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PRESIDENT’S REPORT 2011


The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.

– Mahatma Gandhi

CONTENTS President’s Ledger

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Feature Stories

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Alumni Spotlight

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Financials

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Scholarly Activity Report

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Editor Gil Chorbajian Contributing Writers Gwendolyn Bondi, Megan Davis, Winnie Yu Contributing Photographers Kris Qua, Donna Abbott Vlahos Design Jen Danchetz, D|2 Design Defined

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President’s Ledger While the College has

expanded from our core program in pharmacy, one thing has not changed – the students who attend Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences share a common desire to help people. Whether it’s as pharmacists, laboratory professionals, research scientists, public health advocates, or in other capacities, our students want to make the world a better, healthier place. This year’s President’s Report shines a spotlight on those individuals and organizations at ACPHS who are making a positive impact in the community. As you read, please keep in mind that this is just the tip of the iceberg. For as many programs and initiatives as there are highlighted here, many more could not be included due to space limitations. The commitment to service that exists today at ACPHS is not a new development. It is part of the fabric of the College. I noticed it immediately upon joining ACPHS in 1998. In speaking with many alumni through the years, I know that this characteristic trait has

been present for decades, perhaps even dating back to the earliest days of the institution. It’s also been quickly adopted by the students and faculty on our Vermont Campus. I have spent many years in higher education, and I am not aware of another group of students that is more committed to service than our own. That is why it does not surprise me when ACPHS raises more money for the American Cancer Society than any school of comparable size in the country. Or when Colleges Against Cancer, a nationwide organization comprised of chapters from nearly 500 schools, recognized ACPHS as its 2011 Chapter of the Year. In addition to supporting those who are ill or suffering, there are several other programs at the College that seek to help people from disadvantaged backgrounds. ACPHS students volunteering at the Koinonia Care Clinic help treat residents in one of the most economically depressed sections of Albany. Programs such as the ACPHS Academy and the Summer Enrichment Program, which are

supported by both our students and faculty, nurture students’ interests in the sciences beginning in third grade and continuing all the way through high school. As the College dedicates additional resources to fostering global initiatives, this spirit of community service is extending far beyond the Capital Region and Vermont to places such as Guatemala, Belize, Dominica, and Hispaniola. When you read these stories and see this selflessness and compassion on display, you can’t help but be inspired. You will also feel good knowing that the future is in very good hands.

James J. Gozzo, Ph.D. President Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

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The Magic of Science Grade school students thrive in afterschool science program

On a pleasant winter afternoon, a caravan of yellow school buses pulls up to the ACPHS campus. The doors open, and students spanning grades three through six come bounding out. They line up at the front door and then head upstairs for their classes at the ACPHS Academy. Now in its sixth year, the ACPHS Academy is an afterschool enrichment program that brings elementary and middle school students to the campus for specialized science instruction. The classes are taught by local schoolteachers. They are assisted in the classroom by ACPHS students who serve as mentors to the young scholars. The classes meet for two hours a day, two days a week, for ten weeks each semester. Each year culminates with a science fair and a graduation ceremony which is attended by the students’ families along with members of the College community. 4

According to ACPHS President James Gozzo, Ph.D., the Academy was created to give younger students with an interest in science the opportunity to explore the subject in greater depth. “We target mostly youths with average grades, but who show an interest in science,” he says. “We try to inspire them and hope to help them reach their potential.” A similar program is held on the ACPHSVermont campus, where an additional 40 students are enrolled. The Academy gives the children a chance to do hands-on experiments and learn the basics of scientific research. “Our focus is problem-based, not a classroom lecture,” Dr. Gozzo says. “But we don’t tell the students how to solve problems. We challenge them to find solutions on their own.”


ACPHS Academy scholars work closely with students from the College on a variety of science projects. The program concludes each year with a graduation ceremony and science fair where the young students receive diplomas and showcase what they have learned.

Rebecca Beach, the director of the ACPHS Academy, says the program has been shown to help students improve their core math and science skills. “Nearly every student in the program passes the New York State fourth grade science exam with a score of 3 or 4, which are the highest scores you can get,” Beach says. “Our Academy students typically perform better on these tests than their peers who are not in the program.” The program also seeks to inspire students to one day attend college and perhaps even come to ACPHS. “In addition to what they learn in the classroom, we also take them on tours of the campus so they can see all aspects of a college student’s life,” Beach says. Students who continue in the program and do well in high school are eligible for scholarships to ACPHS, should they attend college here, she says. The Academy program began in 2007 with 20 third graders from the Delaware Community School and has expanded to include students from the Brighter Choice Charter School. Each year the program adds 20 more students while retaining the ones who came the previous year. Today, there are nearly 120 students in the third-, fourth-, fifth- and sixth grades across both campuses. “Some of the

older students who began with the Delaware Community School are now seventh and eighth graders. They are still interested in continuing with the program, but their school commitments have made scheduling much more difficult,” Beach says. “We’re still working out new ways to keep them involved.”

Jendayi Womack, 10, a fifth grader, says she liked making “ooblek,” a gooey mixture of cornstarch and water (named after a Dr. Seuss character) that’s used to demonstrate that matter can be both a liquid and a solid. “As a liquid, it’s free to wiggle around, and as a solid, it can take the shape of whatever it’s in,” she says.

“Any type of science is really exciting to me,” says Eric Bowens, a sixth grader who plans to study medicine someday.

It is the opportunity to work with the ACPHS student mentors that really helps motivate the young students to learn and excel. Vinesh Sookhan, a third year pharmacy student who has been a mentor since his freshman year, says his role is to encourage the children to hone their problem solving skills. “I’ll show them the way, but they have to find the answers,” he says.

Through the years, the students have studied rocks, explored the human body, and learned about the solar system. Eric Bowens, 11, says he especially enjoyed the human body lessons where he learned about muscles, ligaments, and neurons. “Any type of science is really exciting to me,” says Bowens, a sixth grader who plans to study medicine someday. “I like science because it’s different than the other subjects.”

This year, Sookhan is helping two sixth grade students build a solar powered toy and exploring how the planet has been affected by gas emissions. “I see the kids becoming more mature and showing a growing interest in their projects,” he says. “It’s definitely a good program for encouraging their interests in the sciences.”

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One Step at a Time Student Group Takes Up Fight Against Cancer Educating. Fundraising. Lobbying. For students in the ACPHS chapter of Colleges Against Cancer (CAC), these activities give them a voice in the fight against this devastating disease. Each year since it was founded in 2007, the College’s CAC chapter has attracted 70 to 150 students with a passion for helping people whose lives have been touched by cancer. The chapter, which includes a companion group on the Vermont Campus, was formed in the 2007 by Sarah Scarpace, Pharm.D., BCOP, an associate professor and assistant dean for pharmacy professional affairs. As a board certified oncology pharmacist, Dr. Scarpace often hears from students who want to study oncology after seeing how 6

cancer has affected loved ones. “Some of them are too emotionally involved to pursue it as a career,” says Dr. Scarpace, who serves as the group’s co-advisor along with Sal Bottiglieri, Pharm.D., an assistant professor of oncology and hematology, and Joanna Schwartz, Pharm.D., who is the faculty advisor for the Vermont Campus. “Colleges Against Cancer gives them another outlet.” CAC’s signature event takes place each April, when students, faculty, and community members gather on the campus to walk from dusk until dawn in the Relay for Life. During the event, team members take turns walking for 12 consecutive hours to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Relay for Life is held overnight to represent the fact that cancer never sleeps.


“Judging from their results, you would think that ACPHS had a population 10 times its size.”

The Relay for Life event hosted by the ACPHS chapter of Colleges Against Cancer rallies community members to raise money for cancer research. Among schools its size, ACPHS has finished in the top five for fundraising in each of the past four years, finishing first in 2010.

In 2010, ACPHS was the top Relay for Life fundraiser in the country for colleges with fewer than 2,500 students, raising a whopping $41,603.97. In addition to Relay for Life, both the Albany and Vermont chapters have sizeable presences at the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk each fall, collectively raising more than $5,000 last year. According to Alex Baron, director of special events for the American Cancer Society in Albany, the ACPHS chapter was in the top five nationwide for per capita fundraising (dollars raised to students enrolled) in 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011; they were number one per capita in 2010. “One of the impressive things about this chapter, is that in addition to the great fundraising work, they put a strong emphasis on education, advocacy, and survivorship,” Baron says. “Judging from their results, you would think that ACPHS had a population 10 times its size.” Club members do many activities that benefit patients, family members, and the community (the chapter assisted with or initiated more than 45 such activities in 2011). One of the projects is cooking for HopeClub, formerly Gilda’s Club, a program for cancer survivors and their families. “Going there and seeing the young kids smiling is

really rewarding,” says Brittany Fitzpatrick, a fifth year pharmacy student who chairs the survivorship committee. The group also hosts holiday parties for pediatric patients and prepares care packages for patients at New York Oncology Hematology, a private practice in Albany. Education is another key component of outreach activities. Walk around the campus, and you will see posters about the signs and symptoms of different cancers. CAC members can also be found staffing informational tables on the dangers of smoking in places such as Crossgates Mall in Guilderland. The group also lobbies on behalf of people with cancer and their families. They’ve enlisted support for legislation that protects the rights of cancer patients, provides health insurance for smoking cessation programs, and promotes tighter regulation of tobacco by the federal government. Given the scope of these activities, it is perhaps little surprise that the ACPHS chapter has garnered a number of national awards and honors. ACPHS was named by the American Cancer Society as the Outstanding Chapter of the Year in 2011 (after previously earning two honorable mentions), distinguishing themselves among 500

CAC chapters throughout the country. The chapter has also received a Leader of Hope award four years in a row, and in 2008, won the Advocacy Chapter of the Year award. The accomplishments speak for themselves, but what inspires these students to join Colleges Against Cancer and make a difference? Most get involved because they have lost loved ones to cancer or know people affected by the disease. Michael Guariglia, a fifth year student who co-chairs Relay for Life, lost his grandfather to lung cancer and has an uncle with stage IV colon cancer. He joined the group in 2008 and has since taken on several leadership roles. “We cannot fight the fight for someone who has been diagnosed with cancer,” he says. “We cannot endure the pain of chemo, the sickness involved with it, or even imagine the emotions that someone goes through when they are diagnosed. “What we can do though is help raise money for research and support those who have the ability to find a cure. In the process, we can fight back against cancer by remembering those who we have lost and celebrating those who are survivors.”

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For the Health of It

Take-back Program Adds New Dimension to Health Fair Stop in at the annual Mario M. Zeolla Health Fair at ACPHS, and it’s quickly apparent that a pharmacist is much more than someone in a lab coat who dispenses medication. As the event demonstrates so well, the modern pharmacist also educates the public about health, encourages preventive care, and assists in proper medication management.

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macists Association’s Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP), which organizes the fair each year. “We’re really promoting health and wellness.”

What started as a showcase for student-led patient care projects in 2004 has evolved into a full-fledged health fair every October that now includes one of just a handful of medication take-back programs in the region (the fair is held in October to coincide with American Pharmacists Month).

As part of that mission, in 2010 the group began inviting visitors to clean out their medicine cabinets and bring their unused or expired medications to the Health Fair. Working with local law enforcement officials, the drugs are collected at the event and – following the guidelines of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Bureau of Narcotics Enforcement – incinerated at a facility in Hudson Falls, NY.

“It’s our way to give back to the community,” says Sarah DeRuosi, a fifth year pharmacy student and president of the American Phar-

By safely disposing of unwanted medications, the program helps prevent these drugs from entering local waterways.


Students, with the assistance of faculty, offer a variety of services at the ACPHS Health Fair, ranging from blood pressure screenings to immunizations to a medication take-back program. In 2010, nearly 220 pounds of unused or expired medications were collected at the Health Fair and safely disposed.

According to the DEC, research has shown that continuous exposure to low levels of medications has altered the behavior and physiology of fish and aquatic life. “Many people flush their drugs down the toilet,” DeRuosi says, referencing an approach to drug disposal that had been advocated for years, but is now discouraged. “We don’t want them to do that anymore. Now they know they can bring them here.”

For several weeks after each take-back program, the College receives phone calls from those who were unable to attend and who want to know the date of the next collection event. This continued interest indicates that members of the surrounding communities appreciate the program and recognize its importance. As a result, the APhA-ASP has added a second take-back event to the calendar in the spring.

The take-back program also helps reduce access to prescription painkillers, which addresses an even greater public health problem: the growing epidemic of prescription painkiller abuse and overdoses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports this problem has reached disturbing levels, with 12 million people reporting that they used prescription painkillers for nonmedical reasons in 2010.

“We want to encourage health and wellness. Pharmacy isn’t just about pills and medications.”

“Getting those drugs out of medicine cabinets is a major step toward reducing access,” says Jane Boyd, co-director of the Pharmacy Practice Lab and co-advisor to APhA-ASP. “We had more than 50 households that brought medications to us last year.” In 2010, approximately 220 pounds of overthe-counter and prescription drugs were collected. Remarkably, some of the prescriptions dated back to the 1960’s.

Despite the growing popularity of the take-back program, the central focus of the Health Fair remains the patient care booths that target a range of health related issues, including heart disease, diabetes, immunizations, and proper medication usage. Recent health fairs have expanded from these core offerings to add health related organizations and services such as Albany Massage Therapy, CDPHP, the Albany chapter of the American Cancer Society, and even a farmer’s market. In the future,

organizers hope to offer eye exams and teeth cleanings. “Our goal isn’t to just stay on campus,” says Sarah Botting, a fifth year pharmacy student and secretary for the group. “We try to work with local pharmacies, blood pressure clinics, and other groups and get them involved too.” As the fair has expanded in recent years, it has attracted more people from outside the campus. Last October, the five-hour event drew 700 visitors. “We really want people to come back every year,” says Alex Goh, a fifth year pharmacy student and the APhA’s vice president of membership. “We want to encourage health and wellness. Pharmacy isn’t just about pills and medications.” For the students, the Health Fair is an opportunity to also put their budding professionalism into practice, says Patty Tompkins, events manager for ACPHS, and the group’s co-advisor. “The goal of the Health Fair is to allow the students, working with faculty where appropriate, to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real life situations and hone their skills as health care professionals,” she says. “It’s really inspiring.”

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Community Service Day On Saturday, March 24, 2012, more than 120 students, faculty, and staff from the College participated in the school’s Community Service Day. From morning through early evening, volunteers offered their assistance at a variety of local organizations, including: Boys and Girls Club of Albany, Habitat for Humanity, City Rescue Mission, Colonie Senior Service Center, and Delmar Place (a senior assisted living facility). ACPHS also hosted a “Field Day” on the campus for students and families in the ACPHS Academy program (page 4), which featured outdoor sports and activities.

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Forward Thinking

Program Helps Nurture Next Generation of Scientists Some high school students spend their summers toiling away as lifeguards or servers. Others attend camps or help out at home. But since 1998, nearly 100 students from the Capital Region have done scientific research at ACPHS through a unique summer program offered by the College in conjunction with the City of Albany. The High School Summer Enrichment program at ACPHS was created to spur an interest in science and medicine among 12

inner city high school students says ACPHS President James Gozzo, Ph.D., who initiated the program shortly after being named the College’s president in 1998. “The objective is to expose students to opportunities in research that might not otherwise be available to them and encourage them to pursue careers in science. It’s a program that we feel is needed and important.” Every summer, the six to eight students selected for the program spend six weeks


“The objective is to expose students to opportunities in research that might not otherwise be available to them and encourage them to pursue careers in science. It’s a program that we feel is needed and important.”

