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CONTENTS 4

President’s Message Faculty Research

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Student Research

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Financial Report

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Scholarly Activity Report

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Editor Gil Chorbajian Contributing Writers David E. Goldschmidt / Patrick Rathbun Contributing Photographers Scott Barrow / Kris Qua Design Jen Danchetz, D|2 Design Defined

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President’s Ledger (VDUP1) that may play a key role in slowing or even stopping the growth of cancer cells. Graduate student Zhanbin Wang is working in the lab of Dr. Stefan Balaz on our Vermont Campus to develop an approach for modeling how chemicals are transported and accumulate in biological membranes (see image on page 5). Their work will help researchers predict how new drug candidates are likely to behave in the body, even before making a compound. Unfortunately, all of the research taking place across our two campuses cannot fit onto these pages, but the investigators highlighted here demonstrate the breadth and depth of the expertise that exists at the College today. The major goal of our Strategic Plan is to promote excellence in teaching and research, which together contribute to our educational preeminence in pharmacy, pharmaceutical sciences, and the health sciences. The focus of this publication is on the dynamic research activities taking place at the College. Our investments in research – highlighted by the recruitment of outstanding faculty, expansion of available research space, acquisition of new laboratory equipment, and the opening of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute – have set us apart from many other colleges. The results of these efforts led to $10 million in research funding in 2010, a figure that we reached two years sooner than planned. Our research accomplishments have also led to enhanced prestige for the College and helped further distinguish ACPHS among our peer schools. Without question, the greatest beneficiaries of our expanded research program are the students. At many colleges and universities, research activities are largely the domain of post doctoral students 4

and graduate students. At ACPHS, we strongly encourage our undergraduate students to engage in research while on campus, and they are increasingly seeking out these opportunities. From helping design experiments to evaluating the results, our students are not just acquiring knowledge, but they are participating in the discovery process. Along the way, they are learning “how to think,” an invaluable skill that will help them stand out when they compete for residencies, fellowships, graduate school, and post-graduate employment. This Report highlights the accomplishments of several student researchers. One such individual is Jessica Phelps, a fourth year student in the B.S. program in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Jessica is working with Dr. Luciana Lopes on the development of a gel that would be injected under the skin to help improve treatment for patients suffering from addiction. Fifth year Pharm.D. student Michael Camuso has teamed with Dr. Richard Dearborn to tackle another major health threat – cancer. Michael is assisting Dr. Dearborn in exploring ways to control a regulatory protein

As you read further, you will learn about: Dr. Karen Glass, who received a grant from the American Heart Association that is reserved for “promising beginning scientists;” Dr. Arnold Johnson, who was awarded a prestigious $1.4 million NIH grant; Dr. Darius Mason, who has quickly become a strong contributor to our nephrology pharmacy group; Dr. Amit Pai, who is rethinking traditional approaches to dosing drugs; and Dr. Alexandre Steiner, who is questioning long held beliefs about the treatment of severely septic patients. This year marks the 130th anniversary of the College’s founding, and while that is a cause for some reflection, our sights continue to be set on the future — a future where research will continue to play an important role in helping us realize our full potential as an institution.

James J. Gozzo, Ph.D.

President Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences


Stefan Balaz, Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the ACPHS-Vermont Campus, has a $1.35 million NIH grant to develop models like the one above to help predict the behavior of new drug candidates. Dr. Balaz and his team, which includes students such as Zhanbin Wang (see page 36), hope their research will help decrease the time-to-market for new drugs as well as the costs associated with research and development. The above image shows Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) bound with its inhibitor (PDB code 3KGA). This protein serves as a potential target for several inflammatory disorders. The color of the protein surface indicates its electrostatic potential [from red (most positive) to purple (most negative)]. Crystal waters are shown as red balls. 5


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ACPHS has more than 25,000 square feet dedicated to research.

Pharmaceutical Research Institute Rensselaer, NY

Vermont Campus Colchester, VT 8


Bioscience Research Building (BRB) Albany, NY 9


Faculty Research

Come Back to the Bench If you want a lesson in successful multitasking brought to the extreme, look no further than Pharmaceutical Research Institute (PRI) Executive Vice President and Chairman, Shaker A. Mousa, Ph.D., MBA, FACC, FACB. Dr. Mousa is a tireless leader at PRI, the College’s drug discovery and development institute which is located in Rensselaer, New York. He also serves as a tenured professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. In addition, Dr. Mousa holds numerous academic appointments at universities and research centers throughout the world. A native of Alexandria, Egypt, Dr. Mousa’s impressive curriculum vitae includes more than

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600 publications (a number that’s growing even as you read this), 30 U.S. patents, over 200 foreign patents, and numerous contributions to the discovery and development of a variety of pharmaceutical products, including clinical candidates for breast cancer detection, noninvasive imaging agents, and other treatment-based drugs. To add to these accolades, Dr. Mousa was recently appointed to the position of Vice Provost for Research at the College. This key appointment by President James J. Gozzo, Ph.D. perhaps comes as no surprise, as Dr. Mousa’s work has been instrumental in helping grow the College’s research program to one that is annually awarded millions of dollars through a variety of private and public sources, including the Na-

tional Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Defense. “We have more than $10 million in active research grants, contracts, and awards,” says President Gozzo, “and we expect that figure to increase dramatically in the future.” Since his arrival at the College, President Gozzo has placed a strong emphasis on research by investing in state-of-the-art laboratory facilities, adding graduate degrees in key research areas, and renewing the focus on faculty-mentored research activities with students. In his new role, Dr. Mousa plans to increase the emphasis on research at the College without detracting from the College’s current strengths.


In short, he has called for the faculty to, in his words, “Come back to the bench.”

The Cycle of Mentorship Like President Gozzo, Dr. Mousa strongly believes in the cycle of mentorship. And while the faculty-student mentoring model is important, Dr. Mousa sees much more. Combining the talents of senior and junior faculty members enables the senior faculty to act as mentors to the junior faculty, imparting in-depth knowledge and experience in areas such as teaching, research, and scholarship. This new research mentoring system will encourage senior and junior faculty members to come together to develop joint research proposals. “One of the greatest strengths we have is our ability to communicate and collaborate,” says Dr. Mousa. “We need to relearn the fact that one plus one does not equal two; it adds up to much much more.” Without question, mentoring involves both undergraduate and graduate students. “Another important part of the mentorship cycle,” says Dr. Mousa, “is where our graduate students generate preliminary data that our faculty can then develop into collaborative studies and grants.” Many of these graduate students, including those who study with Dr. Mousa, go on to careers in research of their own, be it in academia or at pharmaceutical research centers. As they tackle their sixth-year rotations, a new group of four Pharm.D. students is assigned to Dr. Mousa every six weeks. From their first meeting, Dr. Mousa’s approach is to let students develop and explore their own ideas. “Our job is to show them the way,” he says, “and open doors yet unknown to these fresh minds. They do the rest.”

While publication helps any Pharm.D. graduate stand out amongst their peers, approximately one out of four of Dr. Mousa’s students finds that “spark” and goes on to graduate work pursuing a Ph.D. or lands a residency in a pharmaceutical research company. Not surprisingly, Dr. Mousa previously worked for seventeen years as a principal research scientist at DuPont Pharmaceuticals Co.

Pathways to Collaboration Another key component to Dr. Mousa’s vision for mentoring is what he calls “joint intramural applications.” With so much good research going on at the College, Dr. Mousa sees a need to form pathways of communication and collaboration between separate departments and current “silos of research.” One of the joys he has experienced in his short tenure thus far as Vice Provost for Research is feeling the excitement amongst faculty members when such a pathway or bridge is revealed. “Strong research often involves the combination of seemingly disparate ideas,” says Dr. Mousa. “So in my new role, going along with the idea that one plus one is much more than two, I am looking for ways to bring together researchers from different fields.” This also goes beyond just the College, as strong research certainly requires collaboration and work from multiple entities across the globe, which in turn opens more doors for students at the College. To encourage this crosspollination and entice faculty to “come back to the bench,” Dr. Mousa

organized the inaugural ACPHS Research Forum in January 2011. This well-attended all-day event brought researchers from many different departments and programs, including the satellite Vermont campus, which opened in 2009. The day, which began with introductory remarks from President Gozzo and Provost and Dean Mehdi Boroujerdi, featured presentations highlighting research projects from across the College. The event was organized by Dr. Mousa in a deliberate attempt at opening collaborative pathways between departments, a strategic move that has already started generating positive feedback from faculty. Rounding out the day were poster sessions by faculty and graduate students, plus a set of closing remarks by Dr. Mousa himself, reiterating the message of collaboration and the cycle of mentorship. “By establishing this synergistic event,” says Dr. Mousa, “we showed that quality science matters, that we can solve those problems that ultimately result in the treatment of disease and improvement in human health.” In other words, the aim is to derive clinical value out of a variety of research efforts. And while his own experiences in doing exactly this have proven to be very effective, he also views himself as a team builder, especially in his new role as Vice Provost for Research. “There are no boundaries in science,” he says. “Our goal as scientists is to solve problems and bring value to all of humanity from our efforts. Otherwise, science means nothing.”

“Our goal as scientists is to solve problems and bring value to all of humanity from our efforts. Otherwise, science means nothing.” 11


“I Hate Routine” “There are unfortunately only twenty-four hours in a day,” says Dr. Mousa, acknowledging the difficulties many faculty members face in executing their research. Faculty research efforts often are overlooked or demoted to a lower priority as faculty aim to balance teaching loads, committee involvement, and other duties that are crucial to the ongoing success of the College and its graduates. “I hate routine,” says Dr. Mousa, “as do many faculty and those doing research.” Part of his vision is to provide both the physical and human resources to support faculty in their research. “We need more highly skilled tech staff members and postdocs to do the groundwork in support of faculty research. We also need core facilities where such execution can be that much more efficient.” As a result of supplying such mechanics for the research process, Dr. Mousa believes faculty workloads will be freed up, thus providing faculty more time to interpret their research data, develop grant proposals, publish their results, and act as mentors in their respective fields. “Another part of this grand equation,” says Dr. Mousa, “is providing faculty with knowledgeable grant writers, again in an effort to free up their time to focus on the core aspects of their research.” Dr. Mousa believes that graduating top-notch students is certainly a priority of the College, but asks, “What differentiates these graduates? How can the Pharm.D. we offer be stronger than the norm?” Not surprisingly, he turns to research and the concept of mentorship for answers. “Strategically, we need to raise the bar in the pharmaceutical research community,” he says. “If we build a

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state-of-the-art research community here, it will serve as a model to other colleges and research organizations, and set us and our graduates above the rest.” One model worth duplicating is that of the PRI facilities. “I also like measurements and equations,” says Dr. Mousa. And a little competition doesn’t hurt, either. Another key aspect of Dr. Mousa’s vision for research at the College is an annual award for the best research. More specifically, he envisions a formula that sums weighted measures of acquired funding, publication, graduate student mentorship, junior faculty mentorship, and other factors. “We want to encourage so many different yet important things here,” says Dr. Mousa, “so let’s put them all together into a formula and reward those among us who are leading the way.” Through all of his efforts, Dr. Mousa hopes to convince faculty members at the College to “come back to the bench.”

Making a Difference As to what drives his efforts and his own research, Dr. Mousa states, “I want to make a difference.” Dr. Mousa was brought to the College in 2003 by President Gozzo to launch the Pharmaceutical Research Institute. Three years later, experiencing dramatic growth, PRI expanded to its current location in the Center for Nanopharmaceutical Technology in the University at Albany’s East Campus in Rensselaer, New York. The primary objective of PRI is to enrich pharmaceutical education at the College by providing hands-on access to the full drug development lifecycle. Through Dr. Mousa’s leadership, PRI conducts pre-clinical testing and clinical trials to develop drugs for transitioning to industrial manufacture. Very much a multifaceted entity,

a key aim of PRI is to introduce innovative noninvasive techniques for diagnosing vascular, oncological, and neurological disorders. Part of this innovation includes nanotechnology. “Nanotechnology is a new tool,” says Dr. Mousa. “With it, we are able to deliver more focused and exacting doses of a wide array of drug treatments, including techniques for early detection of cancers.” The promise of such nanopharmaceutical technologies is to avoid some of the other detrimental or even dangerous side effects of traditionally administered drugs. With the multitude of ongoing research at PRI, Dr. Mousa is quick to identify a current passion in his own research—helping those with pancreatic cancer. “There’s a feeling of helplessness amongst patients and their families—and their oncologists,” he says, noting that many of the oncologists on the front lines of pancreatic cancer need psychotherapy to deal with the constant loss of patients after such a short time span, on average three months. “We’re on the verge of clinical trials for a drug that shrinks the tumor in which the pancreatic cancer cells reside,” describes Dr. Mousa. “We starve it. If we can prevent it from spreading throughout the body, we have effectively bought enough time for a surgeon to operate and remove the tumor.” At the end of his seemingly superhuman workdays, Dr. Mousa’s personal aims keep him from giving up. “We cannot quit. We have to keep trying. Every day, I wish to alleviate the suffering of human beings in the face of disease.”

“We cannot quit. We have to keep trying.”


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Faculty Research

Darius L. Mason

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Pharmacy Practice Darius L. Mason, Pharm.D., BCPS, has been awarded a grant from the Genzyme Corporation in the amount of $187,863 to study the effects of different phosphate binders on vascular calcification, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. CKD patients experience significant morbidity and mortality from heart disease. Several factors contribute to incidences of heart disease in these patients, including high levels of phosphorus. High levels of phosphorus can lead to calcification, or hardening, of the blood vessels. The calcification process begins in the early stages of disease and continually progresses as kidney function declines. Additionally, CKD patients often have high levels of a substance called fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), a phosphorus excreting hormone, which has been related to heart disease. As kidney function declines, less phosphorus is excreted and more FGF-23 is released. Phosphate binding medicines are used to lower the amount of phosphorus absorbed. Recent evidence has suggested that use of phosphate binder therapy in the non-dialysis population lowers concentrations of FGF-23, a more sensitive regulator of mineral metabolism

than phosphorus, associated both with vessel calcification and mortality. However, initiating phosphate binder therapy in the early stages of CKD to reduce or slow the progression of vascular calcification has not fully been explored. Furthermore, lowering FGF-23 levels in CKD patients may also lower substances in the blood that cause hardening of blood vessels and blood vessel inflammation in the CKD population. Dr. Mason and his co-investigators’ research is designed to determine if using the phosphate binders in the earlier stages of kidney disease (before dialysis) can decrease FGF-23 levels and biomarkers that are associated with hardening of the blood vessels and heart disease. This collaborative research project includes the support of faculty at ACPHS who are experts in kidney disease (Dr. Amy Barton Pai) and drug development (Dr. Shaker Mousa) in addition to the assistance of Albany Medical Center physician Dr. George Eisele. Clinically important modifications of biomarkers of vascular calcification, inflammation and vessel health after treatment with phosphate binders may indicate a reduction in the progression of blood vessel calcification and suggest a heart benefit in the nondialysis CKD population.

