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Year Two Closing Report Executive Summary In two years, ACMHI initiatives reached nearly 140,000 students. More than 20,000 of those students are actively involved in promoting mental, physical and financial wellness on their campus. This includes:  Awareness, stigma & stress reduction campaigns  Free workshops, classroom presentations & guest speakers  Online resources & tools for distance students  Peer training, counseling & support initiatives  Formation of mental health committees, community & campus partnerships To evaluate the efficacy of student efforts, SAs used campus-wide surveys and direct student feedback throughout the year. A survey (2014) released by ACMHI provides additional information on Alberta’s post-secondary mental health landscape. A summary of ACMHI initiatives and outcomes of the 2014-15 year is provided below. Executive Summary: Provincial Overview of ACMHI Initiatives and Outcomes ACMHI Initiatives

Totals

Awareness & Stigma Reduction Campaigns

Peer Supports

Online Resources

Stress Reduction

On Campus Surveys

Guest Speakers

Classes/ Workshops

Classroom Presentations

Year 2

100

36

35

187

42

65

126

142

Years 1 &2

161

38

53

260

56

86

197

166

ACMHI Outcomes

Totals

Active Student Involvement

Research Participants

Year 2

20,374

1,908

10,793

217

16

Years 1 &2

36,916

3,158

13,214

n/a

50

Online Visitors

MH Supporters

New Services

Community / Campus Connections

Promotional Materials

Total Reach of Students

165

29,683

76,304

268

32,480

136,485

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI: Defining the Gap Mental health support at post-secondary campuses plays a critical role in supporting empowered and informed students. However, high turn-away rates for on-campus counseling services, increased distress calls and suicide attempts, and higher dropout rates due to stress and mental illness have become increasingly common at post-secondary campuses. ACMH-NCHA (2013) and ACMHI (2014) found that:    

About 70% of students faced significant stress frequently. Almost 60% of students were overwhelmed with their workload. More than 50% of students felt things were hopeless. 3 in 10 students felt too depressed to function.

The growing demand is an ongoing challenge for students, while post-secondary institutions (PSIs) struggle to meet the basic demands for mental health services on campus. Many students require some form of mental health support, yet almost 60% of students rarely receive help with mental health when they need it. Additionally, 32% of students admit they have unhealthy methods of coping with stress. Even when students prioritize a concern with their mental health and sought help, more than 40% of students are unaware or unsure of how to access mental health services on their own campus. Table 1, below, provides a summary of mental health services available on our 14 member campuses before the launch of ACMHI. Where only services were limited amount of services, coupled with the lengthy wait-times associated with mental health services currently available on campuses. These concerning limitations contribute to the evident challenges in post-secondary student mental health in Alberta.

Figure 1: ACMHI Initiatives in Alberta Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Mental Health Professionals (Psychologist & Counsellor)

Crisis Interventions

34.8

13

Assessments/ Consults on campus

Mental Health/ Life Skills Programming

6

15

Wait Time for Mental Health Services

Mental Health Awareness Campaigns

New Services (since ACMHI)

yes

0

50

Table 1: A Summary of Baseline Mental Health Services at Postsecondary Institutions Prior to ACMHI

