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2333193

The Island House:

An abundance of history

BY JANE BEATHARD

The Island House Inn in Port Clinton dates from 1886. A microtel, it features 38 newly renovated rooms.

BY JANE BEATHARD news@madison-press.com Just a few nautical miles from the legendary revelry of Put-in-Bay and South Bass Island, The Island House Inn in downtown Port Clinton offers quiet luxury and a glimpse of coastal Ohio history. Located at 102 Madison St., the boutique hotel’s 38 newly renovated rooms combine modern conveniences like wireless Internet and Direct TV with the atmosphere of an 1800s inn. “Our historic property is different from the chain hotels in the area,” said general manager Kathy Kopechak. “We want to treat people like they are at home.” Visitors and guests can relax in the rustic 1812 Food & Spirits dining room and Rosie’s Bar & Grill, both located just off the lobby. Both are open weekdays 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m and weekends 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. A brunch buffet is available in the dining room from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sundays. Constructed in 1886, The Island House replaced an inn of the same name, located on Second Street, that burned in 1882. Ottawa County Sheriff Conrad Gernhard constructed and owned the new “gentlemen only” hotel, doubling the size of the original structure and relocating it to the heart of

the growing city. He also added modern features (for the day) such as an indoor restroom on the first floor. Eventually, shared restrooms were added to each hotel floor. Today, each air-conditioned room has a private bath, as well as a refrigerator and coffee maker. Sheriff Gernhard was a colorful and enterprising figure in the early days of Ohio’s North Coast. A German immigrant, he was barely 18 and old enough

to drink when he opened Port Clinton’s first saloon in 1870. Elected sheriff nine years later, Gernhard collected delinquent taxes in Port Clinton. The job was financially beneficial in those days since Gernhard was allowed to pocket all interest and penalties from those delinquencies. Earned profits allowed him to spend $25,000 to build and furnish The Island House, equipping it “with every modern con-

venience pertaining to the traveling public,” a local newspaper reported. In the 126 years since Gernhard staked his fortunes at the corner of Perry and Madison streets, The Island House has hosted thousands, including politicians, Hollywood celebrities and sports figures. Presidents Hayes and Garfield stayed while hunting and fishing in the area. Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall checked in while shopping for a cus-

BY JANE BEATHARD

Pictures from The Island House Inn’s long and colorful history hang on lobby walls.

tom-designed boat at nearby Mathews Boat Lines. Baseball legends Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio and their New York Yankee teammates made the hotel a regular stopover when traveling to play the Detroit Tigers in the 1920s, 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. Snapshots of those visits and other historic memorabilia now hang in the hotel’s lobby. Closed in 2005, the hotel re-opened as a completely renovated condo-tel in 2008. It’s a unique concept that allows investors to purchase rooms for their own use or add them to the “rental pool” for sublet by the hotel staff. “Fourteen of our 38 rooms are privately owned,” Kopechak said. Guests can choose from standard king and queen rooms or king and apartment suites. A whirlpool suite is available. November and December specials include weekend “Bed & Breakfast” and “Escape From It All” packages priced at $99 to $229, depending on the room. Kopechak said Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Eve specials are also in the offing. Reservations are available by calling (419) 7340100 or via the Internet at port-clinton-ohiohotel.com. Jane Beathard is a reporter with The Madison Press, in London, Ohio.

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ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

A farmer’s job is 365 days/year BY GARY BROCK gbrock@recordherald.com

Of Northwestern Ohio Publisher — Devin Hamilton dhamilton@acresmidwest.com Editor-in-Chief — Gary Brock gbrock@acresmidwest.com Editor — Gregg Rettig meditor@madison-press.com Graphics Manager — Jessica Cea graphics@acresmidwest.com Advertising: advertising@acresmidwest.com Delaware: 740-363-1161 Earl Smith, Advertising Director esmith@delgazette.com Serving Union, Marion, Delaware counties Bellevue: 419-483-7410 Rick Miller, Publisher Serving Ottawa, Sandusky, Seneca, Erie, Huron counties Galion: 419-468-1117 Vicki Taylor, Publisher Serving Crawford, Richland counties Mt. Gilead: 419-946-3010 Vicki Taylor, Publisher Serving Morrow, Knox counties Wauseon: 419-335-2010 Janice May, General Manager Serving Lucas and Henry counties Roy Slater, Regional Advertising Consultant 419-295-1009 rslater@acresmidwest.com Serving Hardin, Wyandot, Hancock, Putnam, Wood counties Subscriptions B.A. Wells, Circulation Manager (740) 852-1616 circ@acresmidwest.com Contact ACRES of North Central Ohio: 30 South Oak Street / London, OH 43140 (740) 852-1616 ACRES of Northwestern Ohio is published monthly by Ohio Community Media, LLC and is available through the Delaware Gazette, Bellevue Gazette, Galion Inquirer, Morrow County Sentinel, Oberlin News Tribune, Fulton County Expositor and The Madison Press. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any material from this issue in whole or in part is prohibited. ACRES of Northwestern Ohio are available for purchase at each of the newspapers offices for $1/copy or contact us to subscribe. Subscriptions are $19.95 per year. Please Buy Locally & Recycle.

"So," people who don’t know what the life of a farmer is really like may ask, "what do farmers do during the winter between fall harvest and spring planting? Long vacation? Winter job? Catch up on TV?" The truth, of course, is that the life of a farmer doesn’t end after harvest and start again in the weeks before spring planting. A farmer’s life is 365 days a year. It is true that the winter months are different. But that is all. Just… different. Any farmer will tell you that from the time they finish the fall harvest until the day they begin to prepare the fields for planting in early spring they are working on some farmrelated project. Maybe they are checking out new seeds, deciding what seeds will be best for the next season and what new hybrids are ready for the ground. Then they must place their seed orders. And they had better not wait until anywhere near the last minute or they might be out of luck. And they must order their fertilizer for the next year. Then there is all the farm equipment. Once harvest is done, the tractors, combines and other equipment isn’t just driven into a barn to sit for three or four months. Winter is the time to do repairs on the trucks and tractors and equipment. It is time to order and

install replacement parts. It is time to refurbish everything and “winterize” all of that expensive farm equipment. And all that tender loving care takes lots of time. So the winter months may be as busy as any other time of the year for farmers. COSTLY FARM BILL DELAY? Speaking of winter issues, the failure to pass the expired federal Farm Bill may be costing to not only farmers but American consumers as well. The Tampa Bay Tribune recently reported that milk prices per gallon could skyrocket if a new bill isn't approved this winter. When the Farm Bill expired Sept. 30, so did the Milk Income Loss Contract program. It was a safety net providing payments when national milk prices drop in contrast to feed costs. When the new farm bill did not pass this year, and the old one expired, the MILC program halted and was not replaced. And the paper reported that this will impact dairy farmers across the nation. The Tribune reports that without a farm bill by the end of this year, an old permanent law would take effect. The Congressional Research Service says the government would be mandated to set crop and milk prices at "parity" — the purchasing power of those crops in 1910-1914, when, according to a 1930s study, a farmer's earning power and purchasing power were equal. MILC, and other dairy support

Gary Brock programs, have prevented imposition of parity. But it could be imposed in 2013 if a new farm bill isn't passed. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said that could raise the price of milk in stores to $6 a gallon. Here in southern Ohio it is about $3 a gallon average. The prices of milk, cheese and butter are all on the increase. So let's hope that after the election, Congress will return for a "lame duck" session and include in it's priorities passage of a new federal Farm Bill. Partisan concerns stalled it this fall. Let's hope that will be put aside after the November election. Gary Brock is editor-in-chief of ACRES.

All Ohio counties designated as primary or contiguous natural disaster areas For ACRES COLUMBUS — Steve Maurer, the State Executive Director for the USDA Ohio Farm Service Agency (FSA) reminds producers about the U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretarial designation on Sept. 5, 2012. All of Ohio’s counties were designated as primary or contiguous agricultural natural disaster areas due to drought and excessive heat that occurred from Feb. 1, 2012 and continuing.

This gives all qualified farm operators in the designated areas the opportunity to file an application for low interest emergency (EM) loans from USDA’s FSA, provided eligibility requirements are met. Farmers in eligible counties have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses. FSA will consider each loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability.

USDA FSA has a variety of programs, in addition to the emergency loan program, to help eligible farmers recover from adversity. Other programs available to assist farmers include the Emergency Conservation Program, Federal Crop Insurance, and the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. Interested farmers may contact their local FSA county office for further information on eligibility requirements and application procedures for these and other programs.

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www.ACRESmidwest.com PAGE 11 TURKEYS

PAGE 14 KNOX

Clarification: On Page 8 of the September issue of ACRES Northwest, we misattributed the story, “Ohio’s organic and sustainable farms and businesses tours.” The story was not written by Penny Smith of the Knox County Citizen. Rather, it was a news release.

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ON THE MENU: THE ORIGINAL THANKSGIVING ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

BY MATT ECHELBERRY mechelberry@galioninquirer.com Do you know what was on the menu at the first Thanksgiving? Are you even sure you know when and where the first celebration occurred? Few official records detailing an exact account of the “first” Thanksgiving in 1621 have been discovered, leading historians and Thanksgiving enthusiasts to speculate on the origins of the holiday, as well as

would include 90 natives who helped the pilgrims survive during that first winter. It began at some unknown date between Sept. 21 and Nov. 9, most likely in very early October. There are only two contemporary accounts. The first comes by way of Edward Winslow in a letter dated Dec. 12, 1621: “Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered

what was on the menu. According to Mayflower History, the Pilgrims landed in Massachusetts in the late fall of 1620. During their first winter in the Americas, 46 of 102 of the Pilgrims died. The following year resulted in a plentiful harvest, with the help from a local native tribe called the Wampanoags. The pilgrims decided to celebrate with a three-day feast that

the fruit of our labors. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and

killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others.” The second description was written about twenty years after the fact by William Bradford, the first governor of Massachusetts, in his “History of Plymouth Plantation.” Those primary sources only list a few items that were on the Thanksgiving “menu.” This contested list of cuisine includes: five deer, a large number of turkeys and waterfowl, cod, and bass; plus the harvest, which consisted of wheat, corn, barley, and perhaps a few peas. “To that list,” Mayflower History continues, “we can add a few additional things that are known to have been native to the area and eaten by the Pilgrims: clams, mussels, lobster, eel, ground nuts, acorns, walnuts, chestnuts, squashes, and beans. Fruits and berries…were available growing wild. Pilgrim house-gardens may have included a number of English vegetables and herbs, perhaps things like onions, leeks, sorrel, yarrow, lettuce, carrots, radishes, currants, liverwort, watercress, and others. “ However, American History points

HISTORY POINTS OUT THAT THE FEAST SHARED WITH THE WAMPANOAG INDIANS AND THE FIRST MENTION OF THANKSGIVING ARE REALLY NOT THE SAME EVENT.