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Faculty Research

Arnold Johnson

Professor, Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences Arnold Johnson, Ph.D., has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health in the amount of $1.4 million. Dr. Johnson will study the role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β in tumor necrosis factor induced lung injury. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a common (150,000 cases/year in the U.S.) and costly disorder with a mortality rate of approximately 50%. During ARDS, the lung has a change in blood pressure and the blood vessels become leaky which allow the lung to fill with fluid (also known as edema). The “wet lung” cannot ventilate adequately which decreases oxygen in the blood and increases carbon dioxide in the blood. Sepsis, commonly known as blood poisoning, is a major factor predisposing to ARDS. Sepsis affects approximately 250,000 Americans each year. The average death rate for sepsis is 40%. Combat-associated trauma with sepsis is a particularly timely concern due to ongoing operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. ARDS is mediated, at least in part, by Tumor Necrosis Factor. TNF is a protein that can cause

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symptoms common to sepsis. TNF is released by white blood cells in response to infection. TNF causes the blood vessels to become leaky similar to what happens in ARDS. An enzyme called glycogen synthase kinase 3β can mediate some of the TNF response. The strategy for this study is focused on glycogen synthase kinase 3β which might modify this lung-injury response during sepsis. Successful completion of the proposed studies may result in progress in the treatment and prevention of advanced sepsis/ARDS. An increasing older population with co-existing conditions such as depression of the immune system combined with an increasing population of antibiotic resistant bacteria will increase the risks of sepsis. The understanding of the lung response to various disease states could lead to therapeutic advances in humans, resulting in improved cell function, fewer incidences of lung injury, and ultimately, better outcomes for patients who develop sepsis.


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Faculty Research

Karen C. Glass Assistant Professor, Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences Karen Glass, Ph.D., a newly appointed Assistant Professor in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department on the Vermont Campus, has been awarded a Beginning Grant-in-Aid from the American Heart Association. This grant for $132,000 will fund Glass over the next two years to study the role of PHD finger modules in heart disease. Cardiovascular disorders, such as infarction and hypertension, place undue stress on the heart muscle often resulting in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, or an enlarged heart. Due to the increased size of heart cells, which are unable to divide after birth, pathologic cardiac hypertrophy significantly weakens the heart leading to higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with progressive heart failure. In order to contribute to the search for an effective therapeutic treatment for the prevention

of hypertrophic growth, Dr. Glass is trying to identify common signaling pathways involved in the development of heart disease. PHD fingers are important protein motifs found in a variety of cardiac genes, whose disruption affects cardiac muscle fiber development and leads to heart disease. The results generated by this study will provide a comprehensive view of the structural and molecular mechanisms by which PHDcontaining proteins regulate gene expression in cardiac muscle development and disease. A deeper understanding of how these molecular signaling pathways can be modulated will provide insight into the design of new therapeutic strategies, and may help to identify novel diagnostic markers and targets to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease.

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Faculty Research

Manjunath (Amit) P. Pai Associate Professor, Dept. of Pharmacy Practice Amit Pai, Pharm.D., received a grant from the National Kidney Foundation of Northeast New York in the amount of $29,996. Pai will study whether the risk of drug induced kidney injury can be reduced in obese patients. Twenty million Americans are thought to have chronic kidney disease, which is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and high treatment costs. Although the cause of chronic kidney disease is multifactorial, the increasing number of patients with this condition is thought to be a result of increasing rates of obesity and diabetes in the United States. The progression of mild chronic kidney disease to a more severe form can be accelerated by acute kidney injury. Several FDA approved drugs that are currently on the market can have the unintended side effect of

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inducing acute kidney injury. The risk of this side effect may be increased if unnecessarily high doses of the drug are used. This potential risk is especially important for drugs that are dosed based on the patient’s body weight. Dosing patients on actual body weight may lead to estimation of unnecessarily high doses that can then increase the risk of acute kidney injury. This potential error may be even worse in patients who are obese. Given that one in three Americans is now classified as obese, it is imperative that we understand how to dose drugs better in this population. Dr. Pai and his co-investigators will be studying the pharmacokinetics and risk of acute kidney injury with the antibiotic agent, gentamicin, in an animal model of obesity. This collaborative research project includes the

support of faculty at ACPHS who are experts in toxicology (Dr. Hassan El-Fawal), drug development (Dr. Shaker Mousa) and advanced pharmacokinetic modeling (Dr. Thomas Lodise). The current method used to detect acute kidney injury is not very sensitive. As a result, Dr. Pai’s group is studying new biomarkers of acute kidney injury to identify more sensitive methods of detection. These data will then be used to identify an approach to dosing gentamicin that maintains effective concentrations while reducing the risk of acute kidney injury. If this model is successful, the approach developed by Dr. Pai’s group can then be used to improve dosing of other drugs used by obese patients.


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Faculty Research

Alexandre A. Steiner

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences The American Heart Association awarded a grant in the amount of $308,000 to Alexandre A. Steiner, Pharm.D., Ph.D., to study the benefit of naturally occurring hypothermia in patients with septic shock.

occurs in some cases of SIRS/sepsis (10%) is a phenomenon that continues to puzzle physicians and scientists.

The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a serious complication in hospitalized patients. It is commonly caused by infection, in which case it is named sepsis. This malady is associated with unacceptably high mortality rates, which may be as high as 70% in those patients who develop circulatory shock. At least 750,000 cases of sepsis occur annually in the USA and account for more than $16 billion in healthcare expenses.

It is not uncommon for a septic patient who develops hypothermia to be re-warmed with the use of heating blankets. This practice, however, is not based on solid evidence showing that the hypothermia that occurs naturally in septic patients is detrimental. Preliminary studies by Dr. Steiner led to the hypothesis that, in the most severe cases of SIRS, naturally occurring hypothermia relieves the imbalance between oxygen supply and demand during cardio respiratory dysfunction and aids the host better than fever.

As traditional anti-inflammatory therapy shows little efficacy in septic patients, it becomes evident that the outcome of sepsis relies largely on the host’s own defense strategies. Whereas the fever (elevation in body temperature) that develops in the overwhelming majority of septic patients (90%) is considered a host-defense strategy, the hypothermia (fall in body temperature) that

This project has strong clinical implications, as it will provide the foundation for possible clinical studies to evaluate whether septic patients with cardiovascular shock can benefit from naturally occurring hypothermia. The possibility exists that lives could be saved simply by not re-warming (at least not to a full extent) those septic-shock patients who become hypothermic.

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“The great thing in this world is

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not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving.� - Oliver Wendell Holmes

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Faculty Research

The Mind of the Researcher “Cut my arm and you’ll see green blood,” says Thomas P. Lodise, Pharm.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice. He’s talking about that signature “midnight green” of his native Philadelphia Eagles, not the hunter green of the New York Jets—and certainly not the dark blue of the New York Giants. In his eighth year at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Dr. Lodise might not be rooting for any New York teams, but he’s quickly become an all-star in the field of epidemiology, studying antibiotic exposureresponse relationships in patients. His research goals are straightforward, though not that easily attained. First, improve patient outcomes through carefully crafted patient care strategies and antibiotic regimens. Second, certainly related to his first goal, reduce the likelihood of toxicity in patients that occurs as a result of the very same antibiotics designed to help fight infection. Third, somehow stay ahead of the game by minimizing the emergence of antibiotic resistance in future strains and metamorphoses of bacterial infections. In September 2008, Dr. Lodise received four grants totaling almost a half million dollars from three separate sources, including Cubist

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Pharmaceuticals headquartered in Lexington, Massachusetts, pharmaceutical industry leader Pfizer, and the Foundation for Health Living in Buffalo, New York. Since joining the faculty at the College, he has been awarded over one million dollars in extramural funding as Principal Investigator or co-Principal Investigator—no easy task in today’s competitive and dwindling research funding marketplace. Dr. Lodise’s 2008 grants were awarded to support the study of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA, a “serious public health concern” in the eyes of the National Institute of Health (NIH) that continues to demonstrate increased resistance to the antibiotics and other medications prescribed to treat it. In particular, Dr. Lodise is researching the efficacy of antibiotics versus potentially deadly MRSA infections, a rivalry going back to Dr. Lodise’s postgraduate fellowship in Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. “I learned how important it was to care for these patients on an individualized basis,” says Dr. Lodise. “In particular, I saw the need to personalize the dosing of antibiotics in each patient to ensure the highest probability

of a successful outcome. It was then that the importance of the math behind proper dosing began to truly crystallize in my mind.” Dr. Lodise notes one individual who was a mentor to him. Peggy McKinnon, Pharm.D., a clinical specialist at Detroit Receiving Hospital and fellowship director, confirmed and further stimulated an already growing interest for Dr. Lodise—how to optimize patient care and efficiently pit antibiotics against infection. This was enough to jumpstart a successful career as a clinical scientist, although it also didn’t hurt that his first paper was accepted and published in the flagship journal, Clinical Infectious Diseases. To date, Dr. Lodise has published approximately


50 peer-reviewed articles in Clinical Infectious Diseases and other such reputable journals, including Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Chest; Pharmacotherapy; and the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. Not surprisingly, in 2006, Dr. Lodise was named Researcher of the Year by the New York State Chapter of The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (NYS-ACCP). In 2008, he was named the Young Investigator of the Year by the Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists (SIDP), who also awarded Dr. Lodise with the Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy Paper of the Year Award in 2010. Good science certainly requires good collaboration. As such, Dr. Lodise is not alone in his endeavors. The study of infectious diseases is a budding area at the College. In addition to Dr. Lodise, there are currently four other faculty members with advanced training and expertise in infectious diseases pharmacotherapy, clinical pharmacokinetics, epidemiology, outcomes research, and mathematical modeling. These faculty members are Christopher Miller, Pharm.D., Tony Nicasio, Pharm.D., Amit Pai, Pharm.D., and Nimish Patel, Pharm.D. Integrating their dual interests in research and patient care, their overall research goals are to advance the science of infectious diseases and improve clinical practice. Dr. Lodise also works closely with Leon Cosler ‘82, Ph.D., director of the Research Institute for Health Outcomes (RIHO), an institute formed at the College in 2006 in response to demand for high-quality, scientifically sound medical and financial data in health outcomes and pharmacoeconomic research.

A year earlier, in 2005, the Albany Nephrology Pharmacy Group (ANephRx) was formed to investigate medication-related issues in kidney disease, quickly becoming another collaborative entity at the College. Dr. Lodise works closely with ANephRx founding member Darren Grabe ‘95, Pharm.D., and Katie Cardone ‘06, Pharm.D., both of the Department of Pharmacy Practice. Beyond the College, Dr. Lodise works with a wide variety of collaborators, including colleagues at Albany Medical Center Hospital (Albany, NY), Ordway Research Institute Inc. (Albany, NY), State University of New York School of Public Health (Albany, NY), University of Buffalo School of Pharmacy (Buffalo, NY), Strong Memorial Hospital (Rochester, NY), Albany Stratton VA Medical Center (Albany, NY), the Hortense and Louis Rubin Dialysis Center (Clifton Park, NY), Northwestern Medical Center University (Chicago, IL), and Wayne State University (Detroit, MI). Given his enemy is MRSA, how does Dr. Lodise stay ahead of the curve in developing sound and effective antibiotic regimens? How does his mind work? What can we learn from such an effective clinical scientist?

Hypotheses from the bedside A 1999 summa cum laude doctor of pharmacy graduate of Temple University School of Pharmacy in Philadelphia, Dr. Lodise completed the APhA-ASHP-accredited Pharmacy Practice Residency at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, also in Philadelphia, in 2000. In 2002, after completing the Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Fellowship at Wayne State University in Detroit, he joined the faculty at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

Eight years later, he finds a comforting mix of the clinical life, the life of a researcher, and the rewards of being a teacher. “These three aspects of life here complement each other daily,” says Dr. Lodise. “And the College recognizes the importance of intertwining the three. I have the academic freedom to best figure out how to conduct my research and deliver a quality educational experience to each student that crosses my path.” Although at first Dr. Lodise planned to embark on a purely clinical career, his research interests brought him to the College where his focus today is clear. “The most problematic organism posing major health risks today is MRSA,” says Dr. Lodise. Death rates of those infected in the United States are estimated to be a staggering 20-30%. Those who do survive then tend to be more susceptible to recurrent infections that are often less responsive to antibiotics. It’s often an uphill battle. Key to Dr. Lodise’s research is finding that “sweet spot” where the optimal dosing of antibiotics is administered to a patient, thus providing the most bacterial-fighting capacity while causing the least amount of toxicity risk and, equally important, future antibiotic resistance. By no means an easy task. And the results directly affect human lives. Harkening back to his fellowship days, Dr. Lodise always begins his research at the bedside. “Hypotheses are generated at the bedside,” he says, “through your interactions with the patient, the observations you make, the patterns that begin to emerge.” Each patient contributes new and invaluable data that together forms those patterns that, in Dr. Lodise’s terms, move the science forward.

