Page 1

Josep LluĂ­s Mateo

Contributors: M. Colominas, R. Scoffier, L. Stalder, E. Viray


INDEX

3

The practice of architecture ultimately produces objects, buildings and spaces—realities. And they are the bottom line when it comes to judging the validity of an idea or the interest of an approach.

works

06

p.

34

p.

54

p.

68

p.

Ultimately, architecture, which is an intellectual activity, becomes a seemingly immutable, enduring fact. Beyond good or evil. Arts Centre in Castelo Branco. Portugal

86

p.

Dwellings in Toulouse. France

94

p.

Residential building in Barcelona. Spain

118

p.

It is this factual dimension that we aim to explain here, presenting a series of buildings (and some projects) produced during our recent activity.

Prague National Gallery Entrance Hall. Czech Republic

They are accompanied by words (a few, to summarize ideas and present data), some planimetric diagrams, and general, distant discourses to contextualize and broaden perspectives.

138

p.

In the end, however, the building has to speak for itself, and it is this conversation that the book aims to reproduce.

Entrance Banc Sabadell Tower in Barcelona. Spain

Remodelling of Ninot Market in Barcelona. Spain

Urban planning and housing in Bordeaux. France

Josep Lluís Mateo

Bayonne: Entrée de Ville. France

texts

p.183

p.186

p.190

p.196

LETTER FROM THE GARDENS OF KYOTO

ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE

METAMORPHOSES

A HOUSE, A STUDIO

by Richard Scoffier

by Laurent Stalder

by Erwin Viray

by Manuel Colominas

projects

202

p.

Lascaux IV: International Cave Art Centre in MontignacLascaux. France

212

p.

Montjuïc Museum Mountain in Barcelona. Spain

222

p.

Nice Grand Arénas. France

Josep Lluís Mateo Architect ETSAB (Barcelona High Technical Architectural School). PHD (with honors) at the UPC (Polytechnic University of Catalonia). Professor Dr. em of Architecture and Design at the ETH-Zürich (Swiss Federal institute of Technology). Guest Professor at the GSD-Harvard (Graduate School of Design). Member of l’Ordre des Architectes de Paris, Swiss Society of Engineers and Architects (SIA) in Zürich and the Catalan Professional Architectural Association (COAC) in Barcelona. Author (selection) of Bauen und Denken (Quart Verlag, Luzern 2002), Textos Instrumentales (Gustavo Gili, Barcelona 2007) and director of a collective research published as Middle East: Contemporary Architectural Conditions (Park Books, Zurich 2013).

His practice, mateoarquitectura, is globally active and tries to connect intelligence and artistic ambition with pragmatism and objectivity. His practice has won many prices and awards (NAN best Spanish project abroad 2010 & 2011; A+ Award 2011 for the most outstanding career); has been worldwide published (Josep Lluís Mateo, Opere e progetti. Electa, Milano, 2007; On Building: Matter and Form. Polígrafa, Barcelona, 2012) and exhibit (MoMA New York 2006 and the Galerie d’Architecture in Paris 2013). www.mateo-arquitectura.com


INDEX

3

The practice of architecture ultimately produces objects, buildings and spaces—realities. And they are the bottom line when it comes to judging the validity of an idea or the interest of an approach.

works

06

p.

34

p.

54

p.

68

p.

Ultimately, architecture, which is an intellectual activity, becomes a seemingly immutable, enduring fact. Beyond good or evil. Arts Centre in Castelo Branco. Portugal

86

p.

Dwellings in Toulouse. France

94

p.

Residential building in Barcelona. Spain

118

p.

It is this factual dimension that we aim to explain here, presenting a series of buildings (and some projects) produced during our recent activity.

Prague National Gallery Entrance Hall. Czech Republic

They are accompanied by words (a few, to summarize ideas and present data), some planimetric diagrams, and general, distant discourses to contextualize and broaden perspectives.

138

p.

In the end, however, the building has to speak for itself, and it is this conversation that the book aims to reproduce.

Entrance Banc Sabadell Tower in Barcelona. Spain

Remodelling of Ninot Market in Barcelona. Spain

Urban planning and housing in Bordeaux. France

Josep Lluís Mateo

Bayonne: Entrée de Ville. France

texts

p.183

p.186

p.190

p.196

LETTER FROM THE GARDENS OF KYOTO

ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE

METAMORPHOSES

A HOUSE, A STUDIO

by Richard Scoffier

by Laurent Stalder

by Erwin Viray

by Manuel Colominas

projects

202

p.