High school students in the Summer Enrichment Program conduct scientific research with ACPHS faculty members. At the end of the program, the students discuss their findings via oral and poster presentations and receive certificates of accomplishment.

working with ACPHS faculty researchers. Each researcher is teamed up with two students, who are recommended for the program by their guidance counselors. “The students we enroll in the program have enjoyed and done well in their high school chemistry and biology courses,” says David Clarke, Ph.D., an associate professor of chemistry, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, and advisor to the program. “Most of them have an interest in pursuing a career in the health or medical fields, but don’t yet know about many of the options available to them.” As part of their applications, all students must provide transcripts, PSAT scores, essays about their career goals, and what they hope to get from the program, he says. Most of the students come from Albany High School and, as a result of the partnership with the City of Albany, are paid through the city’s summer youth employment program. The Summer Enrichment Program has also enrolled students from other public and private schools in the area, though those who are not residents of the City of Albany are not eligible for the stipend. The projects the students are assigned depend on the faculty and their research interests. “We find out which faculty are able to take on a student or two, identify a project, and leave it to the faculty members to work out the students’ roles,” Dr. Gozzo says.

“Most projects involve gathering data, but the students also learn to collaborate.” Last summer, students did research to gauge the effectiveness of the hepatitis B vaccine on hemodialysis patients; examined the effect of a phosphate hormone on smooth muscle cells in the blood vessels of patients with chronic kidney disease, and compared two methods for analyzing HbA1C in people with diabetes. “What they do helps take these studies from step A to step B,” Dr. Gozzo says. In addition to their own research, the students tour area research labs and pharmaceutical companies, which in the past has included visits to Albany Medical Center, Albany Molecular Research, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, and Covidien. The tours are designed to help the students learn how the scientific community works together to understand disease and to develop treatments, Dr. Clarke says. “They get a chance to see the process of drug development in action, an opportunity that most other students don’t get,” he adds. Jake Valentine, 21, of Albany, attended the program in 2007, and worked on research involving nanoparticles in the treatment of glaucoma with Shaker Mousa, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Research at ACPHS and chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute. Valentine says the summer enrichment pro-

gram taught him valuable laboratory techniques and gave him a better understanding of patents, the costs of drug research and development, and pharmaceutical marketing. It also introduced him to job opportunities in the pharmaceutical research field and even helped polish his public speaking skills. “The independence we were given was great,” says Valentine, who is studying biology and philosophy at Tufts University and plans to go to medical school. “It forced us into a collaborative environment with a partner, rather than the traditional teacherstudent style of learning.” Jake’s sister, Mia Valentine, a high school sophomore, is also hoping to get accepted into the program. Their mother, Jenny McErlean of Albany, says she was thrilled with the learning experience her son had. “The first time I saw him in a white coat and goggles, I was just delighted,” she said. At the end of the program, the students are required to present their findings to a room full of ACPHS faculty, staff, and often the students’ families. “When the presentations are over, I will often have faculty tell me how impressed they were with the students and the quality of the work they had done,” Dr. Clarke says. “The students are always proud of their work, and their parents are proud too.” 13


Generation Rx

Students Raise Awareness of Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a number can sometimes say much more. Figures released in fall 2011 from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that 37,485 Americans died of prescription narcotic overdoses in 2009 (the latest year the data is available). It’s a staggering number, but the more chilling takeaway is that 2009 marked the first time since 1979 – the year the CDC began tracking this information – that U.S. drug related deaths eclipsed those from motor vehicle accidents. This “milestone” resulted in prominent stories in the Los Angeles Times and other media outlets, raising awareness among the general public of what can only be described as a health epidemic. In fact, more Americans now abuse prescription medications than cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, and inhalants combined. While many were unaware of the seriousness of this issue, the report was not a surprise for most pharmacists and health care professionals. During the fall 2010 Midyear Regional Meetings of the American Pharmacist Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP), the Academy moved to take a leadership role in this area by introducing a new community outreach program called “Generation Rx.” This educational program – developed by The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy and 14

funded by Cardinal Health – is designed to increase public awareness of prescription medication abuse and encourage health care providers and others to actively work to prevent abuse. Students from both the Albany and Vermont Campuses were in attendance for the launch of Generation Rx and were immediately inspired to roll out the program in their communities. Using materials provided by APhA-ASP and supplementing that information with their own brochures and Facebook pages, the students began reaching out to local schools and youth organizations. “It took a while to get it going in schools,” says Karen Peck, a Vermont Campus student describing one of the challenges associated with launching the program. “Since it’s a sensitive subject, the schools want to know exactly what we will be discussing before they approve it.” After more than a year of knocking on doors, they finally gained approval to present to students in two Burlington area high schools this year. The presentations included interactive discussions and Family Feud style games designed to keep the students engaged on a subject that, if not presented well, could easily cause high school eyes to roll. Based on the feedback from students and teachers, the presentation was well received. One student wrote in her evaluation: “I thought that the information was very use-

Students on both the Albany and Vermont Campuses conduct educational programs on the dangers of prescription drug abuse.


Figures released from the CDC show 37,485 Americans died of prescription narcotic overdoses in 2009 – more than those who died from motor vehicle accidents. Generation Rx presentations include activities that test kids’ abilities to distinguish drugs from candies.

ful and interesting, and it will help me with some of my friends who I know are misusing prescription drugs.” Teachers from Colchester High School were so impressed with the presentation that they have decided to make the Generation Rx program a permanent part of their health class curriculum. ACPHS-Vermont student Andrea Newgren believes the program has generated a positive response because of the approach taken by the student presenters. “We are not up there trying to preach to students. We just want to make them aware of the dangers and explain how they can help their friends,” she says. As these activities have been taking place in Vermont, students on the Albany Campus have been working to help educate both young students and their peers at ACPHS. With some of the highest rates of drug abuse being among teens as young as 12-years-old, Albany Campus students

decided to tailor one of their presentations to a class of fourth grade students who attend the College’s ACPHS Academy program (see page 6). The presentation included a challenge to students to separate gummy bear candies from gummy vitamins (something many of the kids had difficulty doing) and included distribution of Generation Rx bracelets. “I was surprised by how much they knew about these drugs, even at this age,” says Danyelle Rolnick, one of the ACPHS presenters. “They seemed interested in the information that we shared with them and understanding of the potential dangers.” As part of the Generation Rx program, the students invited Jake Nichols, a former pharmacist and recovering prescription drug addict, to give a presentation on campus (the presentation was simulcasted to the Vermont Campus via the College’s distance learning technology).

You could hear a pin drop during the course of Nichols’ one hour presentation as he described his 15-year descent into abuse and his ongoing recovery. Nichols believes that pharmacy schools do not currently devote enough time to teaching about addiction and is advocating that the subject be made a mandatory part of the curriculum instead of a one hour lecture or, at best, an elective. Students on both campuses are already hard at work on their Generation Rx plans for next year. In addition to continuing their student outreach efforts, they are planning to expand their focus to include older audiences such as parents, teachers, school boards, and even practicing pharmacists.

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Mission Possible Service Initiatives Extend Far Beyond Campus Community service has always been popular with ACPHS students, and through the years, most of those efforts have been locally directed. While local outreach programs remain strong, there are a growing number of ACPHS service-based initiatives that are now global in scope. These study abroad opportunities are enabling ACPHS students to make a difference in impoverished areas of the world, and at the same time, change their own lives in ways they never thought imaginable. Over the past year, groups of students and faculty completed medical missions to Dominica, Guatemala, and Belize. These trips are the foundation for what the College plans to be an ever-expanding list of global experience opportunities for ACPHS students and faculty.

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Dominica Four years ago, Jeanine Abrons, Pharm.D., and her husband were married on the tiny Caribbean Island of Dominica and stayed at the Jungle Bay Resort. Following the trip, a Jungle Bay newsletter to former guests arrived in Dr. Abrons’ mailbox requesting medical supplies. “I contacted several friends, pharmacies, and others and was able to generate donations of common over-the-counter items including ibuprofen, gauze bandages, medication pill bottles, antibiotic ointment creams, and dosing spoons,” recalls Dr. Abrons, a former Assistant Professor at ACPHS. “Several months later, I received an email from the doctor of the rural medical clinic near Jungle Bay thanking me profusely for the dona-


“It is one thing to read about poverty and extreme conditions, but another to actually experience it. It changed my understanding of everyday life.” Students who traveled to Dominica spent part of their time with local schoolchildren teaching compounding and leading other activities.

tions, saying this was the first time that they had a consistent supply of these items.” Dr. Abrons returned to the island several months later to meet with the owner of the resort and to discuss how student pharmacists might be able to help, and from there, the Dominica rotation was born. The program is now heading into its third year. In October 2011, Kristen Felthousen (ACPHS Director of Career Services), Dr. Abrons, and her husband, an anesthesiologist and clinical professor at The University of Iowa, arrived in Dominica with ten ACPHS students, all of whom had been trained and prepared to provide basic health care to the people of the island. This group – the second to participate in the Dominica rotation – conducted a first-of-itskind health fair where they spent the day counseling and educating patients about common medical conditions. The students also worked in a local health care clinic. “The most common condition we saw was diabetes, but there were also a lot of questions about kidney disease,” Kristen explains. The clinic was staffed with just two nurses and a physician who rotated between two clinics, so the students’ presence was very much welcomed. “People were so kind, warm and welcoming and excited to see us because they knew that we were there to help,” she adds.

“The patients in Dominica were more enthusiastic about their health care than I’ve seen here at home,” says sixth year Pharm.D. student, Hassan Sheikh. “They really wanted to know about what the medications did and how they affected their health or bodies.” The other component of the mission was teaching. ACPHS students spent two full days in a school with local children from kindergarten through grade 12, where they led a series of compounding exercises and physical activities. With only two pharmacists on the island, there are very few role models for students interested in the profession. “There is a strong, strong need for more pharmacists,” Kristen says. “Our students opened the children’s eyes to pharmacy as a career option.” Aside from teaching the local children, the students also found themselves putting their education to use and thinking on the fly. “We had to work with the tools that were available to us,” Hassan says. “The local people rely more on anecdotal treatment and herbs. It was tricky trying to incorporate their approaches with a [Western] therapy that would be beneficial to the patient. And, while most of the people spoke English, we still had to resort to pictures and more creative ways of communicating. It was challenging, but I believe that we had a positive impact.”

The College expects to offer this rotation twice in the 2012-2013 academic year – once in January and then again in May.

Guatemala After training and preparing for several months, ACPHS students Richa Mehta, Kari McCabe, and Janice Harter, along with faculty member Carmen Mojica, Pharm.D., M.S., embarked on the College’s first rotation in Guatemala. They worked in a clinic in San Raymundo, one hour northwest of Guatemala City. Kari’s first impression of the clinic was not what she expected. “Everything was gated and surrounded by walls so it was a bit intimidating on the outside, but I felt very safe inside. The dorms and cafeteria were more than sufficient and the clinic was well designed. It had a beautiful garden, and the pharmacy was located right in the middle of everything.” The group immediately got to work organizing and cleaning the clinic and taking inventory of what medications they had available to them. Each day the group would eat an early breakfast then head in at 7 a.m. to start their work. On any given day, 200 to 300 patients would pass through the clinic. Upon entering the clinic, a patient would receive a numbered folder containing their charts. Next, their blood pressures and birthdays were noted, along with their chief

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complaints. Then patients were dispensed daily supplies of vitamins and albendazole (a medication to treat tapeworm) to be given to each member in the household.

“The experience from start to finish most certainly changed me.”

“Based on their chief complaints, the patients would be sent to women’s health, pediatrics, general medicine, or the operating room, “ Richa says. “My immediate thought when I saw the operating room was ‘how in the world is this room kept sterile?’ It turned out that the O.R. ran like clockwork, and they took sterilization very seriously. The operating room and the operations that took place there were absolutely amazing.” Some of those procedures included hernia repairs, cyst removals (one woman had a 14 pound tumor removed and went home the very next day), cesarean section, wound cleaning, and suturing. “Spanish is the primary language in Guatemala, and there was no communication in English whatsoever,” says Richa. “Thankfully Dr. Mojica and another pharmacist were fluent in Spanish. We had translators too, but they were usually helping other health care providers. I took Spanish in high school so by the end of the mission, I was comfortable counseling the patients as well.” Some of the other highlights from the trip included spending two days with a medicine man who showed them how he made natural healing remedies. The group also visited a foster home that housed children ages 6 to 12. The kids performed dances and taught them how to make fabrics and masa – a type of tortilla dough. “The experience from start to finish most certainly changed me,” Dr. Mojica says. “It made me realize how lucky we are and how we take everything for granted – our food supply, running water, access to health care, jobs, and education.” Dr. Mojica and Kari both agree that an international mission, where you are helping another human being and making a difference, can have a much bigger impact on one’s life than simply fulfilling a college rotation. “This experience was so touching and rewarding that I would recommend it to anyone,” Kari adds. “It was truly the most memorable experience in my six years at ACPHS. I am determined to go on another mission as soon as possible, and the only question left is when it will fit into my schedule.”

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“People were so kind, warm, welcoming, and excited to see us because they knew that we were there to help.” Belize Last January, sixteen students and one alumnus participated in the College’s first medical mission to Belize. “There was no expectation of getting any sort of credit, just life experience and a desire to help others,” explains Kevin Hickey, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Humanities and Communication, who accompanied the students on the trip. The mission originated from a desire by students Rebecca Nashett and Katelyn Rochester to organize a medical oriented trip to Belize on behalf of the College. Through the assistance of ProWorld, an organization that helps coordinate such trips, the students were placed in villages and clinics throughout the country. Each day the students would see 60 or more patients in “pop up” clinics or go door-todoor into local communities with translators to offer health screenings. A typical screening would include blood pressure, weight check, blood samples, vitals, and patient counseling. If there was a case too involved or complex for the team of pharmacy students and Belizean nurse, a van was waiting nearby to transport the patients to a local hospital.

“We would drive anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour to set up clinics in different underserved rural areas,” Katelyn explains. “Sometimes we set up in an empty community health center that consisted of just a concrete floor and four walls. At one clinic, an outdoor class graciously squeezed together on one half of a cement pad while we used the other half. Luckily, there was a tin roof that kept us fairly dry when it began to pour!” Students also spent one day teaching at the Cristo Rey Elementary School, where they presented lessons to elementary school children on hypertension, hygiene, asthma, and the importance of brushing one’s teeth. “Proworld said that ACPHS students were among the most organized groups they had seen,” Dr. Hickey shares. “We were integrated with college students from other missions and our students stood out as particularly well prepared.” The biggest takeaway for Dr. Hickey was how the students were changed by their experiences and what they learned about themselves and the world around them. “A trip like this to Belize is important because you’re learning so many things. It’s a rich

educational experience, not solely about medicine or pharmacy practice,” Dr. Hickey says. “Our students all stayed with local families so they were having breakfast and dinner with them, sleeping in their homes, and celebrating with these families. They become real, not just anonymous Central American people you hear or read about. They are people who have lives, just like the students.” Rebecca agreed to the benefits of this multifaceted approach to learning and felt transformed by what the experience taught her. “I never expected to become so attached to a country I was only in for two weeks, but I found it difficult to leave the people I had met, lived with, and worked with,” she says. “It is one thing to read about poverty and extreme conditions, but another to actually experience it. It changed my understanding of everyday life.” Looking ahead, there is a group of 18 students who will visit the Peruvian Amazon this summer to help native peoples without access to health care and conduct research on local medicinal plants. Trips are already being planned for next year to places that include Vietnam and Senegal.