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While this process may start with the question of how to properly dose a specific antibiotic or which antibiotic to administer, other questions undoubtedly present themselves. Why is this patient’s infection not responding to the standard treatment? What’s driving the resistance mechanism of this infection? In Dr. Lodise’s own words, “Since we often find the standard approach to care is not the optimal way of maximizing patient outcomes, can we identify some other pattern here, even if it challenges currently accepted paradigms?” Once these new patterns emerge, ideas and hypotheses can take shape and be modeled for evaluation. “Part of this process is seeing where these ideas can fill those gaps in the literature,” says Dr. Lodise, emphasizing the crucial need for staying current with relevant research in the field. And while having a firm understanding of the science behind your observations is key, Dr. Lodise notes the importance of taking this to the next level by discussing a hypothesis with experts in other disciplines “to be as fully informed as possible.” Dr. Lodise enjoys working with people he can learn from, which perhaps explains his uncanny knack for avoiding the so-called “silo effect” in which scientists in any discipline unknowingly isolate themselves from the other sciences and knowledge in the surrounding academic and clinical worlds. Answers, or at least clues, often lie in the unexplored synergies of the sciences.

“The goal is to improve patient care, plain and simple.” 28

“I want to know how these bacteria behave,” says Dr. Lodise, “so I turn to a microbiologist to find those links, those connections to my field, to better understand what I’m up against.” Combining such alternative viewpoints and perspectives from a variety of fields leads Dr. Lodise to stronger hypotheses, as well as crucial partnerships and collaborations. This multidisciplinary strategy and crosspollination does indeed take time, though in our modern age, such a collaborative approach has certainly become easier, enabling Dr. Lodise and others to communicate with fellow scientists across the globe. “The goal is to improve patient care, plain and simple,” says Dr. Lodise. “So when we find that pattern or develop a hypothesis that challenges the norm, I’m excited. Let’s move the science forward and change the currently accepted paradigm.” Dr. Lodise is always on the lookout for ways to innovate and also translate new findings in science into tried and true practice back at the bedside.

From the bedside to the classroom to the bench In his current role at the College, Dr. Lodise teaches core courses in infectious diseases pharmacotherapy and drug information (focusing on statistics and the design and implementation of effective clinical studies), as well as an elective course in epidemiology. Since joining the College in 2002, Dr. Lodise has actively served as preceptor for both clinical and research rotations in infectious diseases. He is also the Infectious Diseases Fellowship Director at the College. With other similar accolades over his eight years at the College, Dr. Lodise understands the importance of teaching and mentoring, including its positive impact on his research.

“There’s a very human cycle here that’s worth maintaining and developing further,” says Dr. Lodise. He’s referring to the experiential cycle in which students and post-docs ultimately becomes mentors, a cycle in which Dr. Lodise continues to play an increasingly crucial role at the College. “This is what distinguishes academia from the purely clinical environment,” he says. Students learn and through their work both as a student and in their postgraduate careers, help move the science forward. Not only do his students learn and experience their craft firsthand through his efforts, Dr. Lodise also stumbles upon new findings and new experiences along the way, a role he finds very rewarding. “Students and post-docs are accountable for improved patient results,” says Dr. Lodise, “and therefore experience being vital members of the team.” He also stresses the importance of getting students involved as early as possible. His passion is evident when describing to his students the significance of mathematical modeling and statistics in the design of clinical studies. “Be as specific as possible and let the data tell us something,” says Dr. Lodise. “Numbers don’t lie, even when they don’t support our hypothesis.” The importance of designing and administering a study cannot be underestimated, as this serves as the means to moving the science forward, though not necessarily in the anticipated direction. “A hypothesis can only exist if it cannot be disproven,” says Dr. Lodise. As a clinical scientist, he views one of his key job requirements as being a good dose of skepticism. And as impersonal as it may sound, Dr. Lodise also believes that the mechanics of research—


the details of its execution—must be treated as a business for the research to be successful. “We can always learn from previous studies ways to design and implement more efficiently executed studies in the future,” says Dr. Lodise. Why slow yourself down by getting caught up with the inherent inefficiencies of the process? Find ways to improve. In addition to improving efficiency, Dr. Lodise looks for ways to improve the thoroughness of his studies. “Research should be done for the sake of finding things out,” he says, “and ultimately patient care.” So while a study certainly has definitive goals, most of which are met and discussed along the way, Dr. Lodise remains vigilant in his search for new and surprising bits of information—the hidden clues as to where to direct his efforts next.

Maintaining the momentum While his focus and driving force is clearly to improve patient care, Dr. Lodise also finds motivation in challenging himself and growing as an individual. “Science is indeed a science, but it is also an art,” he says. Like artists in almost any field, Dr. Lodise has an idea, he develops it, and then he expresses it. “In my mind,” he says, “those artifacts of research—data, results, seminars, presentations, papers—are all a form of self-expression, though by their very nature they are more technical than the other arts.” Perhaps another key to Dr. Lodise’s success is his focus on the all-important discussion sections of his papers. “The discussion section is where ideas and hypotheses thrive,” he says. “Though I disliked writing even back in my undergraduate studies at Temple University, I can say now that I look forward to writing those

discussion sections, as hard as they are to write.” And like many embarking on such intensive efforts, starting is often the hardest part for Dr. Lodise. Opposite the starting gate is the finish line, and though there are many finish lines according to Dr. Lodise, each is crucial to moving the science forward. As Dr. Lodise continues to excel in his field, he certainly carves out time to reflect on his expanding career, identifying those work habits of his own that he can improve. “My advice to younger researchers is to follow your ideas and hypotheses through to completion. Keep the momentum going. I’ve seen researchers give up the fight too early or become stagnant in their approach to research. They lose their passion for the science.”

“My advice to younger researchers is to follow your ideas and hypotheses through to completion. Keep the momentum going.” Dr. Lodise remains passionate about his research, often returning to his “move the science forward” mantra. And while seeing the fruits of one’s labors is certainly a fulfilling feeling for Dr. Lodise—for example learning of yet another paper’s acceptance in a reputable and widely read journal—he notes the process of getting there to be of equal significance. “Earning the ‘win’ is of course beyond measure,” he says. “But the rewards of good science and well-executed me-

chanics are also very gratifying, not to mention the collaborations with colleagues and others passionate about their work.”

The end game without end When does research reach its end? Or does it? “Research requires constant refinement,” says Dr. Lodise. Unlike football, there is no two minute warning, no imminent end of the game. Deadlines come and go. Papers and results are produced and published, progress is made, and the journey continues. “My hope, always, is to identify how to move the science forward,” says Dr. Lodise. “How can we broaden and upscale our ideas, establish reusable patterns, for example, and apply them to the treatment of other bacterial infections, or even other seemingly unrelated problems?” Dr. Lodise’s quest for knowledge and understanding has also led him to working on his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the State University of New York School of Public Health, no small feat for one so busy with clinical work, teaching, and research. “Earning my Ph.D. will certainly be a culmination of much of my work to this point,” says Dr. Lodise. He also credits the College for providing such a unique and synergistic opportunity. And as for his Philadelphia Eagles, rest assured that Dr. Lodise still finds comfort in watching his team in midnight green.

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Student Research

The Student and the World In support of ACPHS’s strategic plan and institutional goals, the College has made great strides in recruiting international students and providing them with world-class resources. For the 2009-2010 year, the College was ranked among the top 30 for international students among specialized colleges, according to the Association of International Educators. The College has 140 international students, comprising nearly ten percent of its total enrollment. Recent college initiatives, including the founding of the Office of Intercultural Affairs and Diversity, the hiring of an English-as-a-Second-Language teacher, international recruitment trips, and the ongoing search for a Vice President of Campus Life, speak to ACPHS’s interest in diversifying and providing for its international student body. Many current international students reveal that the quality of ACPHS’s academics and support systems outside of the classroom have far exceeded their expectations. International students currently enrolled at the College have found their experiences differ widely from previous studies.“It’s tough for people from professional backgrounds to make the transition to a less structured environment,” said Hassan El-Fawal, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Health Sciences. Dr. El-Fawal works closely with the 20 medical students from Saudi Arabia’s King Saud University (KSU) who are currently enrolled in the master’s program in Biotechnology. “A cooperative environment has developed, as the

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students realize they are no longer in competition with each other,” he added. After receiving their master’s degrees from ACPHS, the KSU students plan to complete international medical residencies or pursue Ph.D. programs before returning to KSU, the oldest university in Saudi Arabia, for faculty positions. Despite only having one semester of study and many different career goals, several Biotechnology students already attest that the program has impacted their thinking and lab skills and will influence their careers into the future. “It changed the way I think in that I wouldn’t think of a disease by itself, I would think of treatments used in disease,” Lana Shaiba, a KSU student who plans to become a pediatrician, said. “[It has taught me] how to use basic science instead of a clinical approach. It made me realize how important that is in medicine.” Jalal Jalaly, another Biotechnology student from KSU, said the options and independence students are given is new and appealing to him. He said Vice Provost for Research and PRI Chairman Shaker Mousa gave students the option of an exam or literature review. Jalaly chose the review, which was novel and exciting to him, and tapped into an entirely different set of skills. “This offer was an opportunity to build you and build your research skills,” he said. “Courses are student driven. You have to choose what you want and commit to it.”

Rachel Schiewe, a Canadian MS Biotechnology student who attended the University of Alberta, said she wants to be a lab manager and will benefit from the practical skills the Biotechnology program will impart. “We are more engaged in subjects,” she said. “We try to think about how we’re going to use the material.” El-Fawal said he wants students to think creatively and independently and be productive. To inspire motivation, he asks students what they want their recommendation letter to say. “The grades you receive as an undergraduate will not matter as much as how you think. That’s what people want to know when they look at your C.V.,” he says. Outside of the Biotechnology program, several international students agree their ACPHS experiences have been positive and practical. Zhanbin Wang, who came from China and is a student in the Pharmaceutical Science master’s program, said ACPHS faculty members have provided him with the resources to become an accomplished scientist.“ACPHS grants us the opportunity to reach an upper level of understanding through self-study by offering us electronic resources as well as experienced faculty to aid us on our path to forming our careers,” Wang said. Aditi Baxi, a Pharm.D. student from Canada, also recognizes the vast resources the College has. “Along with studying the theories, the faculty


believes in training students to work and excel in the work environment and therefore we receive an ultimate mixture of both,” Baxi said. “The Dean and the entire faculty are very easily accessible and helpful. Also, the students are a great support since no one really competes against each other, rather they help and motivate others to excel and this is the true quality of

a health professional. “ Albany Pharmaceutical Sciences Chair and Director of Graduate Studies Bill Millington said he believes there is truly an international exchange by having international students on ACPHS’s campuses. Cultural competency and faculty productivity, which can lead to grant money, advance

the College and its place in the world. “We want to infect the entire globe with our graduates. A lot of them will go back, and we will have contacts throughout the world. Hopefully, that will advance the science and health in other places.”

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Student Research

Jessica Phelps ’11

Student in the Bachelor’s Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences Jessica Phelps has worked with Dr. Luciana Lopes in the development of subcutaneous liquid crystalline gels for treatment of drug addiction. The gels are intended to sustain the delivery of naltrexone, decreasing the frequency of dosing and increasing patient compliance during treatment. Because the liquid crystalline gel is too viscous to inject, they started developing fluid pre-concentrates that can be injected subcutaneously and spontaneously form the gel in situ upon absorption of water. Thus far, BRIJ- and Phytantriol- based fluid and injectable formulations have been developed. Both formulations can form hexagonal phase gels within a few hours upon absorption of water, which can sustain naltrexone release for several days. Further investigation is necessary to evaluate the safety of such formulations in vivo, and whether enough drug is absorbed to elicit the desired effect.

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Michael D’Alessandro ‘13 Student in the Bachelor’s Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Mike D’Alessandro is working with Dr. Susan Ludeman, synthesizing deuterium labeled compounds related to cyclophosphamide (CP). Cyclophosphamide is the most widely used anticancer drug and has been for nearly half a century; it is effective against more than half of all cancers. Most, if not all, drugs have adverse effects and those associated with CP include neurotoxicity and therapy induced leukemia. These may be linked to an undesirable metabolism of CP by certain liver enzymes. By replacing hydrogen with its less reactive isotope, deuterium, at the site of undesirable metabolism, it is hypothesized that “metabolic switching” will occur. That is, the metabolic pathway which produces toxic metabolites will be suppressed while a competing metabolic pathway which gives therapeutic metabolites will be enhanced. Using human liver microsomes, labeled and unlabeled drugs are allowed to metabolize and then the relative ratios of toxic and therapeutic metabolites are measured. If their hypothesis of ‘metabolic switching’ is correct, the deuterium labeled drug should generate a lower concentration of toxic metabolites and, therefore, should increase the therapeutic benefits of cyclophosphamide for those undergoing chemotherapy. This work is being done in collaboration with researchers at the Comprehensive Cancer Centers of the University of Chicago and Duke University.

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Zhanbin Wang ‘12 Student in the Master’s Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences

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Passage of drug molecules through a phospholipid bilayer takes between milliseconds to days, depending on the drug structure. Molecules with intermediate strength of the interactions with individual bilayer regions pass the bilayer quickly. Extremely weak or strong interactions lead to a slow transport. Zhanbin Wang worked with Dr. Rajesh Subramaniam, a postdoctoral associate in Dr. Stefan Balaz’s lab, on the partitioning experiments that aim at the characterization of the drug-region interactions. To obtain solvation characteristics of drug candidate molecules in the microscopic regions of phospholipid bilayers, surrogate phases imitating the regions are used. The headgroup surrogate is repre-

sented by a concentrated solution of diacetyl phosphatidylcholine that contains about the same amount of water as in the bilayer under physiological conditions. Hexadecane serves as the core surrogate. Zhanbin used UV/VIS/ NIR spectrometry to characterize partitioning of several drug candidate molecules. He will continue his work as a part of his researchoriented MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree. Understanding the influence of drug structure on the trans-bilayer transport rate is crucial for designing drugs with tailored distribution in the body. Limited distribution is needed for drugs acting locally, while general distribution is preferred for drugs targeting receptors in the entire body.


