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Science has shown that the fittest survive.

We Agree. 1


And Darwin would have understood the concept of (Swedish) ICT.*

But it’s not about evolution. it’s about revolution.

* Information and Communication Technology

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Six short questions that

will get you up to speed.

1. WHAT IS ICT?

2. WHAT’S THE IDEA BEHIND SWEDISH ICT?

3. HOW IS SWEDISH ICT ORGANIZED?

4. WHO OWNS SWEDISH ICT?

5. WHAT MAKES SWEDISH ICT SO SUCCESSFUL?

6. WHAT ARE WE MOST PROUD OF?

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is a term used to describe the technologies that enable users to access, store, transmit, and manipulate information through telecommunications. It is similar to Information Technology (IT), but mainly focuses on communication technologies. This includes the Internet, wireless networks and mobile phones, as well as the necessary software, middleware, storage, and audiovisual systems.

The role of Swedish ICT is to promote sustainable growth in Sweden. We provide a vital link between academia and industry by transferring research results into innovations that contribute to increased competitiveness and business development.

Swedish ICT comprises a group of ICT research institutes (Acreo Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute Swedish ICT, SICS Swedish ICT and Viktoria Swedish ICT). Collectively, our expertise ranges from hardware, software and service development to interaction design and innovation processes.

Swedish ICT is owned by the Swedish government (60 percent) through RISE Holding (the government’s holding company for ownership of Swedish industrial research institutes), and Swedish industry (40 percent) through the industrial associations FMOF and FAV, which hold 20 percent each.

Excellence and innovation are among the main strengths of the institute. We have more than 400 employees that combine expertise in ICT with academic research and experience from industrial applications. Approximately 40 percent are professional researchers.

We are proud of Swedish ICT’s close collaboration with academia and industry. Through our process of making research results available for industry, we contribute to the strengthening of Sweden’s position as a world-leading ICT nation.

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Everything you do...

…creates a new kind o f informati on.

Information and knowled ge are valuab for your busin le tools ess and an e ndless sourc possibilities. e of If we capture , transmit, p and display t rocess his informat ion, we can c exciting new reate oppor tunitie s. THIS IS ICT – Information and Commun cation Techn iology, in its p urest form. 6

annual report 2012 Swedish ICT............................................. 8 Collaboration is key, CEO Hans Hentzell.............................. 10 Swedish ICT Business Areas.............. 12 User experience and quality of life........... 14 SME development.................................... 16 Sustainable mobility................................ 18 Internet and telecom............................... 20 Automation and industrial processes....... 22 Sustainable mobility................................ 24 Security................................................... 26 Infrastructure for Innovation...... 28 E-health.................................................. 30 Smart energy........................................... 32 E-health.................................................. 34 User experience and quality of life........... 36

Keep your Innovation process in motion................................................... 38 National strategic agendas............ 40 Challenge driven innovation........... 42 The year in a brief.............................. 50

Highlights 2012...............................64–67 The structure of Swedish ICT........... 68 Financial Ratios..................................70 Sustainable work...............................72 Performance indicators............................74

Our new look....................................... 52 The Research Institutes of Swedish ICT........................................... 54 SICS Swedish ICT..................................... 54 Acreo Swedish ICT ................................... 54 Interactive Institute Swedish ICT............. 55 Viktoria Swedish ICT................................ 55 Meet our Scientists....................... 56–63

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Sustainable Growth in Sweden The role of Swedish ICT is to encourage sustainable growth in Sweden. Research results are to be turned into innovations that contribute to greater competitiveness and innovation in industry and society. This, in turn will improve quality of life. We do this in close collaboration with industry, society and academia.

a turnover of SEK 444 million. With headquarters in Kista (Stockholm, Sweden), Swedish ICT has operations in major Swedish cities and regions: Eskilstuna, Göteborg, Hudiksvall, Karlstad, Kista, Linköping, Lund, Norrköping, Piteå, Umeå, Uppsala and Västerås.

Access to key knowledge and technology is essential in order to create renewal in industry and society based on ICT. The institutes within Swedish ICT conduct research and development in several of these key areas, ranging from sensors and actuators, communication networks and data analytics to visualization, interaction design and service development. There are many ways to collaborate with us; together in consultancy projects, public funded research projects, as a partner in our competence center, by using our test beds and lab facilities, or taking part in our outreach activities. The Swedish ICT group has approximately 400 employees with

Acreo Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute Swedish ICT, SICS Swedish ICT and Viktoria Swedish ICT, form the group Swedish ICT – a group of world-class independent research institutes operating at the forefront of ICT research and development. The institutes are all experienced research and development partners and can therefore act as a link between academia, industry, public organizations and user groups. We enable innovation by gathering different disciplines and actors to effectively work together and provide cross-functional solutions.

We are an independent partner for your R&D projects.

INDEPENDENT INSTITUTES

“Our strength is the combination of internationally acknowledged scientific expertise within the most relevant areas and our experience to implement it for the good of life, society and industry.” Hans Hentzell CEO Swedish ICT

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Collaboration is key of great achievements across our customer projects. Our research partners and spin-off companies, acting in a competitive market, earned a strong position with products and services for the future and a promising order stock entering 2013.

Looking back, 2012 was a year

CROSS-BORDER CHALLENGES CALLS FOR CROSS-BORDER SOLUTIONS Our role as a neutral actor, that creates collaborations between different types of industries, has been especially evident this year. An example of this is the new project to optimize shipping traffic with minimum

disruption to road and rail transports in Gothenburg, Sweden. Another is our projects for new services and products for the smart use of energy and sustainable infrastructure for communication in The Royal Sea Port in Stockholm. A third is the visualization system Inside Explorer that has taken the visitor experience at museums to an entirely new level. You can read all about it in the pages to come. In 2012, we enjoyed success with VINNOVA’s Challenge Driven Innovation. We are currently participating in 12 projects together with over 100 industry partners; projects that accounted for around SEK 30 million in 2012 and will account for SEK 40 million more in 2013. Our SME partners reported an increase in turnover corresponding to SEK 280 million as a result of collaboration with Swedish ICT. Partner companies allocated resources to be part of our research project “In Kind” corresponding to SEK 200 million, which clearly demonstrates the relevance and value of our collaboration. We have also continued to strengthen our

regional presence. Our work within IT security in Lund has increased by 50% and we have established new operations in Västerås in close collaboration with Mälardalens High School and the Autonomous Regional Council, and also in Värmland, western Sweden, in partnership with Karlstad University. Together with Chalmers, KTH, Halmstad Högskola, and a number of industrial partners, we are presently coordinating a strategically important project within cooperative vehicle systems. Our findings within the field of Printed Electronics, together with Linköping University and Norrköping’s Science Park, has already attracted substantial international interest. In Kista (Stockholm, Sweden), our work with KTH Royal Institute of Technology has continued, predominantly in projects together with EIT ICT Labs and in Electrum Lab. A new research laboratory has also been established together with Swedish telecommunications company Ericsson. This cooperation will not only provide Ericsson with highly skilled researchers but will also be an important factor in continuing

to promote Sweden as a hotspot of mobile communication development. For the good of life, society and business In 2012, we implemented strategically important changes within our organization aimed at increasing our relevance and strengthening our offer. We have launched a new common brand to reinforce the notion that we are a unified group with broad ICT expertise. Our key competences range all the way from sensors and actuators, communication networks and data analytics, to visualization, interaction design, and service development. As a way of increasing our relevance in finding the answers to your challenges, and to lower the barriers for you to engage in projects together with us, we have broadened our offer and have established a number of strategically important focus areas. We call these our Business Areas. These are new ways of presenting our existing capabilities in ongoing projects that account for nearly SEK 290 million. Our Business Areas also provide us with a

platform through which to demonstrate to you the relevance and potential of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Our offer within sensor systems was strengthened in April 2012 when sensor operations at Imego was merged with Acreo Swedish ICT. The merger is expected to further develop and strengthen our research and offering within sensor technology. Together, we’ll make your vision a reality Our strength lies in the unique combination of internationally acknowledged scientific expertise within the most relevant ICT areas, and our experience to implement it for the good of life, society and industry. We have the necessary capabilities to enable innovation and the vision to help you develop and expand your business. If you want to take your business to the next level through ICT, come and talk to us about making your vision a reality. – Hans Hentzell, CEO Swedish ICT

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Business areas ICT for a sustainable and better life for everyone

SICS Swedish ICT focuses on Software, Systems and Services

Viktoria Swedish ICT focuses on Vehicles and Transportation

Acreo Swedish ICT focuses on Sensors and Actuators, Digital Communication, Power Electronics and Life Science

Interactive Institute Swedish ICT focuses on Visualization and Interaction Design

E-HEALTH SMART ENERGY

We all know that we face significant challenges in creating a sustainable society for the next generation. These are complex, cross-border challenges that require crossborder solutions. There is no doubt that ICT will play an increasingly important part of the solutions to our common challenges. The strength of Swedish ICT is that we are a group of specialized institutes offering specific expertise and cross-border solutions based on ICT. With our common challenges as the starting point, we have established a number of strategically important focus areas in order to strengthen and clarify our cross-border offering to industry and the public sector. We call them Swedish ICT Business Areas.

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SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY SME DEVELOPMENT

MARKET

INTERNET AND TELECOM SECURITY AUTOMATION AND INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES USER EXPERIENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE

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In the quest for the perfect race

In the tough world of cross-country skiing, performance is everything. Researchers in Sweden are working on a solution that tracks and analyzes skiers’ performances during training sessions to ensure they reach maximum physical performances levels at the right times. In their quest for the perfect race, elite crosscountry skiers in Sweden have been wearing a smartphone during training sessions. Advanced technology on the device (accelerometers, advanced data analysis, deviation detection and machine learning) generates butterfly-shaped patterns of the skier in motion. THE FIRST STAGE IS THE MOST IMPORTANT

User Experience and Quality of Life

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Globalization, social development, growing urbanization, connectivity and creativity are all strong components in the creation of a sustainable culture of living. Swedish ICT focuses on practical design research and user interaction in order to understand, serve and underpin civil well-being and engagement. We possess unique competence in Interaction Design, Visualization, Experience Design, Sound Design, Service Design, User Behavior, Mobile Services, Sensors and Sensor Systems, and Big Data.

“First, we categorized different motion patterns,” explains Magnus Jonsson at Interactive Institute Swedish ICT. “Thanks to the technology we’ve developed, we can now see the symmetry between the left and right sides of the skier’s body. We have a prototype for the skate motion and next we will do the same for the poles,” he says. Data collected can also be matched with GPS coordinates, allowing the variations between skiers’ motion patterns and the terrain to be compared. Magnus Jonsson believes other sports can also take advantage of the new training method. “We want to present this digital ski lab as a training app for a broader segment of ordinary cross-country skiers,” he says.

VISUALIZE THE INVISIBLE The Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre in Östersund, SICS Swedish ICT, and Interactive Institute Swedish ICT are currently joining forces to developing this tool that could result in Swedish gold medals in the years to come. The Swedish Ski Association expects this new training method will give the Swedish team a clear advantage in the 2014 Winter Olympics and again in the 2015 World Championships. “This equipment makes it possible to actually see things we earlier had to guess about,” explains Lars Selin, coach of Team 2015. “It becomes evident what happens in the skiing and how it can be improved, both for the skier and the trainer.” Project Partners The Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, SICS Swedish ICT and Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.

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SMEs Profit With Swedish ICT Small and medium-sized enterprises often grow and expand from collaboration with research institutes. In 2012, the turnover from our spin-off companies was SEK 1,820 million and SMEs generated some SEK 243 million, based on development projects with Swedish ICT. Swedish ICT creates growth, increased competitiveness and renewal for SMEs. In fact, we have helped generate more than 10 times the total public funds we receive in 2012. During 2011, Grufman Reje conducted a valuation of Swedish ICT’s work with new companies. Results showed that growth is around 10 times faster than the spin-offs from the major universities in Sweden because of the institutions’ innovation-oriented approach.

communication must be optimized at all times. Three researchers at Stockholm’s Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) have been working on a solution to on-chip communication with multicore systems-on-chip for more than a decade. Now, with help from SICS Swedish ICT, the founders of Elsip AB are ready to showcase its findings to the world. Elsip joined SICS’ Startup Accelerator in 2012 after carefully evaluating alternative incubators. The fact that it is an academic beacon in the multicore field was of one the most important reasons for choosing SICS. “Within SICS there’s an understanding for the semiconductor business cycles, which is necessary for a start-up addressing the semiconductor companies on a global scale,” comments Adam Edström, CEO of Elsip.