Lascaux IV: International Cave Art Centre in MontignacLascaux. France

212

p.

Montjuïc Museum Mountain in Barcelona. Spain

222

p.

Nice Grand Arénas. France

Josep Lluís Mateo Architect ETSAB (Barcelona High Technical Architectural School). PHD (with honors) at the UPC (Polytechnic University of Catalonia). Professor Dr. em of Architecture and Design at the ETH-Zürich (Swiss Federal institute of Technology). Guest Professor at the GSD-Harvard (Graduate School of Design). Member of l’Ordre des Architectes de Paris, Swiss Society of Engineers and Architects (SIA) in Zürich and the Catalan Professional Architectural Association (COAC) in Barcelona. Author (selection) of Bauen und Denken (Quart Verlag, Luzern 2002), Textos Instrumentales (Gustavo Gili, Barcelona 2007) and director of a collective research published as Middle East: Contemporary Architectural Conditions (Park Books, Zurich 2013).

His practice, mateoarquitectura, is globally active and tries to connect intelligence and artistic ambition with pragmatism and objectivity. His practice has won many prices and awards (NAN best Spanish project abroad 2010 & 2011; A+ Award 2011 for the most outstanding career); has been worldwide published (Josep Lluís Mateo, Opere e progetti. Electa, Milano, 2007; On Building: Matter and Form. Polígrafa, Barcelona, 2012) and exhibit (MoMA New York 2006 and the Galerie d’Architecture in Paris 2013). www.mateo-arquitectura.com


ARTS CENTRE IN CASTELO BRANCO. PORTUGAL


ARTS CENTRE IN CASTELO BRANCO. PORTUGAL


39°46’17.45”N 07°51’12.146”W

Interview for the Portuguese newspaper Diário de Noticias, April 2011

The square is a surface, a topography, drawn out in relation to the movement of the water and built by pedreiros, following patterns that are abstract but not random. Floating on this surface is an object. At its base, water, frozen here to form a skating rink.

DN

What was your inspiration for this Arts Centre?

JLLM

The project appeared as a continuation of our remodelling of Praça Largo da Devesa, a large public space. It sets out to complete it, then, to continue it. It also looks to its neighbours, the old theatre and the former barracks. These were the initial stimuli. We wanted to make the building float so that the plaza would pass beneath it, and to produce a unitary, continuous building, with roofs, floors and façades that were equivalent to each other.

DN

What were the greatest difficulties?

JLLM

The greatest difficulties were certain technical issues, the structure for instance, which a true constructor actually enjoys solving; and, most of all, the passage of time, the great distance between the idea and the work on site. Though in this case, my faith in the idea is unshaken, and we have worked hard to ensure that it appears new and virginal.

DN

Since this space will house Culture and Art, what is the relation between Art and Architecture?

JLLM

Without the architecture intending to overpower the artwork, this is a strong, singular space, always the best setting for artistic creation.

JLLM

N

Competition 2000. First prize, restricted competition Project 2000-2006 Construction 2012-2013

Location Largo da Devesa city square, Castelo Branco (Portugal) Client Castelo Branco Council, Polis Project Surface area 4,300 m2

Team Project leader: Maria Viñé Project team: Xavier Monclús, Inés Alomar, Rafael Berengena, Victoria Llinares, Martin di Renzo, Nazario Branca, Daniel Guerra, Daniel Blum, Nidia Kurtin, Víctor López-Rioboo, Ana Valente, Maria Canel

Site management Victoria Llinares External collaborators Collaborating architect: Carlos Reis Figueiredo Structure: Manuel Arguijo Lightning: Ove Arup and Partners, Ing. Pinguinha

Acoustics: Higini Arau Landscaping: Manel Colominas Installation consultants: INDUS. Ing. Madeira da Silva, Engenharia Lda. Economic control: Aumedes-Embuena Photographs: Adrià Goula

DN

How did you deal with such a warm, dry climate as Castelo Branco’s?