out that the feast shared with the Wampanoag Indians and the first mention of Thanksgiving are really not the same event. “The first actual mention of the word thanksgiving in early colonial history was not associated with the first feast described above. The first time this term was associated with a a feast or celebration was in 1623. That year the pilgrims were living through a terrible drought that continued from May through July,” the website explains. The pilgrims decided to spend an entire day in July fasting and praying for rain. The next day, a light rain occurred. Further, additional settlers and supplies arrived from the Netherlands. At that point, Bradford proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving to offer prayers and thanks to God. However, this was by no means a yearly occurrence. It would take over two centuries for Thanksgiving to become the national holiday that we know and love today. Sarah Josepha Hale is an important figure in accomplishing that task. Hale wrote the novel “Northwood; or Life North and South in 1827.” One of the

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ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

5

SINGLES In Agriculture BY DEVON IMMELT dimmelt@delgazette.com In today’s fast-paced society, being “single and looking” can be a challenge. That challenge is often doubly so for farmers who frequently work long, physically hard days and live in rural areas where opportunities and venues for social activities are few and far between. So what’s a single farmer to do? For some, finding that special someone has come in the form of Singles In Agriculture, a group that works to promote recreational and social opportunities for singles who have an agricultural background or an interest in agriculture. The idea behind the group, which now boasts 11 chapters in 24 states across the U.S., appealed to Darlene Foos, who lost her first husband to cancer in 1986 and was left trying to manage an 186-acre farm in Galion, Ohio. “I had a good marriage and hope to get married again, but meeting people with similar interests who understood the farming lifestyle wasn’t easy,” Foos said. “It seems like a lot of farm people just stay home.” Two years later, in 1988, Foos learned about Singles in Agriculture (SIA) through a farm journal. She made contact with the organization and soon found herself participating in SIA events. The group organizes inexpensive group activities for its members, including

tours, dances and educational weekend outings. Foos met Dan while attending an SIA-organized singles dance in Marion County, Ohio. The two hit it off, as they say, and married after a courtship that included numerous SIA activities. Although no longer single, the Foos remain involved with Singles in Action — the couple currently serve as the co-presidents of the organization’s Ohio chapter. Dan Foos also serves as the group’s treasurer. “For us, it’s more of a social group now, but most of the members are single. Some are there to find their soul mate, others are there for companionship and to travel,” Darlene Foos said. And the Foos’ are far from the only success story coming out of SIA. Robert Hall grew up on a dairy farm outside of Lima, Ohio and lived there most of his adult life. Like Darlene Foos, Hall said he struggled to find available women who were familiar with and enjoyed the farming lifestyle — traits he hoped to find in a prospective future wife. He first heard about SIA in 1995 when he read a newspaper article promoting an upcoming event organized by the Ohio chapter. Hall then began attending SIA activities regularly, he said. But it wasn’t until he started going to the organization’s national activities, where single farmers meet

with other single farmers from out of state, that he met Sandy, the women he would eventually marry. "We had quite a few things in common and after that I visited her in Iowa probably once a month for several months," Hall said. Ultimately, Hall decided to pick up roots and relocate to be with Sandy, who he has since married. The two currently live in South Dakota near Sandy's family farm, where they are building their first house together. Without a group like Singles in Agriculture, Hall said, as a farmer, he would have struggled to find a significant other. "It's a different lifestyle and the weather and seasons have a larger impact on your life. You don’t see as many people, ... you're a little bit isolated from other people," he said Singles in Agriculture was formed in the mid1980s after a single farmer sent a letter to a farming magazine expressing the difficulties of meeting single women interested in a rural lifestyle. His letter prompted a writer from the magazine to write a series of articles on the social lives of single farmers. The articles became a popular read and a column asking single farmers to submit biographical information to the magazine resulted in more than 2,700 responses, according to SIA’s website. The magazine’s work caught the eye of an Iowa woman who ultimately helped to establish Singles

in Agriculture as a national organization. “Iowan Marcella Spindler volunteered to handle correspondence from those interested in forming a singles organization. By the summer of 1986, the project had generated so much interest that 23 people met in Peoria, IL. to take the necessary steps to make SIA an official organization,” the website states. In October of that same year, Singles in Agriculture was chartered as a non-profit organization. The nationwide organization boasts members in 41 states. Ohio’s chapter is one of the smaller ones. It currently has about 30 active members. What separates SIA from a dating service is the fact that everyone involved has, or is interested in, an agricultural lifestyle, Hall said. There is no pressure to date while participating in the social activities, it's about meeting people, seeing new places and having fun, he said. "I would say, if you're interested, go and see what it's about. Check out the activities and see if there's something you might like," Hall said. "Stay active," Foos added. "There is someone out there fo ryou. It's just about being at the right place at the right time and knowing that your not going to find them sitting at home." For more information visit www.singlesinagriculture.org.

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6

ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

BY BECKY BROOKS/THE BELLEVUE GAZETTE

Burroughs Marine is a business boat and marine engine business in Clyde, Ohio which is located 10 miles from Sandusky Bay and the Sandusky River.

a focus on the asian carp issue BY BECKY BROOKS news@gazettepublishingco.com

Cory Burroughs is a master technician as certified by Evinrude and a top salesman of the outboard motor in Ohio.

of Northwest Ohio, according to Rich Carter, spokesman for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. “There is not evidence of young fish that would indicate reproduction,” he also pointed out in October. Carter said after a summer of multiple agencies conducting fishing and testing, his agency will now look at reports from Ohio, Michigan, Canada and Pennsylvania to determine the next strategic steps in dealing with Asian carp. “We are evacuating our next step forward,” he added.

Over the summer, the ODNR, Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) collaborated to assess the current status of bighead and silver carp within western Lake Erie bays and select tributaries, according to an ODNR report. Laboratory results received late summer indicated the presence of Asian carp environmental DNA (eDNA) in six of the 417 water samples collected in August 2011. Four samples from Sandusky Bay, in Ohio waters, tested positive for

bighead carp eDNA, while two samples from north Maumee Bay, in Michigan waters, were positive for silver carp eDNA. The findings indicate the presence of genetic material left behind by the species, such as scales, excrement or mucous, but not the establishment of Asian carp in Lake Erie. The search for Asian Carp has not been limited to wildlife and natural resources. The United States Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey also reported in a press release that major bodies of water in Northwest Ohio were very hospitable environments for Asian Carp — including Western Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, and the Sandusky, Maumee and

whether DNA from the invasive fish came from live or dead fish or from other sources such as bilge water, storm sewers or fish-eating birds. The joint agencies also conducted electrofishing and traditional gill net fishing in Sandusky Bay and the Sandusky River in September and found no Asian carp, Carter said. Carter said that besides that testing, there is other data being collected. “There has been sampling of bait dealers throughout the Great Lakes,” he added. His agency is one waiting for eDNA results from those tests. The goal is to determine the source of the eDNA being picked up in water samples from local bodies of water, he added. At present Burroughs in Clyde is not too concerned about Asian carp yet. “For us, it probably won’t affect us too much,” he commented this fall. Local fishermen and charter captains are concerned it may change their season, he commented. “The charter guys are most worried about it,” he added. “They ask about it,” he said. “What do we think about it.” “We have heard horror stories,” Burroughs commented. “All we can do is kind of wait and see what is going to come of it.” Becky Brooks is Managing Editor of The Bellevue Gazette & OCM Lake Erie Central Division. She can be reached at (419) 483-4190, or at news@gazettepublishingco.com.

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Being in what some would call a landlocked Marine business does not keep Cory Burroughs immune from the effects of what Asian Carp entering Lake Erie could do to his market, but despite constant attention to the issue he is not overly concerned. Burroughs, whose family business Burroughs Marine Inc., in Clyde, is located 8 miles from Sandusky Bay and 8 to 10 miles from the Sandusky River, said his customers have shared concerns. The family marine business and service sits comfortably in the middle of corn fields instead of water. His customers include charter captains, boat owners and even the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Burroughs as of Oct. 1 was Evinrude’s top salesman in Ohio and Burroughs also has the outboard motor company’s master technician award. Nationwide, the rural business rates 18th in sales for the Evinrude company, Burroughs said. “We do a lot of repowers,” Burroughs said about renovating a boats power with a new motor. Burroughs said Asian carp issues are a concern for his boat customers. The good news for the summer, however, is that no Asian carp have been located in Lake Erie or the waters

Grand rivers. The USGS reported that from experience if Asian carps find a home and establish breeding in Lake Erie, it could have a grave impact on the native fish and Great Lakes economy. So far that there is not specific evidence of that, according to Carter. The three types of Asian carp that breed in rivers during high summer flows are the Silver, Bighead and Grass carps, the USGS reported. According to the USGS, a study released this summer found that the Maumee River, which enters western Lake Erie at Toledo, is highly suitable for Asian carp to mature and spawn. The Sandusky River — which stretches from Upper Sandusky through Wyandot, Seneca, Sandusky and Erie counties to Sandusky Bay — would be moderately suitable for the invasive fish — as would the Grand River that enters the lake at Fairport Harbor, a press release noted. In September, ODNR reported that Asian carp environmental DNA (eDNA) had been detected in three of 350 water samples collected in Maumee Bay and the Maumee River between July and Aug. 4. Silver carp eDNA was detected. In July, ODNR and other agencies also collected 150 water samples from Sandusky Bay and three tested positive for silver car eDNA as well. ODNR noted, though, that eDNA cannot verify


ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

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holiday that we know and love today. Sarah Josepha Hale is an important figure in accomplishing that task. Hale wrote the novel “Northwood; or Life North and South in 1827.” One of the chapters in her book discussed the importance of Thanksgiving as a national holiday. On Sept. 28, 1863, Hale wrote a letter to President Abraham Lincoln to have “The day of annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival.” Then on Oct. 3, 1863, Lincoln proclaimed a nationwide Thanksgiving Day as the last Thursday of November. Today, our Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday of November. This was set by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939 (approved by Congress in 1941). Since then, many cherished traditions have been created, but Thanksgiving’s central theme of celebrating gratitude with a feast has remained constant. SOME LITTLE KNOWN FACTS: The famous pilgrim celebration at Plymouth Colony Massachusetts in 1621 is traditionally regarded as the first American Thanksgiving. However, there are actually 12 claims to where the “first” Thanksgiving took place: two in Texas, two in Florida, one in Maine, two in Virginia, and five in Massachusetts. Oddly enough, most devoutly religious pilgrims observed a day of thanksgiving with prayer and fasting, not feasting. Yet even though this harvest feast was never called Thanksgiving by the pilgrims of 1621, it has become the model for the traditional Thanksgiving celebra-

MORE THANKSGIVING FACTS: From mayflowerhistory.com:

The tradition of the Pilgrims’ first Thanksgiving is steeped in myth and legend. Few people realize that the Pilgrims did not celebrate Thanksgiving the next year, or any year thereafter, though some of their descendants later made a “Forefather’s Day” that usually occurred on Dec. 21 or Dec. 22. Several Presidents, including George Washington, made one-time Thanksgiving holidays. Today, our Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday of November. This was set by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939 (approved by Congress

in 1941), who changed it from Abraham Lincoln’s designation as the last Thursday in November (which could occasionally end up being the fifth Thursday and hence too close to Christmas for businesses). But the Pilgrims’ first Thanksgiving began at some unknown date between Sept. 21 and Nov. 9, most likely in very early October. The date of Thanksgiving was probably set by Lincoln to somewhat correlate with the anchoring of the Mayflower at Cape Cod, which occurred on Nov. 21, 1620. The primary sources only list a few items that were on the Thanksgiving “menu,” namely five deer, a large number of turkeys and waterfowl, cod, and bass; plus the harvest, which consisted of wheat, corn, barley, and perhaps a few peas. To that list, we can add a few additional things that are known to have been native to the area and eaten by the Pilgrims: clams, mussels, lobster, eel, ground nuts, acorns, walnuts, chestnuts, squashes, and beans. Fruits and berries such as strawberries, raspberries, grapes, and gooseberries were available growing wild. Pilgrim house-gardens may have included a number of English vegetables and herbs, perhaps things like onions, leeks, sorrel, yarrow, lettuce, carrots, radishes, currants, liverwort, watercress, and others. It is unlikely much in the way of supplies brought on the Mayflower survived, such as Holland

bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.” The second description was written about twenty years after the fact by William Bradford in his History Of Plymouth Plantation. Bradford’s History was rediscovered in 1854 after having been taken by British looters during the Revolutionary War. Its discovery prompted a greater American interest in the history of the Pilgrims. It is also in this account that the Thanksgiving turkey tradition is founded. Bradford: “They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercising in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which

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Cheese, olive oil, butter, salt pork, sugar, spices, lemons, beer, aqua-vitae, or bacon. It appears the Pilgrims may have had some chickens with them, so likely had access to a limited number of eggs. No mention of swine is found in any account of the first year. There are only two contemporary accounts of the 1621 Thanksgiving: First is Edward Winslow’s account, which he wrote in a letter dated Dec. 12, 1621. The complete letter was first published in 1622. Winslow: “Our corn [i.e. wheat] did prove well, and God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn, and our barley indifferent good, but our peas not worth the gathering, for we feared they were too late sown. They came up very well, and blossomed, but the sun parched them in the blossom. Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruit of our labors. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and

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wl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others.” The second description was written about twenty years after the fact by William Bradford, the first governor of Massachusetts, in his “History of Plymouth Plantation.” Those primary sources only list a few items that were on the Thanksgiving “menu.” This contested list of cuisine includes: five deer, a large number of turkeys and waterfowl, cod, and bass; plus the harvest, which consisted of wheat, corn, barley, and perhaps a few peas. “To that list,” Mayflower History continues, “we can add a few additional things that are known to have been native to the area and eaten by the Pilgrims: clams, mussels, lobster, eel, ground nuts, acorns, walnuts, chestnuts, squashes, and beans. Fruits and berries…were available growing wild. Pilgrim house-gardens may have included a number of English vegetables and herbs, perhaps things like onions, leeks, sorrel, yarrow, lettuce, carrots, radishes, currants, liverwort, watercress, and others. “ However, American History points out that the feast shared with the Wampanoag Indians and the first mention of Thanksgiving are really not the same event. “The first actual mention of the word thanksgiving in early colonial history was not associated with the first feast described above. The first time this term was associated with a a feast or celebration was in 1623. That year the pilgrims were living through a terrible drought that continued from May through July,” the website explains. The pilgrims decided to spend an entire day in July fasting and praying for rain. The next day, a light rain occurred. Further, additional settlers and supplies arrived from the Netherlands. At that point, Bradford proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving to offer prayers and thanks to God. However, this was by no means a yearly occurrence. It would take over two centuries for Thanksgiving to become the national

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they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports.” FROM AMERICAN HISTORY: The first interesting thing to point out is that the feast shared with the Wampanoag Indians and the first mention of Thanksgiving are really not the same event. During the first winter in 1621, 46 of the 102 pilgrims died. Thankfully, the following year resulted in a plentiful harvest. The pilgrims decided to celebrate with a feast that would include 90 natives who helped the pilgrims survive during that first winter. One of the most celebrated of those natives was a Wampanoag who the settlers called Squanto. He taught the pilgrims where to fish and hunt and where to plant New World crops like corn and squash. He also helped negotiate a treaty between the pilgrims and chief Massasoit. The first actual mention of the word thanksgiving in early colonial history was not associated with the first feast described above. The first time this term was associated with a a feast or celebration was in 1623. That year the pilgrims were living through a terrible drought that continued from May through July. The pilgrims decided to spend

an entire day in July fasting and praying for rain. The next day, a light rain occurred. Further, additional settlers and supplies arrived from the Netherlands. At that point, Governor Bradford proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving to offer prayers and thanks to God. However, this was by no means a yearly occurrence. The next recorded day of Thanksgiving occurred in 1631 when a ship full of supplies that was feared to be lost at sea actually pulled into Boston Harbor. Governor Bradford again ordered a day of Thanksgiving and prayer. George Washington issued the first Thanksgiving Proclamation by a President of the United States on Nov. 26, 1789. Interestingly, some of the future presidents such as Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson would not agree to resolutions for a national day of Thanksgiving because they felt it was not within their constitutional power. Over these years, Thanksgiving was still being celebrated in many states, but often on different dates. Most states, however, celebrated it sometime in November. Sarah Josepha Hale is an important figure in gaining a national holiday for Thanksgiving. Hale wrote the novel Northwood; or Life North and South in 1827 which argued for the virtue of the North against the evil slave owners of the South. One of the chapters in her book discussed the importance of Thanksgiving as a national holiday. On Sept. 28, 1863 during

the Civil War, Hale wrote a letter to President Abraham Lincoln “as Editress(sic) of the ‘Lady’s Book’ to have the day of annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival.” Then on October 3, 1863, Lincoln, in a proclamation written by Secretary of State William Seward, proclaimed a nationwide Thanksgiving Day as the last Thursday of November. FROM ABOUT.COM: In the United States, Thanksgiving Day is celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November. But did you know that seven other nations also celebrate an official Thanksgiving Day? Those nations are Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Korea, Liberia, and Switzerland. Oddly enough, most devoutly religious pilgrims observed a day of thanksgiving with prayer and fasting, not feasting. Yet even though this harvest feast was never called Thanksgiving by the pilgrims of 1621, it has become the model for the traditional Thanksgiving celebrations in the United States. Each Thanksgiving Day since 1947, the President of the United States has been presented with three turkeys by the National Turkey Federation. One live turkey is pardoned and gets to live the rest of its life on a quiet farm; the other two are dressed for the Thanksgiving meal. FROM RANDOMHISTORY.COM: The famous pilgrim celebration at Plymouth Colony Massachusetts in 1621 is traditionally regarded as the first American Thanksgiving. However, there are actually 12

claims to where the “first” Thanksgiving took place: two in Texas, two in Florida, one in Maine, two in Virginia, and five in Massachusetts. President Jefferson called a federal Thanksgiving proclamation “The most ridiculous idea ever conceived.” Held every year on the island of Alcatraz since 1975, “Unthanksgiving Day” commemorates the survival of Native Americans following the arrival and settlement of Europeans in the Americas. The famous “Pilgrim and Indian” story featured in modern Thanksgiving narratives was not initially part of early Thanksgiving stories, largely due to tensions between Indians and colonists. The first Thanksgiving in America actually occurred in 1541, when Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and his expedition held a thanksgiving celebration in Palo Duro Canyon in the Texas panhandle. Americans eat roughly 535 million pounds of turkey on Thanksgiving. Now a Thanksgiving dinner staple, cranberries were actually used by Native Americans to treat arrow wounds and to dye clothes. Sarah Josepha Hale (17881879), who tirelessly worked to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday, also was the first person to advocate women as teachers in public schools, the first to advocate day nurseries to assist working mothers, and the first to propose public playgrounds. She was also the author of two dozen books and hundreds of poems, including “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” Thanksgiving football games began with Yale versus Princeton in 1876.

TIMELINE 1541 — Spanish explorer, Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, led a thanksgiving Communion celebration at the Palo Duro Canyon, West Texas. 1565 — Pedro Menendez de Aviles and 800 settlers gathered for a meal with the Timucuan Indians in the Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida. 1621 — Pilgrims and Native Americans celebrated a harvest feast in Plymouth, Massachusetts. 1630 — Settlers observed the first Thanksgiving of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in New England on July 8, 1630. 1777 — George Washington and his army on the way to Valley Forge, stopped in blistering weather in open fields to observe the first Thanksgiving of the new United States of America. 1789 — President Washington declared November 26, 1789, as a national day of “thanksgiving and prayer.” 1800s — The annual presidential thanksgiving proclamations ceased for 45 years in the early 1800s. 1863 — President Abraham Lincoln resumed the tradition of Thanksgiving proclamations in 1863. Since this date,Thanksgiving has been observed annually in the United States. 1941 — President Roosevelt established the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day.

Matt Echelberry is a Galion Inquirer reporter, 129 Harding Way East, Galion. He can be reached at (419) 468-1117.

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Effects of 2012 drought will impact beef and pork prices, supply BY RANDA WAGNER editor@newscolorpress.com Grain prices and supplies are on every producer’s mind these days, thanks to the devastating drought that consumed half the nation this growing season. As has been well publicized, corn is used in 75 percent of the products Americans consume or use, whether directly or indirectly. While the increase in packaged and processed foods may take 10-12 months to realize their full potential, earlier impacts for beef, pork, poultry and dairy are likely. Beef cattle and hogs eat corn; so do chickens and dairy cattle. Lots of it; especially when, in the case of cows, pasturage is not available either. If a producer cannot afford to feed livestock and water is in short supply, he will cull his herd. Short term, increased meat supplies decrease meat prices: good for consumers, right? Yes, but the key words here are ‘short term.’ When producers can’t afford to feed stock and sell off half or all of a herd in September, it means product supplies will

decrease later this year and into 2013. That decrease, in turn, brings higher prices with it. Since about 80 percent of agricultural land in the U.S. experienced drought in 2012, few producers escaped its consequences. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, ‘severe or greater drought impacted 67 percent of cattle production, and about 70-75 percent of corn and soybean production.’ As a result, over 2,000 U.S. counties had been designated as disaster areas by the USDA as of Sept. 12. A significant increase in grain prices is evident locally by reviewing numbers from Producers Livestock in Crawford County. Auction prices on Oct. 6 of last year were (by bushel): Corn $5.80, Beans $11.07, and Wheat $5.91. This year on Oct. 4, those same grains were: Corn $7.42, Beans $15.01 and Wheat $7.96. We all know supply and demand influence prices of any product. Retail food price inflation has averaged 2.5-3 percent each year on average for the past 20 years, says the USDA. Next year, however, they anticipate food price inflation to be

between 3 percent and 4 percent, with increases centralized in animal products: eggs, meat, and dairy. They note since July, egg prices have risen markedly and beef prices have fallen moderately. Beef As of Sept. 11, approximately 74 percent of cattle areas were affected by moderate or more intense drought. Feedlot operators are paying lower prices for cattle because of high feed costs and increased supply and lower prices of cattle being sent for slaughter. Americans love their beef. But what goes into raising a beef or dairy cow directly affects the consumer’s wallet. Reports of ‘alternative feed’ have been making their way into the news. An article from Reuters in late September reported ‘brokers are gathering up discarded food products and putting them out for the highest bid to feedlot operators and dairy producers who are scrambling to keep their animals fed.’ The article said ‘cattlemen are feeding virtually anything they can get their hands on that will replace the starchy sugar content traditionally delivered to the animals through corn.’ This

includes ‘cookies, gummy worms, marshmallows, fruit loops, orange peels, even dried cranberries.’ Ki Fanning, a nutritionist with Great Plains Livestock Consulting in Eagle, Nebraska, told Reuters a ruminant (a cow) can take those type of ingredients and turn them into food.” Animal nutritionists caution operators must be careful to follow detailed nutritional analyses for their animals to make sure they are getting a healthy mix of nutrients. But the report stated ruminant animals such as cattle can safely ingest a wide variety of feedstuffs that chickens and hogs can’t. Some operators use distillers grains, a byproduct that comes from the manufacture of ethanol. Other common non-corn alternatives include cottonseed hulls, rice products, potato products, peanut pellet. Wheat “middlings” that contain particles of flour, bran, and wheat germ, are also used. Bran Dill, a spokesman at Hansen Mueller Grain out of Omaha, Nebraska, says it all comes down to fat, sugar and energy. “That’s all it is,” he said, adding demand is high.

