Issuu on Google+

April 10, 2013  San Francisco Convention Center‐ Room 120  2:00‐5:00 p.m.  .


Program Agenda  Moderator Introduction   Darilyn Moyer, MD, FACP, Chair, Chapters Subcommittee & Governor, Pennsylvania  Southeastern  Region   

Learning Outcome:  • •

Familiarize with ACP’s Diversity Policy and strategies for inclusion   Review ACP’s diverse demographic make‐up 

 

  Keynote Address  Ana Maria Lopez, MD, MPH, FACP, ACP Arizona Chapter Governor, Incoming Member, Board of  Regents and Associate Dean, Outreach & Multicultural Affairs, Professor of Medicine & Pathology,  Medical Director, Arizona Telemedicine Program, University of Arizona College of Medicine  Learning Outcomes:  • •

Understand values, beliefs, attitudes, and perceptual processes across generations and diverse backgrounds.  Find out about the effects of generational and cultural differences and develop strategic tactics to address them.

Interactive Learning  Around the Table What can be done tomorrow morning? Brainstorming on actionable strategies  With the help of a “table facilitator” (mix of Governors, Chapter Leaders, and Executive Directors), each table will examine  a critical question centered around the needs of ACP’s diverse membership to determine strategies for developing short  and long term action goals.  Learning Outcomes:  • • •

Identify key issues, decisions, and choices to consider based on the different member segments and varying ways  to connect.   Brainstorm about the implications and opportunities when selecting specific strategies to address serving the  needs of your diverse membership.   Develop strategies for short term goals by selecting a vital few to focus efforts   

Generational & Cultural Divide Panel  ACP Leaders will provide their unique perspective on  representing their diverse group of ACP Membership  Early Career Physicians Panelist: Gene Lambert, MD, Massachusetts Early Career Physicians Member   Female Physicians Panelist: Kemi Nakabayashi, MD, FACP, Washington Membership Chair    IMG Physicians Panelist:  Janaki Deepak, MBBS, FACP, Maryland IMG Chair  Younger Member Panelist:  Tiffany I Leung, MD, MPH, Illinois Technology Committee Member   

Learning Outcomes:  • •

Hear directly from Chapter Leaders representing these various diverse backgrounds  Recognize the variety of trends and their impact on chapter value and activity  

Chapter Action Planning Diversity and Inclusion Chapter Action Plan  Chapter Leaders will be asked to regroup with their chapter attendees and asked to work on developing a specific action  plan for diversity. Chapters will be encouraged to integrate this plan into their existing core goals and mission.   Learning Outcomes:  • Articulate the significance of having a diversity and inclusion plan   •

Integrate plan into existing chapter core goals and mission 

 

   


Table of Contents This resource manual comprises ideas and information to help your chapter increase its diversity as well as adopt the inclusive policies and practices that will create the culture needed to sustain your chapter’s commitment over time. This guide will introduce you to various steps to develop a chapter’s diversity and inclusion policy as well as action plans to implement them locally. Please do not use this as a step-by-step guide. This will not tell you what goes into your plan, it simply lists the components needed and questions you may want to ask. For more information on diversity and inclusion, we have included a bibliography and reference list for suggested reading. This manual will lead you through critical components of chapter diversity. Introduction to Diversity at ACP----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PAGE 7 ACP Diversity Policy and Goals for Implementation ACP Membership Fast Facts Chapter Data at a Glance - Spotlighting Diversity Trends within the Chapter Consolidated Profile Cultural and Generational Divide: Understanding the values, beliefs, and attitudes across diverse backgrounds-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PAGE 33 Benefiting from Diversity Snapshot of the Generations BoardSource Governance Index 2012- Key Findings for Council Culture Around the Table- “What can be done tomorrow morning?” ------------------------------------------------------PAGE 45 ASAE Trends that Impact Associations: STEEP FRAMEWORK Sample Diversity Discussion Points to facilitate at the chapter level Creating a Pipeline: Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining a diverse volunteer base within your chapter Voice of our Future Leaders------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --PAGE 53 Benefits that the Next Generation of Leaders offer your chapter Foster and Develop Mentoring Programs Locally John Tooker Evergreen Collection Diversity Vignettes A Quick Lesson about Washington Chapter Women in Medicine Dim Sum Program Diversity and Inclusion Chapter Action Plan----------------------------------------------------------------------PAGE 63 Ten Step Plan for Chapter Diversity Sample Diversity and Inclusion Chapter Action Plan Key Steps to building and measuring success-what items will your chapter track as part of its initiative Tool to Analyze your Governor’s Advisory Council Recommended Reading-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PAGE 73 Bibliography and Reference Resources All materials are available electronically on the Chapter Leader Network


Introduction to  Diversity at ACP

7


ACP’s Diversity Policy   Rationale:  To provide policy on how the College will seek to increase:  1. Diversity within its membership,   2. Involvement at the chapter level by members from diverse groups,   3. Diversity among leaders of the College, and   4. Awards to members from diverse groups.  

Policy:  The American College of Physicians’ membership comprises a diverse population of internists, subspecialists of  internal medicine, and medical students. The ACP values diversity and views it as one of its greatest strengths. The College welcomes  prospective members regardless of race; ethnicity; gender; religion; age; sexual orientation; nationality; disability; appearance; geographic  location; and professional activity, such as private practice, research, or academic medicine.    The ACP strives to encourage internists and subspecialists of internal medicine from diverse groups to join the College, participate in chapter  activities, and seek to attain positions of leadership. The ACP believes that a commitment to diversity strengthens the organization's capacity  to respond to the needs of its members and their patients, i.e., to recognize that diversity is an important aspect of infrastructure that  enhances relevance and effectiveness.    The ACP annually recognizes distinguished internists for their accomplishments in a wide variety of areas, including the practice of medicine,  teaching, research, public service, and volunteer service. The College will seek ways to solicit award nominees from diverse groups.    The ACP recognizes the importance of physicians’ understanding the special needs of diverse groups in the delivery of health care. The  College will seek ways to educate its members on how best to deal with diversity among patients. The College will commit resources to  accomplish these objectives and will serve as a model to its chapters.   

Goals of Diversity within the College  • • • •

To increase the membership of the College to better reflect diversity within the physician population.   To increase involvement at the chapter level by involving members from diverse groups.   To increase attainment of leadership positions within the College, whether at the level of chapter, Board of Governors, or Board of  Regents, by involving members from diverse groups.   To increase attainment of College awards by members from diverse groups.  

 

How Will the ACP Diversity Policy Be Implemented?  1. 2.

The ACP’s diversity policy will be regularly shared with the Board of Regents’ Committee and Council members.  The ACP’s diversity policy will be provided to each incoming Committee Chair and Council Chair, as well as incoming members of  committees and councils.   3. The ACP’s diversity policy will be reviewed at each incoming Chair and Vice Chair orientation meeting.   4. The ACP will strive to recognize diversity through its appointments to committees and councils.   5. The ACP’s Bylaws will be changed as appropriate to support efforts to achieve diversity within the College.   6. The ACP will actively recruit prospective members from diverse groups to join the College.   7. The ACP’s chapters will be encouraged to expand their mentoring activities to cultivate leaders of diverse backgrounds and will be  asked to report on their progress annually.   8. Nominees for ACP awards will be actively solicited from diverse groups.   9. The ACP will continue to offer support for diverse groups at "Internal Medicine" annual meeting through informal networking  opportunities, such as the International Reception and the African‐American Reception.   10. The ACP will regularly communicate its diversity policy through appropriate communication vehicles, including brochures to explain  the benefits of membership.    

Consider ACP’s definition of diversity for a moment and answer the following questions:  1) How would you define your chapter’s diversity policy, if different than the one shared?  2) Are there any additional elements that should be added to the definition? 

  8


FAST FACTS ABOUT ACP MEMBERS October 2012 Member Classes  This report is based on September 25, 2012 membership numbers of approximately 128,000.  65% are Members, Fellows and Masters.  18% are medical students.  17% are Associates.  17% are Young Physicians – Members, Fellows or Masters who have been out of medical school 16 years or fewer. Geographic location  93% are in the USA.  2% are in Canada.  The largest proportion of USA members is in the South (33%); the smallest proportion is in the West (19%).  Specific census division strongholds in the USA are the South Atlantic states (18%), Middle Atlantic (17%), East North Central states (15%), and Pacific states (13%).  Age  Of all members:  24% are less than 30  21% are 30 to 39  33% are 40 to 59  21% are 60 or older  Of Members, Fellows and Masters:  16% are under 40  50% are 40 to 59  18% are 60 to 69  15% are 70 or older Sex and Race  66% of all members are male:  73% of Members, Fellows and Masters  55% of Young Physicians  56% of Associates  52% of student members  57% of all members are Caucasian:  63% of Members, Fellows and Masters  49% of Young Physicians  38% of Associates  54% of student members

9


 Other ethnic groups each comprise 13% or less of the total membership:  Asian is the most common group, comprising 13% of all members, 11% of Members, Fellows and Masters, 14% of Young Physicians, 17% of Associates, and 16% of students.  The largest groups among student members are Asian (16%), Hispanic (10%), and Indian (8%).  The largest single group is the 18% of Associates who are Indian. Professional Activity (Members, Fellows and Masters)  Approximately 9% are retired.  Almost all of those currently working in medicine (96%) spend some time in direct patient care.  Just over two-thirds (69%) spend the majority of their professional time in clinical practice.  62% of Young Physicians  Administration (5%), research (4%), and teaching (4%) are primary professional activities for only a small proportion of members. Primary Employer (Members, Fellows and Masters)  40% of those currently working in medicine are employed in a privately-owned practice.  22% of Young Physicians.  Excluding residents/fellows: 43% of all Members, Fellows and Masters and 29% of Young Physicians.  13% are employed by a private community hospital.  19% of Young Physicians.  23% are employed in an Academic Medical Center/Medical school.  39% of Young Physicians.  Excluding residents/fellows: 20% of all Members, Fellows and Masters and 27% of Young Physicians. Practice Size (Members, Fellows and Masters)  17% currently working in medicine and who do some patient care work in a solo practice.  5% of Young Physicians.  42% work in small practices (5 or fewer physicians).  25% of Young Physicians.  Excluding residents/fellows: 45% of all Members, Fellows and Masters and 31% of Young Physicians.  27% work in medium sized practices (6 to 20 physicians).  32% of Young Physicians.  31% work in large practices (over 20 physicians).  44% of Young Physicians.

10


Specialty and Subspecialty (Members, Fellows and Masters)  57% identify their principal specialty as general internal medicine (GIM).  60% of Young Physicians.  33% identify their principal specialty as one of the internal medicine (IM) subspecialties.  19% of Young Physicians.  6% report a non-IM specialty as principal (e.g., neurology).  7% of Young Physicians.  5% identify hospital medicine as their principal specialty.  14% of Young Physicians.  Most common IM subspecialty is cardiovascular disease (6%).  79% see at least some GIM patients.  88% of Young Physicians.  63% see at least some subspecialty patients.  51% of Young Physicians.  60% see all or primarily GIM patients.  77% of Young Physicians  40% see all or primarily subspecialty patients.  24% of Young Physicians.  21% see only subspecialty patients; and 37% see only GIM patients.  12% of Young Physicians see only subspecialty patients; 49% see only GIM patients. Type of Patient Care (Members, Fellows and Masters)  71% do all or primarily outpatient care.  46% of Young Physicians.  10% do all inpatient care.  20% of Young Physicians.  20% do primarily inpatient with some outpatient care.  33% of Young Physicians. Young Physicians Relative to all Members, Fellows and Masters, ACP’s Young Physician Members exhibit the following trends:  Less likely to be male or Caucasian.  Less likely to be an internal medicine subspecialist and more likely to focus on general internal medicine patient care.  More likely to specialize in Hospital Medicine and less likely to do primarily outpatient care.  More likely to work in a medium sized practice (6 to 20 physicians) or a large sized practice (over 20 physicians).  Less likely to be employed in a privately-owned practice and more likely to be employed in an Academic Medical Center/Medical school or private community hospital.

11


12


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile I. Membership Totals ACP Membership Totals Member Class Masters Fellows Members Associates Medical Student Members Affiliates Physician Affiliates Total

Number

% of Total 748 28456 48633 22716 28943 88 17 129601

Total as of June 30, 2012 from ACP's Membership Database. These figures are representative of ACP members who are a part of established chapters, and, therefore, do not include international members who are not associated with a chapter. Also, these numbers do not include Honorary Fellows.

13

0.6% 22.0% 37.5% 17.5% 22.3% 0.1% 0.0% 100.0%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile ACP Membership Totals - Five Year History Member Class Masters Fellows Members Associates Subtotal (No Medical Students, Affiliates)

2007 609 25896 53534 19313 99352

2008 639 26246 52606 20708 100199

2009 661 26738 52793 21405 101597

2010 688 27375 51068 22002 101133

2011 729 27933 49925 22600 101187

2012 748 28456 48633 22716 100553

5 Year Change (%) 22.8% 9.9% -9.2% 17.6% 1.2%

Medical Student Members Affiliates Physician Affiliates Grand Total Yearly Change (%)

22975 80 0 122407

24332 71 0 124602 1.8%

25414 63 0 127074 2.0%

26636 49 0 127818 0.6%

27625 50 0 128862 0.8%

28943 88 17 129601 0.6%

26.0% 10.0% 100.0% 5.9%

Total as of June 30, 2012 from ACP's Membership Database. These figures are representative of ACP members who are a part of established chapters, and, therefore, do not include international members who are not associated with a chapter. Also, these numbers do not include Honorary Fellows.