START-UPS MATURE WITH SWEDISH ICT

IMPROVED MEDICAL PROCEDURES

Computer applications, such as gaming, imaging, media processing and radar, require maximum capacity and performance. This means on-chip

Approximately 30,000 people suffer strokes each year in Sweden. One method of reducing the numbers affected is to screen individuals in

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risk groups. This way, heart irregularities can be discovered at a critical early stage. The company Zenicor Medical Systems successfully integrated new functionality into its product after receiving project coaching from Acreo Swedish ICT. With Zenicor Medical Systems’ mobile electrocardiography (ECG) equipment, cardiac patients can conduct heart-screening tests themselves. This move will prove critical for international expansion. All of the required improvements were completed during a seven-month research and development project financed in part through VINNOVA’s Innovations Check system. Prevas was responsible for development and programming and EpiQ Life Science for the system design part of the project. Acreo acted as project coach, expertly assisting in the financing stage of the project, making sure milestones during the project were met, and served as a discussion partner. “We are a small company,” says Mats Palerius at Zenicor. “To get this project financed and to develop our product was a very important step in

our geographic expansion. With the improved product, we estimate that it’s possible to increase our annual sales from 7 MSEK to 15 MSEK within two to three years,” he adds. THE FUTURE OF PRINTED MEDIA Inspiring researchers at Acreo Swedish ICT and LiU integrate flat-panel displays into print, set up spin-off company Lumisigns, and help Webshape find a unique way of commercializing electrical conductors. For advertisers, government authorities and the media, the possibilities of printed information with a flat-panel display, also known as electroluminescent (EL) displays, incorporated into it are endless. “Volume production of environmentallyfriendly EL displays, at a reasonable cost, is finally a reality,” comments Kent Erhagen, partner and CEO of LumiSigns. “It opens up lots of possibilities,” he adds. In autumn 2012, Webshape took off, selling an ingenious method of manufacturing electrical conductors on flexible substrates. “The complex

innovation behind Webshape has been around for some time but has not processed market,” says Björn Wasell, entrepreneur and co-owner of Webshape. “When the technology was presented to me, I immediately saw its market potential,” he explains. The verification phase was run as a WinVerification Project, financed by VINNOVA.

SME Development The development of new and existing SMEs is crucial to generate growth, create new jobs and promote a more sustainable society. We support SMEs by answering key questions around ICT-driven products, processes and service development. Swedish ICT offers analysis of needs and the possibilities of ICT from a business perspective. We also offer access to a national and international network of experts, as well as support in finding funding, advice around IPR issues, test beds and production incubators. 17


£¥ €$

Business Sustainability Massive efficiency improvements are urgently required in the industrialized world to meet the demands of developing economies if we also want to improve sustainability. Simultaneously, Swedish industry needs to be more competitive. A circular business model addresses both these issues. Viktoria Swedish ICT, together with Chalmers and Swedish bicycle manufacturer Unicykel, has come up with a circular business model with a remanufacturing service that lowers environmental impact whilst remaining profitable. The Electric Bicycle Subscription is the result of a oneyear project that involved the development of an electric bicycle and a circular business model. The business model was later validated by potential customers and dealers, which led to financial evaluation and, finally, a pilot test with paying customers. New perspectives One of the two owners of Unicykel stated that, “For us at Unicykel, this was completely new and has been very instructive. We would not have carried this out on our own accord.” The underlying study was based on a longitudinal inter-

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ventionist research project that gave Viktoria Swedish ICT the unique opportunity to observe the transition to a circular business model. Researchers from Viktoria Swedish ICT and Chalmers ran the project as a form of customer development procedure initiated by serial entrepreneur Steve Blank. The Electric Bicycle Subscription reduces the need for further manufacturing and reduces consumption of raw materials and energy by up to 80 percent. Moving from a traditional business model of product sale, to one in which the sale of the product’s main functions (i.e. personal transportation) is combined with remanufacturing. This also improves the manufacturer’s profitability and competitiveness. Lowering the product’s cost through value retention in remanufacturing attains profitability. Sustainability gives an edge Competitiveness as a service (i.e. the sale of the product’s function) can be made to fit the needs of individual customers more easily than a product can. The success of the circular business model shows that manufacturers need to move away from the red ocean of price competition, redundancies and production relocation to lower-cost countries, to an arena where the service a product provides is what counts.

Circular Business Models

£¥ €$ Circular Business Models

Sustainable Mobility Sustainable transportation of people and goods is a major challenge for today’s society. Innovations are needed that improve road safety, reduce environmental impact, and increase availability and accessibility. Swedish ICT creates ICT-driven innovations that contribute to sustainable mobility irrespective of the choice of transportation. We have the necessary expertise based on research, including Innovation Orchestration, User interface and Experience Design, Enabling Software and Electronics, Sensor Solutions and SiC Power Electronics.

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Big is beautiful… The volume of information produced by smartphones, cloud services, business databases and industrial sensors grows every day. Properly analyzed, this information can be a valuable source of knowledge. SICS Swedish ICT is managing a pioneering research project into the power of Big Data Analytics. In the emerging field of Big Data Analytics, large amounts of data of various types is collected, stored and analyzed to uncover hidden patterns and unknown correlations. This information can improve processes in society as well as provide competitive advantages to companies. ADVANCED DATA ANALYSIS BY INDUSTRY EXPERTS Big Data Analytics is a six-month research project led by SICS that brings together a broad spectrum of stakeholders from academia, industry and public sector. The project will result in a national

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research and innovation agenda for the future. “We’ll examine industry needs, competence and possibilities in a technology domain that will have a large impact on Swedish competitiveness,” says SICS’s Daniel Gillblad, who leads the project. EXPLORING NEW AREAS OF VALUE CREATION Today, we produce massive amounts of data that is largely unstructured and transient. It comes from a variety of sources and types: text, video, geospatial data, information captured by a sensor in a plant or a vehicle, or from social interactions via the web. If this data is collected, stored and analyzed, it would be possible to optimize various processes in society. For example, with the extensive use of smartphones, motion patterns can be analyzed and used in the planning of new roads, railroads, electricity networks and public transport. By cross-examining data from the health report system with search terms used on the Internet, Big Data Analytics can be used to predict the spread

of diseases. It can transform vehicle data into information that allows people use their machines in better ways. It can also help us to better understand customer behavior. PROTECTING BUSINESS-CRITICAL INFORMATION The objective of Big Data Analytics is to make statements about collective behavior. As many analysis applications involve aspects of integrity, privacy protection is a main challenge. In order to create new Big Data Analytics services, there is a need for a framework where actors can exchange data from different sources without violating the integrity of others. Another challenge is to design solutions that will not reveal business-critical information when disseminated. “We need a framework that protects integrity and prevents companies from exposing proprietary and business sensitive information,” adds Gillblad. “Our goal is to examine a broad range of applications. This is why we have participants from established and/or traditional industry as well as new companies, whose business concept is

to analyze data and provide it as a service,” he comments. DEVELOPING A STRONG NETWORK During the research process, a multidisciplinary network of researchers and Swedish companies from different segments will interact and attract new stakeholders in Big Data Analytics, laying the foundation for future cooperation. “When we have captured their needs and the agenda is in place, the ambition is to start new research projects together,” explains Gillblad. Project Partners Ericsson, IBM, Volvo Technology, SKF, Spotify, TIBCO Spotfire, Recorded Future, Gavagai, KTH, Stockholms universitet, Chalmers, ​ Luleå tekniska universitet, Högskolan i Halmstad, SICS Swedish ICT and Viktoria Swedish ICT.

…and the power of data Internet and Telecom Internet and telecommunications are key elements of the majority of ICT solutions today and, as technology continues to develop, more powerful processing and higher bandwidth communication is called for. Swedish ICT has the expert competence to support both industry and the public sector to lead this development in the following areas: Broadband Technology, the Internet of Things, Sensor and Sensor Systems, Probabilistic Network Management, Cloud and P2P Computing, Secure Systems and Privacy, Big Data, Mobile Services, Visualization and Interaction Design.

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Fiber Optics Boosts Productivity

Manufacturers today can choose from a wide variety of measurement techniques to ensure the quality of their products. Tool supplier System 3R International partnered with Acreo Swedish ICT to develop a flexible highprecision measurement system based on fiber optic technology. The growing demand for inexpensive, high-quality optical components for consumer electronics puts pressure on the manufacturing industry. The rise of smartphones and digital cameras means new moulds must be made within a shorter time span in order to manufacture components according to market pressures. In production mode, equipment must work

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with a continuously high degree of accuracy so high-precision measurement is a key factor in the production process. STRONG COOPERATION MEANS ADDED VALUE System 3R International is a supplier of clamping tools for the manufacturing industry. They needed a flexible method to measure distances with high precision, for example, to be able to locate work pieces properly or for machine calibration. In 2006, Acreo and System 3R International began collaborating to find out if fiber optic sensor technology could be used. Together, they developed a prototype for a measurement system for high-accuracy positioning. The sensor measures the absolute distance between a fiber tip and an object within tens of nanometers. “We have been cooperating since 2006,” says Håkan Dahlquist at System 3R International.“ Acreo’s competence, lab resources and their connections in the fiber optics industry have been valuable to us.” EXTEND YOUR BUSINESS AREA With the fiber interferometer, System 3R International

can extend their business area, covering not only the mouldmaking for plastic components. “Now we can include mould-making and direct manufacturing of components that require even higher precision, such as mass production of optics,” explains Dahlquist. “This is a flexible and easy-to-use measuring system,” says Magnus Lindblom at Acreo. “The core of the system is patented signal processing algorithms which makes it possible to get a high resolution from the relatively inexpensive hardware in the solution,” he says. Håkan Dahlquist points out that Acreo has a good understanding of the fact that research projects must lead to sellable products. “They are business-minded, which is very imAutomation and Industrial portant for us,” he explains. “They Processes also have an organization which makes is possible to run projects Global competition, the demand for cost reduction, and increased requirements for efficiently”. Project partners System 3R International and Acreo Swedish ICT.

sustainability drive the automation and development of industrial processes. ICT enables automation and industrial processes to operate more efficiently in several ways, including productivity, energy efficiency, and environmental efficiency. Swedish ICT has unique competence in sensor and sensor systems, resource utilization and efficiency, visualization and user interaction, and business logic. 23


The Congestion-Free City The Göta Älv river is the longest in Sweden and flows right through the city of Gothenburg. Important inland shipping creates problems for the city’s authorities as opening bridges causes traffic delays. These are among the challenges of the ambitious GOTRIS research and innovation project.

The goal of GOTRIS is to create a traffic-management platform in Gothenburg between different modes of transport that addresses different stakeholders’ needs. The monumental challenge of GOTRIS is to optimize shipping traffic with minimum disruption to road and rail transports. If that wasn’t enough, the railroad is already working at near-maximum capacity, so every ship poses a potential cause for delay. EFFICIENT AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY A fully developed GOTRIS platform means that freight traffic can flow freely over the river and the

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Port of Gothenburg can expand. Efficient and environmentally friendly transport can realistically be achieved by minimizing waiting time and fuel use. This means a modern well-functioning city with minimal interference from bridge openings. A pilot version of the platform is currently under development. Information sources from the railways, the city and shipping will be integrated, while models for control and optimization will be developed for ships, traffic management and the road system. COMBINING EXPERTISE TO SOLVE PROBLEMS The innovative project brings together rail, maritime and road authorities and allows them to share information and services in a River Information Service (RIS) for the Göta Älv river. By sharing the same information and services, the project will demonstrate how the Vänern and Göta Älv river shipping can be controlled and guided in an

optimal way for different modes of transport. The consortium that will carry out the project consists of industry actors, government and infrastructure holders, software developers, and research and innovation partners. Industry participants: Ahlmarks Line, Thun Company Erik Thun AB, Vänerhamn AB and the Port of Gothenburg; Authorities and infrastructure holders: City of Gothenburg, Karlstad, Kristinehamn, Region Värmland, Maritime Administration, the Swedish Transport Administration and Region Västra Götaland; Service Developers: Intelligent Port Systems AB (Inport) and Trafikverket ICT; Research and Innovation Partners: Chalmers University of Technology, SSPA Sweden AB and Viktoria Swedish ICT (project managers). The project is funded by VINNOVA, Swedish Transport Agency, City of Gothenburg, Region of Västra Götaland, Region of Värmland, Municipality of Kristinehamn, and Municipality of Karlstad.