JLLM

The climate is extreme, yes. I’m very pleased with the ice rink at the base of the building; it’s a playful relationship with the climate and the plaza. The building is compact and well insulated, a bubble of sheltered activity.


39°46’17.45”N 07°51’12.146”W

Interview for the Portuguese newspaper Diário de Noticias, April 2011

The square is a surface, a topography, drawn out in relation to the movement of the water and built by pedreiros, following patterns that are abstract but not random. Floating on this surface is an object. At its base, water, frozen here to form a skating rink.

DN

What was your inspiration for this Arts Centre?

JLLM

The project appeared as a continuation of our remodelling of Praça Largo da Devesa, a large public space. It sets out to complete it, then, to continue it. It also looks to its neighbours, the old theatre and the former barracks. These were the initial stimuli. We wanted to make the building float so that the plaza would pass beneath it, and to produce a unitary, continuous building, with roofs, floors and façades that were equivalent to each other.

DN

What were the greatest difficulties?

JLLM

The greatest difficulties were certain technical issues, the structure for instance, which a true constructor actually enjoys solving; and, most of all, the passage of time, the great distance between the idea and the work on site. Though in this case, my faith in the idea is unshaken, and we have worked hard to ensure that it appears new and virginal.

DN

Since this space will house Culture and Art, what is the relation between Art and Architecture?

JLLM

Without the architecture intending to overpower the artwork, this is a strong, singular space, always the best setting for artistic creation.

JLLM

N

Competition 2000. First prize, restricted competition Project 2000-2006 Construction 2012-2013

Location Largo da Devesa city square, Castelo Branco (Portugal) Client Castelo Branco Council, Polis Project Surface area 4,300 m2

Team Project leader: Maria Viñé Project team: Xavier Monclús, Inés Alomar, Rafael Berengena, Victoria Llinares, Martin di Renzo, Nazario Branca, Daniel Guerra, Daniel Blum, Nidia Kurtin, Víctor López-Rioboo, Ana Valente, Maria Canel

Site management Victoria Llinares External collaborators Collaborating architect: Carlos Reis Figueiredo Structure: Manuel Arguijo Lightning: Ove Arup and Partners, Ing. Pinguinha

Acoustics: Higini Arau Landscaping: Manel Colominas Installation consultants: INDUS. Ing. Madeira da Silva, Engenharia Lda. Economic control: Aumedes-Embuena Photographs: Adrià Goula

DN

How did you deal with such a warm, dry climate as Castelo Branco’s?

JLLM

The climate is extreme, yes. I’m very pleased with the ice rink at the base of the building; it’s a playful relationship with the climate and the plaza. The building is compact and well insulated, a bubble of sheltered activity.


18

Section AA

FACTS — WORKS

ARTS CENTRE IN CASTELO BRANCO. PORTUGAL

19

0

1

2

5


18

Section AA

FACTS — WORKS

ARTS CENTRE IN CASTELO BRANCO. PORTUGAL

19

0

1

2

5


RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA. SPAIN


RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA. SPAIN


60

Main floor plan

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — WORKS

0

1.5

3

61


60

Main floor plan

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — WORKS

0

1.5

3

61


64

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — WORKS

65

A

A

Section A

0

1

0

0.50

0

0.25

Façade: glass and metallic inside layer

0

2


64

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — WORKS

65

A

A

Section A

0

1

0

0.50

0

0.25

Façade: glass and metallic inside layer

0

2


66

FACTS — WORKS

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

67


66

FACTS — WORKS

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

67


REMODELLING OF NINOT MARKET IN BARCELONA. SPAIN


REMODELLING OF NINOT MARKET IN BARCELONA. SPAIN


100

FACTS — WORKS

REMODELLING OF NINOT MARKET IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

101


100

FACTS — WORKS

REMODELLING OF NINOT MARKET IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

101


108

FACTS — WORKS

REMODELLING OF NINOT MARKET IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

109


108

FACTS — WORKS

REMODELLING OF NINOT MARKET IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

109


170

FACTS — WORKS

BAYONNE: ENTRÉE DE VILLE . FRANCE

3. RIVADOUR 3

The Rivadour complex closes the urban space. It is a continuous block that follows the river before breaking off towards the city. At its end, it rises up to accommodate a hotel. This continuous line forms the limit between the park and the approach to the bridge, and dialogues with the existing urban complex at a smaller scale. The permeable ground floor guarantees pedestrian continuity through the new urban space.