14


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile II. Administrative Information Chapter Staff Of All 72 Chapters 69

(%) 95.8%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 68

(%) 94.4%

Hiring Arrangement Arrangement

Of All 72 Chapters

Utilize existing staff in Gov's office and reimburse Contract through local medical association Contract through management firm Direct employment for chapter management only Independent Contractor No Staff Other

11 13 1 9 27 2 8

(%) 15.3% 18.1% 1.4% 12.5% 37.5% 2.8% 11.1%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 11 12 1 12 25 3 7

(%) 15.3% 16.7% 1.4% 16.7% 34.7% 4.2% 9.7%

Other Support Support Executive Director Office Manager Accountant Lawyer Lobbyist Other

Of All 72 Chapters 36 2 44 9 5 16

(%) 50.0% 2.8% 61.1% 12.5% 6.9% 22.2%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 32 3 40 6 6 13

(%) 44.4% 4.2% 55.6% 8.3% 8.3% 18.1%

Average Number of Hours Spent on ACP Work / Week Support By Governor: By Primary Staff: By Other Staff:

Average For All 72 Chapters 8.8 18.0 2.7

Due to rounding, the total percentage per column may not add to exactly 100%.

15

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 9.6 17.2 2.1


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile III. Chapter Membership and Council Diversity Chapter Council Of All 72 Chapters 72

(%) 100.0%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 71

(%) 98.6%

Chapter Council by Role Role

Of All 72 Chapters

Associate Member Chief Resident Medical Student Member Treasurer/Finance Committee Chair Young Physician Member

(%)

39 29 43 62 54

54.2% 40.3% 59.7% 86.1% 75.0%

Of All 72 Chapters In 20102011 37 23 37 57 51

(%) 51.4% 31.9% 51.4% 79.2% 70.8%

ACP Membership by Age Age 20's 30's 80's 40's 50's 60's 70's 80+ Unspecified Total

Master 0 0 0 3 55 224 261 204 1 748

(%) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.4% 7.4% 30.0% 34.9% 27.3% 0.1%

Fellow 0 1143 1 4523 8086 7248 3862 3587 6 28456

(%) 0.0% 4.0% 0.0% 15.9% 28.4% 25.5% 13.6% 12.6% 0.0%

Member 55 10801 0 14172 12836 6532 2040 2191 6 48633

(%)

Assoc

(%)

0.1% 22.2% 0.0% 29.1% 26.4% 13.4% 4.2% 4.5% 0.0%

8909 12720 0 978 97 1 0 0 11 22716

39.2% 56.0% 0.0% 4.3% 0.4% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%

Total 8964 24664 1 19676 21074 14005 6163 5982 24 100553

(%) 8.9% 24.5% 0.0% 19.6% 21.0% 13.9% 6.1% 6.0% 0.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters 124.5 342.6 0.0 273.3 292.7 194.5 85.6 83.1 0.3 1396.6

(%) 8.9% 24.5% 0.0% 19.6% 21.0% 13.9% 6.1% 5.9% 0.0%

Chapter Council by Age Age 20's 30's 40's 50's 60's 70's 80+ Unspecified Total

Average For All 72 Chapters 1.6 3.4 4.6 5.1 3.3 1.1 0.3 0.1 19.4

(%) 8.4% 17.5% 23.5% 26.3% 17.1% 5.4% 1.4% 0.4% 100.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 1.5 3.2 4.5 5.2 3.1 1.0 0.2 0.2 18.9

Medical Student and Affiliate data is not included. Due to rounding, the total percentage per column may not add to exactly 100%. Based on the total membership numbers as of June 30, 2012. "Unspecified" represents those members who have not supplied ACP with this information.

16

(%) 7.9% 16.9% 23.7% 27.4% 16.6% 5.5% 1.2% 0.9% 100.0%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile ACP Membership by Ethnicity Ethnicity African/African American Arabic Asian/Asian American Hispanic Indian/Pakistani Native American/Alaskan Native Other Pacific Islander White, not of Hispanic Origin Unspecified Total

Master 26 3 16 19 15 0 5 0 556 108 748

(%)

Fellow

(%)

3.5% 0.4% 2.1% 2.5% 2.0% 0.0% 0.7% 0.0% 74.3% 14.4%

810 528 1856 1055 2009 23 440 38 18326 3371 28456

2.9% 1.9% 6.5% 3.7% 7.1% 0.1% 1.6% 0.1% 64.4% 11.9%

Member 2127 886 5264 2287 4838 67 1546 130 24736 6752 48633

(%)

Assoc

(%)

4.4% 1.8% 10.8% 4.7% 10.0% 0.1% 3.2% 0.3% 50.9% 13.9%

1085 797 3096 1409 4125 23 1110 57 7163 3851 22716

4.8% 3.5% 13.6% 6.2% 18.2% 0.1% 4.9% 0.3% 31.5% 17.0%

Total 4048 2214 10232 4770 10987 113 3101 225 50781 14082 100553

(%) 4.0% 2.2% 10.2% 4.7% 10.9% 0.1% 3.1% 0.2% 50.5% 14.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters 56.2 30.8 142.1 66.3 152.6 1.6 43.1 3.1 705.3 195.6 1396.6

(%) 4.0% 2.2% 10.2% 4.7% 10.9% 0.1% 3.1% 0.2% 50.5% 14.0%

Chapter Council by Ethnicity Ethnicity

Average For All 72 Chapters

African/African American Arabic Asian/Asian American Hispanic Indian/Pakistani Native American/Alaskan Native Other Pacific Islander White, not of Hispanic Origin Unspecified Total

0.6 0.3 1.3 1.0 1.4 0.0 0.3 0.0 12.9 1.6 19.4

(%) 2.9% 1.8% 6.5% 5.2% 7.1% 0.1% 1.3% 0.2% 66.6% 8.3% 100.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 0.6 0.2 1.1 0.8 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.1 12.9 1.7 18.9

Medical Student and Affiliate data is not included. Due to rounding, the total percentage per column may not add to exactly 100%. Based on the total membership numbers as of June 30, 2012. "Unspecified" represents those members who have not supplied ACP with this information.

17

(%) 3.0% 1.0% 5.8% 4.4% 6.5% 0.1% 1.4% 0.3% 68.5% 9.0% 100.0%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile ACP Membership by Gender Gender Female Male Unspecified Total

Master

(%)

Fellow

(%)

8.8% 90.2% 0.9%

4440 23576 440 28456

15.6% 82.9% 1.6%

66 675 7 748

Member 15277 30775 2581 48633

(%)

Assoc

(%)

Total

31.4% 63.3% 5.3%

9207 11500 2009 22716

40.5% 50.6% 8.8%

28990 66526 5037 100553

(%) 28.8% 66.2% 5.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters 402.6 924.0 70.0 1396.6

(%) 28.8% 66.2% 5.0%

Chapter Council by Gender Gender Female Male Unspecified Total

Average For All 72 Chapters 5.9 12.9 0.6 19.4

(%) 30.4% 66.6% 3.0% 100.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 5.7 12.6 0.6 18.9

(%) 30.1% 66.9% 2.9% 100.0%

ACP Membership by Training Training US/Canada IMG Total

Master 668 80 748

(%) 89.3% 10.7%

Fellow 21601 6855 28456

(%) 75.9% 24.1%

Member 32913 15720 48633

(%)

Assoc

67.7% 32.3%

12296 10420 22716

(%)

Total

54.1% 45.9%

67478 33075 100553

(%) 67.1% 32.9%

Average For All 72 Chapters 937.2 459.4 1396.6

(%) 67.1% 32.9%

Chapter Council by Training Training US/Canada IMG Unspecified Total

Average For All 72 Chapters 15.8 3.6 0.0 19.4

(%) 81.5% 18.5% 0.0% 100.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 15.6 3.1 0.2 18.9

Medical Student and Affiliate data is not included. Due to rounding, the total percentage per column may not add to exactly 100%. Based on the total membership numbers as of June 30, 2012. "Unspecified" represents those members who have not supplied ACP with this information. "IMG" represents International Medical Graduates.

18

(%) 82.8% 16.3% 0.9% 100.0%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile ACP Membership by Subspecialty Primary Specialty Adolescent Medicine Allergy and Immunology Cardiovascular Disease Critical Care Medicine Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism Family Medicine\General Practiioner Gastroenterology Geriatric Medicine Hematology Hematology/Oncology Hospice & Palliative Medicine Hospital Medicine Infectious Disease Internal Medicine Medical Oncology Medicine-Pediatrics Nephrology Neurology Pulmonary Disease Rheumatology Sleep Medicine Sports Medicine Other/Unspecified Total

Master 2 10 61 4 64 0 38 10 26 16 0 4 63 326 7 1 38 4 22 30 0 0 22 748

(%)

Fellow

0.3% 19 1.3% 267 8.2% 2456 0.5% 254 8.6% 1089 0.0% 0 5.1% 1732 1.3% 451 3.5% 275 2.1% 1078 0.0% 30 0.5% 634 8.4% 1301 43.6% 12908 0.9% 737 0.1% 255 5.1% 1391 0.5% 222 2.9% 1074 4.0% 893 0.0% 10 0.0% 10 2.9% 1370 28456

(%) 0.1% 0.9% 8.6% 0.9% 3.8% 0.0% 6.1% 1.6% 1.0% 3.8% 0.1% 2.2% 4.6% 45.4% 2.6% 0.9% 4.9% 0.8% 3.8% 3.1% 0.0% 0.0% 4.8%

Membe r 39 245 1756 304 778 1 1465 533 136 978 52 2923 1130 28342 519 1346 1237 150 1149 769 25 25 4731 48633

(%)

Assoc

0.1% 0 0.5% 5 3.6% 37 0.6% 23 1.6% 5 0.0% 0 3.0% 17 1.1% 6 0.3% 2 2.0% 41 0.1% 2 6.0% 86 2.3% 13 58.3% 2956 1.1% 2 2.8% 127 2.5% 10 0.3% 11 2.4% 18 1.6% 12 0.1% 1 0.1% 0 9.7% 19342 22716

(%)

Total

0.0% 60 0.0% 527 0.2% 4310 0.1% 585 0.0% 1936 0.0% 1 0.1% 3252 0.0% 1000 0.0% 439 0.2% 2113 0.0% 84 0.4% 3647 0.1% 2507 13.0% 44532 0.0% 1265 0.6% 1729 0.0% 2676 0.0% 387 0.1% 2263 0.1% 1704 0.0% 36 0.0% 35 85.1% 25465 100553

(%) 0.1% 0.5% 4.3% 0.6% 1.9% 0.0% 3.2% 1.0% 0.4% 2.1% 0.1% 3.6% 2.5% 44.3% 1.3% 1.7% 2.7% 0.4% 2.3% 1.7% 0.0% 0.0% 25.3%

Average For All 72 Chapters 0.8 7.3 59.9 8.1 26.9 0.0 45.2 13.9 6.1 29.3 1.2 50.7 34.8 618.5 17.6 24.0 37.2 5.4 31.4 23.7 0.5 0.5 353.7 1396.6

(%) 0.1% 0.5% 4.3% 0.6% 1.9% 0.0% 3.2% 1.0% 0.4% 2.1% 0.1% 3.6% 2.5% 44.3% 1.3% 1.7% 2.7% 0.4% 2.3% 1.7% 0.0% 0.0% 25.3%

Chapter Council by Subspecialty Primary Specialty Adolescent Medicine Allergy and Immunology Cardiovascular Disease Critical Care Medicine Endocrin, Diabetes, Metab Gastroenterology General Internal Medicine Geriatric Medicine Hematology

Average For All 72 Chapters 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.1 0.4 0.3 11.5 0.2 0.1

(%) 0.1% 0.6% 1.4% 0.4% 2.2% 1.5% 59.1% 0.9% 0.7%

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.4 0.4 11.4 0.2 0.2

Medical Student and Affiliate data is not included. Due to rounding, the total percentage per column may not add to exactly 100%. Based on the total membership numbers as of June 30, 2012. "Unspecified" represents those members who have not supplied ACP with this information.

19

(%) 0.1% 0.7% 1.2% 0.4% 1.9% 2.0% 60.3% 1.0% 0.8%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile Chapter Council by Subspecialty Primary Specialty Hematology/Oncology Hospice & Palliative Med Hospital Medicine Infectious Disease Medical Oncology Medicine-Pediatrics Nephrology Neurology Pulmonary Disease Rheumatology Sleep Medicine Sports Medicine Other/Unspecified Total

Average For All 72 Chapters 0.3 0.0 1.0 0.6 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.1 0.5 0.3 0.0 0.0 2.8 19.4

(%) 1.4% 0.0% 4.9% 3.0% 0.5% 1.4% 2.8% 0.3% 2.4% 1.8% 0.0% 0.0% 14.6% 100.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 0.3 0.0 0.7 0.6 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.0 0.4 0.3 0.0 0.0 2.5 18.9

Medical Student and Affiliate data is not included. Due to rounding, the total percentage per column may not add to exactly 100%. Based on the total membership numbers as of June 30, 2012. "Unspecified" represents those members who have not supplied ACP with this information.

20

(%) 1.3% 0.1% 3.8% 3.2% 0.6% 1.5% 3.1% 0.2% 2.3% 1.8% 0.0% 0.0% 13.5% 100.0%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile IV. Chapter Young Physicians ACP Young Physicians by Gender Gender Female Male Unspecified Total

Master

(%) 0 0 0 0

0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Fellow

(%)

748 1377 96 2221

33.7% 62.0% 4.3%

Master

(%)

Member

(%)

7268 8288 1137 16693

Total

43.5% 49.6% 6.8%

8016 9665 1233 18914

(%) 42.4% 51.1% 6.5%

Average For All 72 Chapters 111.3 134.2 17.1 262.7

(%) 42.4% 51.1% 6.5%

ACP Young Physicians by Specialty Primary Specialty Adolescent Medicine Allergy and Immunology Cardiovascular Disease Critical Care Medicine Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism Family Medicine\General Practiioner Gastroenterology Geriatric Medicine Hematology Hematology/Oncology Hospice & Palliative Medicine Hospital Medicine Infectious Disease Internal Medicine Medical Oncology Medicine-Pediatrics Nephrology Neurology Pulmonary Disease Rheumatology Sleep Medicine Sports Medicine Other/Unspecified Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Fellow 1 19 84 18 44 0 42 38 5 57 5 262 91 1147 22 88 92 9 40 49 1 4 103 2221

(%) 0.0% 0.9% 3.8% 0.8% 2.0% 0.0% 1.9% 1.7% 0.2% 2.6% 0.2% 11.8% 4.1% 51.6% 1.0% 4.0% 4.1% 0.4% 1.8% 2.2% 0.0% 0.2% 4.6%

Member 13 61 242 127 151 1 178 159 30 237 23 1979 370 8282 78 905 345 20 198 167 7 14 3106 16693

ACP defines a "Young Physician" as someone who is within 16 years of graduation but not still in training (not an Associate or Student).