ACMHI: From Year 1 to Year 2 Since its inception in 2013 – through support from Alberta Health to the Alberta Students’ Executive Council (ASEC) – the Alberta Campus Mental Health Innovation (ACMHI) fund gives students’ associations the opportunity to make mental health a priority on campuses across Alberta. With thanks to ACMHI funds, PSIs are rapidly transforming into stigma-free, inclusive environments that produce mentally and physically healthy, resilient and flourishing students. Using the information presented above, students’ associations have put great emphasis on, and made considerable progress in, implementing initiatives that a) combat stress and stigma; b) encourage mental, physical and financial well-being; and c) act as a supplement to services already available on campuses. The success and impact of ACMHI-funded programs and events is rooted in initiatives that are created by students, for students. Students devise methods to address the mental health needs on their campus by drawing upon their own experiences – not only as post-secondary students in general, but as students that understand their campus community. One student from the Alberta College of Art and Design wrote, “It’s great that we have these resources on campus that can be tailored to ACAD specifically, since we are such a specialized college and the stressors we face may be different than other students’ at other schools.” It is crucial that mental health initiatives reflect the unique demographics of their PSI. With ACMHI funds, students are able to do just that. In this report, we capture all of the ACMHI initiatives and divide them by geographic regions to highlight activities and initiatives available in the northern, central, and southern regions. See Figure 1 for the provincial distribution of SAs involved with ACMHI (see Appendix A for students’ association acronym breakdown). Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI Funds In the past year, a total of $502,872 has been distributed to students across the province. Through Figure 2: Uni-Tea, Lethbridge College Students’ Association ACMHI, students have received a minimum of $20,000 to a maximum of $40,000 in Year 2. A breakdown of funds, regionally and by SA, is summarized in Tables 2 & 3 below. All ACMHI funding decisions are made by the ACMHI Approval Panel, comprised of mental health experts from across Alberta. They are a committee of independent and impartial adjudicators that consists of researchers, faculty and community partners with ranging areas of expertise. Appendix B lists the Approval Panel members for the 2014/2015 funding year.

Students' Associations (SA) SAKC SAGPRC SAMRU SANQC CSA KUSA NAITSA SARDC SAOC SABVC SAITSA ACADSA SAMHC LCSA Total

Amount of Funds $40,000 $40,000 $20,000 $40,000 $35,800 $40,000 $39,278 $40,000 $20,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $27,794 $502,872

Table 3: Regional Summary of ACMHI Funds

Regional Summary of ACMHI Funds Region

Amount of Funds

North

$80,000

Central

$215,078

South

$207,794

Total

$502,872

Table 2: ACMHI Funds Distributed to SAs in Year 2 Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI Initiatives Though each SA led mental health initiatives specific to the needs identified as a priority on their campus, many SAs drew upon their own experiences as post-secondary students. As such, there was overlap between the initiatives implemented on campuses across Alberta. A majority of SAs focused their efforts on reducing stigma and stress, and raising awareness about various issues related to mental health through campus-wide campaigns. Many SAs also offered informative and engaging classes, workshops and support groups on promoting mental, physical and financial well-being through direct interactions with the student body. Overall, SAs approached mental health by tackling issues that relate to their students’ needs and are important on their campus. See Tables 4 to 6 for a regional breakdown of ACMHI initiatives. Table 4: Regional Overview of Campaigns

Table 5: Regional Overview of Stress Reduction Events

Awareness and Stigma Campaigns Region

Amount

Stress Reduction Region

Amount

North

14

North

8

Central

43

Central

68

South Total

43 100

South Total

111 187

Table 6: Regional Overview of Classes & Workshops

Classes/Workshops Region

Amount

North

13

Central

45

South Total

58 116

One hundred (100) awareness and anti-stigma campaigns were held, with topics ranging from sexual health, to anti-bullying and suicide prevention. Of the latter, a student from NorQuest College wrote, “I really support what you guys are doing for us! It’s great for students with children to have knowledge about Pink Shirt Day and anti-bullying.” These events normalized the language of mental health and illness on campus, and brought the discussion to students and campuses with their peers leading the way. Anti-stigma and general awareness campaigns gave students a chance to assess the state of their own mental and physical health, and offer relevant information on available campus resources.

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI Initiatives: Awareness, Stigma, & Stress The majority of the SAs offered stress reduction events as a way to help students manage the growing pressures and demands of attending a PSI, particularly

SAs

during exam season. Across the province, students enjoyed one hundred and eighty-seven (187) events geared towards stress reduction, relaxation and meditation, and exposed students to a variety of healthy ways to cope with stress (See Table 7). Yoga, craft days, ball pits and puppy therapy were just a few ways students took brief breaks to unwind their minds, and alleviate some of the pressure from the demands they face. Five-minute massages – held on monthly Wellness Wednesdays at NAIT – quickly became popular as they were not only effective in