Student Research

Michael Camuso ‘12

Student in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program Michael Camuso’s ‘12 family has worked in community pharmacy for almost 30 years, but this Pharm.D. student’s interests are centered on pharmaceutical research, discovery, and clinical applications. Camuso has assisted in the lab of Pharmaceutical Sciences Associate Professor Richard Dearborn, Ph.D., for the past two years, investigating Vitamin D3 up-regulated protein (VDUP1). VDUP1 is a regulatory protein found in the cells of organisms as diverse as fruit flies and humans. Since being identified as a protein that is shut down in cancer cells, VDUP1 has become a target for study in laboratories worldwide. Using the powerful genetic tools associated with the fruit fly model, Dr. Dearborn’s lab

has shown that VDUP1 is also essential to nervous system development, in addition to its role in cancer. With this knowledge, a new clue has emerged in determining what controls when VDUP1 is turned on or off – a regulatory pathway called the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. The Hh pathway is overactive in several cancer types, though it is not known why it causes abnormal cell division. Michael has worked with Dr. Dearborn on establishing a link between Hh signaling and VDUP1 expression. This research has taken many forms – for example, Michael has dissected and tested flies to see how changes in Hh signaling affect VDUP1 expression and what consequences these manipulations have on brain development.

In collaboration with Pharmaceutical Science Associate Professor Jeffrey Voigt, Ph.D., Michael and Dr. Dearborn have further examined the regulation of VDUP1 in human breast cancer cells. Through genetic and biochemical experiments, they have established that Hh signaling is a primary regulator of VDUP1 in human cells as well. If the researchers can generate a fly-based VDUP1 tumor model to complement the human tumor cell system, they may be able to find additional ways to control VDUP1, and in the process, help slow or even stop the growth of cancer cells.

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Student Research

Linh Nguyen ’12 Student in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

When Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences HaiAn Zheng, Ph.D., was a pharmacy student, he used diagrams and images to help learn his coursework. As a graduate student, computer modeling played an important part in his research initiatives. Now that he is a faculty member, Dr. Zheng continues to explore different multimedia tools to help students learn complex pharmacy-related topics, and fifth year pharmacy student Linh Nguyen plays a key role in these efforts. For the last three years, Linh has worked with Dr. Zheng to integrate visual aids into his classes through the “Pharmaceutics in Mo-

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tion” project. At first, Linh created animations for molecular structures and processes like osmosis, supplementing traditional text-based materials. Based on positive feedback from students, Dr. Zheng and Linh created and sought out additional multimedia elements such as molecular modeling, video, and computer simulations to be used for the class. Survey results of students have confirmed that Linh and Zheng’s multi-media presentations have greatly helped in understanding the physical, chemical, and biological principles of drug delivery and product preparation. In fact, the results have been so encouraging, that Dr. Zheng and Linh (along with Xun Gong,

Luciana Lopes, and Judy Teng) were invited to present their results at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) in 2010. As the world continues to advance into the digital realm and web sites like YouTube increase in popularity, students are becoming increasingly accustomed to acquiring information through visual and auditory stimuli. The work being done by Dr. Zheng and Linh through Pharmaceutics in Motion may point the way to a new way of teaching and learning pharmaceutics in the 21st century.


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Financial Report

July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010

Balance Sheet ASSETS

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Cash and cash equivalents Investments Other assets Accounts receivable - Students Receivables - Government entities Pledges receivable Student loan receivable Other receivables Agency funds Deposits with Bond Trustees Property, plant & equipment - Net

$

26,781,876 10,186,258 2,378,802 268,830 1,726754 1,644,487 2,234,689 627,214 241,846 1,755,041 52, 296, 305

Total Assets

$ 100,142,102

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Deferred income and deposits U.S. government grants refundable Bonds payable Expected post retirement benefit obligation Other liabilities Deposits held in custody for others

$

5,112,787 7,875,100 2,205,911 29,094,745 1,207,642 932,443 241,846

Total Liabilities

$ 46,670,474

Net Assets Unrestricted net assets Temporarily restricted assets Permanently restricted assets

$

45,613,790 2,182,438 5,675,400

Total Net Assets

$ 53,471,628

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$100,142,102


Statement of Activities REVENUES Student tuition and fees Auxilliary enterprises Gifts and pledges Government contracts and grants Other sources Investment income Postgraduate education

Total

EXPENSES Instruction/Student services Physical plant General administration Research Institutional advancement Student financial aid Postgraduate education

Total

% OF TOTAL 73.21% 8.02% 6.70% 6.67% 3.65% 1.39% 0.36%

100.00%

% OF TOTAL 39.68% 26.26% 19.74% 9.33% 2.75% 1.87% 0.37%

100.00%

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Scholarly Activity Report Information collected from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010.

Dept. of Pharmacy Practice PUBLICATIONS

Farrell J, Siddon A. Vitamin D Can Help Your Heart, Too? CORRONA News, 3(2), 11-12. 2009 Aug 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Jeanine Abrons/Jennifer Cerulli/Shannon Miller/ Tanya Vadala Abrons J, Vadala T, Miller S, Cerulli J. Encouraging Safe Medication Disposal Through Student Pharmacist Intervention. J Am Pharm Assoc 2010;50(2);169-173.

Farrell J. FDA Updates: Rheumatology. CORRONA News, 3(2), 12-14. 2009 Aug 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Magdalene Assimon/Amy Barton Pai Assimon M, Mousa SA, Shaker O, Pai AB. The Effect of Sevelamer Hydrochloride and Calcium Based Phosphate Binders on Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients: A Need for More Research. Consultant Pharm. 2010;35:37-51 George Bailie Bailie GR, Mason NA, Valaoras TG. Safety and tolerability of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Hemodial Int 2010;14:47-54. Jennifer Cerulli Cerulli C, Cerulli J , Santos EJ, Lu N, He H, Kaukeinen K, White AM, Tu X. Does Health Status of Intimate Partner Violence Victims Warrant Pharmacies as Portals for Public Health Promotion? J Am Pharm Assoc 2010;50(2);200-206. Brian Cowles Lee BR, Lubsch L, Cowles B, Gatlin L. Position statement on antidepressant use in children. Prepared for the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group. July 23, 2009. Accessed from: http://www.ppag.org/SSRI/ Jessica Farrell Farrell J, Gumanov D. Propoxyphene: An Antiquated Analgesic. CORRONA News, 3(2), 7-8. 2009 Aug 5. [Epub ahead of print] Farrell J. Patient Assistance Programs for Biologics. CORRONA News, 3(2), 9. 2009 Aug 5. [Epub ahead of print] Farrell J, Siddon A. Sodium Oxybate (Xyrem) for Fibromyalgia. CORRONA News, 3(2), 10. 2009 Aug 5. [Epub ahead of print]

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Farrell J, Giordano S. Leflunomide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Is Your Patient at Risk? CORRONA News, 3(3), 5-6. 2009 Oct 9. [Epub ahead of print] Farrell J, Dispirto A. Nucynta (tapentadol): A New Medication for Pain Management. CORRONA News, 3(3), 6-7. 2009 Oct 9. [Epub ahead of print] Farrell J, Bradley C. Assessment of Long Term Use of Oral Bisphosphonates. CORRONA News, 3(3), 7-10. 2009 Oct 9. [Epub ahead of print] Farrell J. FDA Updates: Rheumatology. CORRONNA News, 3(3), 11-14. 2009 Oct 9. [Epub ahead of print] Farrell J, Hughes D. “Reactivating” the Discussion of Anti-TNF- Agent Use in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus. CORRONA News, 4(1), 8-9. 2010 Jan. Farrell J, Diliberto D. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Clopidogrel: Should You Change the Treatment Regimen? CORRONA News, 4(1), 10-11. 2010 Jan. Farrell J, Bradley D. Interleukin-1 Inhibitor Shows Promise for Gout Patients. CORRONA News, 4(1), 11-13. 2010 Jan. Farrell J. FDA Updates: Rheumatology. CORRONA News, 4(1), 13-15. 2010 Jan. Farrell J. Current Approaches to Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drug (DMARD) Therapy. ACPHS. March 20, 2010. Gina Garrison Garrison GD, Lubowski TJ, Miller SM, Strang AF, Sorum PC, Hamilton RA. A Multi-site Pharmacy Student Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment Service in the Ambulatory Care Setting: Experiential Education and Patient Satisfaction. American Journal of Pharmacy Education (in press).

Garrison GD, Lubowski TJ, Miller SM, Strang AF, Sorum PC, Hamilton RA. Multi-site Heart Disease Risk Assessment Service Provided by Pharmacy Student, American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2010; 74 (3). Thomas Lodise/Nimish Patel Lodise TP, Patel N, Lomaestro BM, Rodvold KA, Drusano GL. Relationship between Initial Vancomycin Concentration Time Profile and Nephrotoxicity among Hospitalized Patients. Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Aug 15;49(4):507 14. Patel GP, Simon D, Scheetz M, Crank CW, Lodise T, Patel N. The Effect of Time to Antifungal Therapy on Mortality in Candidemia Associated Septic Shock. Am J Ther. 2009 Jun 13. [Epub ahead of print] Patel GW, Patel N, Lat A, Trombley KC, Enbawe S, Smith R, Lodise TP. Outcomes of Extended Infusion Piperacillin/Tazobactam for Documented Gram negative Infections. Diag Microbio Infect Dis. 64 (2009) 236–240. Christopher Miller/Nimish Patel Adams J, Patel N, Mankaryous N, Tadros M, Miller CD. Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI) Resistance and the Role of Second Generation Agents. Ann Pharmacoth 2010;44157-165. Sean Mirk Mirk SM, Burkiewicz JS, Kompe K. Student Perception of a Wiki in a Pharmacy Elective Course. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. Volume 2, Issue 2, Pages 72-78 (March 2010) Sarah Scarpace Burkiewicz JS, Scarpace SL, Bruce SP. Denosumab in osteoporosis and oncology. Ann Pharmacother 2009; 43: 1445-1455. e-published ahead of print on 21 Jul 2009 at www.theannals.com, DOI 10.1345/ aph.1M102 Joanna Schwartz Schwartz, J. Current combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic breast cancer. Am J Health Syst Pharm Dec 2009; 66: 3-8.


Previously Published Articles Selected for Inclusion in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy Evolution of Clinical Pharmacy 40 Years of Progress; 2009. Margaret Malone Malone M. The obesity pandemic-how did we get here? EoC 2009; 298-9. Jennifer Cerulli/Margaret Malone Cerulli J, Lomaestro BM, Malone M. Update on the Pharmacotherapy of Obesity. EoC 2009; 300-312.

INVITED PRESENTATIONS George Bailie Bailie GR. “Regulatory pathway for iron sucrose similars”, Complex Biologicals Symposium, Leiden, Holland. October 2009. Michael Brodeur Brodeur MR, Joffee L. NDMS “Pharmacy Operations and Points of Dispensing.” National Disaster Medical System, Department of Health and Human Services. Westchester Medical Center. June 28, 2009.

Brian Cowles Cowles B. “Acute Otitis Media: Guidelines, Vaccines, and You.” ACPHS 2010 Pharmacy Practice Symposium; Albany NY/Colchester VT (ACPE CE). March 20, 2010. Cowles B. “Child & Adolescent Behavioral Medicine & Medication Therapy.” Northeast Parent & Child Society/University at Albany School of Social Welfare; Schenectady NY (Invited presentation). March 26, 2010 Cowles B. “Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Recurrent UTI in Infants & Children.” VtSHP Annual Meeting, Burlington, VT (ACPE CE). April 10, 2010. Cowles B. “Medication Use and Children in Foster Care.” 21st Annual Foster Care & Adoption Conference, NYS Citizen’s Coalition for Children; Albany, NY (Invited presentation). May 7, 2010. Cowles B. “Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.” Rounds lecture, Fletcher Allen Department of Pharmacy October 1, 2009.

Brodeur MR. “Evaluation of Pharmacotherapy of Older Adults: A Beers Criteria Review.” Office of Postgraduate Education. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. September 2009.

Ronald J. DeBellis DeBellis RJ. “Clinical Considerations in COPD.” NYSSHP Continuing Education Program, Latham, NY, November 2009.

Katie Cardone Cardone KE. “Pharmacologic aspects of complicated hypertension.” American Nephrology Nurses’ Association Fall Meeting, Orlando, FL, Oct 2009.

Jessica Farrell Farrell J. “Medication Related Issues in Scleroderma.” Capital District Scleroderma Foundation Support Group, Schenectady, NY. November 11, 2009.

Cardone KE. “Preventing end-stage kidney disease: Interventions in the community pharmacy.” 11th Annual Southwest Nephrology Conference, Phoenix, AZ, Feb 2010.

Gina Garrison Garrison GD. “Tobacco Cessation” (1 hour ACPE Continuing Education). ACPHS Pharmacy Practice Institute, Albany, NY. March 24, 2010.

Cardone KE. “Medication management in chronic kidney disease: Focus on complications and special considerations.” 11th Annual Southwest Nephrology Conference, Phoenix, AZ, Feb 2010.

Garrison, GD, Lytle J. “Legislative Update: What Every Pharmacist Needs to Know about Recent Developments in New York State Law and Regulation.” New York State Council of Health-System Pharmacists Annual Assembly (1 hour CE), Saratoga, NY. May 2010.

Jennifer Cerulli Cerulli J. “Medication Therapy Management: What is it and where do I start?” (3 hours ACPE #0170-9999-10-0140L01-P). Capital Area Pharmacists Society, Albany. March 7, 2010.