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Clinical Thinking

Students Shaped by Experiences at Inner City Clinic Humbled and privileged. These are words commonly used by ACPHS pharmacy students who volunteer at the Koinonia Primary Care clinic located in the heart of inner city Albany. The clinic was founded in 2002 by Dr. Bob Paeglow (known to all as Dr. Bob) to help care for the people of the West Hill and Arbor Hill neighborhoods of the city, where few of the residents can afford medical insurance. Koinonia provides patients with primary medical and mental health services – regardless of their ability to pay. As an extension of his commitment to service, Dr. Bob created a program called Care from the Start to “help teach medical students the joys of caring for the poor and less fortunate.” ACPHS students Bridget Lenaghan, Annemarie “Annie” Nardolillo, and Kenzie Keenan learned of the program and inquired about volunteer opportunities for pharmacy students to which Dr. Bob happily obliged. ACPHS student Annie Nardolillo discusses a patient case with Dr. Bob Paeglow (middle) and a medical student while volunteering at the Koinonia Primary Care clinic in Albany.

Care from the Start is entirely student based and the work of this program is done exclusively at Koinonia. On Wednesday evenings, after the clinic’s normal hours, students from Albany Medical College (AMC) and ACPHS arrive at Koinonia to treat “real world” patients. There are four groups of AMC students and within each group there is one ACPHS student. Annie says, “It is a privilege to be a part of this program. Not only are we helping people in need, but we are building relationships with future physicians and learning how important an interdisciplinary approach is to effective patient care.” “It’s a win-win situation,” says Dr. Bob of the medical student-pharmacy student dynamic. “The more the two professions work with each other, the more they understand the value that each brings to the team. In the

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ACPHS students work side-by-side with medical students at the Koinonia Primary Care Clinic (left), where they treat residents of the West Hill and Arbor Hill sections of Albany.

end, the patient benefits from the expertise of both professionals.” Typically, the medical students perform triage and initial clinical assessments, and the pharmacy students review medication lists and conduct reconciliations. The teams then report their findings back to a physician or resident on duty. Depending upon the situation, the pharmacy students may also be involved with taking vitals and doing triage. “We’ve been able to care for many disease states including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, asthma, cold/flu-like symptoms, and pain,” says Kenzie. “Each week I worked at the clinic, I became more confident in my therapeutic assessments as I became better at counseling patients.” In describing how this work reaches beyond the scope of what she might see in a more traditional practice experience, Annie says, “We are doing examinations, practicing skills such as patient assessment, and learning how to communicate with a wide range of patients. This experience is helping us to prioritize conditions in a very limited timeframe.” Since the clinic has so many patients on these “after hours” evenings, time is truly at a premium. “Fifteen minutes per case per team may be all the time you have,” says Bridget, “so you need to know what’s important to treat. This interdisciplinary approach

is teaching us how flexibility in working with our team and our patients is essential in providing treatment.”

“It is a privilege to be part of this program. Not only are we helping people in need, but we are building relationships with future physicians.” An example of this flexibility was demonstrated recently when a female patient who had been taking medications for headaches returned to the clinic. Lab values showed that she was reaching liver failure, had symptoms of stroke, and numbness. These were reported to Dr. Bob who prompted the student volunteers to consult with each other. The students came to the conclusion that the patient was pre-diabetic (which Dr. Bob already knew but wanted the students to discover using their knowledge of the case). Annie says, “The plan of treatment was based on the recommendations of the whole team, and it was rewarding to see that our teamwork was effective for the patient.”

The interactions with teammates, residents, Dr. Bob, and of course, the patients, are exposing the ACPHS students to the heart of pharmacy practice – patient care. “Working in this clinic and collaborating with future physicians is something I would recommend to every pharmacy student,” says Bridget. “I joined Care from the Start to work with underprivileged patients. It’s been an eye-opening experience. I’m so glad to have had this opportunity.” Annie says, “Dr. Bob tells us to treat patients with the respect and compassion they deserve. I wanted to break the habit of rote, rehearsed questions when working with patients. I wanted to be more comfortable with how I sounded. This experience has been amazing.” Although he has few material possessions, Dr. Bob considers himself incredibly rich. This richness, he says, has come from investing in the lives of others, not only of the poor, but also in those who will carry on his legacy of caring for and serving those less fortunate. With students at ACPHS and AMC lining up to volunteer in the Care from the Start program, it appears that his legacy will be secure.

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Alumni Spotlight

Prescription for Hope Alumni Couple Transformed by Medical Mission to Hispaniola Growing up on a dairy farm in upstate New York did not afford Sarah Price with many opportunities to travel. That all changed when she met her future husband. Approximately three hours north of Sarah in Champlain, New York, Colin Price was born to two teachers and traveled frequently with his parents to the West Coast and Europe as a child, then Central and South America with his father throughout college. Colin and Sarah both enrolled at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in 1997. They met as freshmen and began dating as second year students. “I had never left New York until Colin came into my life,” Sarah explains. “My first trip overseas to Europe was an eye opener for someone who grew up in a small town with only one stoplight. After that trip, I was hooked.” The two graduated in 2002 and, after taking their boards, they spent a few months backpacking through Europe.

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“For the next seven years we worked in Utah for the winter months and traveled in the summer,” Sarah says. They trekked through Central America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the United States. After getting married in 2006, they took a three month honeymoon around the world. Last June, Colin and Sarah set off on a different kind of trip. They volunteered for a one week medical mission with an organization called International Aid Serving Kids (iASK) to the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, which is made up of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. iASK has been in existence for ten years, operating to improve the living conditions of orphaned, abandoned, and poverty-stricken children around the world, with a primary focus on Haiti and the Dominican Republic. “Sarah and I both work at Smith’s pharmacy,” Colin began, which is a division of The Kroger Co. supermarket chain, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. “A colleague of ours had gone on this mission in the past


Colin (left) and Sarah Price, members of the ACPHS Class of 2002, were part of a team of health care professionals who went on a one-week mission to the countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

and put us in contact with the leader and president of the organization.” The Prices’s were part of a team of medical professionals that included a dentist, lab team, two nurses, and a physician from California. They stayed at a hotel in Higuay in central Dominican Republic, about an hour ride by car to their worksite. On the first day, Colin and Sarah collected and organized all the drugs so they knew what they had available to them. “Each medical mission brings and leaves behind medications and supplies,” Colin says. “We also brought and shipped stuff down so it was important to lay it all out and be prepared in order to do our jobs and help people as effectively as possible.” After driving miles and miles through sugar plantations, they came across batays, or corporately owned villages that were built in the middle of the sugar plantations. “We set up clinics in small vacant concrete chapels there,” he says. “Our goal was to de-worm everyone with oral medication. It was a standard protocol. Every child who came through to be seen for something, and who was old enough, was given a tablet in their mouth.”

It was pretty chaotic at times. “There were people everywhere outside the chapel, looking in and congregating. We had to focus on the children and the elderly who were really in pain and could hardly walk,” says Colin.

“These people needed medical care, sanitation, and running water, yet they radiated happiness just because we gave them attention and provided them with the most basic care.” A patient would get directed to either the dentist or the doctor upon arrival. “The dentist’s job was pretty straightforward,” Colin says. “The physician, working through translators, found it a lot harder because he didn’t completely know what drugs we had. Many times he would just send us symptoms, and we would be responsible for treating them.”

lenol and ibuprofen for pain were primarily what made up the couple hundred prescriptions that passed through the pharmacy each day. “Otherwise, we just prescribed a lot of hope and attention,” Colin explains. “People can be so happy when they have so little. These people needed medical care, sanitation, and running water, yet they radiated happiness just because we gave them attention and provided them with the most basic care. They were so appreciative.” Colin and Sarah insist that they were the ones who were changed and humbled by the experience. “This trip shaped us into who we are today, individually and as a couple,” says Sarah. “It was extremely rewarding for me to be a part of a mission to help people in need of medical care, using my education and working together with my husband. Many of these people live in pain and discomfort because they do not have access to medical care, nor are they educated on proper hygiene practices. It may seem like basic care to us, but to them it makes their quality of life so much better.”

A high volume of vitamins, antifungals for ringworm, antibiotics for infection, and Ty-

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Financial Report As of June 30, 2011

Balance Sheet ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Other assets Accounts receivable - Students Receivables - Government entities Pledges receivable Student loan receivable Other receivables Agency funds Deposits with Bond Trustees Property, plant & equipment - Net

$ 21,571,282 19,737,415 1,908,793 385,524 428,631 1,643,836 2,279,359 396,041 261,696 1,155,041 55,756,326

Total Assets

$ 105,523,944

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LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Deferred income and deposits U.S. government grants refundable Bonds payable Expected post retirement benefit obligation Other liabilities Deposits held in custody for others

$ 3,194,279 8,740,043 2,198,274 27,996,278 1,183,195 981,866 261,696

Total Liabilities

$ 44,555,631

Net Assets Unrestricted net assets Temporarily restricted net assets Permanently restricted net assets

$ 52,401,128 1,616,215 6,950,970

Total Net Assets

$ 60,968,313

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$105,523,944


Statement of Activities REVENUES Student tuition and fees (net) Auxilliary enterprises Government contracts and grants Gifts and pledges Investment income Other sources Postgraduate education

Total EXPENSES Instruction/Student services Physical plant General administration Research Institutional advancement Student financial aid Postgraduate education

Total

% OF TOTAL 73.18% 8.34% 7.02% 4.94% 3.80% 2.48% 0.25%

100.00% % OF TOTAL 40.05% 26.73% 19.90% 8.22% 2.73% 1.89% 0.48%

100.00%

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Make a Difference in the Future of Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Support the Moving Forward Capital Campaign In fall 2011, the College launched its Moving Forward Capital Campaign, the largest fundraising campaign in the school’s history. The Campaign’s objective is to raise $50 million to support a variety of student-focused initiatives that are critical to the continued growth and competitiveness of the College.

$4M

Library Renovations

$7.5M

Faculty Endowed Chairs and Technology Needs

$3.3M

Student Event Fund and Global Experiences

$2M

$11.2M

$20M

Athletics Field

Scholarships

Research Labs and Equipment

$2M www.acphs.edu/movingforward 26

ACPHS Academy


Scholarly Activity Report

This report covers research and scholarly activities from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011.

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Scholarly Activity Report School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Cardone KE, Bacchus S, Assimon M, Pai AB, Manley HJ. MedicationRelated Problems in Chronic Kidney Disease. Adv in Chronic Kidney Dis, 2010.

Dept. of Pharmacy Practice - Albany Campus

Robert DiCenzo DiFrancesco R, Rosenkranz SL, Mukherjee AL, Demeter LM, Jiang H, DiCenzo R, Dykes C, Rinehart A, Albrecht M, Morse GD. Quality Assessment for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG 5146): A Multicenter Clinical Trial. Ther Drug Monit, 2010.

PUBLICATIONS George Bailie Bailie GR, Horl WH, Verhoef JJ. Differences in spontaneously reported hypersensitivity and serious adverse events for IV iron preparations: Comparison of Europe and North America. Drug Research 61: 267-75, 2011. Bailie GR. Efficacy and safety of ferric carboxymaltose in correcting iron-deficiency anemia: a review of randomized controlled trials across different indications. ArzneimForsch/ DrugRes, 2010. Sal Bottiglieri Bottiglieri S, Muluneh B, Sutphin S, Iacovelli L, Adams V. Blood pressure control in patients receiving bevacizumab in an outpatient cancer center. J Oncol Pharm Pract, 2010. Bottiglieri S, Adams V. Pharmacologic Prevention of Skeletal-Related Events in Cancer Patients. Orthopedics, 2010. Jill Butterfield Butterfield J, Patel N, Pai MP, Rosano TG, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Refining Vancomycin Protein Binding Estimates: Identification of Clinical Factors that Influence Protein Binding. Antimicrob Agents Chemother, Jun 13, 2011. [PubMed PMID: 21670191] Katie Cardone Cardone KE, Bacchus S, Assimon MM, Pai AB, Manley HJ. Medicationrelated problems in CKD. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 17(5):404-12, 2010. Cardone KE, Lodise TP, Patel N, Hoy CD, Meola S, Manley HJ, Drusano GL, Grabe DW. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous daptomycin during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 6(5):1081-8, May 2011. [PubMed PMID: 21393490; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3087774] Cardone KE, Manley HJ, Grabe DW, Meola S, Hoy CD, Bailie GR. Quantifying home medication regimen changes and quality of life in patients receiving nocturnal home hemodialysis. Hemodial Int 15(2):234-42.

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Gina Garrison Medina MS, Garrison GD, Brazeau GA. Finding Time for Faculty Development (viewpoint). American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 74 (10):179: 1-2, 2010. Darren Grabe Grabe DW. Antimicrobial agents. Semin Dial. 23(5):472-4, SeptemberOctober, 2010. Matzke GR, Aronoff GR, Atkinson AJ Jr, Bennett WM, Decker BS, Eckardt KU, Golper T, Grabe DW, Kasiske B, Keller F, Kielstein JT, Mehta R, Mueller BA, Pasko DA, Schaefer F, Sica DA, Inker LA, Umans JG, Murray P. Drug dosing consideration in patients with acute and chronic kidney disease-a clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO). Kidney Int. 2011 Dec;80(11):1122-37. doi: 10.1038/ki.2011.322. Epub September 14, 2011. Michael Kane Traina AN, Kane MP, Bakst G, Busch RS, Abelseth JM, Hamilton RA. Efficacy of teriparatide in patients with resolved secondary hyperparathyroidism due to vitamin D deficiency. Endocrine Practice 17:568-73, 2011. Traina AN. Kane MP. A Primer on pramlintide: an amylin analog. The Diabetes Educator. 37: 426-431, May/ June 2011.

Nicole Stack Lodise McIntosh J, Rafie S, Wasik M, McBane S, Lodise NM, El-Ibiary S, Forinash A, Djuric-Kachlic M, Rowe E, Besinque K. Changing Oral Contraceptives from Prescription to Over-theCounter Status: An Opinion Paper of the Women’s Health Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. Pharmacotherapy 31(4), 2011. Thomas Lodise Pai MP, Lodise TP. Steady-State Plasma Pharmacokinetics of Oral Voriconazole in Obese Adults. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. 2011 Jun;55(6):2601-5. Drusano GL, Lodise TP, Melnick D, Liu W, Oliver A, Mena A, VanScoy B, Louie A. Meropenem penetration into epithelial lining fluid in mice and humans and delineation of exposure targets. Antimicrob Agents Chemothe. Epub May 16, 2011. [PubMed PMID: 21576431; PubMed Central PMCID:PMC3122433] Lodise TP, Sorgel F, Melnick D, Mason B, Kinzig M, Drusano GL. Penetration of meropenem into epithelial lining fluid of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55(4):1606-10, April, 2011. [PubMed PMID: 21300830; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3067164] Patel N, Scheetz MH, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Determination of antibiotic dosage adjustments in patients with renal impairment: elements for success. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2010 Nov;65(11):2285-90. Epub 2010 Aug 24. Patel N, Harrington S, Dihmess A, Woo B, Masoud R, Martis P, Fiorenza M, Graffunder E, Evans A, McNutt LA, Lodise TP. Clinical epidemiology of carbapenem-intermediate or -resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. 2011 Jul;66(7):1600-8.