SAKC SAGPRC KUSA SANQC CSA SAMRU NAITSA SARDC SAOC SABVC SAITSA ACADSA SAMHC LCSA Totals

Table 7: Awareness, Stigma & Stress Reduction Campaigns Awareness and Stigma Reduction Campaigns

Stress Reduction

2 12 4 11 7 4 4 13 1 8 7 n/a 13 14 100

3 5 20 13 9 4 11 11 n/a n/a 95 3 11 2 187

reducing stress, but did not take up too much of the students’ time during the peak of exam season. One student remarked, “I pulled my back muscles and they have gotten worse with a heavy backpack and stress. This really helped!” Another, “[I] love having this every month. It’s definitely a great thing to have, and it makes stress and tension in my life a lot better.”

Figure 3: Puppy Therapy, Keyano College

Figure 4: 5-Minute Massages, NAIT

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI Initiatives: Speakers, Presentations, & Workshops An overwhelming number of Canadian post-secondary students cite financial burden as a stressor which inevitably contributes to a decline in their mental health. In an effort to further reduce stress, many SAs also held classes and workshops on budgeting and finance management. Numerous stress and time management seminars were also offered, where students developed planning and organizational skills, as well as simple and effective ways to cope with stress – both at home and on-campus. See Table 8. Nearly all the SAs invited guest speakers to give presentations on their own experiences with mental illness, and discussions on the

SAs

importance of mental health. Guest speakers

Guest Classroom Classes/ Speakers Presentations Workshops

consisted not only of notable speakers – such as Kendra Fisher, Olympic Team

SAKC

n/a

n/a

3

Canada hockey goalie and a mental health

SAGPRC

2

79

10

advocate – but also included mental health

KUSA

3

n/a

25

professionals and members of the faculty

SANQC

46

23

22

CSA

1

2

3

SAMRU

1

n/a

n/a

NAITSA

n/a

n/a

n/a

SARDC

1

20

5

n/a

n/a

13

SABVC

4

n/a

n/a

SAITSA

1

n/a

29

ACADSA

6

8

12

SAMHC

n/a

2

4

LCSA

n/a

8

n/a

Totals

65

142

126

and community. These presentations provided students with interactive and, indepth information surrounding mental health. More importantly, the presentations approached these issues from various viewpoints to give students a well-rounded perspective.

SAOC

Table 8: Classes, Workshops & Guest Speakers on Mental Health

Figure 5: Mental Health Expo, Norquest College

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI Initiatives: Peer Support The number of peer support initiatives have dramatically increased since the first year of ACMHI. SAs not only focused on peer support events – where students are given the opportunity to meet others with similar concerns – but on peer counselling initiatives. Many students volunteered to undergo training and become peer counsellors, as many colleges have limited amounts of counselling time available, especially during peak exam times. Peer counselling initiatives then: a) act as a supplement to the traditional counselling services available on campus, b) ultimately reduce lengthy waittimes, and c) reduce the discomfort and stigma that students often cite

SAs SAGPRC SAMHC SANQC CSA SAMRU SAITSA LCSA KUSA SARDC Totals

Students Students Trained Accessed 55 142 28 35 29 208 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 112 385

Planned or Implemented Implemented Implemented Implemented Planned n/a n/a n/a Planned Planned

Events Attendance n/a n/a n/a n/a 8 70 2 n/a 1 150 20 200 2 613 n/a n/a n/a n/a 33 1033

Table 9: Summary of Peer Supports & Counselling

when seeking the help of a mental health professional. One hundred and twelve (112) peer supporters were trained to help and support their peers in times of distress. So far, three hundred eighty-five (385) students were able to receive support and build resiliency, while meeting with someone who can understand the many challenges of being a post-secondary student. With regards to SAGPRC’s Peer Counselling program, one student wrote, “I wanted to talk to someone because I was overwhelmed with my finance issues and stress from school, work and my family. After I

Figure 6: Mental Health First Aid Training, Alberta College of Art & Design

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


talked to the Peer Counsellor I decided that I would go and exercise that day and eat healthier, and make more time for myself without feeling it was selfish. I was thankful for the person helping me and was very relieved.” See Table 9 for more information on ACMHI peer support initiatives.