Nimish Patel/Katie Pallotta-Cardone/Darren Grabe/Thomas Lodise/ Patel N, Pallotta K, Grabe DW, Meola S, Hoy C, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. “Daptomycin (D) Pharmacokinetics (PK) in Patients (Pts) Receiving Standardized 3X Weekly Hemodialysis (HD).” Abstract #2514. Poster Presentation at the 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC). San Francisco, CA. September 2009. Presenter: Patel Patel N, Pallotta K, Grabe DW, Meola S, Hoy C, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. “Daptomycin (D) Concentration (Conc) Time Profile in Hemodialysis (HD) Patients (Pts).” Abstract #1242. Platform Presentation at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Philadelphia, PA. October 2009. Presenter: Patel Nicole Lodise Lodise NM. “Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: An Overview and Approach to Patients.” American Pharmacists Association Annual Meeting. Washington DC, March 15, 2010. Thomas Lodise/Nimish Patel/Amit Pai Patel N, Grifasi, M, Pai M, Rodvold K, Drusano GL, Lodise TP. “Vancomycin (V): We Can Not Get There From Here.” Abstract #193. Poster Presentation at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Philadelphia, PA. October 2009. Presenter: Lodise Thomas Lodise/Nimish Patel VanDeWal H, Patel N, Tristani L, Grifasi M, Dihmess A, Smith R, Lodise TP. “Incidence of Thrombocytopenia (TCP) Among Veterans’ Affairs (A) Patients (Pts) that Received Linezolid (L).” Abstract #200. Poster Presentation at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Philadelphia, PA. October 2009. Presenter: VanDeWal

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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Lodise T, Patel N, Hedge S, Shaw J, Barriere S. Drusano, GL. “Mouse thigh MRSA infection model data and mathematical modeling to determine telavancin dosing for complicated skin and skin structure infection trials.” Abstract #469. Poster Presentation at the 20th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Vienna, Austria. April 2010. Presenter: Lodise Lodise T, Patel N, Hedge S, Shaw J, Barriere S. “Telavancin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with complicated skin and skin structure infections with varying degrees of renal function.” Abstract #468. Oral Presentation at the 20th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Vienna, Austria. April 2010. Presenter: Lodise Tristani L, Patel N, Woo B, Dihmess A, VanDeWall H, Li H, Smith R, Lodise T. “Lack of serotonin syndrome among Veteran Affairs patients receiving linezolid.” Abstract # 464. Poster Presentation at the 20th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Vienna, Austria. April 2010. Presenter: Patel Christopher Miller Miller C. “An Update on Influenza.” ACPHS Respiratory Therapy Update. Albany, NY. January 14, 2010. Miller C. “An Update on Antiretroviral Therapy.” Infectious Diseases Annual Update. ACPHS. February 7, 2010. Miller C. “Current Strategies in the Treatment of HIV Infection.” Pharm.Ed. Conference. Desmond Hotel, Albany, NY. February 24, 2010. Miller C. “Antiretroviral Approach to the New HIV Patient.” Medical Grand Rounds – Ellis Hospital. Schenectady, NY. March 23, 2010. Anthony Nicasio Nicasio AM. “Community & Hospital Acquired Pneumonia: A Therapeutic Overview.” ACPHS. February 7, 2010.

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Sarah Scarpace Scarpace, SL. “GI Toxicities.” Presented as part of the Oncology Bootcamp pre-meeting symposium at the 6th annual Hematology/Oncology Pharmacists’ Association (HOPA) Meeting, New Orleans, LA. March 24, 2010. Scarpace, SL. “Cancer- and Chemotherapy-induced Bone Loss.” 30 minute-ACPE-accredited invited presentation at the American Academy of Managed Care Pharmacists annual meeting, April 8, 2010. San Diego, CA. Scarpace, SL. “Oncologic Emergencies.” 1-hour ACPEaccredited invited presentation at the New York State Council of Health-systems Pharmacists Annual Assembly. May 7, 2010. Saratoga Springs, NY. Scarpace, SL. “Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Focus on Adherence.” ACPE-accredited 1-hour program presented to hematology/oncology pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses at the 2009 Northeastern Hematology/Oncology Pharmacists’ Society (NEHOPS) Annual Meeting, Danvers, MA, October 2 – 3, 2009. Repeated at the Annual Barbara DiLascia Oncology Update at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, October 18, 2009. Joanna Schwartz “Schwartz, Joanna. Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting: The Pharmacists’ role in prevention and management.” Connecticut Society of Health System Pharmacists Annual Meeting, Westport CT, October 30, 2009. Schwartz J. “Updates in New Treatments for Cancer: Oral Chemotherapy Agents.” Barbara M. DiLascia Lecture Series Annual Oncology/Pain Management Symposium, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Oct 18, 2009. Schwartz J. “Oral Chemotherapy Safety.” Vermont Society of Health System Pharmacists, Continuing Education Seminar, Montpelier VT, Nov 5, 2009. Schwartz J. “Novel combination chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer: beating the odds.” Hematology Oncology Pharmacist Association. (HOPA). Miami, FL. June 17, 2010.

Schwartz, J. “Chemotherapy induced nausea and Vomiting: The pharmacists role in Decision Making and Management.” The California Society of Health System Pharmacists (CSHP) Seminar Day 2009. Dan Diego, CA, Oct 3, 2009.

APPOINTMENTS Jeanine Abrons Abrons J. AACP ESAS - Committee on Orientation of New Faculty Members. Abrons J. Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association (JAPHA). Michael Brodeur Brodeur MR. Chair-elect. Geriatric-Sig. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Jessica Farrell Farrell J. President, Northeastern Chapter of New York State Council of Health System Pharmacist (NYSCHP). Farrell J. Member, Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (ARHP) 2010 Clinical Focus Course Task Force. Gina Garrison Garrison GD. Chair, Networking Committee, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Women Faculty SIG. 2009-2010. Garrison GD. New York State Representative, ASHP State Legislative Network (2-year term). Garrison G. 2009-2010 National Nominations Committee, Rho Chi Honor Society. Nicole Lodise Lodise NM. Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Medical Education, Albany Medical College. Sarah Scarpace Sarah L. Scarpace. Board Member-at-Large for the Hematology/Oncology Pharmacists’ Association (HOPA). Joanna Schwartz Schwartz J. Chair, Vermont Society of Health System Pharmacists (VtSHSP) Program Committee.


Scholarly Activity Report POSTERS/ABSTRACTS Jeanine Abrons/Tanya Vadala/ Shannon Miller/ Jennifer Cerulli Abrons J, Vadala T, Miller S, Cerulli J. “Ensuring Safe Medication Disposal.” APhA Annual Meeting 2010. J Am Pharm Assoc 2010;50(2);277. Abstract 201. Katie Cardone/Darren Grabe/ George Bailie Cardone KE (presenter), Giovinazzo T, Manley HJ, Grabe DW, Meola S, Hoy CD, Bailie GR. “Medication regimen complexity in patients receiving daily nocturnal home hemodialysis (DNHD).” Poster at American Society of Nephrology Renal Week 2009, San Diego CA; 29 Oct 2009. Katie Cardone Patel K, Zheng H, Cardone KE. “Stability study of extemporaneously prepared sodium thiosulfate injections.” Poster at 2010 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Northeast Regional Annual Meeting 2010, Rocky Hill, CT; 23 April 2010. Margaret Malone/John Polimeni Malone M, Alger S, Polimeni J. “Do patients taking antidepressants have the same one year outcome after gastric bypass surgery?” Poster accepted for Obesity 27th Annual Scientific Meeting. October 2009. Amit Pai Pai MP. “Antimicrobial Dosing in the Obese Patient.” Interactive Symposium. 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, San Francisco, CA, September 2009. Tsuji BT, Bulitta JB, Forrest A, Kelchlin PA, Brown T, Holden PN, Pai MP, Bhavnani SM, Fernandes P3, Jones RN, Ambrose PG. “Pharmacokinetics Pharmacodynamics (PK-PD) of CEM 102 against MethicillinResistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Using an In Vitro PD Model (IVPM) and Mechanism-Based (MB) Modeling.” 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, San Francisco, CA, September 2009. Bulitta JB, Okusanya OO, Forrest A, Bhavnani SM, Reynolds DK, Pai MP, Still JG, Fernandes P, Ambrose PG. “Population Pharmacokinetics (PPK) of CEM-102 in Healthy Subjects.” 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, San Francisco, CA, September 2009.

Van Wart SA, Pai MP, Bhavnani SM, Wiegand UW, Jones RN, Ambrose PG. Pharmacokinetic“Pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) Target Attainment (TA) Analyses to Evaluate Susceptibility Breakpoints for Labeled Ceftriaxone (CRO) Dosing Regimens.” 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, San Francisco, CA, September 2009.

Margaret Malone SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: GlaxoSmithKline/Efficacy of Orlistat 60mg (Alli) in the Management of Pre-Operative Weigh Loss Required Before Bariatric Surgery TERM: 08/13/09-06/15/10 TOTAL GRANT: $25,000.00

Amy Barton Pai Pai AB, Gertzberg N, Neumann P, Johnson A. “Role of Lipotechoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus in Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Edema.” American Society of Nephrology Renal Week, San Diego, CA, October 30, 2009.

Amit Pai SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Hoffman-LaRoche Inc/ Pharmacokinetics of Oseltamivivir Carboxylate in Morbidly Obese Subjects TERM: 01/13/10-12/31/10 TOTAL GRANT: $237,664.50

Pai AB. “Chronic Kidney Disease Patients (CKD 3 and 4): Clinical Pearls for Bridging the Gap between Hospitalization and Outpatient Care.” American College of Clinical Pharmacy Nephrology Focus Session. Anaheim, CA, October 20, 2009.

Katie Pallotta-Cardone SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Merck/Ertapenum Pharmacokinetics in Patients on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis TERM: 07/01/09-06/30/10 TOTAL GRANT: $113,297.00

GRANTS Michael Kane SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Lilly-Forteo/Efficacy of Teriparatide in Patients with Resolved Secondary Hyperparathyroidism due to Vitamin D Deficiency TERM: 08/01/09-07/31/10 TOTAL GRANT: $22,250.00 SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Abbott Laboratories – A Glucose Meter Study TERM: 09/15/09-09/14/10 TOTAL GRANT: $49,991.58 Thomas Lodise SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Cubist Pharmaceutical/ Evaluating the Epidemiology and Outcomes of Patients with MRSA Bloodstream Infections that Express Heteroresistance to Vancomycin TERM: 06/01/10-05/31/11 TOTAL GRANT: $51,562.50 SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Cubist Pharmaceuticals/ Evaluating the Impact of Vancomycin MIC and Vancomycin Exposure Profile on the Outcomes of Patients with CA-MRSA and HCE-MRSA Bloodstream Infections TERM: 07/10/09-07/09/10 TOTAL GRANT: $150,640.00

Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences PUBLICATIONS Richard Dearborn Chang S, Mandalaywala NV, Snyder RG, Levendusky MC, and Dearborn Jr RE. Hedgehog-mediated down-regulation of vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1) precedes lamina neurogenesis. Drosophila. Brain Res 1324:1-13, 2010. (Note: this work was selected for the cover art). Voigt JM, Basle J, Patel P, Dearborn, Jr RE. Inhibition of AP-1 in human breast cancer cells by VDUP1 (TXNIP). Mol Carcinog (Submitted). Karian T, Dai Y, Reed B, Gray J, Kunes S, Dearborn Jr RE. Reph, a regulator of Eph receptor expression in the Drosophila optic lobe. Mol Cell Neurosci (Under Revision).

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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Scholarly Activity Report Levendusky MC, Basle J, Chang S, Mandalaywala NV, Voigt JM and Dearborn Jr RE. Glucose-dependent effects on Drosophila growth and glioma cells mediated by up-regulation of the VDUP1 tumor suppressor. Brain Res (Re-submission). Levendusky MC, Basle J, Chang S, Mandalaywala NV, Voigt JM, Dearborn Jr RE. Expression and regulation of vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1) is conserved in mammalian and insect brain. J Comp Neurol 517:581-600, 2009. Carlos Feleder Feleder C, Tseng KY, Calhoon GG, O’Donnell P. Neonatal intrahippocampal immune challenge alters dopamine modulation of prefrontal cortical interneurons in adult rats. Biol Psychiatry 67:386-392, 2010.

Rehfuss A, Schuler C, Maxemous C, Leggett RE, Levin R. Cyclical estrogen and free radical damage to the rabbit urinary bladder. Inter Urogynecol J 21:489494, 2010. Hydery T, Juan Y, Lin WY, Kogan B, Mannikarottu A, Leggett RE, Schuler C, Levin RM. The effect of 2- and 4-week ovariectomy on female rabbit urinary bladder function. Urology 74:691-696, 2009.

Krall CM, Yao X, Hass M, Feleder C, Steiner AA. Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol (Submitted).

Juan Y-S, Chuang S-M, Kogan BA, Mannikarottu A, Huang C-H, Leggett, RE, Schuler C, Levin RM. Effect of ischemia reperfusion on bladder nerve and detrusor cell damage. Inter Urology Nephrology 41:513-521, 2009.

Pai AB, Feleder C, Johnson A. Tumor necrosis factora (TNF) induces increased lung vascular permeability: a role for GSK3α/b inhibition. Amer J Physiol - Lung Cell Mol Phys. (Submitted).

Juan Y, Chuang S, Kogan BA, Shen J, Huang C, Wu W, Liu K, Levin RM. Ischemia/reperfusion effects on bladder muscle and mucosa cell contractile regulatory proteins. Lower Urinary Track Symptoms 1:56-61, 2009.

Villanueva A, Yilmaz MS, Millington WR, Cutrera RA, Stouffer DG, Parsons LH, Cheer JF, Feleder C. Central cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist administration prevents endotoxic hypotension affecting norepinephrine release in the preoptic anterior hypothalamic area. Shock 32:614-620, 2009.

Juan, Y-S, Chuang, SM, Mannikarottu A, Chun-Hsung H., Schuler, C, Levin, RM, Coenzyme Q10 diminishes ischemia-reperfusion induced apoptosis and nerve injury in rabbit urinary bladder, Neurourology Urodynamics. (In Press)

Gail Goodman Snitkoff Book Chapter Goodman-Snitkoff G, Hubbard A, Broders J, Schuna AA. Immunity and Autoimmune Disease. In Woman’s Health, Editors: K Calis, L Hansen, MB O’Connell, J Smith. American Society of Health System Pharmacists, Bethesda, MD. 2010. Arnold Johnson Pai AB, Feleder C, Johnson A. Tumor necrosis factora (TNF) induces increased lung vascular permeability: a role for GSK3α/b inhibition. Amer J Physiol - Lung Cell Mol Phys. (Submitted).

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Robert Levin Lopes LB, VanDeWall H, Li HT, Venugopal V, Li HK, Naydin S, Hosmer J, Levendusky MC, Zheng H, Bentley V, Levin R, Hass MA. Topical Delivery of lycopene using microemulsions: enhanced skin penetration and tissue antioxidant activity. J Pharm Sci 99:1346-1357, 2010.

Juan, Y-S, Mannikarottu, Chuang SM, Li S, Lin AD, Chang-Chou L, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Levin RM. Protective effect of Antrodia Camphorata on bladder ischemia/reperfusion injury. Inter Urology Nephrology (In Press).