Traina AN, Kane MP, Bakst G, Abelseth JM, Busch RS. A Pharmacist-run Reclast Clinic. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 68:1399-403, 2011.

Patel N, Pai MP, Rodvold KA, Lomaestro BM, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Vancomycin: We Can’t Get There from Here. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2011 Apr 15;52(8):969-74.

Edwards KL, Riche DM, Stroup JS, Goldman-Levine JD, Padiyara RS, Cross LB, Kane MP. Insulin Glargine and Cancer Risk: An Opinion Statement of the Endocrine and Metabolism Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. Pharmacotherapy. 30:955–65, 2010.

Cardone KE, Lodise TP, Patel N, Manley HJ, Hoy CD, Meola SA, Drusano GL, Grabe DW. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous daptomycin during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2011 May;6(5):1081-8. Epub 2011 Mar 10.

Patel N, Cardone KE, Grabe DW, Meola S, Hoy C, Manley H, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Use of Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Principles to Determine Optimal Administration of Daptomycin in Patients Receiving Standardized Thrice Weekly Hemodialysis. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. 2011 Apr;55(4):167783. Epub 2011 Jan 31. Patel N, Scheetz MH, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Identification of Optimal Renal Dosage Adjustments for Traditional and Extended Infusion Piperacillin/Tazobactam Dosing Regimens in Hospitalized Patients. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. 2010 Jan;54(1):460-5. Epub 2009 Oct 26. Lodise TP, Butterfield J. Use of pharmacodynamic principles to inform β-lactam dosing: “S” does not always mean success. J Hosp Med. 6 Suppl 1:S16-23. doi: 10.1002/jhm.869, January, 2011. [PubMed PMID: 21225946] Lodise TP, Drusano GL. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: optimal antimicrobial therapy in the intensive care unit. Crit Care Clin. 27(1):1-18, January, 2011. [PubMed PMID: 21144983] Margaret Malone Malone M, Alger-Mayer S, Polimeni JM. Antidepressant drug therapy does not affect weight loss one year after gastric bypass surgery. Obes Surg 2011. DOI 10.1007/s11695-0100351-4. Published online January 14, 2011. Darius Mason How PP, Anattiwong P, Mason DL, Arruda JA, Lau AH. Phosphate-binding efficacy of crushed vs. chewed lanthanum carbonate in hemodialysis patients. Hemodial Int 15:95-99, 2011. Hudson JQ, Mason DL, Huch K. Estimates of Kidney Function in Obese African-Americans with Kidney Disease. Nephron Clin Pract 118:c101-c108, 2011. Mason DL, Best SD. Contemporary Pharmacotherapy: Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy. Advances. Chronic Kidney Disease, 2010. Patrick Meek Meek PD, Evang SG, Tadrous M, RouxLirange D, Triller DM, Gumustop B. Overactive Bladder Drugs and Constipation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials. Dig Dis Sci, 2010.


Christopher Miller Miller CD, Crain J, Tran B, Patel N. Rilpivirine: A new addition to the anti-HIV-1 armamentarium. Drugs of Today (Barc) 47(1):5-15, 2011.

Pai MP, Lodise TP. Oseltamivir pharmacokinetics in obese adults: Dose modification for weight is not necessary. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55(12):5640-5, 2011.

Patel N, Pai MP, Rodvold KA, Lomaestro B, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Vancomycin: we can’t get there from here. Clin Infect Dis 52(8):969-74, 2011.

Anthony Nicasio Crandon JL, Ariano RE, Zelenitsky SA, Nicasio AM, Kuti JL, Nicolau DP. Optimization of meropenem dosage in the critically ill population based on renal function. Intensive Care Med 37(4):632-8, April 2011.

Pai MP, Lodise TP. Steady–state plasma pharmacokinetics of voriconazole in obese adults. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55(6):2601-5, 2011.

Patel N, Scheetz M, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Determination of Antibiotic Dosage Adjustments in Patients with Renal Impairment: Elements for Success. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2010.

Wiskirchen DE, Koomanachai P, Nicasio AM, Nicolau DP, Kuti JL. In vitro pharmacodynamics of simulated pulmonary exposures of tigecycline alone and in combination against Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates producing a KPC carbapenemase. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55(4):1420-7, April 2011. Amy Barton Pai Moore CL, Pai AB. CKD: Pharmacotherapy in a House of Mirrors. Adv in Chronic Kidney Dis, 2010. Gupta A, Zhuo J, Zha J, Reddy S, Olp J, Pai AB. Effect of different intravenous iron preparations on lymphocyte intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and subpopulation survival. BMC Nephrology, 2010. Pai AB, McQuade C, Olp J. Hicks P, Conner T. Non-transferrin Bound Iron (NTBI), Cytokine Activation and Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in hemodialysis (HD) Patients Receiving Iron Dextran (ID) or Iron Sucrose (IS). Biometals, Jan 13, 2011. Pai AB, Nielson JC, Kausz A, Miller P, Owen J. Plasma Pharmacokinetics of two consecutive doses of ferumoxytol in Healthy Subjects. Clin Pharmacol Ther 30:1-5, June 2010. Cardone KE, Bacchus S, Assimon MM, Pai AB, Manley HJ. Medicationrelated problems in CKD. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis, 2010 Sep;17(5):404-12. Manjunath (Amit) Pai Pai MP. Estimating the glomerular filtration rate for drug dosing in obesity. Adv Chron Kid Dis, 2010.

Pai MP, Nafziger AN, Bertino JS. Simplified dosing of aminoglycosides in underweight and obese adult patients. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55(9):4006-11, 2011. Morrish G, Pai MP, Green B. The effects of obesity on drug pharmacokinetics in humans. Exp Opin Drug Metab Toxicol, 7(6):697-706. 2011. Pai MP. Estimating the glomerular filtration rate in obese adult patients for drug dosing. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 17(5):e53-62, September, 2010. [PubMed PMID: 20727504] Nimish Patel Patel N, Abdelsayed S, Veve M, Miller CD. Predictors of Clinically Significant Drug-Drug Interactions among Patients Treated with Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase inhibitor-, Protease Inhibitor-, and Raltegravirbased Antiretroviral Regimens. Ann Pharmacother 45(3):317-24, 2011. Patel N, Cardone K, Grabe DW, Meola S, Hoy C, Manley H, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. Use of Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Principles to Determine Optimal Administration of Daptomycin in Patients Receiving Standardized Thrice Weekly Hemodialysis. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55(4):1677-83, 2011. Patel N, Harrington S, Dihmess A, Woo B, Masoud R, Martis P, Fiorenza M, Graffunder E, Evans A, McNutt LA, Lodise TP. Clinical epidemiology of carbapenem-intermediate or -resistant Enterobacteriaceae. J Antimicrob Chemother. 66(7): 1600-8, July 2011.

John Polimeni Polimeni, John M. Factor Five: Transforming the Global Economy Through 80% Improvements in Resource Productivity, Ecological Economics, Vol. 70, Number 6, Pages 1240-1241, 2011. Polimeni, John M. Transdisciplinarity and Higher Education, International Journal of Transdisciplinary Research, Vol. 6, Number 1, Pages 83-84, 2012.

BOOKS Robert DiCenzo DiCenzo, R. (Ed.). Clinical Pharmacist’s Guide to Biostatistics and Literature Evaluation. Lenexa, KS: American College of Clinical Pharmacy. 2011. Manjunath (Amit) Pai Piscitelli S, Rodvold KA, Pai MP (Editors). Drug Interactions in Infectious Diseases, Third Edition. Springer, New York, NY. 2011. John Polimeni, Ray Chandrasekara Polimeni, John M., R. Chandrasekara, and S. Mel. The Economic Growth, Environment, Public Health Connection: An Ecological Economic Case Study of the Impact of the Yali Falls Dam on Cambodia. Linus Publications, Inc., 2011.

BOOK CHAPTERS Amy Barton Pai, Darius Mason Barton Pai, A, Mason DL. DrugInduced Diseases of the Kidney and Fluids and Electrolyte Disorders. Acute Renal Diseases. In: Tisdale J, Miller D. Drug-Induced Diseases, Prevention, Detection and Management. American Society of HealthSystems Pharmacists. Bethesda, MD. American Society of Health-System Pharmacist; 2010. Michael Brodeur, Sean Mirk Brodeur MR, Mirk SM. Respiratory Disorders in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy an Evidence Based Approach. 1st Edition. 2010.

Michael Kane Traina AN, Kane MP. Adrenal Hormones. In: Smith KM, Riche DM, Henyan NN, editors. Clinical Drug Data (formerly Clinical Handbook of Drug Data). 11th ed. McGraw Hill; New York, NY, 2010. Kane MP. Diabetes Mellitus. In: Bainbridge JL, Barbour SY, Coyle EA, et al. Updates in Therapeutics: Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Preparatory Review Course, 2011 ed. Lenexa, KS. American College of Clinical Pharmacy, 1-71 - 1-100, 2011. Traina AN, Kane MP. Hyperthyroidism Graves’ Disease. In: Katz M, Matthias KR, Chisholm-Burns MA. Pharmacotherapy Principles and Practice Study Guide: A Case Based Care Plan Approach. McGraw Hill: New York, NY, 2011. Kane MP. Other Endocrine Disorders. In: Bainbridge JL, Barbour SY, Coyle EA, et al. Updates in Therapeutics: Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Preparatory Review Course, 2011 ed. Lenexa, KS. American College of Clinical Pharmacy, 1-101 – 1-142, 2011. Thomas Lodise Brown JE, Dengler J, Lodise TP. Outcomes and Cost Considerations with MRSA Infections. In Weigelt. MRSA: 2nd Edition. Informa Healthcare USA, Inc, 249-275, 2010. Darius Mason, Magdalene Assimon Mason DL, Assimon MM. Chronic Kidney Disease. In: Koda-Kimble MA, Young LY, Kradjan WA, Guglielmo JB , Alldredge BK, eds. In: Applied Therapeutics: The Clinical Use of Drugs. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (In Press). Anthony Nicasio Nicasio AM, Kuti JL, Nicolau DP. Chapter 50, Televancin. In: Kucers’ The Use of Antibiotics, 6th ed; Grayson ML, Crowe SM, McCarthy JS, Mills J, Mouton JW, Norrby SR, Paterson DL, Pfaller MA eds. Great Britain: Hodder Education, 2010. Manjunath (Amit) Pai Crawford T, Pai MP, Rodvold KA. Infective endocarditis (Case). In: Schwinghammer TL, Ed. Pharmacotherapy Casebook 7th Edition, Chicago, McGraw-Hill, 2011. John Polimeni Polimeni J. Energy Consumption in Transitional Economies: Jevons’ Paradox for Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Poland, with Raluca Ioana Iorgulescu. In: Lucian-Liviu Albu (Ed.), Non-Linear Modelling in Economics Beyond Standard Economics, Editura Expert, pp 271-288, 2011.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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John Polimeni (cont’d) Polimeni, J. It’s Always Sunny in Romania, In: Remus Pricopie, Dorina Guţu, and Mihai Moroiu (Eds.), 3rd Fulbright Anniversary Volume: Fulbright Ripple Effect on International Education; Looking Ahead From a Romanian and American Perspective, Romanian-U.S. Fulbright Commission and Comunicare.ro Publishing House, pp 196-204, 2011. Polimeni, J. Multi-scale Integrated Analysis of Societal Metabolism and Jevons’ Paradox for Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Poland, with Raluca Ioana Iorgulescu, In: Lucian-Liviu Albu (Ed.), Non-Linear Modelling in Economics - Beyond Standard Economics, Editura Expert, pp 291-307, 2011. Polimeni, J. The Impact of the Basescu Presidency on Romanian Agriculture, with Raluca Iorgulescu and Lucian-Liviu Albu. In: Ronald F. King and Paul E. Sum (Eds.), Romania Under Basescu: Aspirations, Achievements, and Frustrations During His First Presidential Term, Lexington Books, pp 293-308, 2011. Sarah Scarpace Scarpace, SL. Chapter 99, Supportive Care in Oncology. In: Pharmacotherapy: Principles and Practice, 2nd ed; Chisholm-Burns M, Schwinghammer TL, Wells BG, Malone PM, Kolesar JM, and DiPiro JT eds. New York: McGraw-Hill, pp 1649-1680, 2011. Scarpace, SL. Head and Neck Cancer. In: Richardson M, Chant C, Chessman KH, Finks SW, Hemstreet BA, Hume AL, et al, eds. Pharmacotherapy Self-Assessment Program, 7th ed, Oncology. Lenexa, KS: American College of Clinical Pharmacy, pp 108-123, 2011.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Magdalene Assimon Assimon MM, Mathew RO, Mason DL. Persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism: the relationship between FGF23 and cinacalcet. Abstract # SA-PO2939. American Society of Nephrology Renal Week, Denver, CO, November, 2010. George Bailie Bailie GR. Serious adverse events to IV iron in the United States. Platform presentation at European Dialysis and Transplant Association Annual Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, June 2011.

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Bailie GR, Tong L, Li Y, Mason NA, Pisoni RL, Goodkin DA, Locatelli F, Marshall MR, Inaba M, Robinson BM. Association of Intravenous Iron (ivFe) Dosing with Mortality: Findings from the DOPPS. Presented at American Society of Nephrology, Denver, CO, November 2010. Bailie GR. Emerging problems with iron sucrose similars. Invited presentation to the Harmonization of Regulatory Approaches workshop, FIP/AAPS annual meeting, New Orleans, LA, November, 2010. Bailie GR, Hoerl W, Verhoef JJ. Differences in serious adverse event reporting rates from IV iron by country. Poster at American Society of Nephrology annual meeting, Denver, CO, November, 2010. Bailie GR, Tong L, Li Y, et al. Association of intravenous iron dosing and mortality. Platform presentation, American Society of Nephrology annual meeting, Denver, CO, November, 2010. Bailie GR, Verhoef JJ, Hoerl W. Adverse events associated with IV iron preparations: comparison of Europe and N. America. Abstract at FIP/AAPS annual meeting, New Orleans, LA, November, 2010. Laurie Briceland Briceland LL, Dukes L. Scholarship in Experiential Education: Stories from the Trenches. 2011 AACP Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, July 11, 2011. Briceland LL. Creation of Certification of Hours Form to Document APPE Student Attendance. 2010 AACP Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. July 2010. Briceland LL. Pharmacy Admissions Interviewing: Scoring Rubrics, Tips for Success. 2010 AACP Annual Meeting, Seattle WA, July 12, 2010. Michael Brodeur Brodeur MR. Medication Management in Older Adults: Medical Grand Rounds at Glens Falls Hospital. June 1, 2011. Katie Cardone Cardone KE, Assimon MM, Mason D, Pai AB, Grabe DW. Medication regimen complexity among patients with chronic kidney disease stages 3-5D. American Society of Nephrology Renal Week; Denver, CO, November 16-21, 2010. Cardone KE, Daoui R, Hoy CD, Meola SA, Bailie GR. Serum phosphorus variability in patients on home dialysis modalities. 13th International Conference on Dialysis, Advances in CKD 2011, Miami, FL, January 26-28, 2011.