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Cloud-Based Services That Guarantee Security The demand for cloud-based services is evolving on both national and international levels. By 2016, the turnover generated by the cloud service industry in Sweden is expected to reach 9 billion SEK. The IT industry must address critical security issues when handling critical or sensitive information to continue this growth. In IT operations, there is a strong trend of consolidating data resources. Cloud computing, and cloud infrastructures in particular, makes it possible to streamline IT operations and save energy. However, the use of cloud computing brings with it new challenges. Third-party providers now control data that was previously controlled by one administrative domain and organization. This implies security risks must be addressed when handling business critical information or patient information, as in the VINNOVA-funded Infracloud Project, run by SICS Swedish ICT,

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Ericsson and Region Skåne. The demand for cloud services is growing, internationally as well nationally with a growing rate of about 22 percent. In 2011, the cloud service industry had a turnover of about 4 billion SEK in Sweden and by 2016 it is estimated to reach 9 billion SEK. One of the main obstacles to the growth of cloud services is the security issue when handling critical information. ANALYZE THE CLOUD MODEL Security guarantees must be given when moving systems to a cloud-based service – especially for those dealing with safety-critical information. The availability of the current system in crisis situations must also be considered. This applies to a large share of the public IT services in Sweden and especially services that deal with patient data. SICS Swedish ICT is leading a project together with Region Skåne and telecommunications company Ericsson that will analyze the cloud

model. Together, they will look at how an entire computer infrastructure is offered to the customer. If this is to be a realistic option for systems dealing with safety-critical information, new technical solutions are needed, which provide guarantees for the cloud service. FULL-SCALE PILOT TEST Our aim is to develop a full-scale infrastructure cloud demonstrator. We will then attempt to verify that it is possible to reliably run a patient information system from Region Skåne. This scheme utilizes and builds upon previous research on the verification of computer resources in public IaaS clouds. With the demonstrator, we will be able to show how a cloud can be designed to provide the necessary security to move a safety-critical IT service to a public cloud. The result will provide important information and guidance to IT professionals faced with future procurement decisions.

“For Region Skåne it is important and of great interest to understand how we can take advantage of the technical advances that have been made in IT. We need to be able to increase the quality, reliability and security of IT delivery to users. Cloud services are probably a large part of that future.” Christian Isacsson, Region Skåne

Security Today, there is intense demand for surveillance and protection of our private, public, enterprise and military infrastructure. In an All-IP telecom network, the development of new security solutions is critical for continued growth. New security solutions will enable new ICT solutions to meet grand challenges of society, such as e-Health and Smart Energy. Swedish ICT is a leader in the area of IT security, cyber security, sensor networks, UV-sensors, IR-sensors, and THz-sensors. 27


Infrastructure for Innovation Test beds, demonstrators and laboratories are vital elements of a system of innovations as well as advanced laboratories and opportunities for smallscale production. Development of new services and products often requires large investments in infrastructure, access to knowledge about technology, business models and the ecosystem. Our infrastructure is available for use by both industry and the public sector to enable cost-efficient access to essential environments and knowledge. Acreo National Test bed The Acreo National Test Bed is a communications network operated by Acreo Swedish ICT aimed at evaluating and validating new technologies

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and innovations under realistic conditions. Acreo National Test Bed is also a meeting place that brings together research and technological innovation with the needs of end users providing the results for the benefit of the industry and society. Fall 2012: Acreo and Transmode demonstrated by field trial the transmission of 100 GBIT/S over 1,640km of installed optical fiber. “This was a brilliant example of good cooperation between industry and research institutes,” says Sten Nordell, CTO of Transmode. “The Acreo National Test Bed allows us to demonstrate and evaluate our technology under real conditions, in an environment of interoperable equipment from many manufacturers,” he adds. Test bed for concept development The visualization table is a platform for interaction with, and visualization of data in 3D. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT has together with Visualization Center C developed a tool for urban planning, Urban Explorer.

 April 2012: Gothenburg City will use it to plan and communicate the urban development projects that the city faces. “The visualization table makes it possible for us to meet and discuss urban development projects in a new way,” explains Eric Jeansson, GIS Manager for City of Gothenburg. “Our city faces many urban challenges today, with projects such as the Western Link and Central Älvstaden. These projects are usually of a very complex nature and we hope that the visualization table will help us make quicker and better decisions,” he says. The Laboratory The Electrum Laboratory is a fully equipped semiconductor process laboratory, with complete and highly qualitative process lines for device research and fabrication of components in a wide variety of materials. Acreo Swedish ICT and the Royal Institute of Technology operate it jointly. We also have a Design Lab for the creation of new components, circuits, ASICs, modules and systems and a Test Lab for measurement and

characterization. Electrum Lab is part of MyFab. June 2012: The Electrum Laboratory was one of the first Swedish semiconductor research laboratories to be granted the ISO 9001 certification. FIBERLAB Acreo Fiberlab in Hudiksvall is one of the world’s most advanced facilities for development and production of customized specialty optical fibers, optical fiber preforms and silica capillary tubing. It is a uniquely equipped laboratory for research, development, manufacture, and characterization of specialty optic fibers for applications such as advanced gyroscopes, sensors for electrical potential and currents, fiber lasers and industrial communication solutions. PRINTED ELECTRONICS ARENA MANUFACTURING Printed Electronics Arena Manufacturing (PEA-M) is a green house for the development of prototypes and small-scale production of printed

electronics, open to anyone that wants to test printed electronics in their products and processes. PEA is also the national hub for the commercialization of printed electronic platforms and solutions. At PEA, we work in close cooperation with researchers at Linköping University and the clean room laboratory at LiU. January 2012: Thin Film Electronics ASA (Thinfilm) announced technology relationships for its integrated addressable memory systems designed to help enable the Internet of Things. Thinfilm signed a non-exclusive licensing agreement with Acreo Swedish ICT , which develops printed displays for a variety of applications.


A Test Bed for E-Health An ageing European population means e-health must be implemented on a large scale if we want to sustain our welfare societies. Offering sophisticated health care to patients in their own homes is still uncommon but a VINNOVA-funded test bed project between Acreo Swedish ICT and Karolinska aims to address the challenges related to e-health. Secure Connection

E-Health

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An aging population calls for cost-effective solutions in the future health care system. The demand for self-monitoring and good quality of life at all ages is set to increase and new understanding and  technology for detection and treatment of diseases is needed. Swedish  ICT has leading competence in end-to-end infrastructure, Internet of  Things, Big Data, user interaction and test beds. We also work in  evolving areas such as Sensor Technolo­g y for detection, diagnosis  and/or analysis needs based on Printed Electronics, Fiber Optics and Nanoelectronics.

One of the big challenges of e-health is ensuring a secure connection. Care-related equipment in patients’ homes, such as sensors and videoconferencing equipment, must be securely connected to the care personnel. This means ensuring the integrity of the data and the patient should be protected. The connection should also be very robust with

one or more 3G/4G backup lines to complement the patient’s own broadband connection. SIMPLE TO INSTALL Today, during e-health trials it is usually an IT-technician that makes the installation of communication equipment, but ideally anyone with just a little training should be able to handle it. We are working on a solution where everything can be remotely monitored and configured. There should be no need for any local configuration during installation.

be used for choosing the main connection (a 4G connection may be better than the existing fixed line) and to determine what kind of services can be offered from the hospital. “We don’t really need to invent anything new, it is rather a question of understanding the different legal and practical constraints and to integrate available technologies in a system that is secure and simple to use for people with limited technical skills”, says Claus Popp Larsen at Acreo. He and his colleagues at Acreo work closely together with Karolinska in order to design a setup that can be easily installed at the patient’s home and communicate through a secure line.

SIGNAL QUALITY The system will be able to monitor the quality of the broadband connection over time – both the fixed and the wireless connections. Knowledge of the quality and stability of the connection can

“This is precisely the kind of equipment we are looking for in our field trials”, says Jonathan Björkehag, Karolinska’s Project Manager for Test Bed Telemedicine and e-health. “Today we cannot verify whether the broadband quality is acceptable, we can just observe when the service is failing. A communication solution like the one Acreo is designing will be essential for trials and future real e-health implementations”. 31


Smarter use of electric energy One of the main consequences of global development is the increasing demand for electric energy. This poses a serious threat to the global climate as long as electric energy generation relies predominantly on the fossil fuels. This demand, in conjunction with limited natural fuel resources, and threats from climate changes, are major factors behind the need to use electric energy in a more efficient way. SiC Power Center is a new platform for collaboration between industry, research institutes and academia. The objective is to promote the introduction of silicon carbide power electronics in the applications where high-energy efficiency, compactness and high-temperature operations provide significant system advantages. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a robust electronic material suitable for large voltages, currents, and high temperatures. The main target areas for a SiC-based component

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technology include electric energy converters for transportation systems, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, and the future distributed power grid (the so-called “smart grid”). The transformation is already here Profound technology driven changes are already taking place regarding power electronics products and systems. One of the driving forces is to maximize the output power by minimizing the energy lost to heat. The power electronics used in generation, distribution and consumption of electric energy is becoming more efficient and smarter through integration of SiC technology with ICT (Information and Communication Technology). The vision of the future society encompasses the smart total energy system integrating power electronics, SiC and ICT technologies also in the structure and management of the multifaceted complex electric energy system based on renewable energy sources. Some of the elements of the future energy system are industrial infrastructure, mass trans-

portation systems, e-mobility, intelligent houses and offices, data servers, electric energy generation plants and energy storage. In this way, SiC-based electronics is a key factor due to the unprecedented potential to facilitate very compact and extremely energy efficient systems. The importance of ICT relies on the necessity to control and coordinate a complex electric energy flow involving decentralized generation, storage and distribution of energy (“smart grid”). Integration of power electronics, SiC and ICT technologies in the products, electronic systems, energy system at large and social infrastructure and use of new materials and technologies builds a basis of the future sustainable society based on efficient and smart use of electric energy. Industries will be able to benefit from the different needs and challenges that will become evident from this. SiC Power Center is led by Acreo Swedish ICT in collaboration with KTH, Swerea Kimab and large industrial partners such as Volvo Car, Bombardier, ABB, and Alstom Power Systems, among others.

Smart Energy A more sustainable society requires a more efficient electrical grid and lower consumption. We must rethink electricity consumption and transport in terms of environmental impact. ICT-based solutions will enable us to achieve sustainable energy production. Swedish ICT has the competence to play a major role in creating a sustainable society, including designs for new behavioral and social practices, electric and hybrid vehicles, reliable monitoring systems, and semiconductor materials. 33


E-health and Biosensors

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One exciting innovation this year is a fully integrated disposable biosensor platform, developed by Acreo Swedish ICT together with Linköping University. It is a unique biosensor concept presenting a new paradigm in inexpensive bio-sensing devices, perhaps making such sensors as common as the RFID tag in the near future. The integrated biosensor is an entire system including power source, sensor and display all printed on a sheet of flexible plastic or paper integrated with conventional readout electronics. The future vision is to replace the conventional electronics with a low-cost chip mounted on the flexible substrate. The main application focus lies within PoC such as: home monitoring and diagnosis of kidney disease, cardiac monitoring, sports medicine, stress measurement – and many others. Other possible applications are agriculture and food safety.

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3D Visualization Tool Reveals the unknown Imagine a tablet device the size of a dining table. You sweep the surface with your fingers to experience and explore objects in intricate 3D detail. Welcome to Inside Explorer – a powerful visualization tool that gives visitors to museums and science centers the chance to interact with exhibited objects. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT first presented a prototype of The Virtual Autopsy Table, a forerunner to Inside Explorer, in 2009. The visualization system, based on software, Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), transforms physical objects into digital entities and was originally developed to support forensic autopsy work. The system was a result of a cross-disciplinary collaboration between Interactive Institute, Center for Medical Image Science Center (CMIV) and Visualization Center C. Today, universities and hospitals use the system for educational purposes and as a complement to perform autopsies. “We understood that the visualization system could also be used in other applications, so

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Interactive Institute continued to develop the product,” says Thomas Rydell at Interactive Institute. SMART TECHNOLOGY Three years later, the Inside Explorer found a new user base: visitors at science centers and museums. Anything that can be scanned can also be visualized, explored and used as the basis for an interactive visitor experience – from meteorites to ancient mummies. The system requires no training, and visitors can interact with it in seconds. Inside Explorer can also be supplied with a number of anatomy datasets from an existing digital library. Museums can scan their own objects or partner with local hospitals to conduct their own research and the Interactive Institute can then work with them to provide visualization experiences. FINDING SUCCESS WORLDWIDE To date, nearly 10 institutions have used Inside Explorer worldwide, including the British Mu-

seum, Singapore Science Center and National Museum for Technology in Stockholm. For one of the British Museum’s most well-known mummies, over 5,500 years old, Inside Explorer even helped the curators to discover that the mummy had almost certainly been murdered. ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES Thomas Rydell is also eyeing another field of application for the Inside Explorer. “Some scientists are considering the idea of converting physical objects at museums into digital libraries,” he comments. “This makes it possible to use non-invasive methods to archive collections. One goal is to create digital 3D archives for entire species, that could be used for research, public access and interactive educational experiences,” he explains. Project partners Interactive Institute Swedish ICT, Visualization Center C, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization.

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Keep the innovation process in motion IKEA boasts more than 8,000 different products in stock. New models and designs are added weekly. The Swedish furniture giant must keep the innovation process constantly in motion to maintain its market share and uphold the brand. Like many companies, IKEA is continually looking for ways to innovate its product range. Together with Interactive Institute Swedish ICT and VeryDay, the Swedish furniture giant will explore a new method of innovation during 2013 that draws on customer insights more than ever before. GET CLOSER TO YOUR CUSTOMERS The innovative research project aims to develop a consumer-focused approach that will show how users involved in the concept development phase can improve innovation. A lead user has special needs, special skills and great experience in a certain product or service domain. Open innovation

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through a lead user approach can give companies a competitive advantage by enabling them to leverage the knowledge and ingenuity of the lead user. “IKEA is interested in coming into closer contact with the customer and to get into a cocreation process,” comments Interactive Institute’s Brendon Clark. “IKEA is a pioneer in opening traditional business areas by inviting customers into their warehouse-like stores and the product assembly process. But they don’t necessarily have a history of inviting customers into the design process,” he adds.

and collaborative design. In this way, the project has a “collaborative mode” of conducting research where the stakeholders can explore their interest in a rapid research process based on user involvement. The labs will be based on both face-to-face and online interactions. Project Partners IKEA, VeryDay and Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.