171


170

FACTS — WORKS

BAYONNE: ENTRÉE DE VILLE . FRANCE

3. RIVADOUR 3

The Rivadour complex closes the urban space. It is a continuous block that follows the river before breaking off towards the city. At its end, it rises up to accommodate a hotel. This continuous line forms the limit between the park and the approach to the bridge, and dialogues with the existing urban complex at a smaller scale. The permeable ground floor guarantees pedestrian continuity through the new urban space.

171


172

FACTS — WORKS

BAYONNE: ENTRÉE DE VILLE . FRANCE

173

3

Rivadour

Ground floor

First floor

Second floor

Third floor

Sixth floor

Eighth floor

Ninth floor

Seventh floor

Roof

C

C’

Section A-A’

Section B-B’

A

A‘

B

B‘

Section C-C’

0

5

10


172

FACTS — WORKS

BAYONNE: ENTRÉE DE VILLE . FRANCE

173

3

Rivadour

Ground floor

First floor

Second floor

Third floor

Sixth floor

Eighth floor

Ninth floor

Seventh floor

Roof

C

C’

Section A-A’

Section B-B’

A

A‘

B

B‘

Section C-C’

0

5

10


18 3

LETTER FROM THE GARDENS OF KYOTO by Erwin Viray

In the El Ninot Market in Barcelona, the moving shutters show the movement of architectural elements - the shutters; that compliment the movement of people; that creates a situation of being open or closed, giving presence to light and space.

In a Dwelling in Barcelona, beside a Japanese restaurant, the façade is made of moving screens that allow air, view and light; while people stand still to enjoy air, view and light.

In the dwellings in Toulouse France, the bricks laid in particular order, and the craftsmen are very proud of the work, creates illusion of depth or flatness.

In the Cultural Centre in Castelo Branco in Portugal, people moving through space, unmoving walls and floors to make the peoples’ movements fluid, architectural elements form volume that stand still in a site, a presence in a site context, a presence and non- presence.


18 3

LETTER FROM THE GARDENS OF KYOTO by Erwin Viray

In the El Ninot Market in Barcelona, the moving shutters show the movement of architectural elements - the shutters; that compliment the movement of people; that creates a situation of being open or closed, giving presence to light and space.

In a Dwelling in Barcelona, beside a Japanese restaurant, the façade is made of moving screens that allow air, view and light; while people stand still to enjoy air, view and light.

In the dwellings in Toulouse France, the bricks laid in particular order, and the craftsmen are very proud of the work, creates illusion of depth or flatness.

In the Cultural Centre in Castelo Branco in Portugal, people moving through space, unmoving walls and floors to make the peoples’ movements fluid, architectural elements form volume that stand still in a site, a presence in a site context, a presence and non- presence.


190

191

METAMORPHOSES Reflections on the recent work of Josep Lluís Mateo by Richard Scoffier

Josep Lluís Mateo’s approach seems to pay close attention to the invisible forces and powers—social, telluric or climatic—that shape our cities and territory. But his is still essentially the work of a constructor, who, by means of his projects, aims to develop a personal vision based on the fundamentals of the art of building.

New Babylon. Constant

The architecture of Josep Lluís Mateo—try as you might, you won’t find any recurrent forms or objects. All of his constructions reflect a succession of almost obsessive stances. They rise up, they deflect, they support, with an arsenal of strategies that serve to resist entropy and to transform the earth at depth. Like the means used by the Robinsons of Jules Verne’s Mysterious Island in their ceaseless efforts to transform the island. This native of Barcelona entirely redesigns the city of the engineer Cerdà around the concept of circulation: living there does not mean enclosing, protecting, becoming sedentary, but rather moving, circulating, exchanging and equipping the world with prosthetics to facilitate travel and meetings. His architecture is conceived as infrastructure, and his projects retain at their heart traces of the utopias of the sixties. Notably the New Babylon of Constant, who promised us megastructures launched like inebriated bridges across uninhabited territories, offering up open spaces for the wanderings of a nomadic population. His work can also be seen as reflection on five of the fundamentals of architecture. The wall, which raises and bears more archaically and tragically than columns or piles. The facing, which clads the wall to civilize it and, sometimes, acquires a degree of autonomy. The floor, which can be considered a horizontal wall separating heaven and earth. Openings, which highlight the efforts of the wall and replace the windows. And, finally, volumes, which find fulfilment in the cantilever that frees them from the ground and allows them to exist in themselves and for themselves. But let us start with the wall, which is, for this architect, the essential notion that generates all the others.