21

(%) 0.1% 0.4% 1.4% 0.8% 0.9% 0.0% 1.1% 1.0% 0.2% 1.4% 0.1% 11.9% 2.2% 49.6% 0.5% 5.4% 2.1% 0.1% 1.2% 1.0% 0.0% 0.1% 18.6%

Total 14 80 326 145 195 1 220 197 35 294 28 2241 461 9429 100 993 437 29 238 216 8 18 3209 18914

(%) 0.1% 0.4% 1.7% 0.8% 1.0% 0.0% 1.2% 1.0% 0.2% 1.6% 0.1% 11.8% 2.4% 49.9% 0.5% 5.3% 2.3% 0.2% 1.3% 1.1% 0.0% 0.1% 17.0%

Average For All 72 Chapters 0.2 1.1 4.5 2.0 2.7 0.0 3.1 2.7 0.5 4.1 0.4 31.1 6.4 131.0 1.4 13.8 6.1 0.4 3.3 3.0 0.1 0.3 44.6 262.7

(%) 0.1% 0.4% 1.7% 0.8% 1.0% 0.0% 1.2% 1.0% 0.2% 1.6% 0.1% 11.8% 2.4% 49.9% 0.5% 5.3% 2.3% 0.2% 1.3% 1.1% 0.0% 0.1% 17.0%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile Young Physicians by Chapter Council Average For All 72 Chapters Total Young Physicians Total Young Physicians on Council

262.7 4.3

ACP defines a "Young Physician" as someone who is within 16 years of graduation but not still in training (not an Associate or Student).

22

(%)

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 14.6% 273.2 22.1% 4.3

(%) 15.3% 22.1%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile V. Chapter Committees Chapter Committees Committee

Average For All 72 Chapters

Associates Awards Chapter Meeting Program Communications Credentialing Diversity Finance Health and Public Policy Hospitalist International Medical Graduate Medical Students Membership Nominations Other Volunteerism Womens Young Physicians

52 58 63 22 19 7 56 52 34 12 54 63 44 27 11 21 52

23

(%) 72.2% 80.6% 87.5% 30.6% 26.4% 9.7% 77.8% 72.2% 47.2% 16.7% 75.0% 87.5% 61.1% 37.5% 15.3% 29.2% 72.2%

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 52 63 63 23 24 12 54 49 30 10 52 62 51 22 12 17 46

(%) 72.2% 87.5% 87.5% 31.9% 33.3% 16.7% 75.0% 68.1% 41.7% 13.9% 72.2% 86.1% 70.8% 30.6% 16.7% 23.6% 63.9%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile VI. Chapter Activities Activity: Advancement Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Assisted headquarters with "Most Wanted" Fellowship campaign Governors or Council members made personal contact or sent letters/e-mails inviting eligible Members to apply for Fellowship Held Advancement to Fellowship Mentoring Workshop Recruited through the Invited Fellow Pathway

(%)

33 60

45.8% 83.3%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 36 61

33 48

45.8% 66.7%

33 46

(%) 50.0% 84.7% 45.8% 63.9%

Activity: Advocacy Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Contacted legislators on behalf of membership Distributed educational materials about healthcare reform to patients Invited legislators to attend meetings, visit doctor offices, clinics, etc. Met with third party payer representatives Monitored rule-making Organized a "day of visits" to local legislators Participated in Leadership Day on Capitol Hill Presented testimony Served on advisory boards Utilized AIM (Advocates for Internal Medicine) program Worked with state medical societies/associations/coalitions on common health care issues Wrote op-ed article and/or letter to the editor

43 20 20 19 29 18 45 12 32 26 49 19

(%) 59.7% 27.8% 27.8% 26.4% 40.3% 25.0% 62.5% 16.7% 44.4% 36.1% 68.1% 26.4%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 41 29 25 22 24 20 50 15 31 39 49 21

(%)

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 59 21 5 17 26 40 31 57 57 n/a 37

(%)

56.9% 40.3% 34.7% 30.6% 33.3% 27.8% 69.4% 20.8% 43.1% 54.2% 68.1% 29.2%

Activity: Associates / Residents Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Abstract/Research competitions Associates freestanding meeting Associate newsletter Chief Residents council Held meeting with Chief Residents Jeopardy or challenge bowl type competition Mentoring opportunities Offered Financial Support for Associates to Attend Internal Medicine Meeting Offered Financial Support for Associates to Attend Leadership Day Work with Program Directors within the region on ACP related programs Workshop/panel discussion/presentation

57 26 7 11 23 41 36 48 38 42 35

24

(%) 79.2% 36.1% 9.7% 15.3% 31.9% 56.9% 50.0% 66.7% 52.8% 58.3% 48.6%

81.9% 29.2% 6.9% 23.6% 36.1% 55.6% 43.1% 79.2% 79.2% n/a 51.4%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile Activity: Awards Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Associate/Resident award Community Service/Volunteerism award Distinguished Internist award Laureate award Medical Student award Nominated someone for a national award Teaching award

(%)

38 27 19 56 38 22 23

52.8% 37.5% 26.4% 77.8% 52.8% 30.6% 31.9%

Of All 72 Chapters In 20102011 40 32 21 54 32 n/a 22

(%) 55.6% 44.4% 29.2% 75.0% 44.4% n/a 30.6%

Activity: Collaboration Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Formed partnership with public interest/charity based organization Worked with another ACP chapter Worked with state medical societies/associations/coalitions Worked with Pri-Med

17 40 47 20

(%) 23.6% 55.6% 65.3% 27.8%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 17 38 50 18

(%)

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 25 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 57 38 n/a

(%)

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 64 4 26 n/a 4 26

(%)

23.6% 52.8% 69.4% 25.0%

Activity: Communications Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Conducted survey of membership Created and managed a Facebook page Created and managed a Twitter page Created and managed any other social medial tools (LinkedIn, etc.) Developed and implemented a communication plan Produced and sent Governor's Newsletter electronically through headquarters Produced and sent Governor’s Newsletter locally Regularly provide new content for chapter web site Sent e-mails to membership on non-meeting related topics

22 21 4 1 11 60 14 41 63

(%) 30.6% 29.2% 5.6% 1.4% 15.3% 83.3% 19.4% 56.9% 87.5%

34.7% n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 79.2% 52.8% n/a

Activity: Educational Programs Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Annual chapter scientific meeting Conducted E-Learning activity such as webinar or webcast Dinner meeting Held educational event not associated with the chapter meeting Reading retreat SEP Module

62 4 27 31 3 26

25

(%) 86.1% 5.6% 37.5% 43.1% 4.2% 36.1%

88.9% 5.6% 36.1% n/a 5.6% 36.1%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile Activity: Hospitalist Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Held a Hospitalist reception at chapter meeting Held standalone networking event for Hospitalists Include Hospitalist member on Governor’s Council Included a Hospitalist track at chapter meeting Included an article geared toward Hospitalists in the Governor’s Newsletter Invited Hospitalist to chapter meeting with special letter Partnered with local chapter of Society of Hospital Medicine

7 5 47 19 12 19 7

(%) 9.7% 6.9% 65.3% 26.4% 16.7% 26.4% 9.7%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 8 4 39 23 6 12 6

(%)

(%)

11.1% 5.6% 54.2% 31.9% 8.3% 16.7% 8.3%

Activity: Leadership Development Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Encouraged young physician member participation in national LEAD program Held leadership development networking event Held retreat for chapter leadership Recognized local leaders in newsletter, web site or e-mail Sponsored chapter leaders' attendance at Internal Medicine to attend the CLN and/or leadership development programming Offered leadership development courses at the chapter meeting or via an online forum Published article in chapter newsletter about LEAD program features

(%)

30 7 10 40 14

41.7% 9.7% 13.9% 55.6% 19.4%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

7 9

9.7% 12.5%

n/a n/a

n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

Activity: Medical Students Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Abstract/Research competitions Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner/Reception Community Based Teaching Internal Medicine career workshop/panel/presentation Mentoring Program Met with Clerkship Directors Offered financial Support for Medical Students to Attend Internal Medicine Meeting Offered financial support for Medical Students to attend Leadership Day Preceptorship Residency fair Supported Internal Medicine Club/Interest Group Work with faculty at medical schools on ACP related programs

50 36 13 35 29 27 40 34 11 9 47 37

(%) 69.4% 50.0% 18.1% 48.6% 40.3% 37.5% 55.6% 47.2% 15.3% 12.5% 65.3% 51.4%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 52 34 9 31 21 25 34 34 9 10 49 n/a

(%)

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 35

(%)

72.2% 47.2% 12.5% 43.1% 29.2% 34.7% 47.2% 47.2% 12.5% 13.9% 68.1% n/a

Activity: Recruitment Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Assisted headquarters in recruiting new members through the "Most Wanted" campaign

26

36

(%) 50.0%

48.6%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile Activity: Recruitment Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Assisted headquarters in recruiting new members through the "Most Wanted" campaign Attended local meetings (i.e. Pri-Med) to recruit new members on-site Contacted Clerkship Directors to encourage students to apply for membership Contacted Program Directors to encourage residents to apply for membership\assisted headquarters with Recruit-a-Resident outreach Developed formal chapter specific recruitment and retention plan Followed up with nonmembers who attended the chapter meeting, encouraging them to join Gave presentation at local hospital or institution promoting ACP membership Met with students/IMIG Leaders at medical schools to discuss benefits of membership\assisted headquarters with IMIG sponsorship program outreach Purchased list of nonmember physicians to assist with recruitment efforts Sent letters/e-mails encouraging nonmembers to apply for membership

(%)

36 26 44 46

50.0% 36.1% 61.1% 63.9%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 35 n/a 43 53

(%)

23 26 23 38

31.9% 36.1% 31.9% 52.8%

n/a n/a n/a 41

n/a n/a n/a 56.9%

10 40

13.9% 55.6%

n/a 46

n/a 63.9%

48.6% n/a 59.7% 73.6%

Activity: Retention Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Contacted dues delinquents to keep them on as members Contacted unpaid members to maintain their membership Sent letters/e-mails inviting terminating Associates to apply for Membership

43 35 24

(%) 59.7% 48.6% 33.3%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 40 36 23

(%)

(%)

55.6% 50.0% 31.9%

Activity: Volunteerism Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Conducted non-medical community service or fundraising activity (e.g. 5K/Fun Run/Clothing for Food Drive) Featured volunteer activities or opportunities in the Governor's newsletter or web site Organized free medical care event Participated in Health Fair Set up community or institutional clinic

(%)

6

8.3%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 3

14 6 8 5

19.4% 8.3% 11.1% 6.9%

n/a n/a 9 n/a

4.2% n/a n/a 12.5% n/a

Activity: Young Physicians Activity

Of All 72 Chapters

Encouraged Young Physicians to serve as mentors to Associates and Students Held standalone networking event for Young Physicians Included an article geared toward young physicians in the Governor's Newsletter and/or produced a chapter CYP newsletter Invited Young Physician/s to Chair/lead chapter committee(s) or join the Chapter CYP Invited Young Physicians to judge chapter abstract competition Offered educational or lifestyle programming geared towards Young Physicians at the chapter meeting

27

(%)

30 23 23

41.7% 31.9% 31.9%

Of All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 n/a 20 22

46 33 24

63.9% 45.8% 33.3%

n/a 31 n/a

(%) n/a 27.8% 30.6% n/a 43.1% n/a


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile VII. Chapter Meetings Meeting Components Component

Of All 57 Chapter Meetings

Town Meeting Business Meeting SocioEconomic Issues Washington, DC Representative Medical Student Events Associate Events Recruitment and Retention Program Women Physician Program Young Physician Program Awards Mentoring Event Hospitalist Program/Event Spouse/Guest Program Child Care Exhibits Social Events Chapter Hosted a SEP Module Other Co-Sponsor ACP Handled the Registrations CME Obtained From ACP CME Obtained From Other Organization

27 12 44 15 33 49 24 13 21 50 26 31 5 4 46 47 21 9 21 39 18

(%) 47.4% 21.1% 77.2% 26.3% 57.9% 86.0% 42.1% 22.8% 36.8% 87.7% 45.6% 54.4% 8.8% 7.0% 80.7% 82.5% 36.8% 15.8% 36.8% 68.4% 31.6%

Of All 63 Chapter Meetings In 2010-2011 29 20 41 17 35 53 20 12 10 54 22 25 3 3 48 47 21 11 19 43 20

(%)

Average For All 63 Chapter Meetings In 2010-2011 2.4 35.1 28.5 43.5 0.0 12.2 0.0 0.0 27.0 2.0 0.6

(%)

46.0% 31.7% 65.1% 27.0% 55.6% 84.1% 31.7% 19.0% 15.9% 85.7% 34.9% 39.7% 4.8% 4.8% 76.2% 74.6% 33.3% 17.5% 30.2% 68.3% 31.7%

Attendance by Member Class Member Class Master Fellow Member Associate Honorary Fellow Medical Student Member Affiliate Physician Affiliate Nonmember Physician Medical Student Nonmember Nonmember Allied Health Professional

Average For All 57 Chapter Meetings 2.8 36.9 30.3 47.7 0.0 11.7 0.0 0.2 23.0 2.6 1.2

(%) 1.7% 22.3% 18.3% 28.9% 0.0% 7.1% 0.0% 0.1% 13.9% 1.6% 0.7%

All information was obtained from the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 meeting programs or was provided to the ACP by the chapter. "Unspecified" represents those members who have not supplied ACP with this information.