EXAMINE EVERY ELEMENT OF YOUR PROCESSES Interactive Institute, with IKEA and VeryDay, are setting up innovation labs to involve stakeholders, lead users, and other valuable competences. The labs will move over the stages of lead user research, analysis, co-creation, express prototyping and user evaluation of prototypes and concepts. The members will be involved in activities such as trend analysis, lead user studies,

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Strategy: StrengtH By numbers

The aim of the VINNOVA’s ‘Strategic Research and Innovation Agendas’ initiative is to gather industrial, social and investigative actors together to formulate a strategy for future needs and strengthen Sweden’s competitiveness. The institutes within Swedish ICT are participating in 15 of the 73 agendas and play the leading role in four. Swedish ICT is leading the unified strategic research and innovation agendas ‘Innovation Enabled by ICT’. SICS Swedish ICT is the leading part of the agenda for Software Development and Big Data Analytics. Acreo Swedish ICT is the leading part of the unified strategic research and innovation agenda Smarter Electronic Systems for Sweden. Acreo is also the leading part of the agenda for Electronic Hardware in Sweden and Swedish Energy-Effective Hardware Within Electronic Systems.

advanced ICT infrastructure and the world’s best developed population in ICT and digital media. Sweden serves as a test bed for new products and services enabled by ICT. ‘Innovation Enabled by ICT’ includes strategic research and innovation agendas IoT Sweden, Cyber Physical System, Skalbar infra­struktur, Big Data Analytics, Systemsimulering, Software Development and Säker IKT. STRATEGIC AGENDA ‘SMARTER ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS FOR SWEDEN’ Swedish electronic components and systems are important ex­ port products (13.6 percent), as well as enablers of sustainable industrial growth and societal development in many ways.

An important goal for the work of the agenda is to make the significance of electronics more visible in Sweden and to show how it contributes to strengthening the competitiveness of the Swedish industrial life. ‘Smart Electronic Systems For Sweden’ includes the strategic research and innovation agendas Svensk energieffektiv hårdvara inom elektroniksystem, Elektronikhårdvara i Sverige, Branschöver­skridande strategisk forsknings- och innovationsagenda för Elektronikindustrin, Kraftelektronik – från milliwatt till giga­watt, Millimeter-wave and terahertz systems, Antennsystem, and Fotonik – En möjliggörande teknologi för Sverige.

STRATEGIC AGENDA ‘Innovation Enabled by ICT’ The vision of ‘Innovation Enabled by ICT’ is that Sweden will strength­en its position to become the leading nation in ICT business and enable growth in both ICT and non-ICT business. This is made possible by Sweden having the world’s most 40

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Innovation Challenges VINNOVA’s ‘Challenge Driven Innovation’ brought about a number of new collaborative projects in 2012. Together with more than 100 industry partners and academies Swedish ICT will work to find solutions to our common challenges. The institutes within Swedish ICT are now involved in 12 UDI projects, and are the leading partner in eight. The idea behind VINNOVA’s ‘Challenge Driven Innovation’ initiative comes from the realization that solutions to common societal challenges can only be found through cross-border collaborations. The challenge-driven approach to finding the solutions is expected to drive innovation and growth in Sweden. Swedish ICT is involved in the following projects: ENSURING CLEAN WATER The “Online Sensor Systems for ResourceEfficient Water” project brings innovative sensor solutions and services for the efficient and safe

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supply of water. The project will be operated as a large consortium led by Acreo Swedish ICT together with SICS Swedish ICT, drinking water producers, steel and paper industries and universities, a total of nearly 30 partners. Read more on page 46–47. FUTURE MEDIA DISTRIBUTION The subject of topology project “Ephraim – Ecosystems for the Future of Media Distribution” ranges from algorithm to content. The project maps user experience, architectures and business models for media distribution as a growing percentage of services and content on the Internet. The project is led by Acreo Swedish ICT together with SICS Swedish ICT, Lund University, and several large companies in the telecom and Internet services. Read more on page 44–45. SCALABLE MEDICAL SOLUTIONS The project “Care of COPD Patients with Chronic Respiratory Failure at Home” integrates and

tests a complete solution that works in practice. Solutions must be based on collaboration between several actors and it must be scalable for use by many patients and different diseases. SICS Swedish ICT and Acreo Swedish ICT, together with the Heart and Lung Association and the Karolinska University Hospital’s pulmonary clinic, are among others partners in the project. INCREASED CUSTOMER VALUE The aim of “Stream” is to create a toolkit for the Swedish automation industry based on the opportunities of developing solutions that create significant customer value from large amounts of streaming data, such as process information. The project is led by SICS Swedish ICT and will run in collaboration with Mälardalen University, ABB, Bombardier and Blue Institute, among others. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT The main purpose of the “GoSmart” a project is

to contribute to the ongoing development of an attractive and sustainable city. The actors aim to develop, demonstrate and promote the use of innovative and sustainable transport solutions. The project is led by Lindholmen, and Viktoria Swedish ICT is one of the partners. COMMUNICATION SOLUTIONS “Intelligent Energy” is a project that brings together SICS Swedish ICT, in cooperation with, among others, SUST, who leads the project. The collaborators will develop and demonstrate the future of IP-based communications solutions for commercial and residential properties, with a focus on energy and emergency services. INDUSTRY INNOVATIONS “Platform Strategy for Swedish Process” aims to create an IT-based industry platform that will provide the process industry and its suppliers with more opportunities to develop new commercial applications. The project will also look at ways to

increase the usage of new innovations in the process industry. The project consortium includes ProcessIT Innovation at Luleå, LKAB, ABB, Logistics Group and Interactive Institute Swedish ICT. SMARTER SMARTPHONES “New Platforms for Communication Between Mobile Phone and Printed Smart Labels” aims to develop green web-based communication solutions that supports the Internet of Things. This is done by extending the capabilities of smartphones with smart and dynamic tags that can collect information. It is a collaboration between Acreo Swedish ICT, Linköping University and a number of major companies in telecommunication and packaging industry.

the new sustainable Stockholm Royal Seaport neighborhood. The project consortium includes Interactive Institute Swedish ICT and Viktoria Swedish ICT, IBM, Fortum, Ericsson, HS2020 – Sjöstadsföreningen, among others, and is led by Stockholm City. DEEPER COOPERATION “Gotris” aims to establish an organizational and physical platform for the coordination and control of the three modes of operating on and over the Göta Älv river in Gothenburg. This requires a deeper work to anchor the roles, responsibilities and forms of cooperation between the different actors that are national, regional and local authorities and private actors and stakeholders. Read more on page 24–25.

DYNAMIC MONITORING “Smart City SRS” is a collaboration between Stockholm City, industry and academia, to develop an interactive information platform. The idea is to create a dynamic monitoring system of

Read more about the two UDI-projects “Active House” and “Smart ICT for Living and Working in the Stockholm Royal Seaport” on page 48–49.

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nnovation Challenge

The Media Distribution of Tomorrow

Online traffic and congestion are increasing every year and require more and more energy. Ensuring sustainable media distribution, without the user experiencing a degradation in perceived quality, is the key challenge being tackled by the EFRAIM project. Movies, music, TV, images and other media are currently distributed in large volumes via the global communication network both live and on-demand. This traffic is growing dramatically – a trend that produces both opportunities and challenges. Creating energy-efficient, robust and scalable media distribution with maximum performance and retained quality is an enormous task. The research project set up to address this issue is the Ecosystem for Future Media Distribution (EFRAIM). IMPORTANT FIRST STEPS So far, researchers working with EFRAIM have begun to analyze and identify (current and future) challenges and market trends. User perception and media consumption are particularly important in this project and are central to the development of solutions for network architectures and media distribution with reduced energy consumption.

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“Working on these issues feels both inspiring and important,” says Andreas Aurelius, Project Manager of EFRAIM and an employee at Acreo Swedish ICT. “Now, when more and more people are using and providing online media services, we hope to be able to help strengthen Swedish participants in the market,” he adds. UNIQUE, CROSS-INDUSTRY CONSORTIUM A cross-industry consortium has been created to accomplish this goal, which consists of Spotify, SVT, TV4, Ericsson, TeliaSonera, Qbrick, Peerialism, LTH, SICS Swedish ICT and Acreo Swedish ICT. Other participants will be invited over the course of the project to industry talks about business models, rights and sustainability. EFRAIM was active during Internet Days 2012 and organized the session “Technology and Services for Tomorrow’s TV”. This event consisted of a panel with representatives from SVT, Qbrick and Magine, who presented their views of the current situation in media distribution and media consumption and ideas about future developments. The discussion during this session illustrated what EFRAIM is all about – gathering representatives of participants within media distribution to jointly clarify challenges and solutions.

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nnovation Challenge

Safeguarding Water Supply The safe and efficient supply of clean water is a global challenge. Standards must be maintained and supply-chain problems detected early in order to prevent unnecessary disruptions in industry processes. Acreo Swedish ICT manages a large consortium developing a sensorbased, online monitoring solution that will provide safe and resource-efficient water management. Acreo and SICS Swedish ICT, in cooperation with over 20 project partners, are developing an online monitoring solution for safe water management. The solution uses sensor technology to detect small quantities of microorganisms, metals, surfactants and oil in order to secure water quality from environmental, economic and health perspective. These sensors are linked to a service and communication platform, including advanced

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From the left: Åsa Rudström, Linda Olofsson, Teresita Qvarnström

data analysis, for online monitoring of the water quality. The monitoring is online, which means deviations are detected much faster (within one to two hours) than what is possible with today’s methods. Based on the results, appropriate actions can be taken. COMPLETE SOLUTION The goal is to develop a complete solution for resource-efficient and safe water management. To be able to address the whole issue of water quality management, both for sustainable cities and for competitive production, the project has included drinking water producers and distributors, the production industry, sensor manufacturers and technical expertise in the consortium. TEST BEDS AND TRIAL INSTALLATIONS The project started in 2011 and stretches beyond the end of the current funding phase that ends in 2014. “Right now, we develop sensor technologies and identify measuring points. SICS Swedish ICT

coordinates communication issues and is responsible for the service and communication platform,” says Teresita Qvarnström at Acreo. A test bed is being established and sensors will be installed at water treatment plants in Göta Älv river and Mälaren, and at steel and paper plants. “The test bed gives us the opportunity to demonstrate, adjust and develop the technologies we use. Hopefully, part of this distributed test bed will also be used by green tech companies that are not part of the consortium,” says Linda Olofsson at Acreo. The project, named SENSATION, is financed by VINNOVA. PROJECT PARTNERS Aqua-Q , Cerlic Controls, Chalmers, Combitech, Göteborg Stad, Iggesund, IVL, Lennheden vatten, Linköpings universitet, Norrvatten, Penttech, Primozone, SSAB, Swerea IVF, Swerea Kimab, Sydvatten, Trollhättan energi, Uponor, Vivab, Volvo, Finnish partners, SICS Swedish ICT and Acreo Swedish ICT.

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nnovation Challenge

ICT makes Sustainability The new Stockholm Royal Seaport neighborhood is expected to become a model of sustainability. One Swedish ICT project is underway that explores the potential of IT to contribute to a more sustainable society. Another project is developing a smart grid for the future. There’s a buzz around Stockholm Royal Seaport and it’s not for nothing. Two separate projects, led by Markus Bylund and Carin Torstensson, feature long-term approaches with a focus on on sustainability. The common thread between these projects is that they will create cross-industry business opportunities and partnerships.

Royal Seaport, and by extension in other residential areas in both Sweden and abroad. The project aims to find opportunities for an open, shared system, where new solutions can be added as they are developed. Areas as diverse as energy consumption, home care and transportation should be able to communicate. Such a solution would reduce investment costs and minimize resource waste. “ICT offers great potential for sustainable urban development, streamlining and orchestration, while stimulating enthusiasm for and engagement in sustainability issues. The major challenge is not technical, but commercial – enabling everyone to take advantage of open and shared systems,” says Markus Bylund, Project Manager at Swedish ICT and researcher at SICS Swedish ICT.