THE WALL In Josep Lluís Mateo’s work, everything is wall. But his wall is not the enclosing wall of the Roman house that bounds the world of Vesta, goddess of the hearth. No, it is the wall that bears. For him, there is nothing feminine about the wall; it is Doric, herculean. Either it rises up, refusing to separate an inside and an outside, to keep the floors at arm’s length. Or it plunges into the ground to contain masses of earth. The two concrete walls of the film theatre in Barcelona, then, are cut strangely to avoid creating enclaves and to allow free passage to the flows of pedestrians in the Raval, the popular neighbourhood near the Rambla. These cyclopean walls support the crossbeams of the airborne trays, accommodating the public without the aid of any intermediate support. They sketch out an archaic Centre Pompidou that would have refused the facility of metal trusses and columns, preferring the expressive materiality of concrete. Barbaric incisions in the grainy skin of the material highlight the sinuous paths of the post-tensioning cables and render the lines of bending moment visible. Meanwhile, the anchors fixing the tensors in the crossbeams explain the workings of this collaborating structure that is deployed in the three dimensions of space. Responding to these tensed walls that soar skywards are invisible walls that retain them, below ground. These are the retaining walls that surround the below-grade screening rooms under the building’s forecourt, forming a casing that provides protection from groundwater. They are comparable to the wall of the vocational training college in Santa Coloma de Gramanet which, like a dam, is embedded between two slopes to retain the construction and prevent it spilling into the valley. Bearing, supporting: the project not chosen for the international cave art centre in Lascaux (2012) near Montignac in the Dordogne can be read as a founding narrative. The new facsimile of the grotto—the original cave has long been inaccessible to the public—was skilfully set at the heart of a complex system of active walls. As though countering the natural cavity decorated with painted figures and the smooth walls on which the light dances. The transition from prehistoric to historic, the staging of the original moment when humankind left its dark, centripetal refuge to occupy a light-filled, centrifugal space.

Film theatre. JLLM

La Bastida. JLLM


190

191

METAMORPHOSES Reflections on the recent work of Josep Lluís Mateo by Richard Scoffier

Josep Lluís Mateo’s approach seems to pay close attention to the invisible forces and powers—social, telluric or climatic—that shape our cities and territory. But his is still essentially the work of a constructor, who, by means of his projects, aims to develop a personal vision based on the fundamentals of the art of building.

New Babylon. Constant

The architecture of Josep Lluís Mateo—try as you might, you won’t find any recurrent forms or objects. All of his constructions reflect a succession of almost obsessive stances. They rise up, they deflect, they support, with an arsenal of strategies that serve to resist entropy and to transform the earth at depth. Like the means used by the Robinsons of Jules Verne’s Mysterious Island in their ceaseless efforts to transform the island. This native of Barcelona entirely redesigns the city of the engineer Cerdà around the concept of circulation: living there does not mean enclosing, protecting, becoming sedentary, but rather moving, circulating, exchanging and equipping the world with prosthetics to facilitate travel and meetings. His architecture is conceived as infrastructure, and his projects retain at their heart traces of the utopias of the sixties. Notably the New Babylon of Constant, who promised us megastructures launched like inebriated bridges across uninhabited territories, offering up open spaces for the wanderings of a nomadic population. His work can also be seen as reflection on five of the fundamentals of architecture. The wall, which raises and bears more archaically and tragically than columns or piles. The facing, which clads the wall to civilize it and, sometimes, acquires a degree of autonomy. The floor, which can be considered a horizontal wall separating heaven and earth. Openings, which highlight the efforts of the wall and replace the windows. And, finally, volumes, which find fulfilment in the cantilever that frees them from the ground and allows them to exist in themselves and for themselves. But let us start with the wall, which is, for this architect, the essential notion that generates all the others.