ACMHI Initiatives: Promotions SAs also made use of promotional materials and online tools to accommodate the diversity in student demographic and to ensure that all students, including distant and rural learners, have access to mental health supports. Table 10 provides more information. These online resources include community resources and information, e-magazines centered on promoting student health, and assessment tools with specialized recommendations SAs

Promotional Materials

Online Resources/Tools

Online Visitors

and relevant information about on-campus and community services. Online tools have

SAKC SAGPRC KUSA SANQC CSA SAMRU NAITSA SARDC SAOC SABVC SAITSA ACADSA SAMHC LCSA Totals

n/a 1141 n/a 2132 2 2 11920 1900 n/a 1000 10000 6 31 1549 29683

n/a 3 2 11 1 1 n/a 3 7 n/a 1 2 1 3 35

n/a n/a n/a 1794 7443 238 n/a 102 n/a n/a n/a 1100 116 n/a 10793

served over ten thousand (10,793) students across Alberta; students, whether they are on or off-campus, now have access to mental health supports, resources and services to ensure that their mental health concerns are addressed. A student, with regards to Student Health 101 - SANQC’s online magazine, said, “I believe it gave me the tools to combat stress at home, and how to use it against anxiety.”

Table 10: Online Mental Health Supports and Promotional Materials

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI: Working Towards Sustainability

Table 11: Mental Health Committees

SAs are working towards sustaining their efforts to continue emphasizing the importance of post-secondary mental health services in Alberta. Students want to ensure that this remains a priority on campuses. A significant area of improvement, compared with ACMHI’s first year, is the creation of nine (9) mental health committees. With a total of 130 members, mental health committees oversee and maintain already-implemented initiatives (see Table 11). Furthermore, one hundred sixty-five (165) community and campus connections are now established, with approximately two hundred (217) regular mental

Mental Health Committees # of SAs Members SAKC 43 KUSA 3 SARDC 21 CSA 4 SABVC 3 SAITSA 8 ACADSA 10 NAITSA 70 SAMHC 11 Total 130

health supporters (see Tables 12 & 13). An outpouring of support has come not only from students, but also from campus leaders and community members. Together, communities are demonstrating that the mental health of Alberta’s post-secondary students is becoming a province-wide priority. The community and campus partnerships, as well as the creation of mental health committees, provide a more Community MH SAs & Campus Supporters Connections SAKC 14 5 SAGPRC n/a 4 KUSA n/a 3 SANQC 63 42 CSA 5 5 SAMRU 20 3 NAITSA 10 5 SARDC 10 16 SAOC n/a 1 SABVC 3 n/a SAITSA 3 30 ACADSA 26 20 SAMHC 42 21 LCSA 21 10 Totals 217 165 Table 12: Campus and Community Supporters & Connections

sustainable foundation for future mental health initiatives undertaken by students’ associations.

Community & Campus Connections Region

# of Connections

North

9

Central

74

South

82

Total

165 Table 13: Community & Campus Connections Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI Initiatives: Research Nine (9) SAs also undertook research to better understand the needs of their campus and to inform the success of their initiatives (Tables 14 & 15). Working in partnership with counselling services, faculty or specific departments, such as social work on-campus courses looking to educate and involve students, , SAs have introduced many research studies that will likely be replicated in the future, in order to continue to analyze long-term changes for mental health demands and services, and ensure sustainability. Much of Figure 7: Career Fair, King’s University College of Edmonton the valuable data and analysis from campus research studies complement existing information, such as the findings from the ACMH-NCHA and ACMHI surveys. Almost two thousand (1908) respondents participated in on-campus research conducted in the past year, with a total of over three thousand (3158) respondents in the past two years.

ACMHI Evaluation & Metrics Many students’ associations measured success through qualitative means, basing success on the positive comments from students, partners, and stakeholders. See Appendix E for a sample of direct student feedback received.