Ercolani M, Sahota A, Schuler C, Yan M, Barone JG, Tishfield JA, Levin RM. Bladder outlet obstruction in male cystinuria mice. Inter Urology Nephrology (In Press). Bean H, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Levin, RM. Antioxidant levels of common fruits, vegetables, and juices vs. protective activity against in-vitro ischemia/reperfusion. Inter Urology Nephrology (In Press). Hydery T, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Levin RM. Treatment of obstructive bladder dysfunction by coenzyme Q10 and alpha Lipoic acid in rabbits. Lower Urinary Track Symptoms (In Press). Radu F, Bean H, Schuler C, Leggett RE, Levin RM. Comparative evaluation of antioxidant reactivity between ovariectomized and control urinary bladder tissue using FRAP and CUPRAC assays. Lower Urinary Track Symptoms (In Press). Tran K, Levin R, Mousa S. Review of behavioral intervention, pharmacologic therapy or combination of two therapies in the management of overactive bladder. Inter J Urol (Submitted). Juan Y-S, Mannikarottu A, Chun-Hsung H, Li S, Schuler C, Levin RM. The effect of L-arginine on bladder dysfunction following ovariectomy. (Submitted). Venugopal V, Radu F, Leggett RE, Abraham C, Schuler C, Levin RM. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on rabbit urinary bladder citrate synthase activity in the presence and absence of a standardized grape suspension. Int Braz J Urol (Submitted). Lin WY, Chen CS, Wu CS, Lin YP, Levin RM, Wei YH. Oxidative stress biomarkers in urine and plasma for rabbits with partial bladder outlet obstruction. Brit J Urol In (Submitted).

Lin W-Y, Mannikarottu A, Li S, Juan Y-S, Schuler C, Javed Z, Blaivas J, Levin RM. In-Vivo correlation of blood flow measurements with tissue hypoxia. World J Urology (In Press).

Hanna K, Ibrahim M, Leggett RE, Levin RM. The effect of calcium on the response of rabbit urinary bladder muscle and mucosa to hydrogen peroxide. Urology (Submitted).

Matsumoto S, Shimizy N, Hanai T, Uemura H, Levin RM. Bladder outlet obstruction accelerates bladder carcinogenesis. BJU Int (In Press).

Book Chapter Lathers CM, Levin RM. Animal Model for Sudden Cardiac Death: Sympathetic Innervation and Myocardial Beta Receptor densities, in Sudden Death in Epilepsy: Forensic and Clinical Issues, Editors: C.M. Lather, Michael W. Bungo, J.E. Leetsma. Taylor & Francis Group LLC. (In Press)


Luciana Lopes Lopes LB, VanDeWall H, Li HT, Venugopal V, Li HK, Naydin S, Hosmer J, Levendusky M, Zheng H, Bentley V, Levin R, Hass MA. Topical delivery of lycopene using microemulsions: enhanced skin penetration and tissue antioxidant activity. J Pharm Sci 99:1346-1357, 2010. Lopes LB, Reed R. A simple and rapid method to assess lycopene in multiple layers of skin samples. Biomed Chromatogr. 24:154-159, 2010. Hosmer J, Reed R, Bentley MV, Nornoo A, Lopes LB. Microemulsions containing medium-chain glycerides as transdermal delivery systems for hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. AAPS PharmSciTech. 10:589596, 2009. Lopes LB, Brophy CM, Flynn CR, Yi Z-P, Bowen BP, Smoke C, Seal B, Panitch A, Komalavilas P. A novel cell permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II inhibits intimal hyperplasia in a human saphenous vein organ culture model. J Vascular Surgery (Submitted). Book Chapter Lopes L. Sistemas de liberação aplicados à cosmetologia. In: de Paula, D. Ativos e formulações cosméticas. Editora Universitária, PR, Brasil. William Millington Filiz N, Buyukuysal RL, Millington WR, Cavun S. GlycylL-glutamine (β-endorphin30-31) inhibits morphineinduced dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol (In Press). Villanueva A, Yilmaz MS, Millington WR, Cutrera RA, Stouffer DG, Parsons LH, Cheer JF, Feleder C. Central cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist administration prevents endotoxic hypotension affecting norepinephrine release in the preoptic anterior hypothalamic area. Shock 32:614-620, 2009. Marcel Musteata Zhan Z, Musteata FM, Basset FA, Pawliszyn. Determination of free and deconjugated testosterone and its metabolite epi-testosterone in urine using solid phase microextraction/liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. (Submitted) Musteata ML, Musteata FM. Analytical methods used in conjunction with SPME: A review of recent bioanalytical applications. Bioanalysis 1:1081-1102, 2009.

Vuckovic D, Cudjoe E, Musteata FM, Janusz Pawliszyn J. Automated solid-phase microextraction and thinfilm microextraction for high-throughput analysis of biological fluids and ligand–receptor binding studies. Nature Protocols 5:140-161, 2010.

Levendusky MC, Basle J, Chang S, Mandalaywala NV, Voigt JM, Dearborn Jr RE. Expression and regulation of vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1) is conserved in mammalian and insect brain. J Comp Neurol 517:581-600, 2009.

Alexandre Steiner Krall CM, Yao, X, Hass M, Feleder C, Steiner AA. Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010.

HaiAn Zheng Lopes LB, VanDeWall H, Li HT, Venugopal V, Li HK, Naydin S, Hosmer J, Levendusky M, Zheng H, Bentley V, Levin R, Hass MA. Topical delivery of lycopene using microemulsions: enhanced skin penetration and tissue antioxidant activity. J Pharm Sci 99:13461357, 2010.

Steiner AA, Krall CM, Liu E. A reappraisal on the ability of leptin to induce fever. Physiol Behav 97:430-436, 2009. Steiner AA, Hunter JC, Phipps SM, Nucci TB, Oliveira DL, Roberts JL, Scheck AC, Simmons DL, Romanovsky AA. Cyclooxygenase-1 or -2: which one mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia? Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 297:R485-R494, 2009. Romanovsky AA, Almeida MC, Garami A, Steiner AA, Norman MH, Morrison SF, Nakamura K, Burmeister JJ, Nucci TB. The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channel in thermoregulation: a thermosensor it is not. Pharmacol Rev 61:228-261, 2009. Book Chapter Translation of book from English to Portuguese: Physiology and pathophysiology of temperature regulation (Blatteis CM, Editor; Steiner AA, Bicego KC, Almeida MC, translators). EdUSP, São Paulo, in press. (In press)

Book Chapter Sinko P (Editor), Amidon GE, Middaugh CR, Omidian H, Park K, Siahaan TJ, Singh Y, Zheng H (Contributors). Martin’s Physical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 6th edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010.

PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS Richard Dearborn Voigt JM, Bajaria A, Dearborn Jr RE. “Regulation of VDUP1 Expression in Breast Cancer Cells by Cyclopamine.” American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting. Washington, DC; April 2010. Chang S, Wright K, White C, Youssef S, Dearborn, Jr, RE. “Vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1) tumor suppressor function during larval neuroblast proliferation and differentiation.” Cold Spring Harbor Neurobiology of Drosophila Meeting. Cold Spring Harbor, NY; Sept. 30 – Oct. 3, 2009.

Jeffrey Voigt Voigt JM, Basle J, Patel P, Dearborn, Jr RE. Inhibition of AP-1 in human breast cancer cells by VDUP1 (TXNIP). Mol Carcinog (Submitted).

Li HT, Lopes L, Zheng H, Hass MA, Dearborn Jr RE, Voigt JM. “Research-based Instructional Laboratory for a Pharmaceutical Analytical Techniques Course.” AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. Boston, MA; July 18-22, 2009.

Levendusky MC, Basle J, Chang S, Mandalaywala NV, Voigt JM and Dearborn Jr RE. Glucose-dependent effects on Drosophila growth and glioma cells mediated by up-regulation of the VDUP1 tumor suppressor. Brain Res (Re-submission).

Dearborn Jr RE. “VDUP1 Tumor Suppressor Function in CNS Development: Regulation of Cell Differentiation, Proliferation and Neural Stem Cell Fate.” Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Albany, NY; February 5, 2010.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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Dearborn Jr RE. “What Determines Brain Size?” Open House Lecture. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Albany, NY; November 15, 2009. Carlos Feleder Yilmaz MS, Feleder C and Millington WR. “Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Blockade in the Midbrain Periaqueductal Gray Region prevents the hypotension evoked by lipopolysaccharide. “ Soc Neurosci. Chicago, IL; Oct. 17 – 21, 2009. Arnold Johnson Barton-Pai A, Gertzberg N, Neumann P, Johnson A. “Lipoteichoic Acid from Staphylococcus aureus Causes Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction.” American Society of Nephrology Renal Week. San Diego, CA; October 31, 2009. Barton-Pai A, Bailie G and Johnson A. “Effects of Intravenous Iron Products in the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Edema,” XLVII ERA-EDTA Congress, II DGfN Congress. Munich, Germany; June 25-28, 2010. Johnson A, Barton-Pai A. “Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) Causes Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Dependent Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction.” American Thoracic Society. New Orleans, LA; May 14-18, 2010. Robert Levin Rehfuss A, Schuler C, Maxemous C, Leggett RE, Levin RM. “Effect of cyclical estrogen on the female urinary tract of rabbits.” Urological Research Society. Port Douglas Australia; August 10-14, 2009. Lopes LB, Vandewall H, Li HT, Venugopal V, Li HK, Naydin S, Hosmer J, Bentley VLB, Levendusky M, Hass MA, Levin R, Zheng H. “Topical Delivery of Lycopene using Microemulsions.” 7th Congress of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto. Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil; September 6 - 9, 2009. Ercolani M, Sahota A, Schuler C, Yan M, Barone JG, Tishfield JA, Levin RM. “The Effects of Cystinuria on Bladder Contractility and Histology in the Slc3a1 Knockout Mouse – New Insights for the Management of Pediatric Cystinuria.” American Association of Pediatrics. New York, NY; October 17 - 19, 2009.

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Luciana Lopes Hosmer J, Shin SH, Nornoo A, Zheng H, Lopes LB. “Influence of the Liquid Crystalline Structure on the In Vitro Release and Skin Penetration of an Anticancer Drug.” AAPS Northeast Regional Annual Meeting. Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010. Ng W, Lopes LB. “Development of Sodium Alginate Beads Containing Varied Lipid Ratios for Wound Healing.” AAPS Northeast Regional Annual Meeting. Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010. Shin S, Lopes L, Zheng H. “Stability and Antioxidant Activity of Lycopene Microemulsions.” AAPS Northeast Regional Annual Meeting. Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010. Li HT, Lopes L, Zheng H, Hass MA, Dearborn Jr RE, Voigt JM. “Research-based Instructional Laboratory for a Pharmaceutical Analytical Techniques Course.” AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. Boston, MA; July 18-22, 2009. Lopes LB, Vandewall H, Li HT, Venugopal V, Li HK, Naydin S, Hosmer J, Bentley VLB, Levendusky M, Hass MA, Levin R, Zheng H. “Topical Delivery of Lycopene using Microemulsions.” 7th Congress of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto. Ribeirao Preto, San Paolo, Brazil; September 6 - 9, 2009. Nornoo A, Bennett l, Lopes L. “Investigating the Role of Microemulsions in the Permeability of Cytotoxic Agents Using a Caco-2 Cell Model.” 7th Congress of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto. Ribeirao Preto, San Paolo, Brazil; September 6 - 9, 2009. Hosmer J, Nornoo A, Lopes LB. “Development of Liquid Crystalline Phases for Topical Delivery of Paclitaxel.” 36th Annual Meeting of the Controlled Release Society. Copenhagen, Denmark; July 18 - 22, 2009. William Millington Yilmaz MS, Feleder C, Millington WR. “Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Blockade in the Midbrain Periaqueductal Gray Region prevents the hypotension evoked by lipopolysaccharide.” Soc Neurosci. Chicago, IL; Oct 17 - 21, 2009.

Marcel Musteata Musteata MF. Exploring “Applications of Microsampling and Microextraction in Pharmacokinetics.” AAPS Northeast Regional Discussion Group. Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010. Vuckovic D, de Lannoy I, Gien B, Yingbo Yang Y, Musteata MF, Shirey RE, Sidisky L, Pawliszyn J. “In Vivo Solid-phase Microextraction for Pharmacokinetics Studies in Mice: Comparison to Manual Terminal and Automated Serial Sampling.” Pittsburgh Conference (Pittcon). Orlando, FL; March 2010. Michael Raley Snitkoff GG, Raley M. “Use of Peer-led Workshops in an Integrated PharmD Program.” AACP Annual Meeting. Boston, MA; July 19 - 22, 2009. Gail G. Snitkoff Snitkoff GG, Raley M. “Use of Peer-led Workshops in an Integrated PharmD Program.” AACP Annual Meeting. Boston, MA; July 19 - 22, 2009. Alexandre Steiner Steiner AA. “Fever versus anapyrexia: let the battle begin.” Autonomic Neuroscience (special issue: 6th Congress of the International Society for Autonomic Neuroscience) 149: 52, 2009 Liu E, Krall CM, Steiner AA. “A reappraisal on the ability of leptin to induce fever.” In: New England Science Symposium. Boston, MA; Program No. 25, 2010. Steiner AA. “Changing the Game: From Fever to Hypothermia in Systemic Inflammation.” Seminars of the Graduate Program in Physiology, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Ribeirao Preto, Brazil; January 12, 2010. Jeffrey Voigt Li HT, Lopes L, Zheng H, Hass MA, Dearborn Jr RE, Voigt JM. “Research-based Instructional Laboratory for a Pharmaceutical Analytical Techniques Course.” AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. Boston, MA; July 18-22, 2009. Voigt JM, Bajaria A, Dearborn Jr RE. “Regulation of VDUP1 Expression in Breast Cancer Cells by Cyclopamine.” American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting. Washington, DC; April 2010.


Scholarly Activity Report HaiAn Zheng Hosmer J, Shin SH, Nornoo A, Zheng H, Lopes LB. “Influence of the liquid crystalline structure on the in vitro release and skin penetration of an anticancer drug.” AAPS Northeast Regional Annual Meeting. Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010.

Robert Levin SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Vaginally Delivered Oxybutynin on Bladder and Systemic Cholonergic Function TERM: 10/01/09-12/31/09 TOTAL GRANT: $9,875.00

Shin SH, Lopes LB, Zheng H. “Stability and Antioxidant Activity of Lycopene Microemulsions.” AAPS Northeast Regional Annual Meeting. Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010.

SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Astellas/Synergy of Solifenacin in the Treatment of Experimental Overactive Bladder Dysfunction by Antioxidant Supplements TERM: 07/27/09-01/26/11 TOTAL GRANT: $82,275.00

Tasgaonkar R, Aziz J, Sgourakis NG, Tian J, Garcia AE, Zheng H. “Computer simulation of insulin molecular dynamics in pharmaceutical formulation.” AAPS Northeast Regional Annual Meeting; Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010.

Pharmaceutical Research Institute PUBLICATIONS

Patel K, Zheng H, Cardone K. “Stability Study of Extemporaneously Prepared Sodium Thiosulfate Injections.” AAPS Northeast Regional Annual Meeting. Rocky Hill, CT; April 23, 2010. Lopes LB, Vandewall H, Li HT, Venugopal V, Li HK, Naydin S, Hosmer J, Bentley VLB, Levendusky M, Hass, MA, Levin R, Zheng H. “Topical Delivery of Lycopene using Microemulsions.” 7th Congress of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto. Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil; September 6 - 9, 2009. Li HT, Lopes L, Zheng H, Hass MA, Dearborn JR RE, Voigt JM. “Research-based Instructional Laboratory for a Pharmaceutical Analytical Techniques Course.” AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. Boston, MA; July 18-22, 2009.

GRANTS Stefan Balaz SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: NIH/Conceptual Prediction of Drug Bioactivities in Cell-Based Assays: cell-QSAR TERM: 09/01/09-08/31/14 TOTAL GRANT: $1,347,500.00 Arnold Johnson SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: NIH/National Lung/Blood Institute/A Mechanism for TNF Induced Endothelial Dysfunction TERM: 05/01/10-04/30/14 TOTAL GRANT: $1,405,380.00

Shaker Mousa Tran K, Levin RM, Mousa SA. Behavioral Intervention versus Pharmacotherapy or Their Combinations in the Management of Overactive Bladder Dysfunction. Adv Urol. 2009:345324. Epub 2009 Dec 15. Aderinwale OG, Ernst HW, Mousa SA. Current therapies and new strategies for the management of Alzheimer’s disease. Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen 2010; 25:414-24. Aljada A, Dong L, Mousa SA. Sirtuin-targeting drugs: Mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic applications. Curr Opin Investig Drugs 2010; 11:1158-68. Amirkhosravi A, Mousa SA, Amaya M, Meyer T, Davila M, Robson T, et al. Assessment of anti-metastatic effects of anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents using animal models of experimental lung metastasis. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:241-59. Assimon MM, Mousa SA, Shaker O, Pai AB. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride and calcium-based phosphate binders on mortality in hemodialysis patients: a need for more research. Consult Pharm 2010; 25:41-54. Awad OI, Travers GE and Mousa SA. Drug Disposal: Current Recommendations and Environmental Concerns. Int J Pharm Research 2010; Volume 2, Issue 4

Bharali DJ, Mousa SA. Emerging nanomedicines for early cancer detection and improved treatment: current perspective and future promise. Pharmacol Ther 2010; 128:324-35. Block RC, Duff R, Lawrence P, Kakinami L, Brenna JT, Shearer GC, et al. The effects of EPA, DHA, and aspirin ingestion on plasma lysophospholipids and autotaxin. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 2010; 82:87-95. Bridoux A, Cui H, Dyskin E, Schmitzer AR, Yalcin M, Mousa SA. Semisynthesis and pharmacological activities of thyroxine analogs: Development of new angiogenesis modulators. Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2010; 20:3394-8. Davis PJ, Zhou M, Davis FB, Lansing L, Mousa SA, Lin HY. Mini-review: Cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone and nongenomic regulation of ion fluxes in excitable cells. Physiol Behav 2010; 99:237-9. Jacoby DB, Dyskin E, Yalcin M, Kesavan K, Dahlberg W, Ratliff J, et al. Potent pleiotropic anti-angiogenic effects of TM601, a synthetic chlorotoxin peptide. Anticancer Res 2010; 30:39-46. Lin Y, Mousa SS, Elshourbagy N, Mousa SA. Current status and future directions in lipid management: emphasizing low-density lipoproteins, high-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides as targets for therapy. Vasc Health Risk Manag 2010; 6:73-85. Luidens MK, Mousa SA, Davis FB, Lin HY, Davis PJ. Thyroid hormone and angiogenesis. Vascul Pharmacol 2010; 52:142-5. Mousa SA, Al Momen A, Al Sayegh F, Al Jaouni S, Nasrullah Z, Al Saeed H, et al. Management of painful vaso-occlusive crisis of sickle-cell anemia: consensus opinion. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost 2010; 16:365-76. Mousa SA, Jeske WP, Fareed J. Antiplatelet therapy prasugrel: a novel platelet ADP P2Y12 receptor antagonist. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost 2010; 16:170-6. Mousa SA, Jeske WP, Fareed J. Prasugrel: a novel platelet ADP P2Y(12) receptor antagonist. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:221-8.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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Scholarly Activity Report Mousa SA, Mousa SS. Current status of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in age-related macular degeneration. BioDrugs 2010; 24:183-94. Mousa SA, Qari MH. Diagnosis and management of sickle cell disorders. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:291-307. Mousa SA, Sudha T, Dyskin E, Dier U, Gallati C, Hanko C, et al. Stress resistant human embryonic stem cells as a potential source for the identification of novel cancer stem cell markers. Cancer Lett 2010; 289:208-16. Mousa SA. Adhesion molecules: potential therapeutic and diagnostic implications. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:261-76. Mousa SA. Antiplatelet therapies: drug interactions in the management of vascular disorders. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:203-19. Mousa SA. Antithrombotic effects of naturally derived products on coagulation and platelet function. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:229-40. Mousa SA. Heparin and low-molecular weight heparins in thrombosis and beyond. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:109-32. Mousa SA. In vitro methods of evaluating antithrombotics and thrombolytics. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:1-28. Mousa SA. In vivo models for the evaluation of antithrombotics and thrombolytics. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:29-107. Mousa SA. Novel anticoagulant therapy: principle and practice. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:157-79. Mousa SA. Oral direct factor Xa inhibitors, with special emphasis on rivaroxaban. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:181-201. Mousa SA. Pharmacogenomics in thrombosis. Methods Mol Biol 2010; 663:277-89. Mousa SS, Davis FB, Davis PJ, Mousa SA. Human platelet aggregation and degranulation is induced in vitro by L-thyroxine, but not by 3,5,3’-triiodo-L-thyronine or diiodothyropropionic acid (DITPA). Clin Appl Thromb Hemost 2010; 16:288-93.

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Rofaiel S, Muo EN and Mousa SA. Pharmacogenomics in Breast Cancer: Steps toward Personalized Medicine in Breast Cancer Management. Pharmacogenom Personalized Med; Sept 2010:3 Pages 129 – 143. Mousa SA, Mousa SS. Current status of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in age-related macular degeneration. BioDrugs. 2010 Jun;24(3):183-94. Mousa SA, Sudha T, Dyskin E, Dier U, Gallati C, Hanko C, Chittur SV, Rebbaa A. Stress resistant human embryonic stem cells as a potential source for the identification of novel cancer stem cell markers. Cancer Lett. 2010 Mar 28;289(2):208-16. Usoro OB, Mousa SA. Vitamin E forms in Alzheimer’s disease: a review of controversial and clinical experiences. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2010; 50:414-9. Yalcin M, Bharali DJ, Dyskin E, Dier E, Lansing L, Mousa SS, et al. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid and tetraiodothyroacetic acid nanoparticle effectively inhibit the growth of human follicular thyroid cell carcinoma. Thyroid 2010; 20:281-6. Yalcin M, Dyskin E, Lansing L, Bharali DJ, Mousa SS, Bridoux A, et al. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and nanoparticulate tetrac arrest growth of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2010; 95:1972-80. Abdel-Majeed S, Mohammad A, Shaima AB, Mohammad R, Mousa SA. Inhibition property of green tea extract in relation to reserpine-induced ribosomal strips of rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of the rat kidney proximal tubule cells. J Toxicol Sci. 2009 Dec; 34(6):637-45.

Glinskii AB, Glinsky GV, Lin HY, Tang HY, Sun M, Davis FB, Luidens MK, Mousa SA, Hercbergs AH, Davis PJ. Modification of survival pathway gene expression in human breast cancer cells by tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac). Cell Cycle. 2009 Nov 1; 8(21):3554-62. Kemp MM, Kumar A, Mousa S, Dyskin E, Yalcin M, Ajayan P, Linhardt RJ, Mousa SA. Gold and silver nanoparticles conjugated with heparin derivative possess anti-angiogenesis properties. Nanotechnology 2009 Nov 11; 20(45):455104. Duong A, Mousa SA. Current status of nucleoside antivirals in chronic hepatitis B. Drugs Today (Barc). 2009 Oct; 45(10):751-61. Yalcin M, Bharali DJ, Lansing L, Dyskin E, Mousa SS, Hercbergs A, Davis FB, Davis PJ, Mousa SA. Tetraidothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and tetrac nanoparticles inhibit growth of human renal cell carcinoma xenografts. Anticancer Res. 2009 Oct; 29(10):3825-31. Mousa SA, Petersen LJ. Anti-cancer properties of low-molecular-weight heparin: preclinical evidence. Thromb Haemost. 2009 Aug;102(2):258-67. Suwan J, Zhang Z, Li B, Vongchan P, Meepowpan P, Zhang F, Mousa SA, Mousa S, Premanode B, Kongtawelert P, Linhardt RJ. Sulfonation of papain-treated chitosan and its mechanism for anticoagulant activity. Carbohydr Res. 2009 Jul 6;344(10):1190-6. Alsayegh F, Al-Rasheed M, Al-Muhaini A, Al-Humoud E, Al-Ostaz M, Mousa SA. Heparin anticoagulation responsiveness in a coronary care unit: a prospective observational study. Cardiovasc Ther. 2009 Summer; 27(2):77-82.

Katrych O, Simone TM, Azad S, Mousa SA. DiseaseModifying Agents in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis: A Review of Long-Term Outcomes. CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets. 2009 Dec;8(6):512-9.

Kemp MM, Kumar A, Clement D, Ajayan P, Mousa SA, Linhardt RJ. Hyaluronan- and heparin-reduced silver nanoparticles with antimicrobial properties. Nanomedicine 2009; 4(4):421-9.

Kemp MM, Kumar A, Mousa S, Dyskin E, Yalcin M, Ajayan P, Linhardt RJ, Mousa SA. Gold and silver nanoparticles conjugated with heparin derivative possess anti-angiogenesis properties. Nanotechnology. 2009 Nov 11; 20(45):455104.

Mousa SS, Davis FB, Davis PJ, Mousa SA: Human Platelet Aggregation and Degranulation Is Induced In Vitro by L-Thyroxine, but Not by 3,5,3’-Triiodo-LThyronine or Diiodo-thyropropionic Acid (DITPA). Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2010 Jun;16(3):288-93.

Rebbaa A, Chu F, Sudha T, Gallati C, Dier U, Dyskin E, Yalcin M, Bianchini C, Shaker O, Mousa SA. The Antiangiogenic Activity of NSITC, a Specific Cathepsin L Inhibitor. Anticancer Res. 2009 Nov; 29(11):4473-81.

Dennis T, Fanous M, Mousa SA. Natural products for chemopreventive and adjunctive therapy in oncologic disease. Nutr Cancer. 2009; 61(5):587-97.


Davis PJ, Davis FB, Lin HY, Mousa SA, Zhou M, Luidens MK.Translational implications of nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone initiated at its integrin receptor. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2009; 297(6):E1238-46. Bharali DJ, Khalil M, Gurbuz M, Simone TM, Mousa SA. Nanoparticles and cancer therapy: a concise review with emphasis on dendrimers. Int J Nanomedicine. 2009; 4(1):1-7. Arias HR, Richards VE, Ng D, Ghafoori ME, Le V, Mousa SA. Role of non-neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in angiogenesis. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2009; 41(7):1441-51.

SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: University of Wisconsin-DOD SubAward-Sustained Release Oral Nanoformulated Green Tea for Prostate Cancer Prevention TERM: 04/15/10-04/14/11 TOTAL GRANT: $40,501.00 SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: NIH/Site-directed Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Using Novel Angiogenesis Inhibitor TERM: 08/07/09-07/31/11 TOTAL GRANT: $372,680.00

Aljada A, Shah KA, Mousa SA. Peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor agonists: do they increase cardiovascular risk? PPAR Res. 2009; 2009:460-764.

Dept. of Health Sciences PUBLICATIONS

Barone C, Mousa SS, Mousa SA. Pharmacoenomics in cardiovascular disorders: Steps in approaching personalized medicine in cardiovascular medicine. Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine 2009:2: 1-9.

Magdalene Assimon Assimon, MM, Salenger, PV, El-Fawal, HAN, Mason, DL. Characterization of Ergocalciferol supplementation on vascular adhesion molecules and oxidative LDL in hemodialysis patients. Am. J. Nephrology (submitted). (2010).

Greene R, Mousa SS, Ardawi M, Qari M, Mousa SA. Pharmacogenomics in osteoporosis: Steps toward personalized medicine. Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine 2009:2 1-10. Clarke H, Mousa SA. The implications of pharmacogenomics in the treatment of HIV-1-infected patients of African descent. Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine 2009:2 93-99. Avery P, Mousa SS, Mousa SA. Pharmacogenomics in type II diabetes mellitus management: Steps toward personalized medicine. Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine 2009:2 1-13.