THE WALL In Josep Lluís Mateo’s work, everything is wall. But his wall is not the enclosing wall of the Roman house that bounds the world of Vesta, goddess of the hearth. No, it is the wall that bears. For him, there is nothing feminine about the wall; it is Doric, herculean. Either it rises up, refusing to separate an inside and an outside, to keep the floors at arm’s length. Or it plunges into the ground to contain masses of earth. The two concrete walls of the film theatre in Barcelona, then, are cut strangely to avoid creating enclaves and to allow free passage to the flows of pedestrians in the Raval, the popular neighbourhood near the Rambla. These cyclopean walls support the crossbeams of the airborne trays, accommodating the public without the aid of any intermediate support. They sketch out an archaic Centre Pompidou that would have refused the facility of metal trusses and columns, preferring the expressive materiality of concrete. Barbaric incisions in the grainy skin of the material highlight the sinuous paths of the post-tensioning cables and render the lines of bending moment visible. Meanwhile, the anchors fixing the tensors in the crossbeams explain the workings of this collaborating structure that is deployed in the three dimensions of space. Responding to these tensed walls that soar skywards are invisible walls that retain them, below ground. These are the retaining walls that surround the below-grade screening rooms under the building’s forecourt, forming a casing that provides protection from groundwater. They are comparable to the wall of the vocational training college in Santa Coloma de Gramanet which, like a dam, is embedded between two slopes to retain the construction and prevent it spilling into the valley. Bearing, supporting: the project not chosen for the international cave art centre in Lascaux (2012) near Montignac in the Dordogne can be read as a founding narrative. The new facsimile of the grotto—the original cave has long been inaccessible to the public—was skilfully set at the heart of a complex system of active walls. As though countering the natural cavity decorated with painted figures and the smooth walls on which the light dances. The transition from prehistoric to historic, the staging of the original moment when humankind left its dark, centripetal refuge to occupy a light-filled, centrifugal space.

Film theatre. JLLM

La Bastida. JLLM


MONTJUÏC MUSEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA. SPAIN

Project 2014-2015 Location Montjuïc, Barcelona

Client AMM—Associació Montjuïc. Muntanya dels Museus (MNAC, La Caixa, Fira de Barcelona)

Team Project leader: Blanca Lora-Tamayo Project team: Ignasi Rincón, Maria Güell


MONTJUÏC MUSEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA. SPAIN

Project 2014-2015 Location Montjuïc, Barcelona

Client AMM—Associació Montjuïc. Muntanya dels Museus (MNAC, La Caixa, Fira de Barcelona)

Team Project leader: Blanca Lora-Tamayo Project team: Ignasi Rincón, Maria Güell


216

MONTJUÏC MU SEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — PROJECTS

Entrance plaza Metro station underground (planned)

Cross section of connection with the MNAC

New foyer

Fast conection to upper levels

217

MNAC


216

MONTJUÏC MU SEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — PROJECTS

Entrance plaza Metro station underground (planned)