Cardone KE, Hoy CD, Daoui R, Meola SA, Bailie GR. Fluctuations in serum phosphorus concentration in patients receiving hemodialysis. 13th International Conference on Dialysis, Advances in CKD 2011, Miami, FL, January 26-28, 2011. Cardone KE, Lodise TP, Patel N, Manley HJ, Hoy CD, Meola SA, Drusano GL, Grabe DW. Use of population (pop) pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) to determine optimal daptomycin (D) dosing in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). American Society of Nephrology Renal Week; Denver, CO: November 16-21, 2010. Jennifer Cerulli Cerulli J. Reducing Medication Errors: Does Counseling Help? Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY. August18, 2010. Robert DiCenzo DiCenzo R, S. Jimenez. Assessing APPE Student Interest in Twitter as a Means of Experiential Education Office (EEO) Communication. AACP Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. July 2010.

Jessica Farrell Farrell J. Current Medications Prescribed in Lupus & Your Relationship with Your Pharmacist. The Arthritis Foundation, Arthritis Expo. Saratoga Springs, NY. April 30, 2011. Gina Garrison Garrison G. Hypertension Management and Patient Monitoring/Case Discussions. Presented at the ACPHS Annual Cardiology Symposium. ACPHS Albany campus, September 12, 2010. Garrison G. Pharmacy-based Immunization Delivery National Certificate Program for Pharmacists. Presented at ACPHS Albany campus, October 30, 2010. Michael Kane Kane MP. ACCP 2011 Updates In Therapeutics: The Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Preparatory Review Course; Other Endocrine Disorders chapter. Columbus, OH, April 8, 2011. Kane MP. ACCP 2011 Updates In Therapeutics: The Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Preparatory Review Course; Diabetes Mellitus chapter. Columbus, OH, April 8, 2011.


Scholarly Activity Report Kane MP. The Endocrine Group Grand Rounds; Thioamide Use in HTR: Which to Use, When, and Why. Albany, NY, July 14, 2010.

Lodise TP. Health Outcomes and Economics. Cubist Pharmaceuticals Sales Representative Training. Lexington, MA, October 4, 2010.

Kane MP. The Osteopathic Founders Foundation. An Update in Women’s Health: Osteoporosis Treatment Update. Tulsa, OK, October 9, 2010.

Lodise TP. Highlights from ICAAC, IDSA, SHEA and the Literature. 14th Annual Making a Difference in Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy (MAD-ID) Meeting. Orlando, FL, May 14, 2011.

Nicole Stack Lodise Lodise NM. Pharmacotherapy of Tobacco Use and Dependence. North Country Tobacco Cessation Center, Saranac Lake, NY, January 20, 2011. Lodise NM. Tobacco Dependence: Treatment Options and an approach to Special Populations. Presented at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Annual Respiratory Disease and Pharmacotherapy Program, Albany, NY, March, 2011. Lodise NM. Treating Tobacco Dependence. Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Grand Rounds. Plattsburgh, NY, January 21, 2011. Thomas Lodise Lodise TP. Advanced PK/PD. 14th Annual Making a Difference in Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy (MAD-ID), Orlando, FL, May 12, 2011. Lodise TP. Applied Antimicrobial Pharmacodynamics: From Bench to Bedside. A Focus on Beta- Lactam Antibiotics. ACPE accredited continuing education; New York State Council of Health-system Pharmacists Antimicrobial Stewardship Certificate Program. Rochester, NY, June 17, 2011. Lodise TP. Applied Antimicrobial Pharmacodynamics: From Bench to Bedside. A Focus on Beta- Lactam Antibiotics. ACPE accredited continuing education; New York State Council of Health-system Pharmacists Antimicrobial Stewardship Certificate Program. Augusta, ME, November 12, 2010. Lodise TP. Clinical Application of Pharmacodynamics. 48th Annual IDSA Meeting. Session Title: Most Influential Papers in Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy. Vancouver, Canada., October 21, 2010. Lodise TP. Considering Health Outcomes and Economics in Infection Management. Cubist Pharmaceuticals National Speaker’s Training Meeting. Detroit, MI, October 1, 2010. Lodise TP. Getting Started in Clinical Research: Elements for Success. Temple University School of Pharmacy, 2011 Research Recognition Day. Philadelphia, PA, February 25, 2011.

Lodise TP. PK/PD Characteristics of Glycopeptides and Lipopeptides. 50th ICAAC Annual Meeting. Session Title: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Glycopeptides and Lipopeptides. Boston, MA, September 12, 2010. Lodise TP. PK/PD for the Practicing Clinician. 21st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Session Title: Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Real World: Methods, Interventions, and Relationships That You Should Be Developing. Dallas, TX, April 1, 2011. Lodise TP. Use of PK/PD to Inform Dose Selection. Invited Presentation. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar Series Presentation. Albany, NY, October 14, 2010. Lodise TP. The Vancomycin Story. Cubist Pharmaceuticals Sales Representative Training. Lexington, MA, September 27, 2010. Lodise, TP. PK/PD Characteristics of Glycopeptides and Lipopeptides. Invited Presentation; 50th ICAAC Annual Meeting. Session Title: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Glycopeptides and Lipopeptides, Session Type: Slide Session, September 12, 2010, Boston, MA. Goff DA, Boening AJ, McKinnon PS, Lodise TP. Health Outcomes of Clinically Relevant Patient Populations Treated with Daptomycin for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Skin Infections. Abstract ID# 30998. International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) 16th Annual International Meeting. Baltimore, MD, May 21-25, 2011. Culshaw D, Lamp KC. Lodise TP. Impact of Prior Vancomycin Duration of Therapy on Daptomycin Outcomes in MRSA Bacteremia. Abstract # L1-1755. Poster Presentation at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC). Boston, MA, September 14, 2010.

Lodise TP, LaPensee K, Berger A, Laudano J, Drusano G. Comparison of Hospital Length of Stay Between Ceftaroline Fosamil and Ceftriaxone Among Hospitalized Patients With Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: Analysis of Two Phase III Randomized Controlled Trials. Abstract # 5-072. Poster Presentation at the American Society of Healthsystems Pharmacists (ASHP) 2010 Midyear Annual Meeting. Anaheim, CA, December 2010.

Margaret Malone Malone M. Challenges in Healthcare Utilization in the Obese population. ACCP Annual meeting, Pharmaceutical Industry and Endocrine and Metabolism PRN focus session. Pittsburgh, PA, October 2011.

Lodise TP, Su Y, Tourkodimitris S, Berger A, Lapensee K, Oster G, Paladino J. Medical Resource Utilization For Hospitalized Community-Acquired Pneumonia Treated with Ceftaroline Fosamil or Ceftriaxone. Abstract #O-2217. Poster Presentation at the 50th ICAAC. Boston, MA, September 15, 2010.

Malone M. National ASPEN Teleseminar, Bariatric Surgery: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Optimize Patient Outcomes. Management of nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

Cardone KE, Lodise TP, Patel N, Manley HJ, Hoy CD, Meola SA, Drusano GL, Grabe DW. Use of population pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation to determine optimal daptomycin dosing in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Abstract #SA-PO2741. Poster Presentation at the American Society of Nephrology Renal Week 2010, Denver, CO, November 2010 (J Am Soc Nephrol 2010;21:739A). Presenter: Grabe. Patel N, Fiorenza M, Dihmess A, Martis P, Graffunder E, Harrington SM, Lodise TP. Predictors of CarbapenemResistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections Among Patients with Enterobacteriaceae Infections. Abstract # 227. Poster Presentation at the 48th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Vancouver, Canada. October 22, 2010. Presenter: Lodise. Nicasio AM, Lodise TP, Evans AM, Harrington SM. Evaluation of Carbapenem Pharmacodynamic Target Attainment Using Three Minimum Inhibitory Concentration Testing Methods for Klebsiella Pneumoniae Harboring Carbapenamases. Abstract # 241. Poster Presentation at the 48th Annual Meeting of the IDSA, Vancouver, Canada, October 22, 2010. Presenter: Nicasio. Pai MP, Lodise TP. Pharmacokinetics of Voriconazole in Obese Adults. Abstract #A1-044. Poster Presentation at the 50th ICAAC, Boston, MA, September 12, 2010. Presenter: Pai.

Malone M. Medication considerations before and after bariatric surgery. 2nd Annual Ward Dunnican Memorial 2011 Conference on Bariatrics and Nutrition. Albany NY.

Malone M, Alger-Mayer S, Lindstrom J, Bailie GR. Iron deficiency and anemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. ACCP Annual Meeting, October 2010. Malone M, Alger-Mayer S, Lindstrom J, Bailie GR. Iron deficiency (ID) and anemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Society for Advancement of Bloof Management, Puerto Rico, September 2010. Malone M, Alger-Mayer S, Lindstrom J. Efficacy of Orlistat 60mg for recommended weight loss before bariatric surgery. Obesity Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL. Malone M, Lindstrom J, Gallati C. Impact of change in duration of therapy with Ursodiol after gastric bypass surgery. ACCP annual meeting Pittsburgh, PA, October 2011. Malone M, Polimeni JM, Alger-Mayer S. Health related quality of life up to four years after bariatric surgery. Obesity Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL. Darius Mason Mason DL, Assimon MM, Akroush MH, Bishop JR , El-Fawal H. Variation in the VDR gene and neuroantibody markers in dialysis patients. Abstract # SA-PO2712. American Society of Nephrology Renal Week, Denver, CO, November 2010. Mason DL, Assimon MM, Cardone KE, Grabe DW, Pai AB. Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in the continuum of CKD: Relationship to medication use. American Society of Nephrology Renal Week, Denver, CO, 2010.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators. 31


Scholarly Activity Report Christopher Miller Miller CD, Abdelsayed S, Veve M, Patel N. Predictors of Clinically Significant Antiretroviral (ARV) Drug Interactions among First-Line ARV Regimens. 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Boston, MA, September 2010. Shannon Miller Miller S, Cerulli J, Abrons J, Vadala T, Towers T. Defining the Pharmacists Role in the Pandemic Outbreak of Novel H1N1 Influenza. APhA Annual Meeting 2010. J Am Pharm Assoc, 2010. Anthony Nicasio Nicasio AM, Lodise TP, Evans AM, Harrington SM. Evaluation of Carbapenem Pharmacodynamic Target Attainment (PTA) Using Three Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Testing Methods for Klebsiella pneumoniae Harboring Carbapenamases (KPC). 48th Meeting of Infectious Diseases Society of America, Vancouver, BC, Canada, October 2010. Wiskirchen DE, Koomanachai P, Nicasio AM, Nicolau DP, Kuti JL. In vitro pharmacodynamics (PD) of pulmonary exposures of tigecycline (TGC) alone and in combination with meropenem (MEM) or rifampin (RIF) against Klebsiella producing the KPC-2 carbapenemase. 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Boston, MA. September 2010. Amy Barton Pai Pai AB, Grabe DW, Eisele G. Effect of the Vitamin D receptor Agonist Paricalcitol on Cell Adhesion Markers and ADMA in CKD 3 and 4. ERA-EDTA Annual Meeting, June 24, 2011, Prague, Czech Republic. Sidile J, Der Mesorpian P, Makary Y, Pai AB, Haqqie S. Evaluation of Predictive Factors of Potassium Derangement in Therapeutic Hypothermia. National Kidney Foundation, Spring Clinical Meeting. April 27, 2011, Las Vegas, NV. Pai AB, Johnson A. Role of Intravenous Iron Compounds in Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Edema. ASN Renal Week, November 17-21, 2010, Denver, CO. Pai AB, Johnson A. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) Induced Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction: Possible Role of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS). ASN Renal Week, November 17-21, 2010, Denver, CO.

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Pai AB, Grabe DW, Eisele G. Effect of the Vitamin D receptor Agonist Paricalcitol on Biomarkers of Vascular Reactivity in CKD 3 and 4 Accepted to American Society of Nephrology Renal Week, Denver, CO, 2010. Manjunath (Amit) Pai Pai MP, Nafziger AN, Bertino JS. Aminoglycoside Dosing in Underweight, Normal Weight, Overweight, and Obese Adult Patients. 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Boston, MA, September 2010.

Scarpace, SL. Cancer- and Chemotherapy- Induced Bone Loss. ACPEaccredited 25-minute presentation given as part of a 2.5-hour panel symposium at the American Society of Health-systems Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting, Anaheim, CA, December 7, 2010. Scarpace SL. Oral Chemotherapy Adherence: Lead the Horse to Water and Make him Drink! Massachusetts Society of Health-System Pharmacists, UMass-Worcester, MA, February 7, 2011.

Pai MP, Nafziger AN, Bertino JS. Lean Body Weight Normalizes the Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Ertapenem in Normal Weight and Obese Adults. 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Boston, MA, September 2010.

Terrence Towers Abrons J, Towers T, Miller S, Vadala T, Cerulli J. Enhancing Community Pharmacy Practice and Research Opportunities: Use of the Well-TIP Method. AACP Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, July 2010.

Pai MP, Lodise TP. Pharmacokinetics of Voriconazole in Obese Adults. 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Boston, MA, September 2010.

Towers T, Vadala T, Miller SS, Cerulli J, Abrons J. Expanding Community Pharmacy Practice Through an Elective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience. AACP Annual Meeting Seattle, WA, July 2010.

Nimish Patel Patel N, Fiorenza M, Dihmess A, Martis P, Graffunder E, Harrington SM, Lodise TP. Predictors of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) Infections Among Patients with Enterobacteriaceae Infections. 48th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Vancouver, BC, Canada, October 2010. Patel N, Veve M, Abdelsayed S, Miller CD. Clinical/Virologic Outcomes among HIV-Infected Patients (Pts) Receiving Dose-Adjusted (DA) Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs). 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Boston, MA, September 2010. John Polimeni Polimeni, JM. The Jevons’ Paradox: Transitional and Developing Countries, Workshop on Rebound Effect of Energy Efficiency, Carnegie Mellon University at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in conjunction with the National Science Foundation, University of Stuttgart, Tsinghua University, and the International Risk Governance Council, June 27-28, 2011. Sarah Scarpace Scarpace SL. Cancer- and Chemotherapy- Induced Bone Loss. American Society of Health-systems Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting, Anaheim, CA, December 7, 2010.

Tanya Vadala Abrons J, Vadala T, Miller S, Cerulli J. Ensuring Safe Medication Disposal. APhA Annual Meeting. J Am Pharm Assoc, 2010.