28

1.5% 22.8% 18.5% 28.2% 0.0% 7.9% 0.0% 0.0% 17.6% 1.3% 0.4%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile Attendance by Member Class Member Class

Average For All 57 Chapter Meetings 8.9 165.4

Other Total

(%) 5.4%

Average For All 63 Chapter Meetings In 2010-2011 2.8 154.1

(%) 1.8%

Attendance by Age Age 20's 30's 40's 50's 60's 70's 80+ Unspecified Total

Average For All 57 Chapter Meetings

(%)

37.8 41.2 22.1 20.8 12.5 0.7 5.5 24.7 165.4

22.8% 24.9% 13.4% 12.6% 7.6% 0.4% 3.4% 14.9%

Average For All 63 Chapter Meetings In 2010-2011 33.4 37.4 20.6 20.3 11.5 0.7 5.6 24.4 154.1

(%)

Average For All 63 Chapter Meetings In 2010-2011 47.5 74.8 31.8 154.1

(%)

21.7% 24.3% 13.4% 13.2% 7.5% 0.5% 3.6% 15.8%

Attendance by Gender Gender Female Male Unspecified Total

Average For All 57 Chapter Meetings

(%)

51.2 82.5 31.6 165.4

31.0% 49.9% 19.1%

Meeting: CME Credits Average For All 57 Chapter Meetings 9.99

Average For All 63 Chapter Meetings In 2010-2011 9.52

Meeting Time: Hours Average For All 57 Chapter Meetings 20.05

Average For All 63 Chapter Meetings In 2010-2011 18.81

All information was obtained from the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 meeting programs or was provided to the ACP by the chapter. "Unspecified" represents those members who have not supplied ACP with this information.

29

30.8% 48.5% 20.6%


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile VIII. Chapter Finances Chapter Finances Transaction Type

Transaction Description

Average For All 72 Chapters

Beginning Balance:

$

157940.80

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 $ 137858.73

Deposits

Governor's Office Allowance (Entered By ACP) Chapter Dues (Entered by ACP) Chapter Development Fund (Entered by ACP) Evergreen (Entered by ACP) Recruit-A-Colleague Chapter Fund (Entered by ACP) Joseph E. Johnson Fund (Entered by ACP) Leadership Liaison (Entered by ACP) Pri-Med Funds Annual Chapter Meeting - Registration Fees Annual Chapter Meeting - Industry Support Annual Chapter Meeting - Other Revenue Other Industry Support (not related to Annual Meeting) Interest Earned Other Meetings (Associates, Dinner Meetings) Other Total Deposits:

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

6761.11 47349.67 134.03 41.67 220.10 250.00 85.88 1652.78 10428.33 7184.61 882.25 1341.67 496.93 1530.59 8178.23 86537.83

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

6808.91 46884.65 215.28 76.39 130.20 291.67 27.40 1878.63 11697.83 7515.18 1953.68 2165.05 669.62 1559.84 8719.90 90594.22

Payments

Staff Support Office Expenses Council Meetings Committee Meetings Annual Chapter Meeting Expenses Associates Activities (Meetings, Competitions) Other Meetings Local Travel for Chapter Activities Travel to Leadership Day Professional Fees (Accountant/Legal) Lobbying/Advocacy Medical Student Activities (Meetings, Competitions) National Internal Medicine Expenses Recruitment Activities Young Physicians Activities Other Expenses (i.e. Bank Fees) Total Payments:

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

26169.09 2721.13 2191.11 526.21 23471.29 6856.73 2550.33 617.65 2446.28 1747.74 2374.42 1974.11 3658.36 640.61 505.01 1659.19 80109.27

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

22203.44 3099.54 2096.38 398.63 25243.43 5877.95 2330.79 695.97 2853.85 1826.11 1618.40 2038.03 3590.99 286.90 375.34 1679.05 76214.79

30


2011/2012 Consolidated Chapter Profile Chapter Finances Transaction Type

Transaction Description Net Profit/Loss:

Average For All 72 Chapters $

Ending Balance:

$

31

6428.56 164369.36

Average For All 72 Chapters In 2010-2011 $ 14379.43 $

152238.16


Cultural and Generational Divide:  Understanding the values beliefs Understanding the values, beliefs,  and attitudes across diverse  backgrounds

33


Benefiting from Diversity   By understanding the power of diversity and by utilizing it appropriately, chapters possess the basic tools for  creating a responsive and open‐minded organization.

Defining Chapter Diversity  Chapter council and committee members have a surprisingly demanding and varied job to do depending on the level of activity and programs each develop. By focusing on defining chapter diversity in terms of skills and aptitude, a chapter can create a structure for matching organizational needs with acceptable candidates. Various backgrounds and experiences (professional and personal, as well as cultural and ethical) add to the quality of a chapter. Other important characteristics include leadership skills, community involvement, political connections, and shared values and commitment. Familiarity with the chapter’s goals and issues can be important. These examples all focus on maximizing the special value of each council member in an chapter. Benefits of a diverse board A homogeneous council may not always be ready to deal effectively with problems due to an inherent near-sightedness. Diversity on a council breeds varying opinions, approaches, attitudes, and solutions. It requires open-mindedness, curiosity, acceptance, and responsiveness, which can ultimately facilitate an understanding and willingness to work together. This is clearly not the easiest way to force a group to make decisions but different or opposing backgrounds, cultures, beliefs, habits and norms can force a consensus-oriented approach to conflict management. Chapter Councils are often expected to represent the chapter’s membership. This is a way to create accountability and form a link with the members. A diverse council sends a message and sets a powerful example for the entire organization. Avoiding tokenism Start with a firm commitment to diversity. Announce it; put it in writing. Creating a sense of ownership is difficult if recruitment of new council members is based on pure representation of a specific group in the membership. No council member wants to fill a quota. No one should be required to — in fact, no one is able to — represent an entire subsection of the population. Council members contribute according to their skills and knowledge. The focus should be on the entity as a diverse mixture, not on individual representation. To avoid the appearance of creating token positions, it is necessary to treat each council member equally. Expect the same from everyone; each council member, new or old, has the same responsibilities. Involve every new member immediately. Assign tasks independent of cultural or ethnic background. If possible, recruit several members at the same time from the same group.

34


Dealing with dissent Disagreement is a natural by-product of diversity. By cultivating acceptance toward differing opinions, it is possible to expand the base from which to make educated decisions. Seeking agreement on the broadest issues first creates a strong foundation for debate. The role of the Governor as a mediator cannot be overestimated. At the end, however, it is important that each council member respect the democratic process and is able to represent the official position to the outside world. Recruitment process It is difficult to create an effective recruitment strategy without first assessing the present composition of the council. By first establishing a profile of the existing council, missing links can be more easily identified. The Governor’s Advisory Council has a key role here. It should have a continuous pool of candidates at differing stages of cultivation so that when an opening needs to be filled or when it is time to expand the council size, the process is ready to deliver. Diversity among committee members naturally is the key element for increasing the diversity of the council and chapter leaders. References Berit M. Lakey, Sandra R. Hughes and Outi Flynn, Governance Committee (BoardSource 2004). BoardSource, The Nonprofit Board Answer Book, Second Edition (BoardSource 2007).

35


A SNAPSHOT OF THE GENERATIONS

TOOL 1

Snapshot of Generations 1901-1924 Greatest Generation

1925-1945 Silent Generation/ Lucky Few

1946-1962 Baby Boomers

1963-1980 Generation X

1981-2002 Generation Y/ Millennials/Gen@

Depression, New Deal/FDR Era, World War II, Korean War

Grew up during WWII, Grew up with a military draft & tension of Cold War, Vietnam War, Watergate

Vietnam War, Watergate, Prosperity & largest segment of society, Suburbia, Man on the Moon, Free love, Huge social change

Raised with technology, Grew up at the end of the Cold War, Gulf War, Latchkey kids, High divorce rates, MTV, AIDS, Dot-com prosperity, Challenger disaster, Recession of early 1990s

Boomer parents, Child-centric upbringing, Raised with technology, Columbine/school violence, 9/11, Wars, Hurricane Katrina, Reality TV, Internet boom/bust, Safety laws, Diverse education

Stability & security, Tradition, Helping others

Tradition, Work ethic, Loyalty to key issues

Recognition, respect, Options & flexibility, and success Positive experiences, Independent thinking

Loyalty, Respect hierarchy, Centralized decision making, Value structure, Earn their way up/pay their dues, Disciplined, Intense patriotism, Risk-averse, Trust the system, Selfsacrifice, Patriotism

Loyalty, Self-sacrifice, Hard working, Faith in institutions, focused on career, Patriotism Respect authority in the workplace, Driven by results, Loyal to the organization, Earn their way up/pay their dues, Work as part of self identity, “Break the rules”, Time-stressed, Politically correct, Causes, Consensusdriven, Sense of entitlement

Major Experiences & Events

Key Motivators

Traits & Values

Can handle fluid or undefined work environments, Informal, Technologically savvy, Value diversity, Ability to learn quickly, Value work/ life balance & focus on family, Independent thinking, Want responsibility and to have a voice, Pragmatic, Selfsufficient & reliant, Skeptical, distrust authority

Working with smart, creative people, Instant gratification, Impactful work Civic-minded, Socially, politically, and eco-conscious, Realistic, Informal, Technologically savvy, Value diversity, Ability to learn quickly, Require supervision, Value work/life balance, Skeptical about employee loyalty, Value change, Opinionated, Authentically confident, Welleducated

Sources: Ron Zemke et al, Generations at Work (New York: AMACOM, 2000); Society for Human Resource Management, Generational Differences Survey Report (2004); Stephanie Armour, “Generation Y: They’ve arrived at work with a new attitude” USA TODAY (11/6/2005); Eric J. McNulty, “Can You Manage Different Generations?’ Harvard Management Update (4/17/2006); Peter C. Brinckerhoff, Generations: The Challenge of a Lifetime for Your Nonprofit (Fieldstone Alliance, 2007); Anne Loehr, “Generational Cheat Sheet” The Washington Post (7/9/2009).

36 5

NEW VOICES AT THE TABLE © 2011 BoardSource


Nonprofit Governance Index 2012 Data Report 1 CEO Survey of BoardSource Members

37


CEO Survey of BoardSource Members

BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2012

7 Board Culture KEY FINDINGS & TRENDS

Diversity and Inclusion Although most respondents (71%) agree that increasing the racial/ethnic diversity on the board would help the organization advance its mission, only 26% of chief executives are satisfied with the level of racial/ ethnic diversity on their boards. More nonprofit leaders express satisfaction with board gender diversity (64%) and age diversity (62%). Yet, the majority of respondents agree that increasing racial/ethnic, gender, and age diversity on the board would bolster their efforts to advance the organization’s mission.

engagement with diverse board members and report it as such, when we asked whether the board has developed a detailed plan to create an inclusive culture, a more concrete measure not subject to interpretation, only 17% report yes. Shared Leadership In 2012, the BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index survey was expanded to include several “shared leadership” items designed to capture unique facets of boardroom interpersonal support and collaborative decision making. The concept of shared leadership has been defined as “a dynamic, interactive influence process among individuals in groups for which the objective is to lead one another to the achievement of group or organizational goals or both.”9

The BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index began tracking implementation of diversity and inclusion policies and practices in 2010. Over the past two years, we have seen little movement in the percentage of boards adopting such practices as diversity training, inclusive policies, and incorporating diversity as a core value (see Figure 11). While respondents report low representation and low implementation of inclusive practices, they give a high assessment of diverse interactions on boards. For example, 74% of chief executives indicate that “diverse members participate in developing the board’s most important policies” to “some extent” or “great extent.” One clue to the disparity may be perception: While chief executive perceive a high degree of

As illustrated in Figure 12, board member contributions and respectful listening appear to be high, but nearly half of all chief executives report that “generally conversations are driven by a few individuals.” Also, board member peer support is low. Only 55% of chief executives “agree” or “strongly agree” that board members coach and teach each other, and only 51% “agree” or “strongly agree” that board members help develop each other’s strengths.