Cross section of connection with the MNAC

New foyer

Fast conection to upper levels

217

MNAC


7.41

218

MONTJUÏC MU SEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — PROJECTS

219

+ 77.01

+ 57.40

TERRASSA + 56.34

+ 56.51

+ 44.75 + 42.00

+ 41.91

+ 36.74

+ 36.96

+ 36.26

P. Victòria Eugènia

Meeting of the foyer with the existing pavilions

+ 77.01 + 74.23

TERRASSA + 59.36

+ 59.59

+ 59.36

+ 51.42

+ 50.78

+ 47.34 + 44.51

+ 44.91

+ 44.75

+ 42.91

+ 42.00 + 40.19

+ 35.69

Floor plan of the foyer

9,98

10,61

11,08

11,08

11,08

11,08

11,08

Cross section through the foyer 11,08 11,08 11,12

12,18

12,18

12,18

12,18

12,18

12,18

5,16

11

10,29

10,29

1


7.41

218

MONTJUÏC MU SEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

FACTS — PROJECTS

219

+ 77.01

+ 57.40

TERRASSA + 56.34

+ 56.51

+ 44.75 + 42.00

+ 41.91

+ 36.74

+ 36.96

+ 36.26

P. Victòria Eugènia

Meeting of the foyer with the existing pavilions

+ 77.01 + 74.23

TERRASSA + 59.36

+ 59.59

+ 59.36

+ 51.42

+ 50.78

+ 47.34 + 44.51

+ 44.91

+ 44.75

+ 42.91

+ 42.00 + 40.19

+ 35.69

Floor plan of the foyer

9,98

10,61

11,08

11,08

11,08

11,08

11,08

Cross section through the foyer 11,08 11,08 11,12

12,18

12,18

12,18

12,18

12,18

12,18

5,16

11

10,29

10,29

1


MONTJUÏC MU SEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

221


MONTJUÏC MU SEUM MOUNTAIN IN BARCELONA . SPAIN

221


GENERAL TEAM

Direction Josep Lluís Mateo Marta Cervelló (associate architect) Project leaders Till von Mackensen Dipl.-Ing.Arch. TU Darmstadt (Germany) Xavier Monclús Technical architect, EUP Barcelona Oia Pursals Architect, ESTA Vallès (Barcelona) Ignasi Rincón Architect, ETSA Barcelona

Team (2012-2016) Eva Florindo, Enric Sanitjas, Katarzyna Kuzior, Sabine Willi, Isabel Riambau, Bruna Soares, Maria Güell, Ala Zreigat, Pablo Sánchez Otero, Lluís Andreu, Benoist Desfonds, Tobias Krieg, Olga Sankova, Àlex Vilar, Blanca Lora-Tamayo, Luka Kreze, Kevin Sun, Sara Dordas, Laura Navarro, Èlia Canadell, Laurent Baudelot, Sergi Garriga, Maria Ubach, Karolina Wierzbinska, Maria Martínez, Eduard Balcells, Marta Gual, Joanna Ejsmont, Jeanne de Bussac, Maria Matamala, Javier Ortiz de Guinea, Vahid Farbod, Monya Riachi, José Espinosa, Jone Jankoski, Ali Khodr, Marianna Maczova, Jonathan Lee, Lu Xiao, Alexander Haus, Pascal Babey, Martin Lepontre, Andrea Cavelti

Administration Salvador Torroja Communication Maria Mateo Soraya Barbero Information systems Eupalinos-Cooperativa d’Arquitectes Jordi Capell www.mateo-arquitectura.com

CREDITS

Published by Actar Publishers, New York, Barcelona Editorial coordination Soraya Barbero Oia Pursals Texts Josep Lluís Mateo Manel Colominas Richard Scoffier Laurent Stalder Erwin Viray Graphic Design and Creative Direction in Production Folch Photographs Luc Boegly Adrià Goula Jean-François Tremege Beat Marugg

Translation and proofreading Into English, Elaine Fradley Into Greek, Cillero & de Motta Into Spanish, Joan Ferrarons / Natalia Gascón Printing AGPOGRAF Impressors ISBN 9781945150029 All rights reserved © of the edition, Actar Publishers, Barcelona 2016 © of the texts, their authors © of the designs, drawings and illustrations of the process, Josep Lluís Mateo, excepting: © BAC (Boma): 191, 204. © Luxigon: 206, 207, 208, 209. © of the photographs, Adrià Goula, excepting: © Luc Boegly: 43 bottom, 50 bottom, 51, 116-117, 124-125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130-131, 134, 135, 142-143, 144-145, 146, 154, 158-159, 162-163, 164-165, 166, 167, 172-173. © Constant Nieuwenhuys: 188. © Jean-François Tremege: 127 bottom, 132, 133. © Erwin Viray: 182, 183. © Manel Colomines: 184. © Beat Marugg: 195,196. © Ferran Freixa: 189.

Distribution Actar D, Inc. New York 355 Lexington Avenue, 8th Floor New York, NY 10017 Phone +1 2129662207 salesnewyork@actar-d.com Barcelona Roca i Batlle 2 08023 Barcelona, SP  Phone +34 933 282 183 eurosales@actar-d.com This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved, whether the whole or part of the material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, re-use of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilms or in other ways, and storage in data banks. For any king of use, permission of the copyright owner must be obtained.


FACTS - Josep Lluís Mateo  

Facts shows a vision of recent buildings and projects from one of the most outstanding European architectural practice, also presented from...

FACTS - Josep Lluís Mateo  

Facts shows a vision of recent buildings and projects from one of the most outstanding European architectural practice, also presented from...

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