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ACSANEWS SETPEMBER 2007

regional news

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College, and establishing an AAS Degree in historic preservation at the Building Construction and Construction Technology program at the same institution. washington state university

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Professor Robert Barnstone returns to WSU this fall after spending a year at Delft University. He was working in their materials development research component. Specifically he is working on cardboard construction that he hopes will provide a new, low-cost, sustainable housing option. Barnstone is working with the Red Cross on a nine square-foot, test home that will be used as emergency refugee housing in Chad.

Center for Japanese Arts, Portland, Oregon—Ying Mao; Instructor: Kevin Nute, University of Oregon

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Looking to coat the cardboard Barnstone began using recently-developed ceramic cement. The material, which, unlike cement, is not gypsumbased, requires less energy to produce than regular cement. It is waterproof and fireproof. Because it’s made of phosphor, it is ecologically-friendly and can be re-used. Using the ceramic cement, Barnstone has been able to develop a house structure that is water proof, structurally strong, fire proof, and durable. “You end up with a sandwich panel that is equivalent to a structurally insulated panel,’’ he says. It can also be shipped and assembled easily, taking up less room than something like foam panels.

Coquille River Interpretive Center, Constructional model — Jeff Hoge; Instructor: Kevin Nute, University of Oregon

Professor Ayad Rahmani was on professional leave for the spring semester 2006 finalizing his manuscript entitled Kafka and Architecture. The book is just as much about Kafka as it about architecture; on the one hand, looking at architecture to analyze Kafka’s central concerns in language but also in matters of psychology and self, while on the other, appropriating the author’s work as a way to explore new theories in architecture. To Kafka, architecture represented more than a means with which to locate his characters; rather to him architecture offered a kind of obstacle course whose hurdling gave his characters, along with his readers, a way to become more aware of the world and their role in it. The book is composed of six chapters, each taking up a different hurdle and using it to gain insights into the issues that shaped Kaf-

Coquille River Interpretive Center, Bridge, Oregon —Jeff Hoge; Instructor: Kevin Nute, University of Oregon

ACSA News September 2007  

ACSA News, published monthly during the academic year (September through May), serves the essential function of exchanging timely informatio...

ACSA News September 2007  

ACSA News, published monthly during the academic year (September through May), serves the essential function of exchanging timely informatio...

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