Dairy High feed costs are expected to result in a small reduction in milk production in 2013 and slightly higher prices than this year. This is likely to affect all milk products including cheese, yogurts, and products using milk solids. Pork The USDA reported in October hog farrowings (litters of pigs) are expected to decline in the second-half of 2012 and the first three quarters of 2013 because of high anticipated feed prices. Pork production for 2013 is expected to be below both 2011 and 2012 at 22,905 million pounds. Media reports in September of a pork shortage in early 2013 have since been dismissed by the American Farm Bureau Federation as “baloney.” “Pork supplies will decrease slightly as we go into 2013,” Farm Bureau economist John Anderson told the Associated Press. “But the idea that there’ll be widespread shortages, that we’ll run out of pork, that’s really overblown.” However, feed makes up about 60 percent of the expense of raising a pig. “I think we’re going to (still) see pretty substantial liquidations of livestock,”

Steve Meyer, consultant to the National Pork Producers Council and National Pork Board told AP in early October. Meyer guesses that 3 percent of the nation’s breeding pigs could be sent to slaughter by next March. “And by my estimation, that’s a big move.” Overall Beef futures rose and pork rose on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange in mid-October. With prices for pork and beef expected to rise next year, butchers are saying that consumers will have to pay more or get used to cheaper cuts of meat. The USDA affirms heat stress, higher feed prices, and the potential for reduced hog and poultry inventories continue to dampen the outlook for pork and poultry production into 2013. While there won’t necessarily be a ‘shortage,’ meat prices will be affected just as readily as other grocery items containing soy and corn. Randa Wagner is editor of the Morrow County Sentinel, 46 S. Main St., Mt. Gilead. She can be reached at (419) 946-3010, ext. 203.

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F A R M

P R O F I L E

Whiteman, Gackstetter Century Farm BY CHRISTINE DIAL exponent@wcnet.org Over 134 years ago, Ebanus Whiteman (Whieman) came to the U.S. from DanKerode, Kurhesson Germany. Gottfried Weidman was born on Dec. 12, 1828 in Erckshansen, Hesser Germany. In 1854 Gottfried traveled from Bremen aboard the “Julia” on Nov. 17, 1854 to New York along with his wife, Christina Pafenbach, from Tangerode Hessen, Germany. Together they journeyed through Pennsylvania to Sandusky, Ohio and continued along the Portage River by oxen to Elmore, Ohio where they purchased 40

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GACKSTETTER FAMILY

Fred Dailey, left, president of Ohio Department of Agricultural, presents the Century Farm Award to Dorothy Gackstetter.

acres of land in 1856. In 1887 Gottfried also purchased 100 acres on Walbridge and Fostoria Road from Joshua Curtice. The town now called Curtice, Ohio was derived from Joshua Curtice. In the late 1890s, Gottfried changed his last name to Whiteman. On Feb. 10, 1902, Gottfried bought 160 acres from Joshua Curtice’s wife, Mary Curtice. The purchase price was $10,500. On June 28, 1911, the property on Walbridge Road was sold to his son, Edward Whiteman for $15,000. On March 17, 1945 the property was deeded as a warranty deed for a dollar from Glen Whiteman. In the early 1930s an oil well was dug, but it now no longer exists. On June 5, 1947, a warranty deed was issued to Carl and Hazel Whiteman for 160 acres. With the passing of Carl and Hazel, the property was then deeded to their children: Harold, Kenneth, and Dorothy Whiteman Gackstetter. On Aug. 5, 2005, Dorothy Gackstetter received the great honor of becoming the recipient of

BY CHRISTINE DIALS/OTTAWA COUNTY EXPONENT

The barn stands on the Gackstetter Century Farm in Ottawa County. the Century Farm Award. The award was presented by President of the Ohio State Agricultural Society, Mr. Fred Dailey. The sign is present on the barn along with the recognition of Gottfried Weideman as the original owner. The barn was constructed in 1902 and there are several trees that remain in the wooded area near the barn. The barn was kept in good condition by painting and in 1970 a new pole barn was erected and used

Cherry Grove Dairy in Toledo, Ohio. During the early years Dorothy helped her father and brothers load hay, shock wheat and corn. “I was really honored to drive the team of horses or mules to pick up bundles of wheat. Back then, hay was cut and a large loader dropped it onto a wagon with “slings” on it which were used to unload into the hay mow,” said Dorothy. The wheat shocks were brought up close to the barn where it was put into the thrasher and the straw was blown into a large straw stack. The horses usually pulled the binder that originally cut the wheat and tied it into shocks. Basic crops raised in the mid 1800s were: oats, wheat, corn, soybeans and alfalfa. As of today, soy-

to store machinery and equipment. The house on the farm was constructed in 1910. Gackstetter stated, “The house still has some of the original windows, that open with rope and pullies. The original molding still hangs in the main bedroom which is made from walnut and oak.” In the barn is the original milking parlor and milk house, where Dorothy and her family milked cows. The milk was then picked up by

beans, corn and wheat are still planted. The house was renovated in the 1960s and again in 2002. The original structure remains. One of Dorothy and her families biggest fear is that the land will be split and sold after they pass. “Most of the time this is done for the money and not the memories,” Dorothy said. The family remembers when land sold for $1 an acre and some now are willing to pay $6,000 per acre for farmland. Dorothy concluded, “We are the sixth generation on this land and hope to keep the farm running as a productive farm, as we have done all through the years.” Christine Dial is the Editor at the Ottawa County Exponent. She can be reached by e-mail at exponent@wcnet.org

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ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

11

BROERMAN TURKEY FARM

1,200 turkeys in a single week BY PENNY SMITH knoxcitizen@ohcommedia.com The Broerman family has been growing and processing turkeys for our local Thanksgiving dinners since 1991. The state inspected farm is located at 11729 Leedy Road, on the north side of Fredericktown. The turkey farm is currently operated by Cheyl Broerman and her children, son, Mike, and daughters, Sarah (Julius) Hulbert, and Jenifer (Trenton) Wine. Sadly, the head of the family, Julius Broerman passed away this past January. Besides hormone, cage, and antibiotic free turkeys the Broerman’s also raise corn and soybeans on their 800 acre farm. This year the family and many extra hands will process 1,200 turkeys the week prior to Thanksgiving. Fresh turkeys can be ordered from Broerman Turkey Farm by calling (419) 886-2141, by e-mail at broermanturkeyfarm@gmail.com or check them out on Facebook — Broerman Farms. Turkeys are typically picked up on the Tuesday and Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Most of the Broerman turkeys will weigh between 15 and 22 pounds with a few smaller and larger birds available on a first come first served basis. Unsold turkeys are frozen and a variety of other turkey products are made available year round. They include smoked turkey breasts, ground turkey, summer sausage, marinated turkey, and turkey jerky. Gift baskets are available for Christmas or other occasions. Turkeys are native to North America and about 5.6 millions tons of turkey meat is produced each year. Of this, over 60 percent is produced in North America. Although domesticated over 500 years ago, it was only during the 20th century that turkeys were exploited for their meat. Prior to this, turkeys were selected for their plumage and exhibited in poultry shows. The female (hen) is smaller than the male (tom or stag), and generally less colorful. They have wingspans of almost 6 feet. The lifespan for a turkey is 10 years. Pure breed turkeys take about 4-5 months to grow to full size. The hen turkey takes 16 weeks to mature completely, and averages 8 to 16 pounds in weight. The tom turkey takes about 19 weeks and

BY JUDY DIVELBISS/KNOX COUNTY CITIZEN

Broerman founder Julius Broerman and his son-in-law, Josiah Hulbert, in the turkey barn among some of the young turkeys.

weighs anywhere from 16 and 24 pounds. Larger tom turkeys can weigh up to 40 pounds. A breeder tom turkey can generate up to 1,500 poults (chicks) in a hen’s six-month laying cycle. Commercial turkey breeding hens produce about 45 live poults each year. Turkey eggs take 28 days to hatch. Turkeys are fed a mixture of corn, wheat and soybeans that are ground up to look like granola. The birds grow quickly so farmers spend a lot of time adjusting feeding rations to match the growth stages of the birds to reach the required market weight.

Water is always provided throughout the barns so they may drink freely. Broilers and hens are used for the whole bird market. Toms and heavy toms are for the further processed market and some are sold as whole birds. So for the freshest Thanksgiving turkey you have ever had on your dinner table, give the Broerman family a call to reserve your fresh juicy turkey. Penny Smith is the Editor of the Knox County Citizen. She can be reached at (740) 848-4032 or by email at knoxcitizen@ohcommedia.com.