GRANTS Robert DiCenzo Co-investigators: Luque A, Cohen S, and the ACTG 5283 Protocol Team Project: An Open-Label, Non-Randomized Study of Pharmacokinetic Interactions Between Depo-Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA) and of the Effects of DMPA on Cellmediated Immunity and Regulation in HIV-Infected Women (A5283) Sponsor: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Darren Grabe Project: Development of a simulated, adaptive, dynamic patient case software platform Sponsor: ACPHS (intramural grant) Award: $22,000 Michael Kane Co-investigators: Heh A, Bakst G, Busch RS, Abelseth JM, Hamilton RA Project: A retrospective analysis of the effects of progression from single to dual RAAS inhibition on blood pressure, serum potassium, serum creatinine, and albuminuria in hypertensive type 2 diabetes patients. Sponsor: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Award: $64,360.27

Thomas Lodise Co-Investigator: Leon Cosler Project: Study Extension Sponsor: Cubist Pharmaceuticals Award: $40,000 Co-investigator: Nimish Patel Project: Incidence of thrombocytopenia and serotonin syndrome among veterans affairs patients: a comparison between linezolid and vancomycin using an intensive search algorithm Sponsor: Pfizer, Inc. Award: $25,000 Co-Investigators: Manjunath (Amit) Pai, Beegle S, Jill Butterfield Project: Individualizing piperacillintazobactam dosing using tobramycin concentrations in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Sponsor: ACPHS (intramural grant) Award: $5,000 Darius Mason Co-Investigators: Amy Barton Pai, Magdalene Assimon, George Bailie, Shaker A. Mousa, Eisle G. Project: A randomized study on the effects of sevelamer carbonate versus calcium acetate on biomarkers of vascular calcification, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease stages 3 and 4. Sponsor: Genzyme Award: $187,863.05 Project: Sustainability of serum [25OHD] levels, inflammatory reduction, and endothelial dysfunction after repletion with ergocalciferol in CKD Stage 5D Sponsor: Norman S. Coplon Extramural Grant Program Award: $150,000 Amy Barton Pai Project: An Observational Prospective Registry to Identify Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients Hospitalized with Euvolemic and Hypervolemic Hyponatremia and Assess the Comparative Effectiveness of Available Treatments and the Impact on Resource Utilization Sponsor: Otsuka Pharmaceuticals (Clinical Trial Agreement) Award: $15,450 Manjunath (Amit) Pai Project: Pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir carboxylate in morbidly obese subjects Sponsor: Roche Laboratories Award: $253,579.10 Project: Reducing the risk of drug-related nephrotoxicity in obese patients Sponsor: National Kidney Foundation of Northeast New York Award: $29,996.50


DeBellis RJ. Emerging Therapeutic Foundations for Sepsis Management. Program Chair. CMEducation, LLC and The University of Massachusetts Medical School. ASHP MCM Symposium, Anaheim, CA, December 2010. DeBellis RJ. New Perspectives in Sepsis: The Health System Pharmacist’s Perspective-A year 2011 Update. Sponsored by CMEducation and The University of Massachusetts Medical School, ASHP MCM Symposium, Anaheim, CA, December 2010.

Dept. of Pharmacy BOOK CHAPTERS Practice - Vermont Campus Brian Cowles

PUBLICATIONS Ronald J. DeBellis Belliveau PP, DeBellis RJ, Tataronis GR, Jarvis CI, Steinberng MJ. Assessment of an elective in antibacterial pharmacotherapy. Pharmacy Education, 2010;10(2): 102-106. Clayton English Harrington CA, English C. Tolerability of paliperidone: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Int Clin Psychopharmacol, 2010 Nov; 25(6):334-41. Macedo L, English C. Pharmacologic options for treating narcolepsy. US Pharm 2011; 36:44-55. Robert A. Hamilton Briceland LL, Hamilton RA. Electronic reflective student portfolios to demonstrate achievement of abilitybased outcomes during advanced pharmacy practice experiences. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 2010; 74(5) Article 79. Joanna Schwartz DS Dizon, A Stuckey, J Schwartz. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in recurrent serous carcinoma of the uterus. J Clin Oncol 2010; 27 (Suppl; abstr e16538). Schwartz, J. Non-anthracycline chemotherapy regimens for the adjuvant treatment of early stage breast cancers. Formulary, Newsletter Edition, November 2010. Schwartz, J. New treatments for metastatic breast cancer. The Oncology Nurse, Vol 4 (1), Feb 2011. Schwartz J, Novel targeted agents for metastatic breast cancer. The Oncology Pharmacist, Vol 4 (1), Feb 2011. Sommer Zarbock Zarbock SD, Pratley RE. Liraglutide. Walgreen’s Diabetes & You Magazine, 2011.

Cowles B. Preventing medication errors and harm in children. In: Ferri FF, editor. Ferri’s Clinical Advisor: Instant Diagnosis and Treatment. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier, 2011, 804-805 (revision). DeBellis RJ. Sepsis. In: Essentials of Emergency Medicine 2nd edition, Richard V. Aghababian ed. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, MA, 2011.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Kathy Boland Boland K. Moving Forward: Managing Diabetes in the Inpatient Setting. Nursing Conference, Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, VT. Boland K. New Drugs and Drug News. Vermont Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists, Burlington, VT. Brian Cowles Cowles B. Corticosteroids for chronic lung disease in infants (VT CE). Department of Pharmacy Grand Rounds, Fletcher Allen Health Care. Burlington, VT. September 2010. Cowles B. Chronic lung disease. Fletcher Allen Health Care Department of Pharmacy, Continuing Education lecture. Cowles B. Cystic fibrosis. Pharmacy Practice Symposium, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Continuing Education lecture. Ronald J. DeBellis DeBellis RJ. The Changing Therapeutic Landscape: Perspectives of an MS-Focused Pharmacist - How Will We Need to Adapt to and Analyze the New Generation of MS Therapies? CMEducation Resources, LLC and The University of Massachusetts Medical School. Miami, FL; Chicago IL; New York, NY; Atlanta, GA; Beverly Hills, CA; Boston, MA; Salt Lake City, UT. October-December 2010 and April-June 2011.

DeBellis RJ. Pharmacy-Directed Implementation of Protocolized Sepsis Order Sets In the Emergency Department and Critical Care Unit. Sponsored by CMEducation and The University of Massachusetts Medical School, ASHP MCM Symposium, Anaheim, CA, December 2010. DeBellis RJ. When do you need a vice chair? 28th Annual Academic Chairpersons Conference by Kansas State University, Orlando, FL, February 2011. Clayton English English C, Schlesselman LA, Rey JA. Prevalence of alcohol abuse and consumption among pharmacy students at six US schools of pharmacy. AACP 2010 Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. Macedo L, Mantsirina N, English C, Anderson W. Off-label treatments for fibromyalgia. ASHP 2010 Midyear Meeting. Anaheim, CA. English C. Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Mainstream Practice: An update on recent developments and contemporary uses of secondgeneration antipsychotics. Vermont Society of Health-System Pharmacists-Winter CE Program, February 5, 2011. Renee Mosier Mosier R. Alphabet Soup of Pharmaceutical Care: CDTM and MTM in a PCMH / Part I. 33rd Annual Pharmacy Practice Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Vermont Campus, March 18, 2011. Joanna Schwartz Schwartz, J. New developments in adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy treatments. University of Vermont Annual Breast Cancer Symposium, Burlington, VT, October 15, 2010. Schwartz J. Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy. Vermont Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Annual Meeting, Burlington, VT, November 2, 2010.

Schwartz J. Chemotherapy- induced peripheral neuropathy. Vermont Multiple Myeloma Support groups annual meeting, November 16, 2010. Schwartz J. New Developments in Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer. Barbara DiLascia Women’s and Men’s Health Symposium, ACHPS Albany and Vermont, April 3, 2011. Sommer Zarbock Zarbock S. Integrative, Alternative, and Complementary Medicine in the Continuum of Mainstream Healthcare. ACPHS Annual Pharmacy Practice Institute CE Program, Colchester, VT, March 2011. Zarbock S. From the Early 1900’s to Today: Is Dabigatran the Ideal New Anticoagulant? VtSHP Annual Meeting, Burlington, VT, April 2011.

GRANTS Sommer Zarbock Project: 2011 ASHP Student Society Development Grant Sponsor: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists - Student Society of Health-System Pharmacists Award: $750

Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Albany Campus PUBLICATIONS Richard Dearborn Levendusky MC, Basle J, Chang S, Mandalaywala NV, Voigt JM, Dearborn Jr RE. Glucose-dependent effects on drosophila growth and glioma cells mediated by up-regulation of the VDUP1 tumor suppressor. Brain Res, 2011. Karian T, Dai Y, Reed B, Gray J, Kunes S and Dearborn Jr RE. Reph, a regulator of eph receptor expression in the drosophila optic lobe. Genetics, 2011. Carlos Feleder Krall CM, Yao X, Hass M, Feleder C, Steiner AA. Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298:R15121521, 2010. Pai AB, Feleder C, Johnson A. Tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF) induces increased lung vascular permeability: a role for GSK3α/b inhibition. Eur J Pharmacol 657:159– 166, 2011.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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Carlos Feleder (cont’d) Marlow J, Villanueva A, Cosmello J and Feleder C. The role of the monoamines norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine in non-febrile thermoregulation. Front Biosci, 2011. Yao X, Hass M, Johnson A, Feleder C. Characterization of Prostaglandins by LC-Mass Spectroscopy in LPS Challenged Spleen. Prostag Leukotr Ess, 2011. Arnold Johnson Barton-Pai A, Feleder C, Johnson A. Tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF) induces increased lung vascular permeability: a role for GSK3α/b inhibition. Eur J Pharmacol 657:159– 166, 2011. Yao X, Hass M, Johnson A, Feleder C. Characterization of Prostaglandins by LC-Mass Spectroscopy in LPS Challenged Spleen. Prostag Leukotr Ess, 2011. Robert Levin Mechlin CW, Tanner MJ, Chen M, Buttyan R, Levin RM, Mian BM. Gli2 expression and human bladder transitional carcinoma cell invasiveness. J Urol 184:344-51, 2010.

Venugopal V, Radu F, Leggett RE, Abraham C, Schuler C, Levin RM. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on rabbit urinary bladder citrate synthase activity in the presence and absence of a standardized grape suspension. Int Braz J Urol 749-757, 2011. Lin WY, Chen CS, Wu CS, Lin YP, Levin RM, Wei YH. Oxidative stress biomarkers in urine and plasma for rabbits with partial bladder outlet obstruction. Brit J Urol Int, 2011. Li HT, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Levin RM. Differential effects of coenzyme Q10 and alpha lipoic acid on two models of in-vitro oxidative damage to the rabbit urinary bladder. Int Urol and Nephrol, 2011. Juan YS, Chuang SM, Mannikarottu A, Chun-Hsung H, Schuler C, Levin RM. Coenzyme Q10 diminishes ischemiareperfusion induced apoptosis and nerve injury in rabbit urinary bladder. Neurourol Urodynam, 2011. Lin WY, Mannikarottu A, Li S, Juan YS, Schuler C, Javed Z, Blaivas J, Levin RM. In-vivo correlation of blood flow measurements with tissue hypoxia. World J Urol. 2011.

Hanna K, Ibrahim M, Leggett RE, Levin RM. The effect of calcium on the response of rabbit urinary bladder muscle and mucosa to hydrogen peroxide. Urol Sci 21:175-179, 2010.

Hydery T, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Levin RM. Treatment of obstructive bladder dysfunction by coenzyme Q10 and alpha lipoic acid in rabbits. LUTS, 2011.

Juan Y-S, Mannikarottu A, Chuang SM, Li S, Lin AD, Chang-Chou L, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Levin RM. Protective effect of antrodia camphorata on bladder ischemia/reperfusion injury. Int Urol and Nephrol 42:637-645, 2010.

Topal T, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Hydery T, Benyamin S and Levin RM. Synergy of solifenacin in the treatment of experimental overactive bladder dysfunction by antioxidant supplements, Part 1. Urol Sci, 2011.

Radu F, Leggett RE, Schuler C, Levin RM. The effect of in vitro ischemia/ reperfusion on contraction, free fatty acid content, phospholipid content, and malondialdehyde levels of the rabbit urinary bladder. Mol Cell Biochem 346:179-186, 2011.

Topal T, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Hydery T, Benyamin S and Levin RM. Synergy of solifenacin in the treatment of experimental overactive bladder dysfunction by antioxidant supplements, Part 2. Urol Sci, 2011. Fitzpatrick B, Schuler S, Leggett RE and Levin RM. Calcium effects on superoxide dismutase and catalase of the rabbit urinary bladder muscle and mucosa. Mol Cell Biochem, 2011.

Luciana Lopes Lopes LB, Brophy CM, Flynn CR, Yi Z, Bowen BP, Smoke C, Seal B, Panitch A, Komalavilas P. A novel cell permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II inhibits intimal hyperplasia in a human saphenous vein organ culture model. J Vasc Surg, 2011. Hosmer, J, Shin, SH, Nornoo, A, Zheng, H, Lopes, LB. Influence of Internal Structure and Composition of Liquid Crystalline Phases on Topical Delivery of an Anti-cancer Agent. J. Pharm. Sci, 100 (4): 1444-55, 2010. Marcel Musteata Lord HL, Zhang X, Musteata FM, Vuckovic D, Pawliszyn J. In vivo solid-phase microextraction for monitoring intravenous concentrations of drugs and metabolites in beagles. Nat Protoc, 2011. Vuckovic D, de Lannoy I, Gien B, Yang Y, Musteata MF, Pawliszyn J. In vivo solid-phase microextraction for single rodent pharmacokinetics studies of carbamazepine and carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide in mice. J Chromatogr A, 2011. Alexandre Steiner Krall CM, Yao X, Hass MA, Feleder C, Steiner AA. Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298:R1512R1521, 2010. Garami A, Pakai E, Oliveira DL, Steiner AA, Wanner SP, Almeida MC, Lesnikov VA, Gavva NR, Romanovsky AA. Thermoregulatory phenotype of the trpv1 knockout mouse: thermoeffector dysbalance with hyperkinesis. J Neurosci 31:1721-1733, 2011. Steiner AA, Molchanova AY, Dogan MD, Patel S, Pétervári E, Balaskó M, Wanner SP, Eales J, Oliveira DL, Gavva NR, Almeida MC, Székely M, Romanovsky AA. The hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide critically depends on brain CB1, but not CB2 or TRPV1, receptors. J Physiol, 2011. Jeffrey Voigt Levendusky MC, Basle J, Chang S, Mandalaywala NV, Voigt JM, Dearborn Jr RE. Glucose-dependent effects on drosophila growth and glioma cells mediated by up-regulation of the VDUP1 tumor suppressor. Brain Res, 2011.

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HaiAn Zheng Hosmer, J, Shin, SH, Nornoo, A, Zheng, H, Lopes, LB. Influence of Internal Structure and Composition of Liquid Crystalline Phases on Topical Delivery of an Anti-cancer Agent. J. Pharm. Sci, 100 (4): 1444-55, 2010.