FIGURE 11 Inclusion policies and practices on boards 2010–2012

80% 70%

2010

2012 63%

63%

60%

56%

59%

50% 40% 30% 20%

12%

13%

10% 0%

Incorporated diversity into core values

Modified policies to be more inclusive

Conducted diversity training for board

Pearce, C.L. and Conger, J.A. (2003). Shared Leadership: Reframing the Hows and Whys of

9

Leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

38


CEO Survey of BoardSource Members

BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2012

Table 8. Board Culture DATA AT A GLANCE Key Variables

Percent

Satisfaction with current level of diversity (percent responding “satisfied” or “very satisfied”)

Age diversity

62%

Gender diversity

64%

Racial/ethnic diversity

26%

Expanding diversity would help advance mission (percent responding “some” or a “great” extent)

Age diversity

62%

Gender diversity

51%

Racial/ethnic diversity

71%

Policies and practices (percent responding “yes”)

Diversity is part of organization’s core values

63%

Conducted diversity training for board

13%

Modified recruitment to reach members of diverse backgrounds

58%

Discussed values and benefits of expanding board diversity

74%

Policies and practices (percent responding “yes”)

Modified organizational policies and procedures to be more inclusive

59%

Developed detailed action plan to create inclusive culture

17%

Engagement and interpersonal dynamics7 (percent responding “some” or “great” extent)

Engaged diverse members in developing board’s most important policies

74%

Demonstrated that the board values contributions from diverse individuals

84%

Board members socialize with members from diverse backgrounds

66%

Members take a personal interest in board members from diverse backgrounds

71%

Board members coach and teach one another

55%

Board members help develop each other’s strengths

51%

At board meetings, different individuals take the lead on topics of interest

80%

Each board member contributes unique perspective to issues under consideration

83%

Generally, conversations at board meetings are driven by a few individuals

48%

Board Diversity

Inclusive Culture

Shared Leadership8 Contributions and support (percent responding “agree” or “strongly agree”)

Inclusive interpersonal dynamics measured via the social and functional inclusion scale of

7

Fredette, C., & Bradshaw, P. (in review). From diversity to inclusion: A multi-method examination of diverse non-profit boards. Items for the shared leadership scale were adapted from Avolio, B.J., Sivasubramaniam, N.,

8

Murry, W.D., Jung, D., and Garger, J.W. (2003). Assessing shared leadership: Development and preliminary validation of a team multifactor leadership questionnaire, pp 143-172. In Pearce, C.L. and Conger, J.A., Eds., Shared Leadership: Reframing the Hows and Whys of Leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

39


CEO Survey of BoardSource Members

BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2012

FIGURE 12 Distribution of Shared Leadership Responses

Board members listen attentively to each other

37%

Each board member contributes unique perspectives to issues under consideration

55%

23%

At board meetings, different individuals take the lead on topics of interest

60%

21%

Board members coach and teach one another

9%

Generally, conversations at board meetings are driven by a few individuals

8%

Board members help develop each other’s strengths

8% 0%

17%

40%

43%

Strongly Agree

20%

Agree

16%

59%

46%

10%

8% 1%

30%

40%

Disagree

40

50%

Strongly Disagree

60%

70%

80%

1%

3%

39%

6%

46%

6%

42%

7%

90%

100%


CEO Survey of BoardSource Members

BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2012

8 Board Performance Governance Knowledge Based on chief executive responses, board members have demonstrated a modest increase in understanding their legal and governance responsibilities, as compared to Governance Index data collected two years ago. In 2012, 62% of respondents felt the board was “well informed” or “very well informed” of its responsibilities, compared to 58% in 2010. Still, the data show a sizeable percentage of boards with limited knowledge of their basic roles and responsibilities. More than one-third of chief executives report that board members are “somewhat

informed” and 4% of board members are rated as “not well informed.” However, data also demonstrate that boards with a formal orientation process effective in bringing board members “up to speed,” are more likely to have knowledgeable board members. More than 70% of chief executives with a structured board orientation process describe their board members as “very well informed” or “well informed.” Only 43% of chief executives without a structured board orientation process describe their board as “very well informed” or “well informed.”

FIGURE 13 Board knowledge of governance and legal responsibilities for organizations with and without structured board member orientations.

18%

Structured Orientation

No Structured Orientation

53%

4%

0%

27%

39%

10%

Very well informed

20%

30%

Well informed

40%

48%

50%

Somewhat informed

41

60%

70%

Not well informed

80%

90%

8%

100%

1%


CEO Survey of BoardSource Members

BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2012

FIGURE 14 Report Card for Ten Basic Board Responsibilities*

59%

Mission

54%

Financial Oversight

27%

36%

Legal/Ethical Oversight

6%

Community Relations

26%

5% 0%

10%

A

B

20%

C

D

25%

30% 30%

40%

50%

F

12%

25%

39%

19%

35% 60%

70%

80%

5%

2%

13%

37%

2%

5%

4%

10% 90%

100%

*As reported by chief executives.

Performance of Basic Responsibilities BoardSource asked CEOs to assess their board’s performance in the responsibilities outlined in the BoardSource publication, Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards. CEOs rated their boards highest in their understanding of the organization’s mission. CEOs also ranked boards high on the two major fiduciary duties of financial and legal/ ethical oversight. This year, as in 2010, boards received a low grade for fundraising. A concomitant low score in community relations seems to indicate that CEOs view their boards as doing better with their internal responsibilities than those that are externally facing. Further research will examine the grades in the “Board Report Card” (Figure 14) and how boards that are highly rated by their CEO in these areas perform in other areas of interest, such as recruitment, orientation, leadership development, and diversity and inclusion.

42

1%

3%

12%

34%

25%

2%

5%

9%

27%

37%

8%

Recruitment

24%

41%

14%

Monitor Performance

21%

28%

19%

Strategy

23%

33%

30%

CEO Evaluation

10%

15% 4%

36%

34%

CEO Support

Fundraising

29%


CEO Survey of BoardSource Members

BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2012

Comparative Board Intelligence Table 9. Key Variables by Nonprofit Type (Public Charity, Association, Foundation) Public Charities (n=930)

Associations (n=191)

Foundations (n=89)

Average board size

16.2

16.0

15.3

Board members elected by current board

76%

16%

75%

Female

46%

42%

43%

Caucasian

82%

87%

83%

Non-Caucasian

18%

13%

17%

All Caucasian board

24%

39%

39%

Under 40 years

15%

14%

10%

41-64 years

70%

79%

70%

65 years or older

15%

8%

22%

Average number of years per term (board members)

3.0

2.7

3.3

Limit on consecutive terms served (board members)

1.8

1.5

1.9

Average number of committees

5.2

7.1

5.4

Executive Committee

81%

74%

72%

Audit Committee

25%

21%

37%

Finance Committee

35%

32%

47%

Finance & Audit Committee combined

50%

41%

30%

Governance Committee

15%

16%

16%

Nominating Committee

24%

60%

17%

Governance & Nominating Committee combined

43%

15%

40%

Fundraising/Development Committee

64%

17%

53%

Average number of board meetings/year

7.4

6.0

6.3

Boards with 75% or greater attendance

85%

97%

96%

Records/minutes of board and committee actions

98%

100%

99%

Percent of time spent on committee or staff reports

36%

28%

35%

Consent agenda

58%

66%

66%

Dashboard report

44%

39%

35%

Board Size and Demographics

Race/ethnicity

Age

Terms and Committee Structure

Meetings

43


Around the Table   “What What can be done tomorrow  can be done tomorrow morning?”

45


Participant Handout Domain 1: Organizational Management

Trends That Impact Associations: 50 Trends “A clear understanding of the changing environment is imperative for association leaders to plan effectively and make the best possible strategic decisions.” - Robert H. Rich, Ph.D., CAE

STEEP FRAMEWORK 

S = Socio-demographic

T = Technological

E = Economic

E = Environmental

P = Political

Socio-demographic Trends 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Generation Y (Millennials): digital, “civic,” and connected Millennials increasingly seeking overseas experience Rising life expectancy, aging global populations Widening generational gap: values, attitudes, behaviors, technoliteracy Baby Boomer retirement and unretirement; talent shortages Increasing political and economic impact of diversity—minorities one third of the U.S. population Redefining work-life balance Funding and chronic diseases shaping future healthcare challenges Growing popularity of online education relative to that of classroom-based courses Increasing economic power of women Growing role for “social entrepreneurship” Evolving trust: declining trust in government and media Increasing interest in philanthropy and volunteer work Deepening personalization of products, services, communications, and experiences

Technological Trends 15. Internet continues transforming government, governance, and business 16. Social media explosion creating new approaches for engagement, communication, publishing, and marketing 17. Rise in mobile and location-based web services as “smart” phones displace laptops 18. Cybercrime, cyberwar, and cyberterrorism 19. Nanotechnology: the next trillion-dollar market? 20. Energy: increasing demand and rising cost accelerate the search for alternative sources

46


Participant Handout Domain 1: Organizational Management

21. Evolving personal technology “ecosystem”: intuitive, visual, and smart

Economic Trends 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41.

Uneven economic growth Growing financial market risks and uncertainty Rising economic strength of China and India, representing an increasing share of global GDP Rise of the “Next 11” nations on the global stage Future growth fueled by rising immigration Rising personal and country indebtedness Growing challenge of maintaining physical infrastructure Nations competing on science investment to drive economic performance Growing economic importance of global knowledge economy Global talent shortages increasing with economic growth Attractiveness of U.S. business environment weakens relative to that of other countries Education falling behind employers’ expectations Pay-as-you-go and “freemium” services becoming more prevalent business models Global outsourcing market could hit $1.43 trillion-USD outsourcing deepening Global rise in entrepreneurship Rise in corporate and individual social responsibility Evolution of tomorrow’s company Continued shift in global wealth and spending power Shifting patterns of global inequality and unmet needs Changing patterns of U.S. income, wealth, and savings

Environmental Trends 42. 43. 44. 45.

Organizations and investors focusing on green issues Global consumption patterns challenge Earth’s resource capacity Climate change a growing political and economic priority globally Rises in ecoliteracy, green practices, and ethical consumption

Political Trends 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.

Diminishing U.S. political influence internationally India and China becoming “spokesnations” of the developing world Increasing political and economic transparency Increasing global role for single-party states Changing patterns of global governance—growing influence of non-state actors

(Source: Designing Your Future: Key Trends, Challenges, and Choices Facing Association and Nonprofit Leaders, ASAE & The Center for Association Leadership)

47


Participant Handout Domain 1: Organizational Management

Trends That Impact Associations: 10 Key Patterns of Change Within Designing Your Future, the 50 key trends were further evaluated and grouped into a list of ten key patterns of change believed to be the most important for associations based on their storylines of change over the next couple of years.

1. Economic Power Shifts - Global integration, emerging economic powers, and shifting patterns of wealth. 2. Politics gets Complex – A rising number of domestic issues, increasing pressure on federal funding, and an increasingly complex global political landscape. 3. Expanding Business Agenda – Pressure to address the ‘triple bottom line’ of people, planet and profits, more global competition and ever widening technology choices. 4. Science and Technology Go Mainstream – Nations competing on innovation, ‘science’ impacting our daily lives, and technology becoming central to middle class lifestyles. 5. Demographic Destinies - Global population growth, increasing life expectancy, aging societies and a more ethnically diverse population. 6. Generational Crossroads - Aging Baby Boomers and the emerging ‘Millennial’ generation. 7. Rethinking Talent, Education and Training – Growing talent gap, rising concerns over educational performance, and the mainstreaming of online and lifelong learning. 8. Global Internet Expansion – More global users, more connected with more functionality. 9. A Society in Transition - An Era of Responsibility and Accountability – Evolving societal norms and expectations, pressures to serve the greater good and perform to the highest ethical standards, and declining trust in key institutions. 10.

Natural Resource Challenges – Growing resource pressures, rising commodity prices, and energy and the environment as dominant agenda items.

48


Sample Diversity Discussion Points to facilitate at the chapter level   Time

Agenda Item

Lead

5 minutes

Welcome, call meeting to order

Governor

5 minutes

Introduction of new members, guests Introduction of discussion topic —

Governor Governor

Supporting Materials Bios

Why Diversity and Inclusion are Important to our Chapter — and ground rules

10 minutes

90 minutes

10 minutes

1. Active participation that allows everyone a chance to contribute to the conversation 2. Create a safe environment for discussion and learning 3. Treat as confidential any information that is shared 4. Extend courtesy to others 5. Listen without judging others 6. Share challenges openly so that we can learn 7. together and develop better ways of doing things 8. Be present in the moment Assign Facilitated Discussion Points Council 1. How do we define diversity? Leader 2. Why is diversity important to us? 3. Have we had an open discussion about changing demographics in our chapter and how it impacts our services, programs, and mission? 4. How might diversity and inclusion increase our ability to serve our mission? 5. What are the potential points of contention or resistance related to diversity? 6. Can our practices, traditions, or culture be perceived as biased or unwelcoming? 7. What, if anything, will we have to change in order to become more diverse and inclusive? 8. Is the council committed to inclusiveness? If so, how has this been demonstrated? 9. As a council, what is our culture? 10. Are we welcoming to people with diverse backgrounds? 11. What are the elephants in the room? Governor/ Executive Next Steps 1. Appoint taskforce Director 2. Notes to board on consensus points, unresolved 3. issues

49

• Council demographics • Membership demographics • Mission and values statements


Creating a Pipeline: Strategies for Recruiting  and Retaining a diverse volunteer base within  your chapter  Bringing on chapter council and committee members who first and foremost embrace the chapter’s  mission, and who have a clear understanding of what is expected of all chapter  members, is a key step. So is effective orientation and rapid integration into  the work of the chapter. For the effort to work well, the entire chapter must make  a real, deep­down commitment to diversity.

Building an effective chapter council means building and developing a team composed of the diversity of perspectives, expertise, and other resources needed to accomplish the mission. However, it is not enough to recruit a diverse council. The council must become a cohesive unit that makes use of what every council and committee member can offer. Such councils and committees are well positioned to enable creative thinking, innovation, and problem solving and to provide leadership in meeting organizational challenges and identifying new opportunities. The more diverse the chapter, the more important it is to nurture understanding by creating opportunities for social and interpersonal interaction. With agreement in principle that chapters make better decisions if diverse viewpoints and experiences are part of their deliberations, bringing together those diverse viewpoints is more difficult than it sounds. Several factors explain why this is true. First, new members are typically recruited from among the friends, acquaintances, and business associates of those already involved in the chapter. This system, of course, tends to make chapter leaders uniform. It often takes great effort for chapter members to reach beyond their immediate circles and bring people of different backgrounds to the table. Inertia and lack of time for chapter work combine to discourage organizations from expanding their recruitment horizons. Often it is simply tradition and lack of effort that keep boards from changing their demographic profile. Second, the definition of diversity itself is often misunderstood. Many of the nonprofit leaders who demand that their organizations pursue diverse membership refer to adding persons of different racial and ethnic backgrounds to predominantly (or entirely) White councils. They often overlook the many other categories of diversity, such as sexual preference, religion, disability, age, or area of expertise. Despite the expansive definition of diversity, most discussions of board diversity seem to revolve around race and ethnicity.