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ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

A Family organic tradition BY PATTY RICE GROTH pattyricegroth@gmail.com Good stewards of the land, educators in their community, innovators of technology. These phrases only begin to describe Dale and Toni Norwood who own and operate Springwood Valley Farm in rural Galion, Ohio. On just over seven acres of slightly rolling land, the Norwoods grow organicallynurtured produce, children, and innovative ideas. Daughters Electra and Serena are home-schooled and participate in many of the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outdoor activities. Two wonderful children growing up in the home of their grandfather and greatuncles built for family patriarch Van Norwood in the early 1970s. Dan and Barbara Norwood had already built a home for themselves and their family in Crestline when Van and the former Florence Maglott purchased the property on Nazor Road on the northeast side of Galion. With help from his siblings and others, a nice two-bedroom brick home was erected on a rise not far off the road. Innovative ideas include experiments with the soil as well as the continuing pursuit of Daleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in electrical engineering from DeVry University. In a workshop and music studio building behind the house, Dale is developing proprietary biomedical user recognition devices and software. Van and Florence were gardeners, using the land to grow produce for their own and family use. Dale says he grew up eating organically, before it was a popular move-

ment. They give credit for some of their early organic gardening beliefs to local growers Lynn and Ken Chapin. Active in certification programs for official status of organic farming, the Chapins are knowledgeable growers who passed on to the Norwoods their experience and success as organic farmers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about making soil,â&#x20AC;? says Toni. You have to feed the soil to grow a healthy plant, which in turn will give hearty produce at its full nutritional capability. A large plot of ground at Springwood Valley Farm is dedicated to composting, creating rejuvenated soils for the fields and greenhouses/tunnels. Before they moved onto the farm in 2001, Toni and Dale enjoyed a small vegetable garden from which they shared naturally-raised produce with their neighbors. Anxious to begin life as fulltime farmers, even before moving into the home on Nazor Road, the couple was working on the farm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fulltimeâ&#x20AC;? has not been achieved yet, but that goal remains. Dale believes he has discovered the best direction in which to plant his rows to take best advantage of natural water drainage on the property. It is part of being a â&#x20AC;&#x153;good steward of the land,â&#x20AC;? taking advantage of natural irrigation while controlling erosion. In every culture around the world, people gather around food. Families need to know and teach children where their food comes from, say the Norwoods. When one knows their food came from a local farm, handled by

a person you can know, so many worries which can accompany large commercial operations are eliminated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are so far away from their food,â&#x20AC;? say the Norwoods of produce brought in from around the country to local grocery stores. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Organicâ&#x20AC;? foods which must be trucked to Ohio from California and Florida are defeating the purpose of organic farming. The produce has to be picked before it has fully matured in order to survive the trip, natural resources are burned up getting it here, and nutritional value is lost in the interim. Eating locally can create a kind of â&#x20AC;&#x153;safe zone.â&#x20AC;? Area farmers markets are an important way to create a safe zone, and the Norwoods demonstrate their commitment to the concept by managing the North Side Farmers Market on Ohio 598 on the north side of Galion in Crawford County. The market is registered with the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and vendors welcome inspectors when they visit the market. Nearing the end of its second year, vendors at North Side Farmers Market continue to learn how to work within ODA regulations. What can often be an adversarial relationship between producers and ODA has developed into one of mutual support of the venture in Galion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All communities could be served by a farmers market,â&#x20AC;? says Toni. That leads to what they see as their role as â&#x20AC;&#x153;educators in their community.â&#x20AC;? Helping folks grow for themselves is an important part of a farmers market, say the

BY PATTY RICE GROTH/INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT

Toni and Dale Norwood are seen here showing off okra growing at Springwood Valley Farm near Galion, Ohio. Toni encourages picking the pods earlier â&#x20AC;&#x201D; smaller than expected â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and preparing them without frying them. Find instructions online at theproducelady.org/2010/07/freshroasted-okra-a-southern-specialty.

Norwoods. Teaching someone how to successfully grow their own produce using organic methods helps everyone. Backyard gardens help create food security for families. Taking oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excess produce to a local farmers market builds food security, a safe zone, for oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighbors. What they would like to see here in Crawford County is a community gathered around healthy growing and eating. Is it possible for Galion to become a self-sufficient agricultural community? Is that possible while

staying within the ODAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rules and regulations? Yes, it is, say the Norwoods, especially with the widespread presence of the canning industry in Ohio. There are three nonprofit companies which will help a small producer develop a small business plan, identify appropriate facilities, and such. Ohio is home to a number of businesses which will prepare your produce your way and label it with your name. Larger local producers could find the fruits â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and veggies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; of their labors on the shelves of

New tax limitations for 2012 continue to provide provid de significant tax benefits to o small business owners.2 Now when you purchase vehicles deduction N h purchase h qualifying lif i GM vehicle hi l s ffor your b h business i b before f 12/31/12, 12/31/12 you could ld earn a tax t d d tion of up to $139,000. Plus you increase yo ou can stack other available e incentives to really increa ase your savings. DEDUCTION GM VEHICLE DEDU UCTION ELIGIBILITY

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The tax incentives are available for depreciable tangible property which is acquired by purchase for use in the active conduct of a trade or business. Additional limitation based on purchasesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for the 2012 tax year, the aggregate deduction of $139,000 under Internal Revenue code Section 179 is most beneficial to small businesses that place in service no more than $560,000 of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Section 179 propertyâ&#x20AC;? during the year. Certain vehicles, models and restrictions apply. Consult your tax professional for details.

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For vehicles that qualify as passenger automobiles under the Internal Revenue Code, there is a $11,160 per vehicle depreciation deduction cap.

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For vehicles that qualify as passenger automobiles under the Internal Revenue Code that are trucks or vans, there is a $11,360 per vehicle depreciation deduction cap.

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For vehicles that qualify as sport utility vehicles under the Internal Revenue Code, there is a $25,000 per vehicle depreciation deduction cap.

Š 2012 General Motors. All rights reserved.

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Patty Rice Groth is an Inquirer correspondent. She can reached by email at pattyricegroth@gmail.com or call (419) 468-1117.

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local grocers with a little affordable professional help. In either case, a good place to start is with the Ohio Department of Agriculture at (614) 728-6201. Springwood Valley Farm is at 1242 Nazor Road, Galion. The Norwoods can be reached by phone at (419) 462-0483 or via e-mail at springwood@columbus.rr.com .


ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

THE AMISH COOK

Kevin enjoyed his seventh birthday with his new bike By Lovina Eicher School doors opened on Tuesday, Sept. 4. The house seemed pretty empty after the six youngest left for school at 7 a.m. They had Rich for their bus driver again which made them happy. Rich has been the bus driver for the children ever since we moved to Michigan eight years ago. He is a good bus driver. (Editor’s Note: Amish schooling differs from place to place. In some communities Amish children primarily attend parochial schools, in others it is public. In Lovina’s settlement, children attend public school, attend the Amish parochial school or are home-schooled.) Son Kevin enjoyed his seventh birthday on Sunday. Daughter Loretta baked a cake for Kevin. She didn’t know he wanted cupcakes instead but he said it didn’t matter. I decorated his cake using candy to write “happy birthday.” He looked pretty happy when he saw it. We gave him a bike for his birthday. He has never had his own. He would just use the other old bikes we have around here. He is so proud to have his very own bike and all of his free time riding. I even caught him riding it in our basement the other night. He found a big bottle of baby powder and sprinkled “trails” on the basement floor. He was biking on the trails until I came downstairs and stopped him. He told me since we told him he couldn’t bike on the roads that he was trying to make roads in the basement. It left quite a dusty floor and mess to clean up. Loretta is getting nervous about her surgery which will be on Monday. We will all be glad when it is over

with. I hope and pray everything will turn out okay. She is very tired after a day spent at school. My husband Joe otatoes and 6 small p Joseph onions 3 medium took the ked ham nces smo u o 8 boat out to 6 on the 12 eggs lake on er to taste and pepp lt a S Monday, Oil Labor Day. aute They ossible. S p s a ly in /2 fished most ham as th tter a 7 1 u d B n . a n , s w n o of the day. t not br toes, onio ham in il soft bu t n Slice pota u ions, and il Elizabeth o n o , in s s e o n t op. and onio yer pota ur over t a o and L p . d h n is a d potatoes e tast ss baking Benjamin et. pepper to d n a 11 3/4 gla lt y ggs are s a b e s il h t it n w u went with s r tes o Stir egg -25 minu 0 Elizabeth’s the dish. 2 r fo 5 2 Bake at 3 friend Timothy on a ine boat on a difhe will have plenty of stoferent lake. and ries to share with us. Kevin was excitThey all came Saturday was the day to get ed to have Steven at school this year. home with some caught up on work at home. This is a delicious, easy breakfast fish which were mostly bluegill. A lot of the deer hunters are doing and you could use potatoes from your The rest of the children and I target practice with their bows. They garden in it. spent the day relaxing at home. It was are getting excited for opening day of a nice day and would have been a deer season. Readers with culinary or cultural good afternoon to do laundry, but we The boys picked five big buckets questions or to share recipes write waited until Tuesday, though, so of tomatoes out of our garden last Lovina at: Lovina Eicher, c/o Oasis Susan and I could do it after the chilnight. Susan and I did laundry this Newsfeatures, P.O. Box 157, dren left for school. We all needed morning and it looks like we will be Middletown, OH 45042. To learn that break. Elizabeth was glad to have working up tomatoes this afternoon. I more about Amish culture and the a day off from the factory. They are am glad to fill more jars. Amish Cook column and to sign up putting in long hours every day. It Sister Emma will drop off Steven, for the twice weekly newsletter, sounds like she will have to work 5, in a little bit. She has to take one visit www.amishcookonline.com or Saturdays now. When I worked at a of her children to a doctor’s appoint“The Amish Cook Fan Page” on sewing factory before I was married I ment this afternoon. Since Steven Facebook. did not like working Saturdays. It goes to school in the morning I imagseemed like enough to work five days

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14

Acres of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

BY ZACHARY GRIMM/KNOX COUNTY CITIZEN

Part of the annexed portion of the Knox County Agricultural Museum at the Knox County Fairgrounds, open to the public for the 2012 Heart of Ohio Tour on Oct. 6-7. Aside from this vast collection of tools and implements used by farmers and others in the 1800s-1960s in rural communities in Knox County, the museum also houses many larger, antique tractors, various farm equipment, and even a Conestoga Wagon.