GRANTS Shaker Mousa SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: RPI NIH Sub Award- Development of Biengineered Heparin From a NonAnimal Source TERM: 08/01/09-04/30/14 TOTAL GRANT: $654,500.00 SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: Vascular Vision Pharmaceutcials-Novel Modulators of HDL Metabolism TERM: 07/27/09-07/26/10 TOTAL GRANT: $75,000.00

Indra Balachandran Balachandran I, Walker J, Taylor J, et al: The impact of New York State’s new licensure legislation for laboratory professionals on health care providers: Results of a survey on issues related to staffing of clinical laboratories, Journal of Allied Health, Dec 2009, 113E-117E. Balachandran I. Transformation in Education and Practice: Cytotechnology Program, Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Albany, N.Y. ASC Bulletin, 2010, XLVII (4): 94-95. Balachandran I, Walker J, Broman J: Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of ALK 1(-), CD 30(+) Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Post Renal Transplantation – A Case Report and literature review. Diagnostic Cytopathology, 2009 doi:10.1002/dc21176. Balachandran I, Jiayuh Ju, Walker J, Broman J: Fine needle aspiration of metastatic granulosa cell tumor of the ovary. Accepted for publication in Acta Cytologica, Feb. 2010.

Lawrence Lansing Yalcin M, Bharali DJ, Dyskin E, Dier E, Lansing L, Mousa SS, Davis FB, Davis PJ, Mousa SA. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid and tetraiodothyroacetic acid nanoparticle effectively inhibit the growth of human follicular thyroid cell carcinoma. Thyroid. 2010 Mar;20(3):281-6. Yalcin M, Dyskin E, Lansing L, Bharali DJ, Mousa SS, Bridoux A, Hercbergs AH, Lin HY, Davis FB, Glinsky GV, Glinskii A, Ma J, Davis PJ, Mousa SA. Tetraiodothyroacetic Acid (Tetrac) and Nanoparticulate Tetrac Arrest Growth of Medullary Carcinoma of the Thyroid. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Feb 4. [Epub ahead of print] Yalcin M, Bharali DJ, Lansing L, Dyskin E, Mousa SS, Hercbergs A, Davis FB, Davis PJ, Mousa SA. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and tetrac nanoparticles inhibit growth of human renal cell carcinoma xenografts. Anticancer Res. 2009 Oct; 29(10):3825-31.

ARTICLE REVIEWS Lawrence Lansing Davis PJ, Zhou M, Davis FB, Lansing L, Mousa SA, Lin HY. Mini-review: Cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone and nongenomic regulation of ion fluxes in excitable cells. Physiol Behav. 2010 Feb 9;99(2):237-9.

BOOK CHAPTERS Hassan El-Fawal El-Fawal, H.A.N. Neurotoxicity: Common themes and biomarkers. Encyclopedia of Environmental Health. (S. Ansar, ed). Elseviers Publishing, London, UK. (in press for 2010).

ABSTRACTS/PRESENTATIONS & EXHIBITS Indra Balachandran Balachandran I., Walker J. “Development of an Asynchronous Review Course in Cytopathology.” Faculty Development Series, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, March 30, 2010.

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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MENTORING STUDENTS TO PRESENT AT NATIONAL MEETINGS Lindsay Ruslander Case presentation at the ASCT meeting, Spring, 2010. Julie Deluca, Rachel Desanto, Ken Ibe, Sierra Kovar, Lisa Lavery, Jennifer Lemay, Caitlin Lennox, Lany Mulyana, Deepika Narahari, and John Orfanides Presented cases in computer format. Sierra Kovar Won prize for best computer presentation.

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES SCIENTIFIC/CLINICAL/PR NATIONAL Indra Balachandran American Society Cytotechnology, Invited Speaker, November 2009. Florida.

Dept. of Arts and Sciences PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES Patricia Baia Baia, P. No Money for Professional Development? Go Local. Educause Quarterly Magazine, v32(2), 2009. Trent Gemmill Singh, N; Ma, Z.; Gemmill, T.; Wu, X; DeFiglio, H; Rossettini, A; Rabeler, C; Beane, O; Morse, R; Palumbo, M; and Hanes, SD. The Ess1 Prolyl Isomerase Is Required for Transcription Termination of Small Noncoding RNAs via the Nrd1 Pathway. Molecular Cell, Volume 36, Issue 2, 255-266, 23 October 2009. Martha Hass Lopes, LB; VanderMall, H.; Li, HT; Venugopal, V.; Li, HK; Naydin, S.; Hosmer, J.; Bentley, M.V.L.B.; Levendusky, M.; Hass, MA. Topical delivery of lycopene using microemulsions: enhanced skin penetration and tissue antioxidant activity. J. Pharm Sci. 99(3) 1346-57, 2010.

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Levin, RM.; Legget, RE; Schuler, C.; Rehfuss, A.; Hass, MA. Oxidative Stress and Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunctions Primarily Found in Women. Urol Sci. 1(1) 7-17. 2010. Krall, C.M.; Yao, X.; Hass, MA; Feleder, C.; Steiner, A.A. Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298: R1512R1521, 2010. Susan Ludeman Pinto, N, Ludeman, SM, Dolan ME. Pharmacogenetic Studies Related to Cyclophosphamide-Based Therapy. Pharmacogenomics 10(12), 1897-1903 (2009). Amoyaw, P.N.A.a; Springer, J.B.b# ; Gamcsik, M.P.c; Mutesi, R.L.b; D’Alessandro, M.A.d; Dempsey, C.R.a; and Ludeman, S.M.a*. Synthesis of 13C-Labelled Derivatives of Cysteine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of Drug Uptake and Conversion to Glutathione in Rat Brain. Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals. Meenakshi Malik Noah, C.E., Malik, M., Bublitz, D. C., Camenares, D., Sellati, T. J., Benach, J. L., Furie, M. B. GroEL and lipopolysachharide from Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain synergistically activate human macrophages. Infection and Immunity 78(4):1797-806 (2010). Melillo, A. A., Mahawar, M., Sellati, T.J., Malik, M., Metzger, D.W., Melendez, J.A., and Bakshi, C. S. Identification of Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain CuZn superoxide dismutase as critical for resistance to extracellularly generated reactive oxygen species. J.Bacteriol. 191(20):6447-56 (2009). Wendy Parker London, A.S. and Parker, W.M. Incarceration and PostIncarceration Living Arrangements: Findings from the National Health and Social Life Survey. Journal of Family Issues. 30 (6): 787-812, 2009.

Michael Racz Racz, MJ, Sedransk J. Bayesian and frequentist methods for provider profiling using risk-adjusted assessments of medical outcomes. Journal of the American Statistical Association 105, 48-58, 2010. Hannan, EL, Racz MJ, Gold J, Cozzens K, Stamato NJ, Powell T, Hibberd M, Walford G. Adherence of catheterization laboratory cardiologists to American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass graft surgery: what happens in actual practice?, Circulation 121, 267-75 2010. Hannan EL, Zhong Y, Racz MJ, Jacobs AK, Walford G, Cozzens K, Holmes DR, Jones RH, Hibberd M, Doran D, Whalen D, King SB 3rd. Outcomes for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction in hospitals with and without onsite coronary artery bypass graft surgery: the New York State experience. Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions 2, 519-27, 2009. Laura Rogers Rogers, L. Diving in to Prison Teaching: Mina Shaughnessy, Teacher Development, and the Realities of Prison Writing. Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service Learning and Community Literacy 8(3): Summer 2009 99-121.

BOOK CHAPTERS Kevin Hickey Hickey, K. “Africa and Travel Writing.” New Directions in Travel Writing and Travel Studies. Ed. Carmen Andras. Aachen: Shaker Publishing GmbH, 103-118, 2010.

REVIEW ARTICLES Kenneth Blume Blume, K. Review of Craig L. Symonds, Lincoln and his Admirals. Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Navy, and the Civil War. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008) for International Journal of Maritime History, December 2009. Blume, K. Review of The Sherlock Holmes Illustrated Cyclopedia of Nautical Knowledge, by Walter W. Jaffee. (Palo Alto, CA: Glencannon Press, 2009), for Steamboat Bill, the quarterly journal of the Steamship Historical Society of America, Winter 2009/2010.


Scholarly Activity Report POSTER PRESENTATIONS/ EXHIBITIONS Patricia Baia Baia, P. “Create your own professional development opportunity.” Conference on Instructional Technology (CIT), Plattsburgh, NY, 2010. Lynn Evans Werner, E.A., Evans, L., Monk, C. “Higher antenatal maternal cortisol associated with more reactive infant temperament – but only when maternal age is controlled for.” XVIIth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, 2010. Evans, L., Werner, E.A., Russo, J., Ju, J., Monk, C. “Preschool temperament measures and the 5-HTTLPR, DRD4, ACE and BDNF polymorphisms: a pilot study.” XVII World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, Baltimore, MD, 2009. Evans, L., Werner, E.A., Russo, J., Ju, J., Monk, C. “A BDNF variant but not maternal diagnosis is associated with increased anxiety in preschoolers.” XVIIth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Baltimore, MD, 2010.

Carroll, M. “John McCloskey and the Popular Press.” Researching New York: Perspectives on Empire State History, State University of New York at Albany in partnership with the New York State Archives, Nov. 19-20, 2009. Ray Chandrasekara Chandrasekara, R. “China in Africa: Expanding the Strategic Periphery.” 35th Annual Conference of New York African Studies Association at SUNY-Binghamton, March 26-27, 2010.

Michael Pittman Pittman, M. “G.I. Gurdjieff and Sufism in America: Contribution, Confluence, and Controversy.” American Academy of Religion Conference, Montreal, CA, November 9, 2009.

Denvir, P. “Identity management during routine ‘lifestyle’ history taking: Practices that patients employ when reporting on problematic conduct.” 95th Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago, 2009.

Pittman, M. “G.I. Gurdjieff and Late 19th Century/Early 20th Century Cosmopolitanism in the Caucasus.” American Comparative Literature Association Conference. New Orleans, LA, April 4, 2010.

Sunanda Sukumar Sukumar, S., Woo, B., and Sukumar, N. “Docking of Dipeptides to Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors.” NERM Meeting, June 2008. Elisabeth Vines Vines, E. Dinner Prep accepted into juried Fences Select Exhibit at the Arts Center of the Capital Region, Summer 2009.

d’Oney, D. “Fire, Water and Government Know Nothing of Mercy: Court Cases Which Determined Houma Identity.” American Society for Ethnohistory Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, October, 2009.

PODIUM PRESENTATIONS

Kevin Hickey Hickey, K. “‘Enfouies dans les chairs’: European Body, African Body, Identity.” 35th Annual New York African Studies Association (NYASA) Conference on Global-Africa, Global-Asia: Africa and Asia in the Age of Globalization, SUNY Binghamton, March 27, 2010.

Margaret Carroll Carroll, M. “The Social Programs of John McCloskey.” The American Conference for Irish Studies National Conference, Galway, Ireland, June, 2009.

Parker, W.M. “Parental Resources and Child Health: An Initial Examination of Child Health Trajectories.” Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, CA, August 8-11, 2009.

Paul Denvir Denvir, P. “Some dilemmatic aspects of advising patients to be tested for HIV in primary care contexts.” University at Albany Communication Research Seminar, 2010.

Daniel d’Oney d’Oney, D. “Creoles, Indians, and Sugar Princes: Interpretation of Houma Indian History on Louisiana’s River Road. Many Voices—One Story?” A Conference on Public History Narratives of Native American and African American Histories, Raleigh, North Carolina, April, 2010.

Kenneth Blume Blume, K. “That Voodoo That You Do: John Stephens Durham, Caribbean Cultures, and African-American Racial Identities, 1865-1914.” American Society for Ethnohistory Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, October 2009.

Wendy Parker Parker, W.M., Wilmoth, J.M., and London, A.S. “Does Military Service Offset the Effect of Childhood SES Disadvantage on Men’s Later Life Physical Functioning?” Annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA), Atlanta, GA, November 18-22, 2009.

Hickey, K. “‘To roof the sea’: Derek Walcott’s Caribbean Response to Kant’s ‘Ultimate Purpose of Nature.’” 36th Annual African Literature Association (ALA) Conference on Eco-Imagination: African and Diasporan Literatures and Sustainability, University of Arizona, Tucson, March 13, 2010.

Michael Racz Racz MJ, Sedransk J. “Bayesian and frequentist methods for provider profiling using risk-adjusted assessments of medical outcomes.” 8th International Conference on Health Policy Statistics, Washington, D.C., January 2010. Racz MJ, Sedransk J. “Bayesian and frequentist methods for provider profiling using risk-adjusted assessments of medical outcomes.” Joint Statistical Meetings, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, August 2010. Laura Rogers Rogers, L. “College in Prison: Remixing Power, Identity and Resistance.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Louisville, KY, 2009.

GRANTS Sunanda Sukumar SPONSOR/GRANT TITLE: American Chemical Society/ Project SEED Award TERM: 06/01/10-07/31/10 TOTAL GRANT: $2,800.00

Bolded names within citations indicate ACPHS faculty collaborators.

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“Progress is the activity

ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND HEALTH SCIENCES Cabinet Members James J. Gozzo, Ph.D.

President

Mehdi Boroujerdi, Pharm.D., Ph.D. Provost and Dean Vicki DiLorenzo

Vice President, Institutional Advancement

Angela Dominelli, Ph.D. Tiffany Gutierrez

Vice President, Enrollment Management

Gerald Katzman Packy McGraw

General Counsel

Associate Vice President of Administrative Operations

Shaker Mousa, Ph.D.

Vice Provost for Research and Chairman of PRI

Michael A. Sass

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Associate Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness

Special Assistant to the President

Pamela Smith

Chief Technology Officer, Information Technology Services

Michele Vien

Vice President of Finance

ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND HEALTH SCIENCES BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2010 - 2011 Officers Alfred J. Collins Jr. ‘53 Chairman Herbert Chorbajian Vice Chair Christopher Mitiguy Treasurer Bridget-ann Hart ‘80 Secretary

Term Trustees Stephen C. Ainlay Robert S. Busch Richard H. Daffner ’63 J. Gordon Dailey ‘57 Francis J. DiLascia ‘54 Melvin Friedland ‘58 Geno J. Germano ‘83 Rocco F. Giruzzi, Jr. ‘58 Zachary I. Hanan ’63 Hugh A. Johnson Jeanette S. Lamb ’57 Joseph M. Lapetina Thomas O. Maggs Fouad Morkos Marion T. Morton ‘84

Trustees Emeriti Michael F. Bette Kenneth M. Nirenberg


of today and the assurance of tomorrow.� - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Non-Profit Org US Postage

PAID

Albany, NY Permit No. 349

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Presidents Report 2010