RECRUITING THE RIGHT MIX Selecting an effective diversity committee was a common key to success. Almost all of the members included the diversity of their chapter, and the members of successful committees had good contacts in a variety of communities. Once an effective diversity committee was in place, members found key strategies that identified and attracted people of diverse backgrounds to their chapter council and committees.

50


Seek people for their interest in the mission. A Governor described creating a matrix identifying the types of skills that were needed on the council and refusing to fill vacant positions until people were found who met the profile. The diversity committee worked creatively to uncover resources; they started with referrals from people they knew and then moved to prominent people in the community who were not currently involved with chapter. They did calls, seeking to find people interested in the chapter’s mission. It took time and hard work, but they succeeded. • Explore the committee’s network of contacts. Committees used every possible resource — from current council members’ contacts in social and political circles, churches, and other nonprofit organizations. They also considered people with whom members had served on other boards, those who had already volunteered with similar organizations or people who had expressed strong interest in a relevant issue. • Target recruitment in the same way you market member benefits See the benefit of targeted recruitment focused on various groups to bring in diverse volunteers and council members, a process somewhat similar to marketing your chapter programs and activities to these same groups. Networking and making professional connections with diverse communities were also viewed as strategies with great potential. • Identify goals and commit to them. Several chapters recommended establishing quantifiable goals and sticking to them. One chapter identified the goal of bringing in one-third of the new council members from six target groups. They felt that without that strongly stated goal, the diversity committee might not persevere. This chapter’s diversity committee was aggressive in asking other council members for names. They also called numerous contacts seeking additional names, and they likened making calls for potential chapter leaders to hiring a new chapter staff — you must keep searching for what you want.

51


Voice of our Future Leaders

53


Benefits that the Next Generation of Leaders  offer your chapter  Here are some benefits and value younger generations add to your council? Here are four common benefits that Generations X and Y offer your chapter councils and committees. Note that these findings may or may not be unique to these generations. Benefits include: • Passion for the mission Younger chapter leaders are passionate about what we do and it can generate excitement among the more senior leadership. They bring energy, enthusiasm, and freshness to the chapter’s work. It’s inspiring to our other members. Their passion is critical. They teach the more senior leaders, from their generation’s perspective, the needs and interests related to the chapter’s programs and activities. • Results-oriented thinking Younger council members go beyond being motivated by the mission. They connect passion with a need for real outcomes. Younger council members view their volunteer experience as synonymous with leadership development, so spearheading committees, setting chapter goals, and measuring progress against those goals are common ways that chapters benefit from their zeal. Recognizing that personal and professional achievement can be key motivators for Generations X and Y, Governors will find that when they provide younger council members with responsibilities that build skills (e.g. developing a council orientation program, leading a committee , or organizing social networking events), it is advantageous for both the younger council member and the chapter. • Access to new networks Generations X and Y want to be involved in meaningful work, not busy work. Chapter Staff note that when engaged, younger generations give freely of their time, talent, and expertise. They discover new ways to connect with their peers and are also raising awareness of the chapter through technological vehicles, such as blogs, podcasts, social networking, and exchanging information by e-mail or listservs. The result is more interest among those peers and more engagement in chapter activities. In addition, their younger council members have introduced alternate methods of registering for events, collecting payments for events or sharing documents, many of which are Web based, including accepting payments via credit card and PayPal or distributing resources using Google Docs.

• Fresh perspective on old problems Chapters that do not have a rotating election cycle for appointing/electing new members, particularly diverse members, have difficulty coming up with new ideas and contacts and connecting with the needs of their chapter’s younger generation. New members who are unlike the current members, such as those in Generations X and Y, can bring fresh ideas, new contacts, and connections with new groups of volunteers. Chapter Staff in particular value the challenging questions younger council members pose in meetings. Generation X and Y members are not afraid to ask why or challenge assumptions. Their perspectives and experiences often serve as a reality check for council and lead to more informed decision making.

54


Here are some of the ideas to engage the next generation of leaders. Committee Chairs How can Committee Chairs accelerate the recruitment of and engagement of young leaders on Committees? 1)

Partner with the Executive Director and Governor’s Advisory Council to create a plan to diversify the board.

2)

Help identify prospective committee members by turning to sources such as educational programs that promote board leadership.

3)

Identify and remove any barriers to engaging young leaders on the board.

4)

Create a comfortable space and atmosphere of respect. Encourage robust conversations and welcome new ideas from younger committee members.

5)

Use tools and techniques in meetings, such as small groups, to ensure all members are comfortable speaking up.

6)

Create a mentoring program that pairs all new board members with tenured board members.

Governor’s Advisory Council/Committees How can the Governor’s Advisory Council accelerate the recruitment of and engagement of young leaders on the Council? 1)

Create a philosophy of valuing age diversity on the Governor’s Advisory Council.

2)

Implement term limits to ensure regular turnover on the board to make room for young professionals.

3)

Review “age” in the Governor’s Advisory Council Chapter Profile. [NOTE: The Chapter Profile can be a useful tool that helps council chart the diversity that exists on the council. The profile helps the council identify gaps that then are used to identify and target prospective council members.]

4)

Change where the Committee/Council finds members.

5)

Establish “mutual mentoring” by engaging and connecting members from different generations.

6)

Create opportunities for council members to discuss, learn about, and appreciate the unique value and contributions of all members including young leaders on the Council.

7)

Ensure meetings engage all Council members.

8)

Make room for more technology in meetings and in the work of the Council.

55


Council Members How can council members accelerate the recruitment of and engagement of young leaders on the Council? 1)

Help create a receptive and flexible environment.

2)

Help to educate the council about the value of generational diversity.

Executive Directors How can Executive Directors accelerate the recruitment of and engagement of young leaders on the Council? 1)

Look for members in nontraditional places.

2)

Recruit at least two young leaders at a time to avoid feelings of “alienation.�

3)

Use technology to enhance meetings.

56


Foster and Develop Mentoring Programs Locally  Creative chapters are utilizing mentoring as a means for orienting new members, promoting individual and chapter learning, and preparing for leadership succession. Further, mentors are being assigned to new council members as an inclusive practice for socializing them to the culture of the chapter. Mentoring partners can meet virtually and/or in person prior to and after council/committee meetings during the first year of council service and beyond. The council/committee mentors welcome the new members into the “chapter family” by introducing them to the people, issues, and work of the chapter, and they serve as go-to people and sounding boards. As mentors get to know the new council/committee member, they might confer about how to best utilize the mentee’s time and talent and enhance his or her chapter leadership experience.

Promoting Ongoing Individual and Chapter Learning Peer mentoring is a powerful tool for council/committee education because it engages people and harnesses the collective power of the chapter. It has the added advantage of facilitating more trusting and meaningful chapter leader relationships, building chapter cohesion, and ultimately contributing to the level of shared understanding that promotes more informed decision making.

The Power of Mentoring Chapter Leaders share remarkable stories that speak to the power of mentoring. They can’t imagine not having a go-to person to answer questions, bounce ideas off of, and help sort out organizational puzzles. They feel more comfortable more quickly because they have established meaningful relationships. And because they are able to grasp the big picture faster, they are able to make meaningful contributions to their chapter sooner. To build, grow, and support a viable chapter mentoring culture, you consider doing the following: • • •

Establish concrete learning objectives and long-term goals that you can measure and celebrate. Secure visible support, involvement, and commitment from the highest levels of the Governor’s Advisory Council and Chapter Staff. Involve the Governor’s Advisory Council in developing, implementing, and evaluating the program. Determine how you will pair mentors and mentees (this will depend on your goals and learning objectives). Consider involving both council and committee members as mentors.

MENTORING DOS AND DON’TS •

Do establish points of connection early on in the relationship. Don’t assume that because you serve together you know each other.

Do identify and utilize multiple venues for communication. Don’t rely on face-to-face interaction alone.

Do set a regular contact schedule, but don’t be inflexible.

Do check regularly on the effectiveness of communication. Don’t assume that the messages you are sending are being received or understood.

Do talk about the effectiveness of the mentoring process. Don’t forget to evaluate learning progress.

Excerpted from “Mentor Your Way to Board Development” by Lois J. Zachary. Board Member®, May/June, 2008.

57


John Tooker Evergreen Collection Diversity Vignettes The full collection is available online at http://www.acponline.org/cln/updated_evergreen13.pdf BUILDING LEADERSHIP AND STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY - NEW YORK The New York Chapter conducts a leadership conference every 18 months, bringing together current leaders with invited potential new and upcoming leaders. The format for the conference changes each time, but the goals are to present a mix of information on ACP, the Chapter, the organizational structure, current issues, forecasting of future issues, a formal resolutions process and personal physician skill building. Throughout the conference, time is scheduled to allow peer to peer exchange of information and networking opportunities. The social highlight of the weekend is an evening of “Are you Smarter than a Future ACP’er” which engaged all attendees, including the children and families, in several rounds of a take-off of the popular game show “Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader”. The New York Chapter continues to believe in the benefit of engaging members to become future leaders and building a strong path to leadership and this conference is the foundation of doing so. (2013) DIM SUM AROUND THE SOUND - WASHINGTON The Women in Medicine organizing committee for the Washington Chapter sought a way to arrange periodic informal get-togethers to network and have occasions for conversation about career-related issues. In the greater Puget Sound area there are a number of restaurants which feature dim sum, which was an attractive choice given the reasonable cost, variety of traditional special occasion foods, and the large restaurant size to accommodate any size group with little advance notice. The Dim Sum events are held every 2 months on the first Saturday of the month. The events have served as a means for new women physicians in our area to make fast acquaintances, for younger physicians in training to seek mentorship and advice, for practicing physicians to exchange experiences and solutions to practice challenges, as well as to work on planning for other activities for the WIM group, including opportunities to mentor/interact with medical students interested in pursuing internal medicine residency. The chapter and the WIM committee plan to continue this activity and they hope to add a mentoring Dim Sum with students and also with residents with the help of the Associate Council. (2013) MEETING THE NEEDS OF OUR INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL GRADUATE ACP MEMBERS MARYLAND The Maryland Chapter’s International Medical Graduate Committee was chartered approximately eight years ago. Several objectives for the committee were then developed as a result of a survey administered to IMGs/FMGs in the chapter. These included the need for education on visa and immigration issues, workshops on contract negotiations, and distribution of information and resources to IMGs/FMGS and their families to assist with assimilation into the Maryland community. In collaboration with the Chapter’s Young Physician Council, the IMG Committee created several workshops hosted by local law firms on topics including “A Legal Seminar for Physicians” (held in 2010) and “The ABC’s of Visas and Contracts” (held in 2011). In addition to organizing these workshops, the IMG Committee worked to develop resource materials specifically for IMGs/FMGS. This information included the AMA webpage listing the licensing requirements for IMGs, a compilation of Maryland’s school districts and rankings, driver’s license information, directory of banks, real estate information and even shopping locales. In the fall of 2011, the Committee also hosted a joint “International Pot Luck Dinner” in collaboration with the Chief Resident Association of Baltimore (CRAB) group. The IMG Committee is a vital and active component of the Maryland Chapter and continues to create new initiatives in collaboration with other groups in the chapter. (2012, Winner)

58


DECISION-MAKING BY BOTH GENDERS - JAPAN To encourage female physicians in Japan to advance their careers and actively contribute to society, the Japan Chapter created a Women’s Committee. Upon its inauguration in 2007, the Japan Chapter’s Women's Committee created an email distribution list of all female members to allow them to communicate directly with each other. Using this network, the Women’s Committee achieved a "decision-making by both genders" status in all Chapter Committees that is seldom achieved in other medical societies in Japan. In 2008, the Committee conducted a survey on mutual partnership between male and female physicians. This survey generated a great deal of public interest and received attention from several medical societies and TV programs. The Women’s Committee also established an annual luncheon at the chapter meeting. These luncheons, which are open to all, have witnessed a steady increase in the number of attendees each year as well. From these meetings, participants recognized the importance of networking and sharing opinions. Since the creation of the Women’s Committee, every Japan Chapter Committee includes at least one female member. The total number of women members increased from 53 members in April, 2007, to 128 members on October 27, 2009, an increase of over 140%. (2010, Winner) ENHANCING THE PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS, LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL, AND PERSONAL GROWTH OF FEMALE INTERNISTS-WISCONSIN The Wisconsin Chapter developed a strategic initiative to enhance the professional success, leadership potential, and personal growth of female internists. They accomplished these tasks in several ways. The first was recruiting seven new council members to serve on the Chapter Council. They also created a Women’s Committee, with specific goals aimed at empowering female physicians. The committee recruited female members to advance to fellowship and attend Leadership Day. In addition, a Women’s Caucus held during the Chapter’s annual meeting focused on balancing your health and professional life. During the meeting, the Chapter presented the first Women of the Year Award. As a result, they have increased the number of female Members and Fellows, as well as higher engagement of these physicians in chapter activities. (2008, Winner) MEMBERSHIP RECRUITMENT INITIATIVES- MISSOURI The Missouri Chapter wanted to increase relevance for their membership through increased participation of hospitalists, women physicians, residents, program directors, and medical students in the chapter. The Chapter developed the concept of holding lunch meetings for targeted groups of membership during the annual chapter meeting. These groups included: women physicians (with a lecture pertaining to women’s health); program directors of internal medicine (with an agenda for discussion of issues important to residency programs); and chief residents (with a directed agenda about how to involve more residents in the Missouri Chapter). The Chapter also added a program especially for hospitalists. In addition, the Governor of the Chapter developed a lecture that focused on the views of women in medicine as well as vignettes about the female pioneers in medicine with a specific emphasis on some of the obstacles they overcame as well as some of the humorous and serendipitous occurrences in their lives and careers. The Governor then arranged to give this lecture to medical students around the state, through pre-arranged student gatherings, and encouraged those students attending to apply for membership in the ACP. There was a 47% increase in student membership in the last two years since these lectures were given. (2007, Winner) WOMEN IN MEDICINE SUBCOMMITTEE-HIGHLIGHTING PROGRAM ON PART-TIME & GENERAL CONTRACT NEGOTIATION FOR WOMEN- MARYLAND The Maryland Chapter recognized the increasing number of women going into medicine and wanted to ensure that their interests and needs were being addressed. They formed a Women in Medicine Subcommittee in December of 2004. To increase the visibility of the Subcommittee, they created a Web site discussion group on Yahoo Health Groups which identified the goals of the committee, upcoming activities, discussion group postings, and photos. In addition to creating a forum for ACP Maryland Women Physicians to network, they planned and executed successful events. One event was focused on contract negotiations for women addressing the art of negotiation when seeking a new position, as well as addressing negotiation with the myriad of insurance carriers. The Subcommittee plans to host additional dinner meetings for their women physicians. The Subcommittee has successfully created a forum for women physicians at all levels of training and practice and has increased the sharing of information. These activities will hopefully translate into better career and family balance, improved efficiency, salary equity, and mentorship and networking opportunities for all women physicians. (2006, Winner)