Heart of Ohio Tour showcases Knox County agriculture The Knox County Agricultural Museum in Mt. Vernon was the first stop on the 2012 Heart of Ohio Tour, as area residents took the opportunity to explore eight significant places which demonstrate longstanding commitment to showcasing the culture, natural resources, and rural living of Knox County. The Museum began in 1984, but in both 2011 and 2012, visitors to the Knox County Fair were treated to an often standing-room-only presentation of many of the thousands of tools, implements and smaller household appliances common to the area in the 1800s up to the 1960s. Jim Linkous was happy to guide onlookers through a brief picture history of Mt. Vernon and the surrounding area, paying particular attention to the areas around the Square. In 1883, the people of Mt. Vernon placed a water fountain in the center of what is now the Square, later adding a statue that still stands today. As many undoubtedly know, the fairgrounds so many visit in late summer for the fair were once the home of the Old Hiawatha Park, now situated just down the road toward Coshocton Avenue. What surprised some listeners was learning that the lake in the center of the horse racetrack used to be much bigger. Linkous, along with museum staff member Paul Hothem, also spoke of two agricultural woes in the history of the area during the time the Old Hiawatha Park existed. In 1913, Hothem said, a very large flood inundated the area, namely targeting the former town of Zook, said to have been near the Millwood area. That flood, Hothem added, also destroyed the railroad running through Mt. Vernon, likely creating havoc with the local industries and farming communities, the water itself being a major issue. In 1959, a second flood hit Mt. Vernon in early January. This particular disaster, Hothem remembered, brought at least four to five inches of

water to South Main Street. Hothem talked of a third onslaught of rain in the early 1960s, which, he said, made a lot of people very nervous, despite the fact that the area sits on a 100-year floodplain, meaning that at least every 100 years, conditions could become ripe for a flood. The reason for this floodplain came eons earlier, when the area in and around the fairgrounds saw a two-milehigh glacier tear through the land. Hothem said that, due to the way the glacier cut through the region and then melted, the shredded land blocked the water from flowing south, kept it in Mt. Vernon and also rerouted it around Gambier. Doug McLarnan, ranger with the Knox County Park District, says of the Kokosing River around Honey Run Park and its waterfall, would not be as (healthy) as it is today if not for the two to three generations of responsible farming done by the areas farmers in the last several decades. McLarnan credits the continued accountability of farmers who use farming systems such as no-till and contour farming, as well as the rise in scientific farming (using chemicals on crops for their intended use and in a timely manner) as the main reasons the river, the park and its 25-foot waterfall have remained as pristine as they are. McLarnan also gives credit to the Millwood Sand Company, which helps keep Honey Run Park viable by preventing the basilica sand from overreaching its boundaries, and also keeps the local economy moving forward by allowing its special type of sand to be used in things like electronics. Specific to Honey Run Park itself, McLarnan also said that the Park District has helped both Honey Run Park and the surrounding farmland by responsibly turning 60 acres of unsustainable farmland into a beautiful prairie. The prairie is in its second full year, and McLarnan says it will be at its best in its fifth year. He adds, “We haven’t done a controlled burn on it, yet, either, so that helps its potential.” Maureen Buchwald is

a driving force in the success of Glen Hill Orchard, near Gambier, and the fourth stop on the 2012 Heart of Ohio Tour. Buchwald spoke to a continuous conveyance of visitors on Saturday and Sunday’s showcasing of the operation, saying that it takes eight to 10 people to run the line at the orchard’s picking and packing business. Glen Hill Orchard is 100 percent refrigerated, and, Buchwald added, “We don’t even let the apples sit in their cardboard boxes very long at all, because the cardboard can still take out the water inside the apples.” While stored in airtight buildings, the apples remain in a controlled environment of 100 percent nitrogen and 85 percent humidity until they’re ready to be shipped out, akin to a farm which might produce hydroponic tomatoes or similar crop. Buchwald spoke of the growing cycle of their apples, commenting that, since the apples give off nitrogen as they mature, keeping them in an environment completely filled with nitrogen keeps that maturity at bay, thus allowing the apples to stay fresh until they’re sold. Typically, Buchwald noted, their throwaway rate is about 20 percent, so not every apple makes the cut. Of the 57,000 bushels and 20 varieties of apples Glen Hill Orchard produces in a season, most of that crop is sold by Jan. 1. Grocers want a uniform, constant supply, so Buchwald says they hold 7,000 bushels at a time in their controlled environments for those grocers. But Glen Hill Orchard is not alone in their endeavor. They are part of the Ohio Apples co-op, a group of 20 orchards working together to grow and ship that constant supply, mostly to Ohio, and most of that goes to Columbus Buchwald says. “What makes Glen Hill Orchard the place to go to get your apples? We’re close,” Buchwald laughs. Location is everything. Nathan McKee and his family own and operate Sassafrass Hill Farms and Farm Market, between Millwood and Bladensburg, Ohio. For 35 years, McKee has been raising farm-fed beef cattle on his 800-acre farm.

“(Six generations ago) My great-great-great-grandfather came to the area after fighting in the War of 1812, and started this farm. I’ve been doing this for 35 years, and I don’t consider it a job because I’m doing what I love, and I love what I do.” McKee, self-titled “management to mechanic” says he operates his farm with 30 mother cows who produce a calf once a year, “a lot like humans do.” Like us, it takes a calf nine months to mature to birth. Once born, McKee says the calf can be weaned starting at two and a half months, and that process lasts typ-

ically for six to seven months. When the calf reaches 15 to 18 months of age, it is ready to be processed. Each year, McKee says, about 60 percent of each cow becomes meat for processing. That means if you have a cow that weighs 1,000 pounds, 600 pounds of that cow is used for edible meat. In response to questions of organic farming, McKee pointed out that his farm is not, and that it runs as any farm-fed beef cattle operation would. “We vaccinate for the bad stuff, and medicate as needed.” Additionally, all the necessary food for the

www.hardinmotors.com

HARDIN @MOTORS

cattle is grown at the farm, instead of somewhere else. Also on the farm’s property, inside a beautiful building, visitors will find a small but very neat market, run by Nathan’s wife, Cheryl. Inside, patrons can buy delicious, locallybaked bread, pastries, maple syrup, and other goodies. Other stops included on the 2012 Heart of Ohio Tour were the Bladensburg Fire Department, Lannings Foods in Mt. Vernon, Rine Poultry in Walhonding, and Hillside Veterinary Clinic in Mt. Vernon.

Photos of all new & used vehicles on our website!

FALL HARVEST SALES EXTRAVAGANZA

Test Drive - 2013 Dodge Dart

*All of these vehicles have a *** ALL CERTIFIED USED CARS *** 3 year 36,000 mile basic bumper 1. Have a 6 yr. 80,000 mile power train warranty 2. A 3 mo. 3,000 mile all mechanical warranty to bumper warranty and a 5 year, 100,000 miles power train warranty. 3. Plus have passed a 125 point inspection and repair list.

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ALL CURRENT PRICES HAVE BEEN MARKED DOWN!!! CARS 12 12 11 07 06 05 04 04 03 03 02 02 00 97

NOW

CHRYSLER 200 TOURING SEDAN - CAST WHEELS - ALL POWER - 30+ MPG - DEEP CHERRY ...................... $16,995.00 DODGE JOURNEY HERO SXT - ALL WHEEL DRIVE - CAST WHEELS - 7 PASSENGER - BLACK ........................ $22,995.00 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED - V/6 - HEATED LEATHER - SUNROOF -NAVIGATION - WHITE .................................. $18,995.00 CHRYSLER PACIFICA - FWD - 4.0 - NEW TIRES - TAN INTERIOR - BLACK...................................................... $10,995.00 DODGE STRATUS SXT - V/6 - CAST WHEELS - LOW MILES - CYPRESS GREEN ............................................ $6,995.00 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING - LEATHER - CAST WHEELS - LOW MILES - COOL VANILLA .................................. $11,995.00 PT CRUISER LIMITED - TURBO - LEATHER - SUNROOF - INFERNO RED ........................................................ $6,995.00 CHRYSLER PACIFICA - ALL WHEEL DRIVE - LEATHER - NEW TIRES - CAST WHEELS - SILVER .................... $7,995.00 CHEVROLET IMAPLA - 4DR - SEDAN - WHITE ................................................................................................ $4,795.00 FORD TAURUS - SEDAN - CAST WHEELS - LEATHER - SUNROOF - BLACK .................................................... $3,995.00 MERCURY SABLE LS - SEDAN - LOW MILES - TAN ........................................................................................ $4,295.00 CADILLAC DEVILLE - 4 DR SEDAN - LEATHER - WHITE.................................................................................. $4,295.00 PONTIAC GRAND AM GT - COUPE - SUNROOF - SPOILER - V/6 - BLACK........................................................ $3,495.00 FORD MUSTANG COBRA - COUPE - LEATHER - A/C - 5 SPEED - FAST - BRIGHT RED .................................... $6,995.00

VANS 12 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING L - STO & GO - DUAL DVD - LEATHER - DARK CHARCOAL........................$24,995.00 10 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING - STO&GO - POWER SLIDERS - CASHMERE ..........................................$17,995.00 08 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING LX - STO & GO - 7 PASS - LOW MILES - SILVER....................................$13,995.00 08 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT - STO & GO - POWER SLIDERS - LOW MILES - INFERNO RED................................$13,995.00 07 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING - STO & GO - POWER SLIDERS/HATCH - BRIGHT SILVER $10,495.00 06 KIA SEDONA - 7 PASS - MINI VAN - BLUE ................................................................................................................ $6,495.00 06 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY - STO&GO - POWER DOORS - REAR HEAT/AC - MAGNESIUM .............................. $8,995.00 05 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING - STO&GO - REAR HEAT/AC - 3.8 - MAGNESIUM .................................. $7,995.00 05 PONTIAC MONTANA EXTENED VAN - REAR SEAT HEAT/AC - TAN ............................................................................ $5,995.00 03 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SPORT - 7 PASS - LEATHER SEATS - NEW TIRES/BRAKES - SILVER .............................. $5,495.00 00 PLYMOTH GRAND VOYAGER - 7 PASS - GRAY .......................................................................................................... $995.00

SPORT UTILITY 12 11 06 05 02 00 97

JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 SPORT - V/6 - CAST WHEELS - CLOTH INTERIOR - DEEP CHERRY ..................................$18,995.00 DODGE DURANGO 4x4 CREW - V/6 - CAST WHEELS - MINERAL GRAY ..........................................................$26,995.00 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER 4X4 LS - 7 PASSENGER - BLACK ........................................................................$10,995.00 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 SPORT - BRIGHT SILVER ................................................................................................ $9,995.00 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4x4 - V8 - TOW PKG - NEW TIRES - RED ................................................................ $6,995.00 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4x4 SE - TOW PKG - GREEN .................................................................... $3,995.00 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED - 4X4 - 4.0L 6CYL - LEATHER - GRAY ...................................................... $3,295.00

TRUCKS 12 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 QUAD CAB SLT - BEDLINER - TOW PKG - DEEP CHERRY .......................................................... $25,995.00 12 DODGE RAM 1500 4X2 QUAD CAB HEMI-SPORT - HOOD SCOOP - GRAPHICS - 20” WHEELS - LOW MI. - RED ............................$25,995.00 11 DODGE DAKOTA CREW CAB 4X4 - V/6 - SLT - BEDLINER - SILVER .................................................................................. $23,995.00 09 GMC 2500 HD 4X2 REGULAR CAB - TOW PKG - WHEEL PKG - BEDLINER - WHITE ........................................................ $17,995.00 08 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 QUAD CAB SLT - LONG BED - TOW PKG - CHROME STEPS - TAN.............................................. $12,995.00 07 FORD F150 4X4 SUPER CREW CAB - LEATHER - 20” CHROME WEELS - DUAL EXHAUST - BLACK .............................. $19,995.00 07 DODGE 4X2 1500 MEGA CAB LARAMIE - HEATED LEATHER - SUNROOF - TOW PKG - HEMI - SILVER.......................... $14,995.00 05 DODGE RAM 2500 4X4 - POWER WAGON - REGULAR CAB - HEMI - 24,000 MILES - WHITE ........................................ $18,995.00 89 FORD F-250 XLT 4X4 - WHITE ............................................................................................................................................ $3,995.00 1959 CUSHMAN EAGLE - RESTORED ...................................................................................................................................... $4,995.00

BALANCE WHEELS, ROTATE TIRES & INSPECT BRAKES

INCLUDES: •Computer balance 4 wheels •Reset air pressure •Rotate tires for wear •Inspect front pads & rotors •nspect rear linings & drums

EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR TIRES!