SUSTAINABLE URBAN DEVELOPMENT

INTEGRATED URBAN ENVIRONMENT

Markus Bylund heads up the project “Smart ICT for Living and Working in Stockholm Royal Seaport.” The goal is to develop an infrastructure that supports sustainable development in Stockholm

The “Active House in the Sustainable City” project focuses on smart grids. These grids will be integrated into several areas – from active multifamily buildings and communication systems,

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to overall electrical systems and infrastructure. One of the apartments in Stockholm Royal Seaport will be a “Living Lab”. Many extra lines and cables have been installed in the walls, which will make it possible for the people who moved in this March to be the first to live with a system that will enable them to adapt electricity usage to the time of day when electricity is less expensive or more environmentally friendly. In one possible scenario, the washing machine could be loaded in the morning and then started automatically when the price is more affordable. “We aim to build a system that can communicate with users and this communication must work so well that users don’t give up. The challenge is to motivate the people who live in the buildings to get involved. And it has to be kept at a reasonable level,” says Carin Torstensson, Project Manager at the Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.

A Reality

Project partners Smart ICT: Exformation Communication INTENO Broadband Technology ITUX Communication JM KTC Control NCC PacketFront Systems SKB SABO Stockholms Stad Telcred Ericsson TeliaSonera Acreo Swedish ICT SICS Swedish ICT   Project partners Active House: ABB Electrolux Fortum JM ByggVesta HSB NCC KTH Interactive Institute Swedish ICT

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THE YEAR IN A BRIEF Financial results The total turnover of the Swedish ICT group increased 3.5% from the previous year and amounted to SEK 444 million (2011: SEK 429 million). The 2012 turnover for the individual institutes was for Acreo Swedish ICT AB: SEK 191 million (SEK 167 million), SICS Swedish ICT AB: SEK 126 million (SEK 118 million), Interactive Institute Swedish ICT AB: SEK 46 million (SEK 44 million) and Viktoria Swedish ICT AB: SEK 43 million (SEK 30 million).

14%

3% 18%

9%

26%

30%

NEUTRAL PARTICIPANT ENABLES CROSS-BORDER COLLABORATIONS

Our job, as a neutral participant, is to initiate collaborations between different types of businesses. This role has been particularly evident during 2012. Innovative solutions have been produced, such as the charging of electric cars together with carmarker Volvo, Göteborgs Energi and the City of Gothenburg; the creation of new services and products for smart use of energy; and a sustainable communications infrastructure in Norra Djurgårdsstaden. The Visualization Table continues to be successful and the city authorities Swedish Government of both Stockholm National project funding and Gothenburg are National industry sector now using our tool for future city develInternational industry sector opment and citizen EU projects involvement. Other operating income

SCIENTIFIC EXPERTISE MEETS INDUSTRY KNOWHOW During 2012, our 23 professors, 156 PhDs and 42 postgraduates produced 171 examined articles and 26 conference presentations. During the same period, 8 new patents were granted, which means the group now holds 117 patents and five license agreements. STRONG REGIONAL PRESENCE We continue to strengthen our regional presence and are now operating in twelve locations. SICS Swedish ICT’s new operations within IT-security in Lund grew 50 percent during 2012. A new branch was established in Västerås, which focuses on Automation and Industrial processes in close collaboration with Mälardalens Högskola and Automation Region. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT was established in Karlstad, with its service development focusing on experience and learning together with the University of Karlstad.

A VALUABLE PARTNER FOR INDUSTRY

INFRASTRUCTURE FOR INNOVATION

INTERNATIONAL PRESENCE

The turnover from industry collaborations reached SEK 155 million in 2012. This makes up 35 percent of our total turnover (SEK 444 million). In addition, “in kind” revenue equaled approximately SEK 199 million. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) that have worked with Swedish ICT during 2012 reported a collective increase in turnover of SEK 243 million. New companies with roots in Swedish ICT reported a turnover of SEK 1.82 billion. Our industrial delivery was strengthened by the fact that SICS Swedish ICT during 2012 established a test lab together with telecommunications company Ericsson in Kista (Stockholm, Sweden). During the year, eight new Swedish ICT Business Areas were established in order to increase our relevance to industry. (Read more on page 12.)

The demand for our test beds and labs, with special interest in Acreo Printed Electronics operations in the Printed Electronics Arena (PEA), had more than 50 unique client visits during 2012. Visitors included consumer-oriented companies within the advertising industry through industrial partners from the paper industry. (Read more on page 17, 29.)

In 2012, we participated in, and coordinated three, EU projects that corresponded to a turnover of SEK 124 million. During fall 2012, an agreement was signed for collaboration between Swedish ICT and SENAI Institute of Innovation in Brazil. Acreo Swedish ICT conducted a study on economic benefit through fiber investments in 2012. The study received great attention in the European Union, especially in Denmark, where the government has highlighted it during work on developing a strategy for fiber development in Denmark. The collaboration between Interactive Institute Swedish ICT and the British Museum in London, has taken visitor experience to a new level with the help of the Visualization Table, which helped solve the world’s oldest murder mystery. (Read more on page 36.)

FINDING ANSWERS TO GRAND CHALLENGES During 2012, we enjoyed great success in VINNOVA’s “Challenge-Driven Innovation” (CDI) competition. We now participate in thirteen CDI projects, of which we manage nine. Swedish ICT today operates CDI projects worth nearly SEK 30 million in 2012 and SEK 40 million in 2013. Swedish ICT also collaborates with more than one hundred different partners from both the industrial and public sectors.

Total 444 MSEK

50

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n AreAs

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A new look As a way of consolidating our strengths and resources, all of the Swedish ICT subsidiaries will from now on carry the group name as part of their own. We have modified our logos, colors and websites – everything except the people. We still have the same highly skilled researchers and brand new ideas as before. We make things happen. We are curious, creative, inspiring and unafraid. The only difference is that now we want it to show. We will remain independent institutes with our own business, but now we will also gather our expertise in strong business areas and highlight our joint brand with a new profile. The new brand is also expressed with the new vision – “ICT for a sustainable and better life for everyone”.

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PANNING FOR GOLD IN BIG DATA STREAMS LIFE SCIENCE

The Swedish ICT group’s new websites are built with Drupal, an open source software maintained and developed by an active community of hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Knowledge sharing, co-creation and participation are values that correspond to our philosophy as research institutes, and that is why an open source platform was the obvious choice. Our new website is actually no less than five new websites – five organizations sharing one installation. We would like to invite you to explore our offering on our new website – www.swedishict.se. And we look forward to a dialogue on how we can work together to create new products, processes, methods and services for a sustainable society. Our promise is that together with you, we enable innovation.

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Christer Norström

Christina von Dorrien

CEO SICS Swedish ICT AB

CEO Interactive Institute Swedish ICT AB

We focus on Software, Systems and Services with expertise in:

We focus on Visualization and Interaction Design in the key areas:

• • • •

User-Oriented Services and Products Networked Systems Technologies and Services Resource Utilization, Efficiency and Optimization Software and Systems, Technologies and Engineering

“Collaboration is key to maximizing value. To be successful today, businesses cannot rely on having all necessary skills internally; rather, they must have fast, reliable access to external skills. SICS Swedish ICT is a leading partner in computer science with both substantial expertise and access to a global network of world-leading researchers. Together with industry and the public sector we pave new ground for what it is possible to achieve with ICT.” Facts • • •

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Turnover: SEK 126 million (SEK 118 million). Locations: Kista (Stockholm), Västerås, Linköping, Lund, Uppsala. Subsidiaries: SICS Swedish ICT Västerås (1st May 2012) and SICS East Swedish ICT (former Santa Anna).

Leif Ljungqvist CEO Acreo Swedish ICT AB We focus on Sensors and Actuators, Digital Communication, Power Electronics and Life Science: • • • • •

Printed Electronics Fiber Optics Nanoelectronics Broadband Technology Sensor Systems

“Swedish electronics is both a large export industry and an enabler for many other companies to grow and strengthen their positions internationally. Thanks to Acreo Swedish ICT’s skills within sensors, power electronics, digital communication and life science we continuously contribute to a sustainable as well as competitive industrial life and society.” Facts • • • • •

Imego AB merged with Acreo Swedish ICT AB on 1st April 2012. Leif Ljunqvist took the role as CEO after Mårten Armgarth in March 2013. Turnover: SEK 191 million (SEK 167 million). Locations: Kista (Stockholm), Gothenburg, Hudiksvall, Norrköping. Subsidiaries: IRnova and Fibertronix.

• • • • • • •

Design Strategy and Participatory Innovation Interaction Design for Extreme Environments Visualization for Interactive and Collaborative Experiences Future Energy Use Sound and Interface Design for Enhanced Usability and Richer Experiences Game Design and Gamification Grand Challenges and Prototyping the Future

“With our unique expertise in Visualization and Interaction Design, we create new business opportunities in new and existing markets. A breathtaking user experience is the difference between failure and success in today’s competition.” Facts • Turnover: SEK 46 million (SEK 44 million). • Locations: Kista (Stockholm), Eskilstuna, Gothenburg, Karlstad, Norrköping, Piteå, Umeå.

Per-Åke Olsson CEO Viktoria Swedish ICT AB

We focus on Sustainable Mobility enabled by ICT in the following application areas: • • • •

Cooperative Systems Electromobility Digitalization Strategy Sustainable Transports

“Viktoria Swedish ICT addresses the global challenges of the transport system by combining demands from humans, society and business, using ICT as an enabler of innovation. By stimulating cross-barrier, open collaboration between multidisciplinary organizations, innovations are accelerated. We call this Innovation Orchestration.” Facts: • Turnover: SEK 43 million (SEK 30 million). • Location: Gothenburg.

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INTERVIEW:

Can sustainable companies also be highly Profitable? Mats Williander is an expert in how industry can be more sustainable and contribute to the rise of the sustainable society.

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Mats works to improve competitiveness and profitability of Swedish industry through ICT. His current research focuses on business model innovation and the characteristics of sustainable business models. What is your area of expertise?

I have a fairly broad background, 30-plus years in industry within R&D, business strategy and management. I have been CEO at two SMEs and I hold an M.Sc. in electrical engineering, an MBA and a Ph.D. in Technology Management. My current research focus is on “Circular Business Models” that make companies more competitive, more profitable and simultaneously more sustainable. What do you aim to achieve?

I want to contribute to an industry where profitability, competitiveness and sustainability go hand-in-hand. In such a world, environmental concerns doesn’t have to be the driving force for improved eco-sustainability. I believe this can be achieved with Circular Business Models.

In what way can industry and society benefit from your research?

The research methods we use at Viktoria create both practical knowledge that industry can use, and knowledge that contributes to science. The best way for industry to benefit and gain knowledge is by joining with us in projects where we use applied, collaborative research methods. This creates a learning-by-doing environment that also benefit society. We also publish our research results in short videos, reports, conferences and journals. Where does your research stand internationally?

This enables us to create more value for industry than if we worked in industry. How do you collaborate with industry or the public sector?

We collaborate hands-on with things like innovating new business models and service offerings, validation of hypotheses, target group interviews and the like. We act like colleagues although we simultaneously gather data to advance scientific knowledge and theory. How does your research encourage innovation?

We are at the forefront of research on the shift from traditional linear business models to circular ones – not only how it affects the organization and decision logic of management but also why many managers hesitate to shift to circular models.

Innovation relates to products, processes, organizations and also business models. Because the business model affects the decision logic of the organization, a business model shift will most certainly lead to product, service and process innovations.

Why work at Viktoria Swedish ICT?

Why start a project together with Swedish ICT?

I really enjoy the possibility to work so close to industry and to contribute to their business and still be able and free to run my own research agenda.

Acquiring knowledge should be a main reason. We can build knowledge by gathering and analyzing data from whomever we partner with and they

can gain expertise from us. Openness in terms of giving us access to data and willingness to learn are hence two important issues to consider. A highlight of 2012

We worked with Unicykel on a low-budget but extremely interesting and inspiring project that has managed to create a new customer segment for the firm, an electric bicycle subscription based on a Circular Business Model and significant research results – all in about 12 months. We also produced a low-budget short video about the project (which can be found at http://www.youtube. com/Viktoriainstitute) that has helped spread the word about Circular Business Models. What do you look forward to 2013?

This will be an exciting year in which Viktoria Swedish ICT will grow our resources in Circular Business Models, initiate projects with companies with higher complexity (product, organization, value chain, global presence), and collaborate more within RISE on the topic of sustainable business.

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INTERVIEW:

Is Design and engineering the perfect couple? Petra Sundström is a senior researcher at both SICS and Mobile Life, and lab manager at the Interaction, Design and Innovation laboratory. 58

The aim of her research is to use technologies as design materials in the same way more traditional materials are used for inspiration in the design process. With her various design projects Petra wants to point to the benefits of bringing design and engineering closer together. What is your area of expertise?

Interaction Design. I started out as a pure engineer but, over time and from working in several multidisciplinary design research projects, I’ve been fortunate to acquire a skill set in both forefront engineering and creative design thinking. What do you aim to achieve?

I want to achieve more of a sincere collaboration! Engineers study programming and hardware and software engineering for years, but when they join less-experienced multidisciplinary design teams they are rarely able to fulfill their potential. My dream is that we reach a state where designers and engineers can sketch ideas together and end up using the possibilities of technology in creative and innovative ways.

How can industry and society benefit from your research?