59


THE MENTORING BREAKFAST INITIATIVE FOR MEMBERSHIP ENHANCEMENT AND DIVERSITY- LOUISIANA The Louisiana Chapter held a mentoring breakfast as part of the Louisiana/Mississippi Chapter meeting in 2003. The Diversity Committee sponsored the event which represented a full spectrum of college members. It includes women, minorities (African American, Hispanic, Indian, Asian, and others) as well as students, associates, members and fellows. The committee generated a list of “table hosts” for the breakfast, chosen to represent a broad range of practice types and localities, gender, and race, and issued personal invitations to participate. Personal invitations were also sent to all members, associates and students. The breakfast was planned to create a visible event at the state Chapter meeting that would welcome both current and prospective members of those groups. Internal Medicine was presented as an attractive and vibrant career to the younger members through the interaction with role models across a broad spectrum. The breakfast was used to share information from the Governor and College Representative on membership benefits and advancement to fellowship. Active participation in the Chapter and College was also encouraged. The breakfast attended by about 60 people was determined to be highly successful based on attendee feedback and an enthusiastic response from the Governor and College Representative. (2004, Winner) VENUE FOR MULTICULTURAL, RACIAL, AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN IOWA- IOWA The Iowa Chapter initiated a Diversity Committee in 1996 to recognize multicultural, racial and gender differences among rural and community physicians in the state. The Committee, which has grown to sixteen members, provides educational programs for local physicians to address specific diversity issues relevant to their healthcare practices. Since its inception, the Committee has offered a diversity breakfast and program at the annual chapter meeting where notable speakers have shared their experiences. The Committee participated in various diversity activities throughout the year offered by the University of Iowa and in local communities. They have also developed a Web site as a resource. The Committee recommended policies and actions to the Chapter Council, which enhance and strengthen the diversity in Iowa’s professional and internal medicine community. (2002, Winner) MEMBER RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION-TEXAS The Texas Chapter developed a two-year multifaceted recruitment and retention program to further the growth of the chapter while improving diversity. The Chapter appointed fifteen members to its Credentials and Membership Committee in an effort to broaden its representation to all regions of the state. They attracted over five hundred medical students to recruitment meetings held at all eight Texas medical schools and provided these schools with grants to create internal medicine interest groups. In addition, grants were provided to four regional Associates councils to fund local activities. Recruitment and advancement letters were mailed to female and African American physicians. The Chapter placed articles on advancement to Fellowship and the recognition of new Fellows in numerous editions of their newsletter. One hundred fifty local internists served as preceptors to over two hundred medical students to expose them to the rewards of a practice in internal medicine. The Chapter recognized the value of building relationships with the young potential leaders of tomorrow when they are still students and Residents, while at the same time emphasizing the retention of dues paying members and the recruitment of new members. (2002, Winner) HEALTH CARE ISSUES AFFECTING THE HISPANIC AMERICAN COMMUNITY- FLORIDA South Florida is host to a large population of Hispanic American physicians who, at times, feel disenfranchised from the mainstream of College activities. A committee, chaired by Dr. Antonio Fernandez, discussed the needs of those physicians and a one-day program addressing health care issues of particular interest to them was arranged. Expert speakers were chosen and a local hospital agreed to provide CME accreditation for the course as well as meeting space. The course received uniformly excellent evaluations and the speakers were rated outstanding. As a result of the course, several non-member physicians were persuaded to become members and a number of long-time ACP-ASIM members were encouraged to apply for advancement to Fellowship. The Florida chapter is pleased to have met an important educational need for its members and plans to repeat the course in the near future, perhaps in conjunction with other societies. (1999)

60


A Quick Lesson about Washington Chapter Women in Medicine Dim Sum Program Dim sum is a Chinese style of food prepared as small bite-sized or individual portions of food. The literal meaning is “touch the heart”, referring to the food being only a snack and not a main meal. The prepared dishes are often carted around the restaurant for customers to choose orders while seated at their tables. Smaller restaurants may offer a menu (sometimes with photos) for diners to select and have made-to-order items served fresh. Eating dim sum at a restaurant is usually known in Cantonese as yum cha, going to “drink tea”. Yum cha refers to the older tradition from teahouses established along the roadside for travelers on the ancient Silk Road needing a place to rest and have refreshment. Dim sum originated with the Cantonese in southern China. In Hong Kong and in cities and towns in the Guangdong province, restaurants offer dim sum as a tradition for the elderly to gather to eat early after morning exercises. It has also become a custom for a family weekend gathering. Business transactions over dim sum are also not uncommon. Dim sum items are small, often 3-4 pieces in one dish. Food is shared by diners at the table, family-style. Because of the small portions, people can try a variety of selections. Dim sum items can be savory or sweet. Customary offerings include assorted types of steamed dumplings, baked or steamed buns, meat items (chicken feet, meatballs, spare ribs), sticky rice (presented steamed in a lotus leaf), rolls (braised tofu skin rolls, steamed rice noodles rolls, or fried spring rolls), savory cakes (turnip cake or taro cake) and congee (rice porridge) with Chinese donut (a fried bread). Dessert items typically include egg (custard) tarts, mango pudding, and sesame balls (a deep fried light rice flour ball stuffed with sweet bean puree). Flower teas (chrysanthemum or jasmine) are commonly served, though a variety of other teas may be available such as green tea, oolong tea, or Pu-erh tea (fermented with a more earthy flavor). It is customary to pour tea for others during dim sum before filling one’s own cup. A custom unique to the Cantonese is to thank the person pouring the tea by tapping fingers on the table, symbolizing ‘bowing’ to them. The origin of this gesture dates back to the Qing dynasty when the Qianlong emperor traveled incognito with companions. While at yum cha, the emperor poured his companion some tea, which was a great honor. The companion, not wanting to give away the emperor’s identity in public by bowing, instead tapped three fingers on the table, one representing the bowed head and the other two the prostrate arms as a sign of appreciation. In addition, leaving the lid balanced on the side of the teapot is a common way of attracting a server’s attention and indicates a request for more hot water in the teapot. Pricing of the dishes varies, but usually the dishes are classified as “small”, “medium”, “large” or “special” and charged accordingly. The orders are recorded, stamped or written onto a bill that remains on the table. The total price is then calculated at the end of the meal. While you are in San Francisco, here are a few recommended restaurants near-by for dim sum: YANK SING 101 Spear St (between Mission St & Howard St) San Francisco, CA 94105 Neighborhood: Financial District (415) 957-9300

Hours: Mon – Fri 11 am – 3 pm Sat – Sun 10 am – 4 pm

YANK SING 49 Stevenson St (at Ecker Pl) San Francisco, CA 94105 Neighborhood: Financial District (415) 541-4949 http://www.yanksing.com This website includes menu items with links to beautiful photographs and detailed descriptions of the various categories of items served. Yank Sing is pricier than average but has been highly recommended by the SF Chronicle in 2011, the Michelin Guide 2012, and the Zagat Survey 2012. Yank Sing also received the James Beard Award in 2009.

61


CITY VIEW RESTAURANT 662 Commercial St (between Kearny St & Montgomery St) San Francisco, CA 94111 Neighborhood: Financial District (415) 398-2838 Hours:

Mon - Fri 11 am - 2:30 pm Sat - Sun 10 am - 2:30 pm

NEW ASIA CHINESE RESTAURANT 772 Pacific Ave (at Stockton St) San Francisco, CA 94133 Neighborhood: Chinatown (415) 391-6666 Hours: Mon - Fri 10 am - 3 pm Sat - Sun 10 am - 4 pm

DIM SUM AROUND THE SOUND The Washington chapter ACP Women in Medicine interest group began Dim Sum Around the Sound in October 2011 as a format for ongoing informal opportunities to promote networking and mentoring. Dim sum gatherings do not require an up front cost or commitment. One or two large round tables are easily available at the designated restaurant on Saturday morning when the restaurant opens before peak weekend time when more customers typically dine. RSVPs are requested (but not required) from electronic announcements in order to help coordinate restaurant accomodations. In the Puget Sound area, the cost is reasonable. The no-host meal is approximately $10 for brunch, including tax and tip. We arbitrarily picked the first Saturday every other month on even numbered months for some predictability of planning. Attendees have enjoyed a delicious light meal which comes with the sense of camaraderie, making new connections over conversation. Primary care physicians, hospitalists, subspecialists, residents and medical students have attended. Most often recent experiences are spontaneously recounted and advice shared amoung the group, particularly with physicians in training and early career physician colleagues. Topics of discussion vary accoridng to the interests of attendees and have included the challenges of EMR, processes of reimbursement for primary care work that is done outside of billable office visits, counseling patients, and even how endoscopes are made to fit the hands of male but not female operators. The WIM organizing committee thought the first year cycle in 2011-2012 went well, fulfilling the goal of reaching out with different urban and suburban locales for these informal conversational gatherings, so we have continued on this year. These brunches have been an efficient way to schedule our scarce “free time� for peer socialization in a pleasant setting that can offer support, energize and re-invigorate us. The medical students liked the idea so much that our chapter hosted separate dim sum mentoring brunches for male and female medical students where we described our career paths and work and helped to answer questions related to training experiences and future career choices.

Kemi Nakabayashi, MD, FACP WA chapter ACP membership chair kemin@pacmed.org

62


Diversity and Inclusion  Chapter Action Plan Chapter Action Plan

63


Ten Step Plan for Chapter Diversity Goal: Identify the recruitment, involvement, and participation of women, minority physicians, and international medical graduates as a primary goal for your chapter. 1. Develop a formalized, long term integrated approach to developing inclusion including strategic plan and chapter priorities. Establish goals and objectives could involve building consensus around what diversity means to the council/committee and, its benefits and challenges; Identify strategic recruitment partnerships and tactics to develop diverse pipeline of board candidates; Interview exiting board members for insights on board culture and experience 2. Appoint a Diversity Committee, or other committee(s) with a diversity-related function (e.g. Women in Medicine Committee), to design and develop programs and initiatives. 3. Charge all local committees to incorporate diversity into their plans and activities and to maintain liaison with both the local and national Membership Committees for guidance and direction. Attend, or send a representative to, the diversity events held at the annual Internal Medicine meeting. 4. Diversify your councils and committees. Consider gender, age, ethnicity, skills set, and perspective. Is your council relevant (i.e. does it meet the needs of your members)? Does it brings different perspectives to decision making and represents different points of view? Is it more likely to attract diverse volunteers because of its composition? 5. Encourage women, minority physicians, and IMGs to run for the position of Governor when applicable. 6. Establish relationships with local medical organizations that serve as links with women, minority physicians, and IMGs (e.g., American Medical Women's Association, National Medical Association, American College of International Physicians, National Hispanic Medical Association). 7. In chapters with a high concentration of IMGs, consider supporting acculturation programs in conjunction with residency programs, to help IMG residents deal with cultural differences. 8. Establish mentorship programs, matching mentors with nonmembers to introduce them to College activities and programs, matching mentor Fellows with Members to assist them through the process of advancing to Fellowship, or matching members with medical students, residents, and fellows. Encourage use of ACP’s mentoring database. 9. Sponsor special events, such as educational programs dealing with diverse patient population issues, breakfasts, luncheons, receptions, etc., to provide a forum for women, minority physicians, and IMGs to identify their needs and encourage them to contribute their views. 10. Incorporate women, minority physicians, and IMGs into chapter/regional meetings in the following ways: Offer a panel discussion or course at the chapter meeting about topics of interest to these groups like work-life balance, health care disparities, or VISA issues Host special networking sessions (breakfasts, luncheons, receptions, etc.) Provide child care Ask faculty from diverse groups to be part of the scientific program

64


Please be sure to communicate activities in the Governor's newsletter or on the Chapter Web site, and submit activities towards a John Tooker Evergreen Award. Review the compendium of diversity vignettes from the John Tooker Evergreen Awards program (http://www.acponline.org/governors/management/diversityvignettes.pdf) to see how ACP chapters have met the diversity challenge.

65


Sample Chapter Action Plan: Diversity and Inclusion Chapter Action Plan Begin to map out with your chapter leaders a specific action plan to address diversity and inclusion within your chapter. Use this sample action plan as a starting point to integrate into your existing core goals and mission. Before starting this process, identify your underrepresented groups that will serve as the focus for your plan. Key Focus Build Consensus

Objective Work with your Governor’s Advisory Council to build consensus and uniformity around what diversity means to your chapter, its benefits and challenges.