$

3995

plus tax WITH COUPON

Expires 11/30/12

THE WORKS A COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE AT ONE LOW PRICE!

3799

$

INCLUDES: •Change engine oil with Chrysler WITH COUPON approved oil (up to 5 qts.) •Install genuine Mopar oil filter DIESELS AND SYNTHETICS •Lubricate chassis (if applicable) EXTRA •Rotate tires Must present coupon when order is •Inspect front and rear brakes for wear •Inspect tire condition and adjust pressure written. Most models. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 11/30/12 INSPECT AND FILL TO SPECIFICATIONS: •Transmission, brake/clutch master cylinder, power steering and coolant fluid levels

LUBE, OIL AND FILTER CHANGE SERVICE

INCLUDES: ONE OF THE MOST •Change engine oil with Chrysler IMPORTANT SERVICES approved oil (up to 5 qts.) •Install new genuine Mopar oil filter FOR YOUR VEHICLE •Lubricate chassis (if applicable) SOME VEHICLES •Top off fluids plus tax SLIGHTLY HIGHER. •Check tire pressure SYNTHETICS & WITH COUPON •Tire rotation and multi-point DIESELS EXTRA. vehicle check up Must present coupon when order is written. Most models. Not valid with any other offer.

2895

$

BATTERY SPECIAL

Don’t Get Stranded with a Dead Battery! INCLUDES: •Replacement Battery •Check Charging System •Clean Cable Ends

Must present coupon when order is written. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 11/30/12

Expires 11/30/12

MINI DETAIL SPECIAL HAVE YOU CAR SPARKLING THIS SPRING!

STARTING AT $ 50 plus tax

INCLUDES: •Wash and wax exterior •Clean all glass •Clean and dress tires •Sweep interior

59

Call For Pricing

HARDIN MOTORS, INC. 481 South Main St. • Mt. Victory, Ohio

800-473-2681 or 937-354-4061 www.hardinmotors.com

WITH COUPON

Cannot be used in combination with other coupons and discounts. Expires 11/30/12

All Prices Include Hardin Motors Discount Plus Factory Rebates: Tax And Title Extra IT’S A NEW DAY

EVENT OF A

LIFETIME

Now In Our 54th Year! We May Not Be The Largest, But WE ARE THE BEST!

Hardin Motors Inc.

Photos of all new & used vehicles on our website! www.hardinmotors.com

“The Little Profit Dealer, They’re Cheaper In The Country!”

481 S. Main St. • Mt. Victory • 1-800-473-2681 or 1-937-354-4061 Jerry Burrey - Owner

FIVE STAR

Norman Smiley- Sales

Dodge Jeep

HOURS: M-W 8-8, T-Th-F 8-5, Sat. 8-12 2331644

BY ZACHARY GRIMM Knox County Citizen

FIVE STAR*****

HARDIN MOTORS-MT. VICTORY, OHIO

CHRYSLER Plymouth Dodge

*****FIVE STAR

WE INCLUDE A TANK OF GAS WITH EVERY NEW VEHICLE PURCHASE


ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

15

Monday, November 5, 2012

that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

Serving Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky, Erie, Huron, Seneca,Wood, Henry, Putnam and Hancock counties

www.acresmidwest.com www.madison-press.com www.morrowcountysentinel.com www.expositornews.com 200 - Employment

www.delgazette.com www.gallioninquirer.com www.theoberlinnewstribune.com 200 - Employment

200 - Employment

DEADLINES/CORRECTIONS: Liner deadline: 3rd Thursday each month Display Deadline: July Edition: June 20 Aug. Edition: July 18 Sept. Edition: Aug 22 Oct. Edition: Sept 19 Nov. Edition: Oct 24 Dec. Edition: Nov 19 Jan. Edition: Dec 19

515 Auctions

GENERAL INFORMATION Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8-5

515 Auctions

235 General

Restaurant Equipment

Located 11 miles south of Fostoria, Ohio or 7 miles north Carey, Ohio on US Rt. 23 then ½ mile west on Co. Rd. 7. Watch for auction signs.

Monday November 5th, 2012 @ 10AM Location: 250 Castalia St. Suite F. Bellevue, OH 44811

Saturday November 10, 2012 at 10 AM. Tractors, Combine & Dozer: 96 JD 8400 FWA tractor, shuttle shift, 540 & 1000 PTO, radar, fully weighted, 4 remotes, good rubber, duals 2085 hr.; 91 JD 9500 RWA reconditioned combine w/ long auger, good rubber, SN 641997; 99 JD 930F 30 ft. grain head; Unverferth HT30 header wagon; 643 JD oil bath low tin corn head; Unverferth HT12 head wagon; 76 Ford 7000 diesel low profile tractor w/ Dunham Lehr 22 loader, good rubber; AC WD tractor; AC 3-14 mounted plow; 110 JD lawn tractor; Cat D3C Bull Dozer w/ 6 way blade.

2332781

500 - Merchandise

515 Auctions

500 - Merchandise

515 Auctions

500 - Merchandise

515 Auctions

515 Auctions

PUBLIC AUCTION

23916 Co. Rd. 7 Alvada, OH 44802

235 General

740-852-1616

We Accept

515 Auctions

FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION 235 General

www.acresmidwest.com

POLICY: Please Check Your Ad The 1st Day. It Is The Advertiser’s Responsibility To Report Errors Immediately. Publisher Will Not Be Responsible for More Than One Incorrect Insertion. We Reserve The Right To Correctly Classify, Edit, Cancel Or Decline Any Advertisement Without Notice.

Other Farm Equipment: JD tandem 750 NT grain drills w/ JD hitch, Yetter Hydro markers, sensor units; 7240 JD vacuum 6-30 Max-Emerge no-till liquid fert. planter w/ monitor; 23 ft. Wil-Rich hydro fold soil conditioner w/ lift harrow; Ford 9 shank 138 spring loaded disk chisel; 25 ft. Brillion X fold cultipacker; 14 ft. MF 520 wheel disk good blades; Woods Bat Wing hydro fold field chopper; 14 ft. AC field cultivator w/ Remlinger lift harrow; 7 ft. JD sickle bar mower; 7 ft. New Idea 3 pt. snow blower; 16 ft. Harrogator; Woods 3 pt. model 72 chopper mower; 1000 gallon tandem axle field sprayer w/ hydro booms & agitator; MF 880 on land 716 plow; Ford semi mounted 6-16 plow; Killbros 400 bu. bottom dump gravity wagon w/ truck tires; Killbros. 400 bu. gravity wagon; J&M 250 gravity wagon w/ Killbros hydro auger; McCurdy 200 gravity wagon w/ J&M hydro auger; McCurdy 100 bu. gravity wagon w/ JD gear; tandem axle metal hopper trailer; JD PTO manure spreader, needs work; 20 ft. tandem axle trailer frame w/ brakes; 500 gal. poly tank trailer w/ Ace pump; port. 5 X 20 ft. auger w/ motor; 2 house trailer axles; air compressor; 5 stainless hog feeders & others; other misc. Trucks, Trailers & Auto: 1995 Freightliner conventional Semi Tractor w/ 425 Cat 13 speed, wet line, air ride, fair rubber, 647K miles; 1992 Kenworth T600 w/ 10 speed, 60 series Detroit engine, wet line, air ride, hi miles; 06 Timpte 40 ft. hopper bottom grain trailer 72 by 102 w/ alumn. air ride wheels; 34 ft. Fruehauf aluminum dump trailer w/ tandem axle & roll tarp; 38 ft. Raven aluminum flat tandem axle trailer w/ air ride; Aluminum & steel truck rims; chrome exhaust stacks; 300, two 500 & 3000 gal. fuel & oil tanks some w/ pumps; 99 Mercury Cougar hi miles; other misc.

Sellers: Sweet and Sour LLC. Terms: Cash, Check w/ Bank Letter, Visa or M/C. 10% Buyers Premium to be added. Removal day of Auction or by appointment. Everything selling As-Is to the last and final bidder.

WILSON AUCTION & REALTY CO., LTD. 825 N. Main St. Bryan, OH 43506 / 419-636-5500 241 S. Main St., Bowling Green, OH 43402 / 419-354-7653 Toll Free: 866-870-5500 Auctioneers: Wayne M. Wilson CAI, Brent J. Wilson CAI Denver N. Geitgey CAI, Fred Nott, Keith Whitman, William H. Retcher, Shad T. Ridenour CAI, Richard Reed, Sam Kunsman, Rick Roth, Bart Westfall www.WilsonAuctionLtd.com

2332112

Terms: Cash or check with acceptable ID on sale day. Visa & MC + 3%; Not responsible for accidents or for items after sold. Lunch on grounds.

Hobart SS 2 Door upright freezer; True S.S. 2 Door upright fridge; Hoshizaki Temp Guard SS Upright 3 Door fridge; Frymaster & Elete gas deep fryer; 4’ griddle; 24”charbroiler; Southbend 6 burner gas range 3 bay SS sink; SS sink w/ spray Single SS deep sink; mop sink; SS tables 4’5’6’; 4’ 3 bay can rack; 4 bay elec steam table; S.S. storage cabinets; Metro racks of various sizes; Grease trap; radiant order warmer; 14 Sq. tables; 2-Lg. rd. tables; 46 wood chairs; 22 black metal chairs; (4) high chairs 3 booths (selling as one unit); Utensils; stock pots; serving pans ( fulls , ½,1/4,1/8, shallow and deep); Hand French Fry cutter; plates; silverware; coffee cups; Crock pots; commercial toaster; Bunn Coffee maker; buss tubs; Carryout & paper products & More.

2333176

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE-24/7

Owner: Hickory Hill Farms, Joe & Penny Fruth 419306-2754

2332110

515 Auctions

515 Auctions

Public Auction

Walter Bros. Inc. Auctioneers Ben, Tom, Matt Walter & Kris Gosche 901 N. Main St., Findlay, OH 45840 419-424-0944 www.walterbrosinc.com

2333175

Consigned by neighbors: 98 JD 5510D FWA tractor w/540 loader only 2315 hrs has ROP & weights, sharp tractor; 1200 Kilbros 600 bu. grain cart w/roll tarp; 6-30 1980 JD 7000 reconditioned corn planter, dry fert, row cleaners; bean meters, monitor & herb; may be more

535 Farm Supplies/Equipment

Of Wyandot Co. Farm Land Auction held at the Crawford Twp. Building 107 E. North St. Carey, OH 43316

Saturday November 3rd, 2012 at 10 AM. Offering 106.906 acres located south of Carey on Twp. Rd. 98. In Sections 21, 27 & 28 Crawford Twp. The land will be offered in the following parcels until the highest bids are obtained. Following is the surveyed acres. Parcel 1. 61.829 acres all tillable in north part of NE ¼ SE ¼ Section 28 & a NE part of the SW ¼ of Section 27 that lies west of the RR and northeast of US Rt. 23. This parcel has a recorded access off Twp. Rd. 98. PN 09-2340000000 & part of 09-238500.0000 Parcel 2. 21.394 acres all tillable in south part of NE ¼ SE ¼ Section 28 that is south of Rt. 23 and a south part of NE ¼ of SW ¼ of Section 27 fronting on Twp. Rd. 98. PN pt of 09-238500-0000

1947 SILVER KING tractor Model 42, runs and looks excellent, $1,975 OBO. MUST GO! 419-293-3847.

JobSourceOhio.com 600 - Services

615 Business Services

600 - Services

615 Business Services

Civitas Media

Reach more than ONE MILLION OHIO READERS for only $275!