In 2007, when we started the Mobile Life Centre, the mobile phone was pretty much used as a work tool that was also used from time to time for private purposes. Today, we see a range of creative apps designed especially for entertainment. Creative industries are growing in terms of budget and market share, as is mobile phone usage. As Interaction Designers, we want to shape this development, not simply see it happen. Where does your research stand internationally?

The Mobile Life Centre and the Interaction Design and Innovations laboratory at SICS have several design researchers who publish almost exclusively at top-ranked international conferences and journals within the field. Why work at SICS Swedish ICT?

We have the opportunity to invent interaction system designs that are beautiful all the way down to the binary. Working together in multidisciplinary teams we can truly make a difference,

making innovative use of both forefront technology and creative design thinking. In what way can your research support industry or the public sector to create innovations?

We are building one-function tech probes for ABB as a way of combating latency in workloads. Inspired, talented control room workers are hard to find and keep in these environments. As well as industry workshop sessions, we aim to demo and write about our work in newspapers and magazines – not just in conference proceedings and scientific journals. This way we can inspire industries and the public sector that may not understand how useful we can be to them. Why start a project together with Swedish ICT?

Present us with a problem, define the boundaries, and we will perform wonders! The key to understanding our approach is to see that we are researchers and not consultants. You’ll get far more for your money. Not always the way you thought you wanted, but better, more advanced, more challenging, and more competitive.

An acheivement from 2012

Our collaboration with the car team at Salzburg University was a highlight. We looked at the car design and also safety precautions to explore what still bodily experiences could be and how they could be designed for. We also looked at if we could make it more fun for small children to sit still in the car. The outcome was three highly innovative games that explored this design space and showed different ways it could be done. What do you look forward to in 2013?

I look forward to collaborating with IKEA and Nokia. We are going to investigate how they already work with various traditional and digital materials and from this take inspiration for how we potentially can apply some of their thinking and expertise on our working with the Internet of Things materials: sensors, actuators, radio and various other technical bits and pieces.

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INTERVIEW:

How can DESIGN HELP US ACHIEVE A Sustainable SOCIETY? Cecilia Katzeff is Interactive Institute’s Research Director of Energy Design.

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Her research focuses on the user experience and the role of IT design, as well as behavioral change related to the use of energy in contexts such as the household, the workplace and sustainable urban areas. Cecilia was recently appointed adjunct professor of sustainable interaction design at KTH, which will strengthen the cooperation between Interactive Institute Swedish ICT and KTH. What is your area of expertise?

I work in the area of sustainable interaction design. My research is a human-oriented approach towards the design of interaction between people, their environment and various ICT artifacts and systems. It focuses the role of design and development of digital services in behavioral change related to the use of energy in households, the workplace, sustainable cities, and food consumption. What do you aim to achieve?

My vision is a sustainable society encompassing all aspects of the concept. I would like to integrate socially and psychologically based research with design and technical research to understand how

sustainable lifestyles may be created. One of the driving forces behind the work I’m involved in is to concretize research issues and to point to questions that might not yet have been addressed. How can industry and society benefit from your research?

Industry and society benefit in various ways. Our research aims to shed light on the human oriented aspects of the transition into a more sustainable society. We combine technological and design research with behavioral and a human-oriented approach without reducing the role of people. Our projects have a strong focus on participation and involvement of all target groups. Where does your research stand internationally?

Our work regarding the visualization of energy consumption is highly cited in international scientific journals and conferences. I also get many proposals from international students and researchers who wish to collaborate, which I interpret as a sign that what we do is quite well known abroad.

Why work at interactive institute Swedish ICT?

I enjoy the interdisciplinary environment, the creative atmosphere and the proximity to real world challenges. I also appreciate the autonomy, trust and responsibility given to individual researchers and groups. How do you collaborate with industry or the public sector?

We cooperate in projects towards similar goals. An industry partner might provide a context to general research questions at the same time as concrete problems are addressed in the daily business. Our projects in the Royal Seaport are examples of how we collaborate with industry and the public sector. Why start a project together with Swedish ICT?

Collaborating with us does not fit into an ordinary customer-supplier framework. When we develop a prototype, the value for the companies is in the testing phase and being able to influence it. We think about the project as a way for com-

panies to learn new things, to be inspired, and to build long-term relationships. Hightlight of 2012

The opportunity to work as a national expert on energy efficient behavior in the International Energy Agency’s program for Demand Side Response (DSM). The major goal is to form a global network of experts and to design a framework facilitating for policy-makers, implementers of DSM and other stakeholders in their work towards a more sustainable practice and behavior in relation to energy use. This project pinpoints our role as a bridge between research and the rest of society. What do you look forward to 2013?

I look forward to communicating the results of several interesting projects. I also look forward to finally embarking on the Celsius project – a fouryear EU Energy initiative that connects five countries and 13 demonstrators for sustainable cities.

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INTERVIEW:

How can Fiber Optics take you to a new level? Walter Margulis, senior scientist at Acreo, is an expert in this field.

technology, development of methods, techniques, products and services for a sustainable society.

What is your area of expertise? I work with optical fibers and non-linear optics in fibers. Fiber optics has applications in all kinds of areas. That’s what makes it so interesting and important. The project we are working on right now about how to control light in a fiber is really exciting. Also exciting is a project we are involved in where we look at how to use fiber to study biological processes. 

How does your research stand internationally?

I am on the academic side of Acreo so I collaborate closely with universities. Otherwise, collaboration with industry can involve mundane problems, such as mounting a fiber piece in a support, or complicated solutions, such as developing an advanced system for measuring distances, or storing radar signals.   How can your research encourage innovation?

Swedish ICT typically works with industries, so the dialogue between companies and Swedish ICT institutes is easier than with universities. Researchers there should contact us because we offer

Fiber optics is an enabling technology applied to different fields, so it would be counterproductive to specify prerequisites for discussions. I suggest that when a company is about to launch a project,

What do you aim to achieve?

I want to reach the point where our department is acknowledged as a leader in its field of science and 62

an easier route to collaboration with industry.   How do you collaborate with industry or the public sector?

As one of the leading scientists working with fiber optics today, Walter Margulis is recognized both in Sweden and internationally. He also works at Acreo Swedish ICT. Due to Walter’s recognized expertise in his field, he is often asked to participate in the peer review process for The Optical Society (OSA) journals. This year, he received the inaugural 2012 OSA Outstanding Reviewer Award for his “indispensable contribution to the success and stature of the OSA journal publishing program”.

How can industry and society benefit from your research? Photonics and fiber optics are enabling technologies. Optical fibers can be used in telecommunications as the “backbone” of the Internet, in sensing, industrial processing and in medicine. Fibers are used in many fields and SMEs can make use of the opportunities we create.  We are leading the way in a couple of specific areas. Generally, however, the further we are academically, the further we are from a commercial product. It takes years to turn a new result into a commercial success.   What is the best about working at Acreo Swedish ICT?

We use ICT to create new tools that solve specific problems. We have a huge number of techniques with fiber optics that are often unknown to those with practical industrial problems. Familiarity with what is available is useful to solve what is apparently a complicated problem.   Why start a project together with Swedish ICT?

where they suspect optical fibers could be of use, they should talk to us first. Every case is different and the best thing we can do is discuss the specific problem and possible solutions.   Which achievement from 2012 are you most proud of? I could cite a couple of nice technical results, but the best, of course, refers to people: three PhD students who worked with us successfully completed their studies in 2012.   What do you look forward to 2013? It would be great to participate in yet another European project as they typically last for three years. That would give us the chance to work in peace and develop new technology with colleagues around Europe. I am looking forward to the workshop on Specialty Optical Fibers – an international meeting that we are organizing in Sigtuna (near Stockholm) in August. Experts from all over the world will be there.

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January Thin Film Electronics ASA and Acreo Swedish ICT sign an agreement for the use of Acreo’s printed display technology in the development of integrated addressable and rewritable

January

January Interactive Institute Swedish ICT receives SEK 10 million for design research into smart grids. Along with ABB, ByggVesta, Electrolux, Fortum, HSB,

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memory systems designed to enable IoT. The first proof-of-concept prototype is later successfully demonstrated.

expert organization Video Quality Experts Group (VQEG).

ers, attend the networking part of the program. April Imego becomes a part of Acreo. The strategic merger aims to both strengthen and develop Swedish ICT’s skills and expertise in the field of sensor technology.

May Acreo Printed Electronics presents a new bio-sensor platform, developed in collaboration with LiU, to a large, enthusiastic audience at the biannual Biosensors conference in Cancún, Mexico. The bio-sensor platform can be produced in the form of a label or a smart card.

June “Viking Days,” a networking meeting for the Enterprise Europe Network, is held for 55 North European delegates. Acreo mediates contacts between SMEs and researchers.

research and innovation agenda “Smarter Electronic Systems for Sweden.” The agenda is written in collaboration with KTH, Chalmers, PhotonicSweden and The Swedish Electronics Trade Association. Also involved are members of the Swedish electronic industry through analysis and workshops.

September Acreo’s fiber optics researcher Walter Margulis receives the inaugural 2012 Outstanding Reviewer Award for his “indispensable contribution to the success and stature of OSA’s journal publishing program.”

October The exhibition “NANO” opens in Visualization Center C in Norrköping, Sweden. Acreo Nanoelectronics participates with scientific material as well as a filmed interview with professor Jan Y. Andersson.

November Acreo Swedish ICT’s Crister Mattson and Marco Forzati present the study “The Socioeconomic Impact of FTTH” at the International Telecommunication Unit in Geneva. ABB, Alstom Power Systems, Bombardier Transportation, and Volvo Cars, join the SIC Power Center, a new center at Acreo Swedish ICT

for technology and knowledge transfer within silicon carbide devices. December Acreo Swedish ICT hosts the Life Science workshop “Bio Sensing, Innovation through Successful Partnering” in Kista (Stockholm, Sweden), resulting in more than 15 new academic and industrial collaborations.

The collaboration with Brazil industry is intensified through a new MOU. A letter of intent is signed between Acreo and Inera, which is responsible for the National eHealth strategy in Sweden.

February Acreo’s Kjell Brunnström is appointed Professor of Video Quality at Mid Sweden University. Kjell was previously chairman of the independent international

March Acreo Business Services, Enterprise Europe Network, and Nano Connect organize “Scandinavia Conference Nano Update” in Ireland. Half of the 250 conference delegates, representing SMEs as well as research-

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September October

November

December

JM, KTH and NCC, the institute also secures funding from VINNOVA to create the first active house in Stockholm’s Royal Seaport.

Sweden. The exhibition is called “100 Innovations” and examines the most important innovations of all time.

for the second time. Christina von Dorrien was also on Computer Sweden’s yearly list of powerful women in IT.

funding from VINNOVA’s challenge-driven innovation program.

allows a virtual autopsy to be undertaken on one of the British Museum’s most well-known mummies.

April Interactive Institute Swedish ICT in Piteå, Sweden, is nominated for a European Union RegioStars

October Visitors to the Natural History Museum in London are given the opportunity to interact with specimens using the Inside Explorer table, developed by Interactive Institute Swedish ICT and Visualization Center C. Carl Heath, Researcher at Interactive Institute Swedish ICT, is one of the

invited speakers at the 2012 StoryWorld Conference held in Hollywood, California.

March Interactive Institute Swedish ICT’s CEO is listed among Computer Sweden’s 50 Most-Powerful Women

May Interactive Institute Swedish ICT and Visualization Center C are selected to represent Sweden at the World Expo. Daniel Fällman, Studio Director in Umeå, Sweden, is appointed professor at the Department of Informatics at Umeå University.

Carin Torstensson, Studio Director in Eskilstuna, is appointed member of the Swedish Government’s new Smart Grid council.

February The Virtual Autopsy Table opens at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Stockholm,

Award in the category of “Smart Growth – Connecting Universities to Regional Growth.” The Urban Explorer Table is delivered to The City of Gothenburg to be used to plan and communicate a major urban development project.

November Interactive Institute Swedish ICT and Visualization Center C provide a virtual autopsy table to the British Museum in London. This new technology

December Interactive Institute Swedish ICT is granted funding by VINNOVA for two “Open Innovation and Lead Users” projects: “Lead User Innovation Lab,” together

with VeryDay and IKEA, and “Product Development through Inclusion of Lead Users,” together with Monki and Lindholmen Science Park.

August Acreo is appointed by VINNOVA to coordinate the national strategic

June Together with a number of partners, Interactive Institute Swedish ICT participates in two of the 30 projects granted

September The 7th Audio Mostly Conference takes place at the Ionian University in Corfu. The conference, which focuses on sound, was initiated by the Interactive Institute in 2006.

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January SICS Swedish ICT and Swedish Winter Sport Research Centre at the Mid Sweden University in Östersund begin a collaboration to show what stateof-the-art technology and

January

January Project Future Airport is presented by Michael Lind, Ph.D., Research Manager, Sustainable Transport, in a keynote presentation at the conference Future Travel Experiences (FTE) Asia 2012.

