spike in food prices causes unrest as communities and entire countries suddenly find the staples on which they depend beyond reach. ACF undertakes a detailed study called Feeding Hunger & Insecurity and calls for the creation of a global emergency fund to strengthen smallholder farmers and prioritize acute malnutrition.

Expelled From Darfur: The Government of Sudan expels ACF and 15 other humanitarian organizations in apparent reprisal for the International Criminal Court’s listing of President al-Bashir as a war criminal. The humanitarian sector scrambles to hand over responsibilities for several large-scale programs on which hundreds of thousands depend. Hostages: Three ACF staff are taken hostage in northeastern Kenya by an armed group from Somalia. The hostages are held in Mogadishu until ACF secures their release three months later after working with a range of clan and community leaders in Somalia.

ACF’s Impact: A budget of 126.7 million euros in support of life-saving programs reaching some five million beneficiaries. Global Figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry” people in the world rises to1.02 billion.

2009

 © ACF – Malawi, S. Vera

Pakistan: ACF responds to severe flooding in Pakistan’s southern Sindh and Balochistan provinces that affects 2.5 million people and leaves 400,000 homeless. The combined effects of cyclone Yemyin and intense monsoon rains leave hundreds of thousands displaced and without access to safe water and proper sanitation. ACF’s emergency intervention ensures access to safe water and sanitation.

Page 42

 © ACF – Kenya, S. Bruas

Central America & Peru: ACF’s rapid response capabilities were put to the test as Hurricane Felix slammed into Central America and Peru experienced a sizeable earthquake. In both cases, pre-positioned stocks of emergency supplies were flown into the affected areas within 48 hours of these natural disasters.

11:24 AM

 © ACF – Kenya, M. Francia

Bangladesh: Cyclone Sidr leaves a swath of destruction that obliterates harvests, lives, and homes across the south. ACF responds with a rapid assessment and launches life-saving programs to restore livelihoods and access to clean water in the cyclone’s aftermath.

11/3/09

 © ACF International

3749JF_r1_30YearsBrochure.qxd:Mise en page 1

➤ R e g i o n a l Tr a i n i n g Center: ACF opens a Regional Training Center in Nairobi, Kenya to provide professional development and technical training for the thousands of ACF staff implementing programs in nutrition, food security, and water, sanitation, & hygiene that benefit some three million people in vulnerable communities in East and Central Africa.


Myanmar: Cyclone Nargis touches down in Myanmar (Burma), destroying harvests, uprooting communities, and devastating livelihoods. ACF responds with rapid assessments and launches programs to restore clean water and restart agricultural production.

➤❂Breakthrough: Rufs & Prevention: To prevent the seasonal spikes in malnutrition that occur each year during the “hunger gap”—when food stocks are consumed before new harvests are ready—ACF is field testing preventive distributions of non-therapeutic RUFs to at-risk children in need of a micronutrient boost during this period of seasonal h u n g e r. AC F i s te s t i n g t he non-therapeutic RUF Plumpy’doz in Northeastern Kenya in conjunction with TUFTS University and the Kenyan Research Institute.

Kenya: ACF pilots an innovative cash-based relief program in partnership with a national bank to empower communities displaced by post-electoral conflict in Kenya. The program becomes a model for cash-based emergency responses elsewhere. Hostages: Security conditions deteriorate in Afghanistan and two expatriates are taken hostage. In Somalia, four staff and their two pilots are taken hostage. A crisis cell is mobilised and their release is secured in 2009.

2008

 © ACF – Peru

2007

Global Food Crisis: A global spike in food prices causes unrest as communities and entire countries suddenly find the staples on which they depend beyond reach. ACF undertakes a detailed study called Feeding Hunger & Insecurity and calls for the creation of a global emergency fund to strengthen smallholder farmers and prioritize acute malnutrition.

Expelled From Darfur: The Government of Sudan expels ACF and 15 other humanitarian organizations in apparent reprisal for the International Criminal Court’s listing of President al-Bashir as a war criminal. The humanitarian sector scrambles to hand over responsibilities for several large-scale programs on which hundreds of thousands depend. Hostages: Three ACF staff are taken hostage in northeastern Kenya by an armed group from Somalia. The hostages are held in Mogadishu until ACF secures their release three months later after working with a range of clan and community leaders in Somalia.

ACF’s Impact: A budget of 126.7 million euros in support of life-saving programs reaching some five million beneficiaries. Global Figures: Global estimate of number of “hungry” people in the world rises to1.02 billion.

2009

 © ACF – Malawi, S. Vera

Pakistan: ACF responds to severe flooding in Pakistan’s southern Sindh and Balochistan provinces that affects 2.5 million people and leaves 400,000 homeless. The combined effects of cyclone Yemyin and intense monsoon rains leave hundreds of thousands displaced and without access to safe water and proper sanitation. ACF’s emergency intervention ensures access to safe water and sanitation.

Page 42

 © ACF – Kenya, S. Bruas

Central America & Peru: ACF’s rapid response capabilities were put to the test as Hurricane Felix slammed into Central America and Peru experienced a sizeable earthquake. In both cases, pre-positioned stocks of emergency supplies were flown into the affected areas within 48 hours of these natural disasters.

11:24 AM

 © ACF – Kenya, M. Francia

Bangladesh: Cyclone Sidr leaves a swath of destruction that obliterates harvests, lives, and homes across the south. ACF responds with a rapid assessment and launches life-saving programs to restore livelihoods and access to clean water in the cyclone’s aftermath.

11/3/09

 © ACF International

3749JF_r1_30YearsBrochure.qxd:Mise en page 1

➤ R e g i o n a l Tr a i n i n g Center: ACF opens a Regional Training Center in Nairobi, Kenya to provide professional development and technical training for the thousands of ACF staff implementing programs in nutrition, food security, and water, sanitation, & hygiene that benefit some three million people in vulnerable communities in East and Central Africa.


3749JF_r1_30YearsBrochure.qxd:Mise en page 1

11/3/09

11:24 AM

Page 44

Thank you ! Action Against Hunger would like to thank all those who have supported us over the last 30 years in the fight for a world without hunger.


Action Against Hunger: 30 Years of Action