Parcel 3. 23.683 acres all tillable in SE ¼ of Section 21 with good access on Twp. Rd. 98. PN 09-321500-0000 Terms: Ten thousand dollars of the purchase price of each parcel shall be paid down on the day of the auction and the balance on delivery of a Warranty Deed within 30 days. Possession will be following harvest of 2012 crops. All inspections must be completed prior to auction day. Buyers financing must be pre-approved. Sellers intend to sell, however, do reserve the right to reject any bids. Be prepared to bid and buy.

Walter Bros. Inc. Auctioneers Ben, Tom, Matt Walter & Kris Gosche 901 N. Main St., Findlay, OH 45840 419-424-0944 www.walterbrosinc.com

that work .com

2333169

Owner: Alice E. Baker Trust, Rebecca J. Long Trustee

Contact Roy Slater for details (419) 295-1009 rslater@acresmidwest.com rwslater711@sbcglobal.net

Cash-in

Classifieds on the

FIND & SEEK

2332773

in

that work .com


16

ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

Monday, November 5, 2012

• AGRICULTURE •

Consignment Hay Auction

Gypsum Direct

Calcium Sulfate All Auctions Start @ 10:00am Auctioneer Fred Wolfe

Hay and Straw Auctions

Nov. 24th • Sat., Dec 22nd

25 ton minimum

Custom Applicators Available

Call Matt Gibson at 740-207-6039

www.ewaldfurniture.com

2331785

- HOURS Mon. & Sat.: 10:00-5:00, Tues thru Fri.: 10:00-8:00

2331792

Hrs: Mon-Fri 8am - 5:30pm; Sat 8am - Noon

gypsumdirect@gmail.com Web site: gypsumdirect.com

2329957

Buildings

TATE’S

THE ERLIN TRADERS 701 Main St., Clyde 419-547-0441

Chainsaw & Small Engine Shop

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 12-5, Closed Thurs.

Repairs made on all Brands

Bloomville, OH 419-983-5972 • 800-552-2772 Cell 419-618-0839 www.jpwardconstruction.com

Mike Freeh, Owner

Manager, Andy Wonderly

Mike Freeh Construction, General Contractor Fremont, OH 43420

3875 St. Rt. 6, Helena, Ohio 43435

567-201-9398 - Business 419-463-0330 - Residence

Meister Insurance Group

THAYER Engine & Machine

FARMERS CO-OP

Green Camp Branch 604 Elevator Rd. Green Camp, OH 43322

•Residential, Commercial & Agriculture 00183655

740-528-2211 800-432-8427

Custom Baling

00186824

Utility Vehicle

Extensions are listed on back of card

Fax: 419-849-2720 Grain Recording: 419-849-2876 Web: www.luckeyfarmers.com 800-589-2711

The Polaris RANGER, general purpose off-road utility vehicle, is not intended and may not be registered for on-road use.

Ohio’s Favorite Dealer Co Rd 99 at I-75, Exit 161 - FINDLAY

Insurance

866-302-9253

Field Tiling

DAN WILHELM Insurance, dba Ottawa County Agency, LLC Auto/Home/Business/Life Insurance 1515 Main St. • Genoa OH 43430 Phone: 419-855-9089 Email:dan@ottawacountyagency.net Web: http://ottawacountyagency.net

Emch Bros.

Drainage Contractors Est.1975 • 1902W.Main St,Woodville,OH 43469 2289398

Propane Customers Welcome 2289233

clouse@acctiffin.com www.clouseconstruction.com www.clouseconstruction.com

Direct Phone Line: 419-849-2114

1200 W. Main Street P.O. Box 217 Woodville, Ohio 43469 2289395

00176636

2289408

Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Inc.

CALL (419) 448-1365

Phone: 419-849-2711 800-589-9711

Farm • Auto Truck • Industrial 19 20 years years experience experience

Propane Service

115 W. Washington St. • Napoleon, OH 43545 419-592-5059 419-592-934 Fax

Seed and Feed Luckey Farmers, Inc.

Engine Rebuilding

Hours: Weekdays 8-5 • Sat. 8-Noon 18039 N. Dixie Hwy., Bowling Green, OH 419-353-5271 888-440-5271

Butler Steel # *Design BuildBuildings # Post Frame *Butler Steel Buildings # Site Development Work *Concrete Development *Site Concrete Work # 2331810

2289296

2289410

Owners 1775 S. CR 1 Tiffin, Oh 44883 (419) 448-9850

Agri-Commercial-Residential

We’re here for all your Insurance needs

Nancy Homan, CISR, CPIW Agent nancyhoman@hotmail.com

Scott Weininger • Steve Howard 300 N. Warpole St. 14889 St. Hwy. 31 Kenton, Oh 43326 Upper Sandusky, Oh 43351 (419) 674-4715 (419) 294-4981

PHONE 419-638-3311

Insurance

Passenger & Farm Tires

•China Cabinets •Bar Stools •Antique Items

Owner, Dave Wonderly

2289403

2294159

2310584

BRENEMAN EQUIPMENT

•Roll Top Desks •File Cabinets •Bookcases •Glassware •Clocks

New Homes Additions - Garages Pole Buildings and Old Barn Restoration Replacement Windows and Doors Complete Residential and Agricultural Services

2331801

• J & M • KILBROS • YETTER • UNVERFERTH • REMLINGER, ETC.

Wolverine Vinyl Side Solid Vinyl Siding

• Custom Hydraulic Hose • Tillage Wear Parts • Wheel Bearings • Combine Cutter Bars • DMI Truck Hitches • All Makes & Systems

•Dining Room Hutches •Tables & Chairs •Amish Bedroom Suites

Auto Body Service

Siding

Farm Repair Parts

• 800-499-8494 • 419-757-5012 ONE MILE E. OF ALGER • CO. RD. 90 Visit us @ brenemanequipment.com

Lots More To Choose From...

2289390

388 E. Perry Street • Tiffin • (419) 443-1530

Amish Made Flat Screen TV and Entertainment Centers

In Business Since 1973 Free Estimates • Pre Engineered Post • Frame Buildings • Farm, Horse, Residential, Commercial

2331818

2331797

• Snapper • Jonsered • Kohler • Kawasaki • . • Briggs & Stratton

2332986

Sat.,

Directly shipped to your farm

2941 S. State Route 100, Tiffin Phone 419-447-1828 | Fax 419-447-8437

PHONE 419-270-0560

Quality Fuels & Lubricants

Pole Barns

MARION OIL CO. Quality Fuels & Lubricants

• Hay and Straw • We Do Complete Custom Baling, Cutting & Raking For You.

JIM BOWMAN, MANAGER

J.E. Forry Forry Custom CustomBaling, Baling,LLC LLC 00185384 2289239

2289220

327 S. Hazel StAda, • Upper OhioSandusky, OH 567-230-0031 567-230-0031//740-225-1502 740-225-1502

CELL PHONE: (740) 225-3190 BUS. PHONE: (740) 382-9610 TOLL FREE: 1-888-498-9880 FAX: (740) 387-8863

2289225

We Sell Hay & Straw

517 PARK BLVD. MARION, OHIO 43302 E-mail:marion_oil@yahoo.com http://www.centraloilfarm.com

Dining/Restaurant

The VILLAGE RESTAURANT 435 N. Warpole St., Upper Sandusky, Ohio Phone: 419-294-2945 Banquet

Open Sunday-Thursday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Room and Carryout Available

2289345

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Monday, November 5, 2012

17

2333218

ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,


ACRES of Northwestern Ohio,

2013 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500

20 MPG!

$25,635

Monday, November 5, 2012

2013 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LT

LOADED! BRAND NEW!

$33,540

SNOW PLOW PREP PKG!

$43,840

4X4 CREW CAB

$59,160

DURAMAX DIESEL

DURAMAX DIESEL

$52,650 6.6L V8, 6 SPD. ALLISON AUTO STK# T12158

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500

DURAMAX DIESEL

$62,515

$47,030 6.0L V8 STK# G12080

LOOKS GOOD!

$14,995 8.0L V8, HEATED LTH SEATS STK# T12250A1

2013 SHADOW 2 HORSE BP

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 HD

4X4

1/2 TON 4WD

$57,765

2012 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD

Z71 Off Rd. Suspension Pkg.

$47,030

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 HD LTZ

DURAMAX TURBO DIESEL

EXTENDED CAB

$13,695 6.0L , V-8 4X4 STK# N5027B

2013 SHADOW 3 HORSE GN

$58,135 6.6L 4X4 CREW CAB STK# T12216

2009 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500

Low Mileage

$23,995

2007 GMC YUKON DENALI

All Wheel Drive

$28,995 6.7 L, V8 STK# D1

$35,770

6.0L V8, ONSTAR & BLUETOOTH EQP, WORK TRUCK - STK# T12005

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 HD

4X4

$58,135 6.6L ,V-8 ,Duramax Diesel , LTZ Trim STK. # T12194

2006 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500

CREW CAB

5.3L , V-8, FUEL INJECTED STK # Q11032B

6.0L ,V-8 4X4 CREW W/SLE TRIM STK# G12080

2006 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD

$39,090 5.3L V8, 6 SPD. AUTO, LEATHER INTERIOR - STK#T13019

6.6L V8, CREW CAB LTZ STK# T12193

4X4 CREW CAB STK# T12224

2005 GMC SIERRA 3500

2013 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LT

4.3L V8 W/ LS TRIM STK# T12138

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 HD

6.6L DURAMAX TURBO STK# T12160

CREW CAB SLE TRIM

$35,725

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 HD

6.0L V8, 4X4, EXTENDED CAB STK# T12179

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 HD

BLUETOOTH EQUIPPED

5.3L V8 W/ LT TRIM, 2WD EXTENDED CAB - STK# T13022

4.3L, V6, PWR WINDOWS, DOOR LOCKS, MIRRORS - STK# T12221

2013 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 HD LT

2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LS

$28,995 6.6 L , V-8, TURBO DIESEL STK# T12183A

2008 DODGE RAM 3500 LARAIME

All Wheel Drive

$28,995 6.2 L , V-8 STK# N5049

2013 SHADOW HORSE TRAILER

$11,995

$14,995

$48,900

STK# S1306

STK# S1240

4 hrse slant load gooseneck STK# S1377

2332518

18

NW 11/12  

Acres of Northwestern Ohio

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