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advanced mathematics can do to develop new training methods. The purpose of the project is to achieve success at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi.

(Stockholm). The conference attracts more than 500 participants from research and industrial sectors.

tion between Mälardalen’s College and Automation Region.

February SICS Swedish ICT performs the first big Swedish fullday conference about Internet of Things in Kista

March SICS Swedish ICT starts a subsidiary company in Västerås in order to strengthen the region’s innovation systems within commissioned research. This is a collabora-

April SICS and telecommunication company Ericsson start a research laboratory together for a joint, longterm project on software research in Kista (Stockholm). The laboratory will

February

March

February Ericsson announces the collaborative project ELVIIS at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. The keynote, delivered by Hans Westberg, CEO of Ericsson, presented this collaborative project, in which Ericsson, Volvo and Göteborgs Energi have collaborated with Victoria Swedish ICT to develop a new model for charging electric vehicles.

March Travelhack and Trafiklab receive an award for the “Best Public Transport Initiative” in the category of “Good Intentions.” Trafiklab and Travelhack are the result of the “Innovation for Sustainable Everyday Travel” project.

develop advanced software technology for telecom systems that will lead to higher capacities, improved reliability, energy efficiency and lower development cost.

SICS Swedish ICT’s spin-off companies specializing in measurement of the emotional currents online.

based on his work with Google’s research division in New York City. Thiemo Voigt, leader of the SICS Swedish ICT Networked Embedded Systems group at CSL-lab, is appointed Professor at Uppsala University.

August SICS organized “Multicore Day” in Kista (Stockholm). This well-established event is regarded as one of the most important annual Swedish conferences within the multicore area. The conference brings together Swedish and international

experts from the industrial and academic worlds to discuss the latest findings and future issues.

August

September October

June Gavagai predicts Loreen will win the Eurovision Song Contest. Gavagai is one of

July Oscar Täckström, researcher at SICS Swedish ICT, is awarded the IBM Best Student Paper award at the NAACL-HLT 2012 conference in Montreal, Canada,

April

May

June

July

April SIS publishes ISO standard 14033, where Raul Carlsson from Victoria Swedish ICT has led the standardization work. The standard makes it easier for businesses and organizations to report complex environmental data.

May Trafiklab wins the Guldlänken competition for the most innovative e-services in the public sector.

June “Competence and Innovation Node for Automotive Electronics” is established at the Lindholmen Science Park and Victoria Swedish ICT is appointed project manager.

July Three new projects are granted within VINNOVA’s UDI program, of which Victoria is a part.

November Volvo starts a research collaboration with SICS to make the vehicle’s computer systems open for apps

September Victoria Swedish ICT’s newest doctor, Fredrik Svahn publishes his dissertation, “Generativa produkter: Att konstruera för det som inte finns.”

that make the trip more efficient, safer and more fun. The goal is to build a mechanism that enables third-party operators to add apps to the vehicle’s computer system without compromising safety. The vehicles will no longer be closed systems, but plat-

October Viktoria Swedish ICT’s Magnus Andersson and Chalmers/Lund University’s Henrik Sternberg present their analysis of the Swedish ITS Council

forms for innovation with open source data. December SICS Swedish ICT starts a competence center for the Internet of Things with support from VINNOVA, which invests SEK 6 million. The consumer-oriented In-

ternet of Things will become a center for entertainment and lifestyle services with all required technology to put the entire value chain in place: from sensors to interaction.

November

December

and how ITS projects from 67 countries have had an impact on the transport system.

December Victoria Swedish ICT Forum 2012 on the theme of Open Innovation for transport systems attracts 130 participants to hear how open innovation can improve the transport system.

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Structure of Swedish ICT Swedish ICT Research AB is a non-profit research and technology organization, owned by the Swedish government through RISE Holding (60%) and Swedish industry (40%) through industrial associations FMOF and FAV, (20% each). Owners RISE, Research Institutes of Sweden Holding AB, is the governmental holding company for ownership of Swedish research and technology organizations. FMOF, the Society of Microelectronics and Optics Research, promotes technical research and development within microelectronics, optics, and communication technology. FAV promotes research and development in the areas of communications and software systems, as well as their applications, services and products.

FMOF 20%

FAV 20%

Swedish ICT Research Acreo Swedish ICT IRnova

Fibertronix

SICS Swedish ICT SICS Swedish ICT East

rate group. The group comprises the four research institutes Acreo Swedish ICT AB, SICS Swedish ICT AB, Interactive Institute Swedish ICT AB and Viktoria Swedish ICT AB. All four are wholly owned by Swedish ICT Research AB, except Viktoria, which is 91% owned. Majority-owned subsidiary companies for Acreo are IRnova AB (65%) and Fibertronix AB (85%), and for SICS, they are SICS East Swedish ICT AB – formerly Santa Anna – (91%) and SICS Swedish ICT Västerås AB (100%). The institutes of Swedish ICT are independent companies offering competence in specific areas of expertise. Board members of the institutes are elected by the board of Swedish ICT Research. Customers and partners engaged in different forms of cooperative projects are examples of an ongoing dialogue that provides valuable input on customer needs and to the direction of future research.

The Institutes of Swedish ICT

Governance

Swedish ICT Research AB (Swedish ICT) is the parent company within the Swedish ICT corpo-

The CEO of Swedish ICT reports to the board which consists of 11 members. Two members are

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RISE Holding 60%

Interactive Institute Swedish ICT

Viktoria Swedish ICT

SICS Swedish ICT Västerås

employee representatives. Board members are nominated by an election committee formed with representatives from each of the owners. The CEO has a management group that consists of the vice president, the four CEOs of the research institutes, and a staff of directors of finance, communication and business and strategy development. The board, together with the management group, is responsible for the general planning and development of the Swedish ICT corporate group. Policies for different issues are formulated at group level and implemented at the institutes as well as support functions are coordinated at group level. Swedish ICT coordinates and handles contacts with governmental organizations and owners. Specifically, Swedish ICT handles the strategic use of the core funding for developing new capabilities within the group. Swedish ICT is headquartered in Kista (Stockholm, Sweden) with operations in several major cities and regions in Sweden: Eskilstuna, Gothenburg, Hudiksvall, Karlstad, Kista, Linköping, Lund, Norrköping, Västerås, Uppsala, Umeå, and Piteå.

Management group Swedish ICT Lena Nilsson Executive Assistant Swedish ICT Research AB, Rolf Leidhammar Business and Strategy Development Swedish ICT Research AB, Christina von Dorrien CEO Interactive Institute Swedish ICT AB, Per-Åke Olsson CEO Viktoria Swedish ICT AB, Leif Ljungqvist CEO Acreo Swedish ICT AB (2013)*, Hans Hentzell CEO Swedish ICT Research AB, Christer Norström CEO SICS Swedish ICT AB, Jenny Sperens Director of Communication Swedish ICT Research AB, Lars-Erik Ridderström CFO Swedish ICT Research AB, Staffan Truvé Vice President Swedish ICT Research AB *Mårten Armgarth is the former CEO of Acreo Swedish ICT AB (January 2010–March 2013)

Board Members Swedish ICT Ulf Wahlberg Ericsson AB Chairman, Anders Bruse recently from TeliaSonera, Hanna Eriksson Sectra Imtec AB, Martin Heiman Volvo 3P, Peter Holmstedt RISE holding, Dan Jangblad SAAB AB, Sven Löfquist Climeon and former Micronic Laser Systems, Barbro Naroskyin Landstingen i Östergötland, Jennifer Råsten Netlight Consulting AB, Christer Lindqvist Acreo & Åsa Rudström SICS Employee Representative

Swedish ICT HQ Acreo Swedish ICT Interactive Institute Swedish ICT SICS Swedish ICT Viktoria Swedish ICT

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SEK

FINANCIAL RATIOS Swedish ICT Consolidated Income Statement .............................................................................................................................. Jan – Dec Jan – Dec (KSEK) 2012 2011 .............................................................................................................................. Operating income Net turnover 429 495 428 633 Other operating income 14 077 119 .................. ..................  443 572  428 752 Operating expenses Other external costs -168 072 -157 209 Personnel costs -295 537 -277 540 Depreciation of tangible assets and intangible assets -7 237 -7 226 .................. .................. Operating profit/ loss

 -27

274

-13 223

Result from financial investments Result from other securities and receivables 0 1 159 Interest income and similar items 1 513 3 571 Interest expense and similar items -85 -137 .................. ..................  -25

847 -8 630 Result after financial income and expenses Deferred tax 81 -419 Minority interest 3 703 -181 ..............................................................................................................................  -22 063  -9 230 Net profit/loss for the year ..............................................................................................................................

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Swedish ICT Consolidated Balance Sheet .............................................................................................................................. (KSEK) 2012-12-31 2011-12-31 .............................................................................................................................. ASSETS Intangible assets 7 937 3 701 Tangible assets 10 977 13 894 Financial assets 1 771 1 754 Inventories, Work in progress 80 821 89 476 Accounts receivables – trade 47 343 55 051 Other receivables 20 156 20 565 Cash and bank balances 82 026 71 546 ..............................................................................................................................  251

 255

031 987 TOTAL ASSETS .............................................................................................................................. EQUITY AND LIABILITIES Shareholders’ equity 53 640 76 103 Minority interest 3 250 430 Provisions 125 85 Advance payments from customers 111 339 107 117 Current liabilities 82 676 72 251 ..............................................................................................................................  251 031  255 987 TOTAL EQUITY AND LIABILITIES ..............................................................................................................................

Note: The total turnover of the Swedish ICT group increased 3.5% from the previous year and amounted to SEK 444 million (2011: SEK 429 million). The margin before yearend adjustments and taxes was SEK -25.8 million (2011: SEK -13.2 million). The operating result was SEK -27.3 million. Restructuring costs of SEK -21.4 MEK were a result of the decision to liquidate and merge parts of Imego AB’s operations with Acreo Swedish ICT AB (SEK -19.7 million) and development costs for the subsidiary IRnova AB (SEK -8.7 million). The operating result has also been positively affected by SEK 7.0 million due to the issuing of shares in IRnova AB during the year due to external financing of 13.1 MSEK. During 2013 an additional 10 MSEK has been invested in IRnova.

Swedish ICT Summary over the years ..............................................................................................................................

Swedish ICT Subsidiary 2012 ..............................................................................................................................

2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 (KSEK) Jan–Dec Jan–Dec Jan–Dec Jan–Dec Jan–Dec ..............................................................................................................................

SICS Interactive (KSEK) Acreo group group Institute Viktoria Imego ..............................................................................................................................

Income statement

Income statement

Net turnover

429 495

428 633

424 321

414 220

332 958

Result after financial items

-25 847

-8 629

1 561

127

4 385

Balance sheet Balance sheet total 251 031 Shareholders’ equity 53 640

255 987 76 104

259 249 85 334

236 617 84 001

215 428 67 437

-6,0% 21,4% 344

-2,0% 29,7% 355

0,4% 32,9% 342

0,0% 35,5% 338

1,3% 31,3% 303

10 480

-34 975

-4 392

9 007

-20 824

Key figures Net margin ratio, Equity ratio, Average number of employees Cash flow

Key figure definitions Net margin ratio: results after financial items in % of turnover Equity ratio: equity capital in % of balance sheet total Average number of employees: average number of employees during the period

Net turnover

203 491

129 552

45 534

43 290

13 417

-15 722

3 865

25

547

-14 649

Balance sheet Balance sheet total 88 202 Shareholders’ equity 9 749

122 993 30 364

24 035 8 426

17 472 2 429

4 689 1 108

3,0% 24,7% 116

0,1% 35,1% 46

1,3% 13,9% 34

-109,2% 23,6% 0

Result after financial items

Key figures Net margin ratio, Equity ratio, Average number of employees

-7,7% 11,1% 145

Key figure definitions Net margin ratio: results after financial items in % of turnover Equity ratio: equity capital in % of balance sheet total Average number of employees: average number of employees during the period

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Sustainability Work at Swedish ICT Swedish ICT is a Research and Technology Organization (RTO) and therefore influences society and the environment by the research results we provide, rather than by our own operations. ICT is an enabling technology that provides solutions to the grand challenges of business and society and so sustainability questions are central to our research projects. In 2012, Swedish ICT formed eight new business areas, several of them with a clear focus on sustainability. Our sustainability goals were formulated in 2010 and our subsidiaries have formulated their own based on internal strategies and policies: Goals 2012 – All employees should be aware of the social, economic and environmental sustainability issues.

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Each of the subsidiaries shall have a detailed plan for their CSR work. – Swedish ICT shall have a group policy for environment and travelling. Goals 2013 – The group shall see CSR as a natural and important part of the customer offering. CSR aspects shall be a clear part of goals and business plans for the subsidiaries. CSR WORK The CSR work is predominantly carried out in the subsidiaries. Important issues are for example Swedish ICT being an attractive employer, travelling policies, waste management- and energy consumption. A number of different initiatives with sustainability aspects have been taken on a local level by the subsidiaries and for the common group, for example activities during 2012: – A company policy on travel and environmental issues has been created for the Swedish ICT thus fulfilling the second goal 2012.