Recommended Action Steps - Develop a chapter diversity and inclusion statement. -Review chapter infrastructure to increase cultural competency around volunteer leaders, increasing tactics to develop diverse pipeline of future leaders, and incorporate into new leader orientations

Integration

Align your chapter’s newly developed diversity policy with chapter’s strategic focus and integrate diversity into functional areas and member segments

Membership

Establish pathways for greater involvement of various generational and cultural backgrounds

Long-Term Relevance

Reinvestigate and review longterm plans for involvement that resonate with more diverse pools of members that can continue to provide a richer mix of ideas, perspectives, and life experiences to expand our thinking and possibilities

- Assist chapter leaders and key groups in chapter operations (i.e. serving on committees, developing chapter policies) to incorporate the policy into every day practices and goals. -Identify opportunities to integrate strategies into chapter practices such as speaker recommendations. -Expand outreach, visibility, and contribution opportunities for underrepresented groups in ACP’s membership - Conduct demographic analysis of membership segmentation to identify and prioritize where chapter needs to focus efforts -Continue to ask members to communicate their needs. -Continue to conduct demographic analysis of chapter membership to identify and prioritize where the chapter needs to focus recruitment and retention efforts.

66

Milestones 2014 - Work with GAC to define what diversity means. -Work with GAC and Committee Chairs to discuss and finalize a chapter diversity and inclusion policy. -Review chapter operations and activities to be more inclusion of new policy. -Communicate new policy and post on chapter web site and integrate into communications. -Work with GAC and Committee Chairs to in integrate diversity into chapter operations and activities. -Develop metrics to assess outcomes for each area.

-Form Diversity Committee and define specific strategies for recruitment. -Launch pilot project to expand council diversity leadership program focusing on two targeted groups. -Send chapter membership needs assessment survey asking specific demographic questions followed by needs assessment on chapter leadership and activities. -Measure and reassess metrics and outcomes from each area.


Key Steps to building and measuring success   Key Steps to building and measuring success-what items will your chapter track as part of its initiative Because chapters typically only meet quarterly with their Governor’s Advisory Council, it’s easy to become complacent. So how does the chapter stay focused without being sidetracked by the new tasks or priorities? One way to avoid getting sidetracked is to create an action plan, dashboard, or logic model to keep everyone focused and accountable. Whichever mechanism you select, key components typically include: Clear Goals — Without goals and stated expectations, the chapter lacks direction and council and staff will function in continuous misalignment. It is impossible to be accountable without being able to compare objectives with achievements. Accountability assumes a solid link between knowing what to aim for and reaching an agreed upon target. Activities/Action Steps — Articulate how you will meet your goals and objectives and the specific tactics that will be employed. Resources — Commitment to any program or initiative requires a commensurate commitment of resources, which may be human, financial, organizational, or membership resources. Lead Party — Identify who has primary responsibility for each action item to help ensure accountability. Timeline/Completion Date — Most plans include a range of activities — some short-term (1-3 years) and others long-term (4-6 years or longer). Monitoring — Continuous monitoring and acceptance of feedback are critical for improvement and accountability. Communication — Openly sharing progress, results, and accomplishments helps sustain commitment and is the strongest incentive for organizational accountability. 

DISCUSSION POINTS What are the items your council will track as part of its diversity and inclusion initiative? • Leadership commitment • Membership demographics • Council/Committee demographics • Diversity and inclusion learning and development opportunities • Financial impact • Program impact • Partnerships relationships

67


Sample Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan with Key Metrics and Accountability D&I Objective Work with your Governor’s Advisory Council to build consensus and uniformity around what diversity means to your chapter, its benefits and challenges.

Action Plans - Work with GAC to define what diversity means.

-Review chapter infrastructure to increase cultural competency around volunteer leaders, increasing tactics to develop diverse pipeline of future leaders, and incorporate into new leader orientations

Performance Measures - Develop a chapter diversity and inclusion statement. - Finalize a chapter diversity and inclusion policy.

Accountability

Timeframe

-Governor, GAC and Committee Chairs

Fall 2013

Spring 2014

-Amend chapter operations and activities to be more inclusion of new policy. -Communicate new policy and post on chapter web site and integrate into communications.

68

Status


GOVERNOR’S ADVISORY COUNCIL SELF-ASSESSMENT TOOL Council effectiveness stems from informed discussion and commitment to addressing priorities. This self assessment tool is meant to create an educated starting point for discussion among the leadership of ACP Chapters. Governors should use their best judgment to rate their Council provided they are informed about the Council structure and specific members on the Council. This task may require additional investigation by consulting with your Council and/or Chapter Staff, analyzing your Chapter Bylaws, and reviewing your Chapter Profile in comparison to your membership to ensure diversity. Ultimately, this tool provides a general indication of a Council’s performance in order to identify potential areas for improvement. We encourage you to adapt this tool to meet your governance needs and we appreciate any feedback on how to improve its usefulness. The tool findings are intended to focus discussion among Council members around the governance activities that will result in the greatest benefit for the chapter.

SECTION 1: PERFORMANCE OF COUNCIL ON ITS CORE RESPONSIBILITIES Shape mission and strategic direction Clarify mission and vision Participate in and approve strategic and policy decisions Build reputation Chapter’s Mission Council members know the mission and vision of our Chapter and can communicate it to others Council policy decisions and the chapter’s programs and services reflect the mission Public Relations and Advocacy Council members participate in volunteer recruitment for the chapter Council members are effective advocates for our members Council members build relationships with local legislators Council Relationships Council members are passionate and unguarded in their discussion of issues Council members know what their peers are working on and how they contribute to the collective well-being of the team Council meetings are compelling, not boring During Council meetings, the most important and most difficult issues are put on the table to be resolved Council members end discussions with clear, specific resolutions and calls to action Fiscal Oversight and Risk Management Council members understand the basic responsibilities and operation of a nonprofit chapter The Council thoroughly discusses the annual operating budget before approving it The Council takes advantage of the budget process to consider the most effective allocation of resources The Council receives financial reports on a regular basis that are understandable, accurate, and timely The Council ensures legal compliance with state, federal and local regulations The Council has at least the minimum number of members as required by their bylaws The Council regularly reviews the bylaws The bylaws conform to state statute and have been reviewed by legal counsel The Chapter has a clear policy on the responsibilities of members in fundraising 69

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes Yes Yes

No No No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No


SECTION 2: PERCEIVED IMPORTANCE OF RESPONSIBILITIES IN FUTURE Engage in Strategic Thinking and Planning One of the major contributions that a Council can make is to establish the chapter’s direction and major goals. Reviewing the direction and goals every three to five years allows the chapter to adapt to these changes.

The Council regularly assesses its own work The Council has a vision of the Chapter’s future over the next three to five years The Council engages in a strategic thinking and planning process that helps it consider how the chapter should meet new opportunities and challenges The Council has considered conducting an annual planning/leadership retreat, and has resources in the budget to support this The Council ensures that the chapter’s programs and strategic goals are aligned The Council has key indicators for tracking progress toward the chapter’s strategic goals The Council is knowledgeable about the chapter’s current programs and services The Council knows the strengths and weaknesses of the chapter The Council periodically considers adopting new programs, and modifying or discontinuing current programs

Yes Yes Yes

No No No

Yes

No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No

SECTION 3: QUALITY OF COUNCIL EFFECTIVENESS ENABLERS Size and Structure

Composition

Leadership

Processes

Council Selection and Orientation: Carefully Select and Orient New Council Members and Leaders A good Council is made up of individuals who can contribute critically needed skills, experience, perspective, wisdom, time, and other resources to the chapter. Because no one person can provide all of these qualities and because the needs of a chapter continually change, a Council should have a well-conceived plan to identify and recruit the most appropriate people to serve on the Council. Once new members are selected, a Council should orient new members to their responsibilities and to the activities of the chapter. A system should be in place to rotate Council members off the Council to ensure that it is infused with new ideas without making the Council so large that it becomes unwieldy.

Size and Structure Does your Governor’s Advisory Council reflect the diversity of your membership? Use your Chapter Profile to determine if your Governor’s Advisory Council reflects the diversity of your membership. Yes No Age Ethnicity Yes No Gender Yes No Training Yes No Composition The size of the Council is appropriate for effective governance The Council includes a balance of various membership categories Does your council include positions for : - Treasurer - Chairs of each of your Committees - Young Physician - Associate and/or Chief Resident - Medical Student If bylaws permit, the Chapter includes an open call for interested members to get involved in the chapter by joining the council

70

Yes Yes

No No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No

Yes

No


Leadership and Process The Council cultivates and recruits candidates who possess the qualities needed to strengthen Council composition The Council’s nominating process ensures that Council composition reflects the diversity needed by the chapter The Council has established bylaws for length of Council service and rotation of Council members to ensure the necessary leadership, energy, and resources The Council provides new Council members with comprehensive training and orientation to Council responsibilities and to the chapter’s activities and finances The Council has a list of responsibilities and expectations so that Council Members are informed of their appropriate role

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Council Operations Councils carry out much of their work in meetings. To make Governor’s Advisory Council meetings productive, Council members typically receive and review agendas and background materials prior to the meetings. Effective Councils focus on important issues and allow for discussion that leads to action. Since Councils are required to operate in accordance with their bylaws and other major chapter policies, Council members need to know what those important documents say. From time to time bylaws must be reviewed and if necessary, revised.

The focus of Council work is on strategic issues rather than short-term administrative matters The Chapter has a list of responsibilities and expectations so that Council Members are informed of their appropriate role Council members have adequate opportunities to discuss issues and ask questions The frequency of Council meetings is appropriate for the Council’s responsibilities to be accomplished The Council has an annual calendar of meeting and an attendance policy such that a quorum of the chapter's Council meets regularly in accordance with the Chapter’s bylaws The Executive Director works with the Governor and other Council members to determine items for the agenda Most Council members are actively engaged Committee assignments reflect the interests, experience, and skills of the Council members Each committee has a stated purpose and an annual plan of work Committee assignments offer adequate opportunities for leadership development Council members are familiar with the bylaws The Council has a process for handling urgent matters between meetings A written job description clearly spells out the responsibilities of the Executive Director The Council respects the responsibilities distinct to the Executive Director The Governor and Council assess the Executive Director in a systematic and fair way on a regular basis The Chapter orients new Council Members The Chapter uses Council Members to lead new chapter programs The Chapter holds retreats and encourages members to share ideas The Chapter acknowledges and publically appreciates the Council Members The Chapter encourages Council Members to participate in the College’s LEAD Program

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes Yes

No No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes Yes

No No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No No No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No

EVALUATION TIPS • Work with your Governor, Executive Director, and Leadership to evaluate your Governor’s Advisory Council • Carefully review your Chapter Bylaws to ensure your Governor’s Advisory Council is in compliance • Examine how the council and Executive Director work as a team • If you don’t already, survey Council Members for interests and areas of expertise. Match these with specific chapter committees, goals, and activities • Engage the council in assessing its own performance by providing them with the Chapter Profile • Identify ways in which to improve communication and workflow 71


RECOMMENDED READING on related topics Diversity & Inclusion Resources The following resource links serve only as a starting point. Numerous other resources are available. The Board Building Cycle: Nine Steps to Finding, Recruiting, and Engaging Nonprofit Board Members, Second Edition, by Berit M. Lakey. BoardSource, 2007 Culture of Inquiry: Healthy Debate in the Boardroom by Nancy R. Axelrod. BoardSource, 2007. The Nonprofit Board Answer Book: A Practical Guide for Board Members and Chief Executives, Second Edition, by BoardSource. BoardSource and Jossey-Bass, 2007. Recruiting a Stronger Board: A BoardSource Toolkit by BoardSource. BoardSource 2009. Getting on Board with Effective Orientation: A BoardSource Toolkit by BoardSource. BoardSource, 2009. Generations at Work: Managing the Clash of Veterans, Boomers, Xers, and Nexters in Your Workplace by Ron Zemke, Claire Raines, and Bob Filipczak. AMACOM, 1999. Generations: The Challenge of a Lifetime for Your Nonprofit by Peter Brinckerhoff. Fieldstone Alliance, 2007. American Express NGen Fellows Project Final Report. Independent Sector, 2010. Millennials: A Portrait of Generation Next. Pew Research Center, 2010.

73


Sampling of organizations conducting diversity-related research, offering data related to diversity, or building capacity for research on diversity. DiversityInc. www.diversityinc.com Society for Human Resource Management www.shrm.org The Conference Board www.conference-board.org Bureau of Labor Statistics www.bls.gov US Census Bureau www.census.gov US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission www.eeoc.gov Human Resource Planning Society www.hrps.org American Association of Retired Persons www.aarp.org American Association of People with Disabilities www.aapd-dc.org National Urban League www.nul.org Catalyst http://catalystwomen.org Sampling of websites related to diversity. Blue Avocado http://www.blueavocado.org/ Blue Avocado is a provocative nonprofit online magazine for community nonprofits which has included various posts on diversity. Diversity in Philanthropy Bibliography by the Foundation Center http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/topical/diversity_in_phil.pdf Available from the Foundation Center, the bibliography includes some information Foundation Diversity: Policy & Practices Toolkit http://www.calendow.org/Article.aspx?id=3966 A toolkit available through The California Endowment. Fresh Faces on Board: More students participate in nonprofit-leadership programs http://philanthropy.com/premium/articles/v20/i17/17003501.htm by Eman Quotah, Chronicle of Philanthropy, June 12 2008. This article discusses an increase in the number of board fellowship programs at MBA schools around the country and the value for both the sector and the students. (NOTE: registration is required to view this article.)

74


Perspectives From the Pipeline http://www.rosettathurman.com/ A blog by Rosetta Thurman offering perspectives on the sector from the next generation. Ready to Lead: Next Generation Leaders Speak Out http://www.meyerfoundation.org/downloads/ready_to_lead/ReadytoLead2008.pdf – A National Study Produced in Partnership by CompassPoint Nonprofit Services, The Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Meyer Foundation and Idealist.org. This report contains guidance to next generation leaders about the importance of board service and contains advice for boards of directors to help them facilitate generational diversity at the board and senior leadership levels.

75



Chapter Diversity- Generating Change