BOOK CHAPTERS Marcel Musteata Musteata, FM. Comprehensive Sampling and Sample Preparation. Editor: Pawliszyn J. Elsevier, 2011 [Application of SPME to Pharmacodynamics, Pharmacokinetics, and Toxicology] Alexandre Steiner Steiner AA, Almeida MC, Bicego KC. Translation to Portuguese of: Physiology and Pathophysiology of Body Temperature Regulation. Editor: Blatteis CM. EdUSP, São Paulo, Brazil, 2011.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Presentations Carlos Feleder The central nervous system controls LPS hypotension during septic shock. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Research Forum, Albany, NY. January 22, 2011. Arnold Johnson Tumor Necrosis Factor-a (TNF) induced increased lung vascular permeability: a role for GSK3α/b. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Research Forum, Albany, NY. January 22, 2011. Tumor Necrosis Factor-a (TNF) induced increased lung vascular permeability: A role for GSK3α/b. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar Series, Albany, NY. November, 11 2010. Robert Levin Treatment of Experimental Overactive Bladder Dysfunction in Rabbits by Coenzyme Q10 and Alpha Lipoic Acid. Urology Research Society National Meeting, Niagara on the Lake, Canada. September 30 - October 3, 2010. Treatment of Experimental Overactive Bladder Dysfunction in Rabbits by Coenzyme Q10 and Alpha Lipoic Acid. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Research Forum, Albany, NY. January 22, 2011. Calcium effects on Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase of the Rabbit Urinary Bladder Muscle and Mucosa. American Urological Association Annual Meeting. May 14-19, 2011. The effect of antioxidants on the response to in vitro ischemia / reperfusion on contraction, free fatty acids, phospholipid, and malondialdehyde and phospholipase A2 levels of the rabbit urinary bladder. American Urological Association Annual Meeting. May 14-19, 2011.


Scholarly Activity Report Alexandre Steiner How does body temperature influence hypotensive shock in systemic inflammation? Society for Neuroscience Meeting (Program No. 794.14), San Diego, CA, November 13-17, 2010. Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2. Society for Neuroscience Meeting (Program No. 695.5), San Diego, CA, November 13-17, 2010.

The effect of calcium on the response of rabbit urinary bladder muscle and mucosa to hydrogen peroxide. American Urological Association Annual Meeting. May 14-19, 2011. Marcel Musteata Measurement of Free Drug Concentrations. Pittsburgh Conference (PittCon), Atlanta, GA. March 13-18, 2011. Donabella P, Rogers N, Levin R, Musteata FM. Supported Liquid Phase Microextraction Probes for Pharmacokinetic Studies. Pittsburgh Conference, Atlanta, GA, March 13-18, 2011. Alexandre Steiner Competitive demands in sepsis: the Yin-Yang of body temperature and energy balance. Albany Medical College, Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany, NY. January 26, 2011. Fever-hypothermia dichotomy in systemic inflammation and sepsis. Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Physiological Science, St. Louis, MO. May 17, 2011.

Abstracts Richard Dearborn Hedgehog-dependent regulation of the VDUP1 tumor suppressor in Drosophila brain and mammalian tumor cells. Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 13-17, 2010. Arnold Johnson Role of intravenous iron compounds in pathogenesis of pulmonary edema. ASN Renal Week, Denver, CO, November 17-21, 2010. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction: possible role of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS). ASN Renal Week, Denver, CO, November 17-21, 2010.

TNF causes GSK-dependent increased VE-cadherin RNA expression: role for suppression of endothelial permeability.Am Rev Resp Dis Abstract. May 15, 2011. Luciana Lopes Development of sustained release subcutaneous gels for the treatment of drug addiction. American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists – Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. November 14-18, 2010. Influence of monoglycerides incorporated in lamellar phases on topical delivery of paclitaxel. American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists – Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. November 14-18, 2010. Stability and antioxidant activity of lycopene microemulsions. Annual Northeast Discussion Group of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, Rocky Hill, CT. April 15, 2011. Influence of the liquid crystalline structure on the in vitro release and skin penetration of an anticancer drug. Annual Northeast Discussion Group of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, Rocky Hill, CT. April 15, 2011.

Jeffrey Voigt Hedgehog-dependent regulation of the VDUP1 tumor suppressor in drosophila brain and mammalian tumor cells. Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 13-17, 2010. HaiAn Zheng In Silico formulation: insulin stability and molecular dynamics by computer simulation. AAPS Annual Meeting, FIP Pharmaceutical Sciences 2010 World Congress, New Orleans, LA. November 14-18, 2010. Pharmaceutics in motion: embracing computer modeling and multimedia presentation in pharmacy education. AACP Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. July 10-14, 2010.

Tamer Fandy Fandy T, Thakkar M, Jiemjit A, Gore SD. Decitabine upregulates Nox4 expression in a DNMT1-independent manner, Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2011. Karen Glass Avvakumov N, Lalonde ME, Saksouk N, Landry AJ, Paquet E, Glass KC, Ullah M, Doyon Y, Cayrou C, Robitaille G, Côté V, Richard D, Yang XJ, Kutateladze TG, Côté J. Conserved molecular interactions within MystING acetyltransferase complexes that regulate cell proliferation. Cellular and Molecular Biology, 2011.

BOOK CHAPTERS Y.M. Bhatnagar Koerper GE, Shipp RL, Bhatnagar YM. Repetitive DNA Elements as Probes for the Genomic Analysis of Scamp and Yellowmouth Grouper from the Gulf of Mexico. In: Fisheries, Aquaculture and Biotechnology. Eds. Thangadurai D, Hall SG, Manimekalan A, Mocz G., Agrobios, Jodhpur, India, 2010.

GRANTS

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS

Arnold Johnson Project: A mechanism for suppression of TNF-alpha induced endothelial dysfunction (R01HL059901) Sponsor: National Institutes of Health - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Award: $1.4 million

Stefan Balaz Natesan S, Balaz S. Conceptual QSAR models for cell-based assays combining QM/MM Linear Response approach and disposition function. 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition, Boston, MA, COMP-308, August 22-26, 2010.

Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Vermont Campus

Natesan S, Khandelwal A, Balaz S. Binding Affinity Prediction of Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors: QM/ MM Linear Response Approach. Vermont Cancer Center’s 2010 Clinical and Translational Research Symposium: Inflammation & Cancer, Burlington, VT, November 2010.

PUBLICATIONS

Development of sodium alginate beads containing varied lipid ratios for wound healing. Annual Northeast Discussion Group of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, Rocky Hill, CT. April 15, 2011.

Stefan Balaz Natesan S, Wang T, Lukacova V, Bartus V, Khandelwal A, Balaz S. Rigorous Treatment of Multi-species Multimode Ligand-Receptor Interactions in 3D-QSAR: CoMFA Analysis of Thyroxine Analogs Binding to Transthyretin. Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling 51, 11321150, 2011.

Marcel Musteata Interpretation of Plasma Concentrations in the Case of Drugs with High Protein Binding. AAPS Northeast Regional Discussion Group, Rocky Hill, CT, April 15, 2011.

Tandlich R, Vrana B, Payne S, Dercova K, Balaz, S. Biodegradation mechanism of biphenyl by a strain of Pseudomonas stutzeri. Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A 46, 337-344, 2011.

Gail G. Snitkoff Use of written assignments in large lecture classes. AACP Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. July 13-16, 2010.

Tandlich R., Balaz, S. Clay minerals and biphenyl sorption in soils. African Journal of Agricultural Research 6, 2321-2328, 2011.

Balaz S, Natesan S, Khandelwal A. QM/MM-Based Linear Response Method for Correlation of Binding Affinities with Structure in Cell-Free and Cell-Based Assays. 4th Humboldt Conference on Computational Chemistry, Varna, Bulgaria, July 2010. Tamer Fandy Fandy T. Decitabine induces delayed ROS in leucemia cell. First Annual ACPHS Research Forum, Albany, NY, January 2011.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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Scholarly Activity Report Karen Glass Glass K. The role of ING4 and ING5 tumor suppressors in chromatin remodeling and disease. Vermont Cancer Center’s 2010 Clinical and Translational Research Symposium: Inflammation & Cancer, Burlington, VT, November 2010. Glass K. Histone tail “reader” domains in chromatin remodeling. First Annual ACPHS Research Forum, Albany, NY, January 2011. Glass K. The role of ING4 and ING5 tumor suppressors in chromatin remodeling and disease. FASEB Conference Histone Deacetylases & Reversible Acetylation In Signaling & Disease, Steamboat Springs, Colorado, June 26-July 1, 2011.

GRANTS Stefan Balaz Project: Conceptual Prediction of Drug Bioactivities in Cell-Based Assays: cell-QSAR Sponsor: National Institutes of Health (NIH NIGMS, R01- GM080508) Award: $1,347,500 Term: September 2009 - August 2014. Project: Accurate Prediction of Binding Affinities of Ligands across the Matrix Metalloproteinase Family by QM/MM Linear Response Approach Sponsor: National Science Foundation TeraGrid Award: 100,000 hours of supercomputer time (nonmonetary award). Karen Glass Project: The Role of BRPF1 PHD fingers in Chromatin Remodeling and Disease Sponsor: American Heart Association (10BGIA3420014) Award: $132,000

Pharmaceutical Research Institute PUBLICATIONS Shaker A. Mousa Mousa SA. The Future of Anticoagulant Therapy. Cardiovasc Ther, doi: 10.1111/j.1755-5922.2011.00281, May 3, 2011. Lin HY, Cody V, Davis FB, Hercbergs AA, Luidens MK, Mousa SA, Davis PJ. Identification and functions of the plasma membrane receptor for thyroid hormone analogues. Discov Med, 11(59):337-47, April 2011. Lin HY, Davis FB, Luidens MK, Mousa SA, Cao JH, Zhou M, Davis PJ. Molecular basis for certain neuroprotective effects of thyroid hormone. Front Mol Neurosci, 4:29, April 2011. 36

Clayton S, Mousa SA. Therapeutics formulated to target cancer stem cells: Is it in our future? Cancer Cell Int, 11:7, March 25, 2011. Phillips PG, Yalcin M, Cui H, AbdelNabi H, Sajjad M, Bernacki R, Veith J, Mousa SA. Increased tumor uptake of chemotherapeutics and improved chemoresponse by novel nonanticoagulant low molecular weight heparin. Anticancer Res, 31(2):411-9, February 2011. Lin HY, Landersdorfer CB, London D, Meng R, Lim CU, Lin C, Lin S, Tang HY, Brown D, Van Scoy B, Kulawy R, Queimado L, Drusano GL, Louie A, Davis FB, Mousa SA, Davis PJ. Pharmacodynamic modeling of anti-cancer activity of tetraiodothyroacetic acid in a perfused cell culture system. PLoS Comput Biol, 7(2):e1001073, February 3, 2011. Hackel D, Stolz A, Mousa SA, Brack A, Rittner HL. Recruitment of opioid peptide-containing neutrophils is independent of formyl peptide receptors. J Neuroimmunol, 230(12):65-73, January 2011. Davis PJ, Davis FB, Mousa SA, Luidens MK, Lin HY. Membrane receptor for thyroid hormone: physiologic and pharmacologic implications. Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol, 51:99-115, February 10, 2011. Ramli J, CalderonArtero P, Block RC, Mousa SA. Novel therapeutic targets for preserving a healthy endothelium: strategies for reducing the risk of vascular and cardiovascular disease. Cardiol J. 18(4):352-63, June 2011. El-Sayyad HI, El-Sherbiny MA, Sobh MA, Abou-El-Naga AM, Ibrahim MA, Mousa SA. Protective effects of Morus alba leaves extract on ocular functions of pups from diabetic and hypercholesterolemic mother rats. Int J Biol Sci, 7(6):715-28, June 2011.

GRANTS Shaker A. Mousa Project: Site Directed Chemotherapy for breast cancer using novel angiogenesis inhibitors (1R21CA124931-01) Sponsor: National Institutes of Health – National Cancer Institute Award: $423,500 (08/01/2009 – 7/31/2012) Project: Experimental Models for testing novel targets in pancreatic cancer cell invasion (1R21CA124931-01) Sponsor: National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute Award: $ 378,340 (4/1/20082/28/2011)

Co-investigators: Mogridge J, Kane MP Project: Development and testing of polyvalent anthrax toxin inhibitors (2U01A1056546-06) Sponsor: National Institutes of Health Award: $1,370,503 (08/01/2008 – 07/31/2013) Co-investigators: Linhardt R, Liu J. Project: Development of a Bioengineered Heparin from a Non-Animal Source (1R01HL096972-01) Sponsor: National Institutes of Health Award: $654,500 (08/01/2009 – 07/01/2014) Co-investigators: Mukhtar H Project: Nano formulated Aptamer Conjugate for prostate cancer prevention and therapy (W81XWH-10-1-0245) Sponsor: Department of Defense (sub-award from University of Wisconsin) Award: $40,990 (4/15/2011 – 4/14/2012) Co-investigators: Elshourbagy N Project: Structure-Based Search for Novel Antihypercholestrolemic Agents (2R44HL092712-02) Sponsor: National Institutes of Health (sub-award from Shifa Biomedical) Award: $845,611 (4/1/20103/31/2012) Co-Investigators: Elshourbagy N Project: Novel Modulators of HDL Metabolism 1R43HL097438-01 Sponsor: National Institutes of

Health (sub-award from Shifa Biomedical) Award: $ 181,110 (8/1/20097/31/2011) Investigators: Johnson A, Mousa SA Project: A mechanism for suppression of TNF-alpha induced endothelial dysfunction (2R01HL059901-10A2) Sponsor: National Institutes of Health Award: $1,405,380 (05/01/10 – 04/30/14) Co-investigator: Block R Project: Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Aspirin in cardiovascular and diabetic patients. Sponsor: National Institutes of Health (sub-award from University of Wisconsin) Award: $9,000 (03/30/11 – 04/30/12) Project: Coated Activated Carbon as a Blood-Compatible Alternative for Extraction of Melphalan from Blood Sponsor: Delcath Systems Inc. Award: $79,000 (12/01/2010 – 4/30/2012)


School of Health Sciences Dept. of Diagnostic Laboratory Sciences PUBLICATIONS Indra Balachandran Balachandran I, Walker J, Broman J. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of metastatic Adult Granulosa Cell Tumor - A case report. Acta Cytologica 54(5): 933-938, 2010. Balachandran I. Transformation in Education and Practice: Cytotechnology Program, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, ASC Bulletin XLVII (4): 9495, 2010. Balachandran I. Human Papilloma Virus and Pap smear. An invited State of the Art Review. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine doi:10.1177/1559827611402581, 2011. Balachandran I. A case study of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage. ASCP Non-Gyn Digital image system Event i. Case ND 0083, 2011. Kenneth Ihenetu French F, Gorgi A, Ihenetu K, Weeks M, Lynch K, Wu AHB. Vitamin D Status of County Hospital Patients Assessed by Diasorin Liason 25hydroxyvitamin D . Clin. Chim. Acta. 412: 258- 262, 2010.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Indra Balachandran Balachandran I, Friedlander M. The Current and Future State of Cytology in New York State (NYS): A Needs Assessment Study. 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Cytopathology, Boston, MA, November 12-16, 2010.

Walker JW, Balachandran I. Assessment of technology among cytotechnology programs. 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Cytopathology, Boston, MA, November 12-16, 2010. Balachandran I. Cytopreparation: Tips for beating Murphy’s Law. American Society of Cytotechnology Webinar Series, 2010. Balachandran I, Friedlander M. The Current and Future State of Cytology in New York State (NYS): A Needs Assessment Study. Program Faculty Seminar, 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Cytopathology, Boston, MA, 2010. Walker JW, Balachandran I. Assessment of technology among cytotechnology programs. Program Faculty Seminar, 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Cytopathology, Boston, MA, November 12, 2010. Kenneth Ihenetu Ihenetu K. Current Controversies in the Laboratory Diagnosis of Alcohol Poisoning. AACC Annual Convention, Atlanta, GA, 2011.