– Brand Launch – kick off for all employees in the group. An event designed to anchor the Swedish ICT’s newly defined role and vision. Thus emphasizing the importance of sustainability. – One subsidiary has completed in 2012 a threeyear gender project that has focus on innovative leadership. A book has been published with the title: “Gender aware Leadership – from non-issue to a matter of growth.” Innovative leaders are presented in its own chapter. – Different initiatives from the subsidiaries to inform the employees about alternatives for travel to work and the environmental impact of different alternatives. – One subsidiary has in 2012 signed an agreement with a provider of travel services, in order to more effectively measure and monitor CO2 emissions of the company’s business travel. – One subsidiary has stopped publishing annual reports, marketing materials, etc. on paper, only the electronic versions are now available. The goals have not been fully implemented in 2012 and this will be a continuing work in 2013. The clear owner statement expressing the

importance of sustainability work makes sustainability aspects a natural part in Swedish ICT’s business offer. With that as a starting point goals and methods will be evaluated and revised. REPORT SCOPE AND BOUNDARY Swedish ICT has been a part of the CSR report provided by RISE Holding 2008 and 2009. For the year 2010 Swedish ICT made its first independent CSR report and this report is the third. This report has the aim to follow the GRI guidelines for Application Level C self-declared to the extent that is deemed reasonable. Indicators chosen are the same as reported 2011. The indicators were originally chosen in cooperation with RISE according to what was decided to be relevant for the character of the involved organizations but also according to what data could be collected with a reasonable effort. Indicator data has been collected with the help of a common report template and is saved by the respective subsidiary to, and assembled by, the CSR manager at Swedish ICT.

Acreo’s subsidiary IRnova and Fibertronix are not included in this report except when explicitly noted. Primary stakeholders are the owners with RISE Holding representing the government and FMOF and FAV representing industry interest. Included are also all parts of society and industry that can benefit from the research results, developments, and innovations, provided by the institutes. Other stakeholders are competence-developing partners in academia and industry together with other RTOs both nationally and internationally. All employees as well as all prospective new employees are also important stakeholders. No specific stakeholder analysis has been produced from a restricted Swedish ICT perspective. The stakeholders mentioned here were identified in the preceding work with the previous reporting by RISE Holding.


CSR

Sustainability Performance Indicators Economic Indicators The economic dimension of sustainability concerns the organization’s impact on the economic conditions of its stakeholders and on economic systems at local, national and global levels. The financial performance is fundamental to the sustainability of Swedish ICT. However, this shall be viewed considering that the articles of association of Swedish ICT Research AB state that no dividends shall be provided to the owners and that all profit should be reinvested in the operations. The evaluation of Swedish ICT is to a large extent based on other aspects of its contribution to society.

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EC1 – Direct economic value generated and distributed .............................................................................................................................. (KSEK) 2012 2011 2010 .............................................................................................................................. Direct Economic Revenues from Value operations and Generated financial revenues 445,085 433,482 425,131 .............................................................................................................................. Distributed Operating costs -168,072 -157,209 -154,660 Economic Value Employee compensation -295,537 -277 540 -261,226

Payment to capital providers

-85

-137

-29

Payment to the public sector (tax) 121 -659 -700 .............................................................................................................................. Earnings -18,488 -2,063 8,516 .............................................................................................................................. Note: - The total turnover of the Swedish ICT group increased 3.5% from the previous year and amounted to SEK 444 million (2011: SEK 429 million). The margin before year-end adjustments and taxes was SEK -25.8 million (2011: SEK -13.2 million). The operating result was SEK -27.3 million. Restructuring costs of SEK -21.4 MEK were a result of the decision to liquidate and merge parts of Imego AB’s operations with Acreo Swedish ICT AB (SEK -19.7 million) and

development costs for the subsidiary IRnova AB (SEK -8.7 million). The operating result has also been positively affected by SEK 7.0 million due to the issuing of shares in IRnova AB during the year. - This table refers to the consolidated group figures for Swedish ICT, where internal transactions are eliminated. - The consolidated group figures also include the subsidiaries of Acreo; IRnova and Fibertronix

EC4 – Significant financial assistance received from government and authorities .............................................................................................................................. (KSEK) 2012 2011 2010 .............................................................................................................................. Significant Financial Assistance .............................................................................................................................. R&D Assistance Research support national 213,519 190,964 204,706 EU Assistance

Research support EU

Other Types of Assistance

Other research support

62,131

71,666

63,643

Subsidies (Diminution of Rent) Tax Relief (i.e. Regional Support) .............................................................................................................................. Total Financial Assistance 275,650 262,630 268,349 .............................................................................................................................. Note: - Data reported here are Swedish ICT consolidated figures including the subsidiaries of Acreo; IRnova and Fibertronix. - ‘Research Support National’ refers to governmental funding, fully or partly, of R&D projects run by the institute. This is not regarded as a subsidy in the general sense as the institute views the funding as remu-

neration for commissioned R&D work to support industry and society. - Governmental research support is provided by RISE, VINNOVA, and The Swedish Energy Agency, among others. R&D assistance provided by RISE Holding is offered with specific criteria for use and is followed up. The board of Swedish ICT is responsible for the spending of the financial assistance according to the directives.

Environmental indicators Swedish ICT influences the environment via the research results we provide, rather than our own operations. To date, no systematic work on the environmental impact has been done but the group has formulated a corporate environmental and travel policy in 2012. .............................................................................................................................. 2012 2011 2010 .............................................................................................................................. Electric Energy (kWh) 2,513,806 2,533,078 2,695,562 CO2 (kg) 481,043 497,985 552,744 .............................................................................................................................. Note: - The energy consumption declared is the electric energy consumed in the operations at the different facilities of Swedish ICT. Figures are unobtainable for parts of the facilities run by Swedish ICT due the fact that energy consumption in some cases is included in the rent or the facility is shared with another party. Wherever possible, consumption is estimated based on the rented area. There is no change in these aspects in comparison with the figures of 2011. - Relevant data for energy consumption from heating and cooling has been considered too difficult to obtain so the figures disclosed are restricted to direct electricity consumption.

- An effort to estimate the CO2 emissions has been made. The figures in the table for CO2 emission relates to business travel. Travel agencies have provided information on the estimated emissions. A new template for travel expense specifications has been introduced with a CO2 calculator to obtain information on travel not booked through a travel agency. Viktoria Swedish ICT and Santa Anna have no information available. Teleconferencing equipment is, to some extent, available in order to provide an alternative to travel for meetings. - The figures are calculated in the same way 2012 as in 2011.

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Social Indicators The social dimension of sustainability concerns the impact an organization has on the social system within which it operates. The selection of indicators disclosed here reflects the priorities of Swedish ICT in this area. Prioritized issues are working environment, diversity and equal opportunity and customer relations. Here below, indicators LA1, LA7, LA12, HR4, SO8, PR5 are presented. LA1 – Employment .............................................................................................................................. 2012 2011 2010 .............................................................................................................................. Employment type Swedish ICT Swedish ICT Swedish ICT Group Group Group .............................................................................................................................. Permanent

313 328 302

Full-time

283 296 283

Part-time 30 32 19 .............................................................................................................................. Temporary

73 68 77

Full-time

31 29 34

Part-time 42 39 43 .............................................................................................................................. Sum 386 396 379 .............................................................................................................................. # Managers

44

50

49

Managers/Employees 11% 13% 13% .............................................................................................................................. Note: Number of employees based on head count carried out on 31st December 2012.

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LA7 – Occupational Health and Safety .............................................................................................................................. 2012 2011 2010 .............................................................................................................................. Swedish ICT Swedish ICT Swedish ICT Group Group Group .............................................................................................................................. Employees 386 396 379 .............................................................................................................................. Fatalities

0 0 0

Injury

3 1 0

Occupational Disease 1 1 0 .............................................................................................................................. Lost Days Absentee Total

2,096

1,177

1,410

Lost Days Due to Injury or Occupational Disease 243 44 0 .............................................................................................................................. Total Absentees as % of Scheduled Workdays

1.7

1.3

1.7

Part of Total Absentee with More Than 60 days Continuous Absentee (%) 3.6 5.9 0.2 .............................................................................................................................. Note: - The number of employees is based on a head count. - Programs to address health and safety issues are present in all

subsidiaries and work is ongoing to harmonize policies. Different programs to encourage keep-fit activities are also provided to the employees.

LA12 – Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews .............................................................................................................................. Total .............................................................................................................................. 2012

88%

2011

90%

2010 82% .............................................................................................................................. Within the Swedish ICT Group there are different practices for performance and career development reviews. Acreo Swedish ICT is ISO 9001 certified with formal routines for reviews and follow up.

In principle 100% of the full-time permanent employees are covered for Acreo Swedish ICT. Formal practices have been implemented by Viktoria Swedish ICT and SICS Swedish ICT.

LA14 – Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category .............................................................................................................................. 2012 2011 2010 .............................................................................................................................. Swedish ICT Swedish ICT Swedish ICT Group Group Group .............................................................................................................................. Managers

Women

12 13 13

Men

32 37 36

W Salary/M Salary % 83.7% 83.9% 81.5% .............................................................................................................................. Administrative Staff Women

21 23 22

Men

12 12 14

W Salary/M Salary % 86.3% 61.0% 71.3% .............................................................................................................................. Other Staff Women

76 74 64

Men

233 239 225

W Salary/M salary % 88.2% 89.3% 87.4% .............................................................................................................................. Note: The number of men and women is based on a head count. Salary used for calculation is based

on the salary for full-time employment.

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Social Indicators, cont.

GRI-index

HR4 – Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken During 2012, no incidents of discrimination were reported.

The GRI-index shows which elements of the GRI Reporting framework have been applied in the preparation of the report. Swedish ICT has the aim to follow the GRI guidelines for Application Level C self-declared to the extent that is deemed reasonable. The table below shows on which page the different disclosures can be found.

SO8–Significant fines and other sanctions Swedish ICT has not been subject to any fines or other sanctions in 2010, 2011 or 2012. PR5–Practices related to customer satisfaction Some of the different subsidiaries of Swedish ICT have implemented practices related to customer satisfaction. No changes in these routines have been introduced during 2012. Acreo Swedish ICT: Annual systematic interviews with customers. The customer satisfaction index for 2012 shows a similar, or slightly higher, value compared to 2011, depending on the parameter. The overall satisfaction index was 4.1 in 2012 and 4.0 in 2011. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT: Annual contact with regular customers for following up on running projects and sales of new. SICS Swedish ICT and Viktoria Swedish ICT: No formalized established practices related to customer satisfaction.

.............................................................................................................................. GRI-information: Standard Disclosure Level Page .............................................................................................................................. Strategy and analysis

c

1.1 Statement from CEO about the relevance of sustainability to the organization and its strategy c 8, 10–11, 12 .............................................................................................................................. Organization

c

2.1 Name of the organization

c

68

2.2 Primary brands, products and/or services

c

54–55

2.3 Operational structure of the organization

c

68

2.4 Location of organization’s headquarters

c

68

2.5 Number of countries where the organization operates

c

51, 68

2.6 Nature of ownership and legal form

c

68

2.7 Markets served

c

12–13

2.8 Scale of the organization

c

50–51, 54–55, 70–71

2.9 Significant changes during the report period regarding size, structure, or ownership

c

11

..............................................................................................................................

..............................................................................................................................

GRI-information: Standard Disclosure Level Pages ..............................................................................................................................

GRI-information: Standard Disclosure Level Pages ..............................................................................................................................

Report Parameters

c

Governance, Commitments, And Engagement

c

3.1 Reporting period

c

72

4.1 Governance structure of the organization

c

68

3.2 Date of most recent previous report

c

72

4.2 Independence of the Chairman of the board

c

68

3.3 Reporting cycle

c

72

4.3 Independence of the board

c

68

3.4 Contact point for questions regarding the report or its contents

c

80

3.5 Process for defining report content

c

72

4.4 Mechanisms for the employees to influence the governance c 68 ..............................................................................................................................

3.6 Boundary of the report

c

72

3.7 State any specific limitations on the scope or boundary of the report

c

72–79

3.8 Basis for reporting on subsidiaries and other entities that can significantly affect comparability

c

72–79

3.10 Effects of changes of information provided in previous reporting and the reasons for such re-statements

c

72–73

3.11 Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the scope, boundary, or measure ment methods applied to the report

c

72–73

Stakeholders

c

4.14 List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization

c

68, 72–73

4.15 Basis for identification and of stakeholders c 72–73 .............................................................................................................................. Performance Indicators

c

EC1, EC4, EN4, EN16, LA1, LA7, LA14, LA12, SO8, PR5 c 74–79 ..............................................................................................................................

3.12 GRI Index c 78–79 ..............................................................................................................................

2.10 Awards received in the reporting period c 64–67 ..............................................................................................................................

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Swedish ICT annual report 2012