GRANTS Kenneth Ihenetu Project: Investigations into the Performance of HBA1C Relative to Core Lab Analyzers (in association with ACPHS High School Summer Research program) Sponsor: ACPHS (intramural grant Award: $1,500.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Hassan A. N. El-Fawal Shaiba LA, Alrowaily NF, Zaffo BJ, Mousa SA, El-Fawal HAN. Abnormal induction of angiogenesis (AG) by inorganic lead (Pb): Implications for developmental neurotoxicity and acute encephalopathy. Proceedings Joint Meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies and the Asian Pediatric Research Society, Denver, CO, 2011. Alrowaily NF, Shaiba LA, Zaffo BJ, Mousa SA, El-Fawal, HAN. Differential effects of neurotoxic heavy metals on tumor-induced angiogenesis (AG). Proceedings Joint Meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies and the Asian Pediatric Research Society, Denver, CO, 2011. Nash M, Robinson E, Zaffo BJ, Obhan S, Alrowaily NF, Shaiba LA, Mousa SA, El-Fawal HAN. Differential effects of neurotoxic mercurials on angiogenesis (AG). The Toxicologist 25, 2011. Zaffo BJ, Yalcin M, Robinson E, Shaiba LA, Alrowaily NF, Mousa SA, El-Fawal HAN. Antagonistic Effects of neurotoxic mercurials on tumor-induced angiogenesis (AG). The Toxicologist 25, 2011. Mason DL, Assimon MM, Akroush M, Bishop J, El-Fawal, HAN. Variations in the VDR gene and neuroantibody markers in hemodialysis patients. Proceeding of the American Society of Nephrology, 2010.

Dept. of Medical Biotechnology and Informatics

School of Arts and Sciences

PUBLICATIONS

Dept. of Basic and Social Sciences

Hassan A. N. El-Fawal El-Fawal, HAN. Neurotoxicology. In: Nriagu JO (ed.) Encyclopedia of Environmental Health, Volume 4, pp. 87–106 Burlington: Elsevier, 2011. Markus Stein Zeaiter Z, Diaz H, Stein M, Huynh HQ. Helicobacter pylori Induces Expression and Secretion of Oncostatin M in Macrophages In Vitro. Dig Dis Sci 56(3):689-97, 2011.

PUBLICATIONS Sean Ali Cafaro, C., Giffin, A., Ali, S. A., Kim, D.H. Reexamination of an information geometric construction of entropic indicators of complexity. App. Math. Comp. 217, 2944-2951, 2010. Ali, S. A., Kim, D.H., Cafaro, C., Mancini, S. The Effect Of Microscopic Correlations On The Information Geometric Complexity Of Gaussian Statistical Models. Physica A 389, 3117-3127, 2010. Corda, Ch., Ali, S. A., Cafaro, C. Interferometer Response to Scalar Gravitational Waves. Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 19, 1095-2109, 2010.

Kim, D.H., Ali, S. A., Cafaro, C., Mancini, S. An Information Geometric Analysis of Entangled Continuous Variable Quantum Systems. Journal of Physics: Conference Series 306, 012063, 2010. Martha Haas Krall, C.M., Yao, X., Hass, M.A., Feleder, C., Steiner, AA. Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298, R1512R1521, 2010. Susan Ludeman Gamcsik, M.P., Clark, M.D., Ludeman, S.M., Springer, J.B., D’Alessandro, M.A., Simpson, N.E., Pourdeyhimi, R., Johnson, C.B., Teeter, S.D., Blackband, S.J., Thelwall, P.E. Non-invasive Monitoring of L-2-Oxothiazolidine-4-Carboxylate Metabolism in the Rat Brain by In vivo 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Neurochem. Res., 36, 443–451, 2011. Wendy Parker Wilmoth, J.M., London, A.S. and Parker, W.M. Sex Differences in the Relationship between Military Service Status and Functional Limitations and Disabilities. Population Research and Policy Review, 30, 333354, June 2011. Wilmoth, J.M., London, A.S. and Parker, W.M. Military Service and Men’s Self Rated Health Trajectories in Later Life. Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, 65B(6), 744-754, 2010. Eric Yager Yager, E.J., Stagnar, C., Gopalakrishnan, Franchini, A., Narendran, A., Fuller, J.T., and Fuller, D.H. Particlemediated DNA vaccines against seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses eicit strong mucosal antibody and T cell responses in the lung. Procedia in Vaccinology (3), 2-11, 2010.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Sean Ali Ali, S. A., Kim, D.H., Cafaro, C., Mancini, S. On the Information Geometry of Quantum Entangled Wave Packets. Fifth International Workshop DICE 2010, Castiglioncello, Tuscany, September, 2010. Ali, S. A., Cafaro, C., Mancini, S., Kim, D.H. Can we Understand the Effect of Correlations on the Complexity of Dynamical Systems in an Information Geometric Setting? Fifth International Workshop DICE 2010, Castiglioncello, Tuscany, September, 2010.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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Lynn Evans Werner, E.A., Kinsella, M.T., Evans, L., Monk, C. Continuity in neonatal regulation: newborn heart ratemovement coupling predicts infant temperament at 4 months. 43rd Annual Meeting of the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology, San Diego, CA, November, 2010. Werner, E.A., Evans, L., Leotti, L., Kinsella, M., Monk, C. Maternal age influences infant temperament: The contribution of prenatal and postpartum factors on infant reactivity. International Biennial Congress of The Marcé Society, Pittsburgh, PA, October 2010. Martha Hass Hass, M., Carreno, J., Hammad, A. Synthesis and Antioxidant Activity of Mutual Prodrugs Derived from Tocopherol and Lipoic Acid. American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, November, 2010. Pepe, D., Bonnier, E., DuJack, J., Jahan, S., Lewis, K., Phelps, J., Scarlett, K., Hass, M., Lopes, L. Microemulsions containing sugar-based surfactants as topical delivery systems for lycopene. Northeast regional Discussion Group (NERDG), American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, Rocky Hill, CT, April 2011. Meenakshi Malik Dasgupta, J., Atianand, M.K., Sellati, T.J., Bakshi, C.S., Harton, J.A., Malik, M. Co-ordination of Toll-like Receptors and Nod-like Receptors in recognition and immune response to the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis. 111th General Meeting of American Society for Microbiology, New Orleans, LA, May 2011. Duffy, E.B., Atianand, M.K., Malik, M., Harton, J.A. Inflammasome activation by Francisella tularensis in human cells is mediated in part by NLRP3. 111th General Meeting of American Society for Microbiology, New Orleans, LA, May 2011. Mahawar, M., Atianand M.K., Harton J. A., Malik M., Bakshi, C. S. Francisella tularensis encoded factor FTT0831c dictates subversion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by interfering with NFκB signaling. 111th General Meeting of American Society for Microbiology, New Orleans, LA, May 2011. Wendy Parker Parker, W.M. Trajectories of Children’s Health: Inequalities and the Role of Parental Resources. Academy Health Annual Research Meeting, Seattle, WA, June 2011.

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Usdansky, M. L., Parker, W.M. When Money Matters: How College and Motherhood Shape Wives’ Housework. Population Association of American Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, 2010. Michael Racz Racz M.J., Sedransk J. Bayesian and frequentist methods for provider profiling using risk-adjusted assessments of medical outcomes. Joint Statistical Meetings, Vancouver, Canada, August 2010.

GRANTS Martha Hass Co-Investigator: Lopes, L. Project: Codrugs of Lipoic Acid and Tocopherol/Tocopheramine for use as Photoprotective Agents in the Skin Sponsor: National Institute of Health (NIH) – National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) Award: $453,899 Co-Investigator: Feleder, C. Project: The Role of the Spleen in the Febrile Response Sponsor: National Institute of Health (NIH) - Neuroendocrinology, Neuroimmunology and Behavior (NNB) Award: $194,133 Susan Ludeman Project: Pharmacology of Cyclophosphamide and Other Alkylators Sponsor: National Institute of Health (NIH) – National Cancer Institute (NCI) Award: $522,181.95 Meenakshi Malik Project: Synergistic extra- and intracellular recognition of Francisella tularensis. Sponsor: National Institute of Health (NIH) – National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) Award: $431,750 Co-Investigator: Bakshi, C.S. Project: Modulation of Macrophage Function by Francisella Tularensis Sponsor: National Institute of Health (NIH) – National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID), Subaward from New York Medical College (NYMC) Award: $20,000 Michael Racz Co-Investigators: Meek, P., Cosler, L. Project: Mesalamine Adherence and Impact on Indirect Costs in Individuals with Ulcerative Colitis Sponsor: Shire Pharmaceuticals Award: $156,043

Dept. of Humanities and Communication PUBLICATIONS Kenneth Blume Blume, K. Review of John Lawrence Busch, “Steam Coffin: Captain Moses Rogers and the Steamship Savannah Break the Barrier” (n.p., Hodos Historia, 2010) for Powerships, quarterly journal of the Steamship Historical Society of America, Fall 2010. Blume, K. Review of Stephen R. Taaffe, “Commanding Lincoln’s Navy: Union Naval Leadership During the Civil War,” Naval Historical Foundation, Pull Together, Spring/Summer 2011. Margaret Carroll Carroll, M. A Benefactor to Albany’s Irish, The Times Union (Albany), Section A-17, March 17, 2011 Carroll, M. Love of the World: Essays. New Hibernia Review 14, No. 4, 141-143, 2010. Carroll, M. The Road Away Becomes the Road Back: Prodigal Sons in the Short Stories of John McGahern. Journal of the Short Story in English: Special Issue on John McGahern. Guest editor, Prof. Claude Maisonnat, University Lumiere, Lyon, France. Vol. 53. Autumn 2009 (published in fall 2010). J. Daniel d’Oney d’Oney, J.D. Frontiers and Pharmacists: The History of the American Frontier as Taught at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Journal of the West. Vol. 49, No. 4, 61-66, 2011. Laura Rogers Rogers, L. Reviews of Two Sessions at Conference for College Composition and Communication, Louisville, KY, 2010, Kairos, Fall 2010.

BOOKS Kenneth Blume Blume, K. The A to Z of U.S. Diplomacy from the Civil War to World War I, (a volume in the publisher’s “A to Z Guides” series), Scarecrow Press of Roman and Littlefield, 2010.

BOOK CHAPTERS AND ENTRIES Patricia Baia Baia, P. The Trend of Commitment: Pedagogical Quality and Adoption. In: Adaption, Resistance and Access to Instructional Technologies, S. D’Agustino, ed., Fordham University, USA: IGI Global, 273-315, 2011. Kenneth Blume Blume, K. Student study guide to accompany Boyer, et. al., The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People, 7th ed., Cengage, 2011. Blume, K. Entries for Encyclopedia of Free Blacks and Free People of Color in the Americas (Facts on File, 2011): Frederick Douglass; Frederick Douglass, What is the 4th of July to a slave?; Henry Highland Garnet; Mifflin W. Gibbs; John Mercer Langston; Amistad Case.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Patricia Baia Baia, P. Create your Own Professional Development Opportunity. SUNY Conference on Instructional Technolog, Plattsburgh, NY, 2010. Baia, P. Show and Tell. Capital District Educational Technology Conference, Skidmore College, Saratoga, NY, October 2010. Baia, P. Commitment to Pedagogical Quality. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Science Research Forum, Albany, NY, January 2011.


Scholarly Activity Report Baia, P. Professional Development for K-12 Instructors. Technologies in Education Conference, College of St. Rose, Albany, NY, May 2011. Baia, P. Mobile Devices for Teaching & Learning. Capital District Educational Technology Conference, ITT Technical Institute, Albany, NY, June 2011. Margaret Carroll Carroll, M. The Sisters of Charity, Irish Immigrants, and the Parochial Schools in Albany, New York. New England ACIS, Framingham State College, Framingham, MA, November, 2010. Paul Denvir Denvir, P. Some dilemmatic aspects of advising patients to be tested for HIV in primary care contexts. 96th Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA, November, 2010. Kevin Hickey Hickey, K. Stone Virgins: Grounds for a Convivial Remapping of Africa. 36th Annual New York African Studies Association Conference on Gender, Science, Technology, and Socio-Economic Development: Africa and the Diaspora, Oneonta, NY, March 2011. Hickey, K. “After College” Roundtable Discussant. 36th Annual New York African Studies Association Conference on Gender, Science, Technology, and Socio-Economic Development: Africa and the Diaspora, Oneonta, NY, March 2011. Hickey, K. Neo-Romantic Pilgrimage and Forgiveness in South African Film. 37th Annual African Literature Association Conference on African Literature, Visual Arts, and Film in Local and Transnational Spaces, Athens, OH, April 2011.

Laura Rogers Rogers, L. Prison Research: Ethics, Context and Representation. Special Event on Prison Literacies and Pedagogy, Conference on College Composition and Communication, Atlanta, GA, April 2011. Rogers, L. Tutor Growth and Development: Using Mina Shaughnessy as a Model. Northeast Writing Centers Association, Hooksett, NH, March 2011.

GRANTS Margaret Carroll Project: Research at the National Library of Ireland, Martin Glynn and the 1922 Anglo/Irish Peace Treaty Sponsor: ACPHS (intramural grant) Award: $2,000 J. Daniel d’Oney Project: NEH Summer Seminar Program, Chapel Hill, NC Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities Award: $3,900 Project: NEH Summer Institute, Flagstaff, AZ Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities Award: $3,300 Michael Pittman Project: Classical Spirituality in Contemporary America Sponsor: ACPHS (intramural grant) Award: $4,950 Project Period: 2010-2011 Laura Rogers Project: College in Prison: Remixing Power Sponsor: ACPHS (intramural grant) Award: $250

Michael Pittman Pittman, M. Majid Majidi’s The Color of Paradise: Reflections of Rumi and Reflections on Majidi in the Classroom. American Academy of Religion Conference, Atlanta, GA, October 2010.

Board of Trustees Officers Herbert G. Chorbajian, Chairman Bridget-ann Hart ‘80, Vice Chair Christopher Mitiguy, Treasurer Fouad Morkos, Secretary

Term Trustees Stephen C. Ainlay Matthew J. Bette Raymond A. Bleser ‘81 Robert S. Busch Richard H. Daffner ‘63 J. Gordon Dailey ‘57 Kandyce J. Daley ‘74 Francis J. DiLascia ‘54 Geno J. Germano, Jr. ‘83 Rocco F. Giruzzi, Jr. ‘58 Zachary I. Hanan ‘63 Hugh A. Johnson Jeanette S. Lamb ‘57 Joseph M. Lapetina Thomas O. Maggs Marion T. Morton ‘84

Trustees Emeriti Michael F. Bette Kenneth M. Nirenberg

Cabinet Members James J. Gozzo, Ph.D.

President

Mehdi Boroujerdi, Pharm.D., Ph.D. Vicki DiLorenzo

Provost and Dean

Vice President, Institutional Advancement

Angela Dominelli, Ph.D.

Associate Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness

Tiffany Gutierrez

Vice President, Enrollment Management

Gerald Katzman

General Counsel

Pamela Smith

Chief Technology Officer

Packy McGraw

Associate Vice President of Administrative Operations

Shaker Mousa, Ph.D. Vice Provost for Research and Chairman of Pharmaceutical Research Institute Jose Rodriguez, Ed.D. Michael A. Sass Michele Vien Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

Vice President of Campus Life and Global Initiatives Special Assistant to the President Vice President of Finance 39


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President's Report 2011