SAs SAGPRC KUSA SANQC CSA SAMRU SARDC SAITSA ACADSA SAMHC Totals

OnResearch Campus Participants Surveys 4 n/a 2 n/a 25 1616 1 n/a 2 n/a 2 250 2 5 2 12 2 25 42 1908

Research Participants Region North Central

Amount 0 1866

South

42

Total

1908

Table 15: Regional Overview of Research Participants

Table 14: On-campus Research & Respondents Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


ACMHI Evaluation Over twenty thousand (20,374) students have actively participated in ACMHI events and programs throughout the province. Though not all students have participated in events, many have been exposed to promotional materials, emails with mental health information, social media, online supports and more. A modest estimate of nearly eighty thousand (76,304) have been exposed to ACMHI information in the past year. Since ACMHI’s first year, ACMHI initiatives have reached nearly 140,000 (136,485)

Active Student Involvement

Total Reach of Students

SAKC

413

1213

1,626

SAGPRC

3826

8500

12,326

KUSA

200

650

850

SANQC

3162

8500

11,662

CSA

1004

8459

9,463

SAMRU

800

4851

5,651

NAITSA

2300

8300

10,600

SARDC

2000

5000

7,000

SAOC

880

2000

2,880

SABVC

975

7500

8,475

SAITSA

90

15000

15,090

ACADSA

800

1100

1900

SAMHC

993

1000

1,993

LCSA

2931

4231

7,162

Totals

20,374

76,304

96,678

SAs

Total Student Population

students across Alberta. Tables 16 to 18 provide more information. Active Student Involvement Region

# of Students

North

4239

Central

9466

South

6669

Total

20374

Table 16: Regional Summary of Student Participation

Total # of Students ACMHI Reached Region

# of Students

North

9713

Central

35760

South 30831 Total 76304 Table 17: Total Students Reached

Table 18: Summary of ACMHI Student Involvement & Reach

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Lessons Learned, Successes, & the Future A unique benefit of ACMHI is that students learn throughout the implementation of projects. Major learning’s occurred for each SA, with three major themes emerging: Figure 8: Mental Health Expo, Norquest College 1) Timing of events on campus are critical for impact – 

Not hosting too many events in succession

Having shorter events offered at various times

Aligning events with the student cycle – peak stress times and key awareness campaigns

2) Pure Education Versus Fun – A balance is required to interest students, while offering helpful information. 3) Communication – More regular communication is needed to be Between teams, with student body, and via social media and event promotion Over two years of running ACMHI initiatives, campuses and students experienced much success. An outpouring of support came, not only from students, but also from campus leaders and community members, demonstrating that the mental health of Alberta’s post-secondary students is gradually becoming a province-wide priority. Major success and advancement of mental health support emerged on all campuses. These themes included: 

Campus-wide buy-in from partners & students

Trained student champions

Evaluative feedback to help continually adapt initiatives, ensuring needs is being met

Sustainable projects, with some initiatives becoming annual and ongoing

Looking to the future, Year Three of ACMHI commences in the fall of 2015. ACMHI will continue empowering students to confront mental health issues and stigma on campuses with impressive results. The challenge now is to ensure these gains are built upon in the future and that mental health support remains a priority. ACMHI is setting up for continued success in the coming third and final year.

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Appendix A Table 19: Acronyms for Students’ Associations

Students' Associations (SA)

Institution

SAKC

Keyano College

SAGPRC SAMRU SANQC CSA

Grande Prairie Regional College Mount Royal University NorQuest College Concordia University College

KUSA

King's University

NAITSA

NAIT

SARDC

Red Deer College

SAOC

Olds College

SABVC

Bow Valley College

SAITSA

SAIT

ACADSA

Alberta College for Art and Design

SAMHC LCSA

Medicine Hat College Lethbridge College

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Appendix B Table 20: Complete Summary of Mental Health Initiatives at the 14 Students’ Associations

SAs

SAKC SAGPRC KUSA SANQC CSA SAMRU NAITSA SARDC SAOC SABVC SAITSA ACADSA SAMHC LCSA Totals

Awareness and Stigma Reduction Campaigns

Online Resources/ Tools

Stress Reduction

On Campus Surveys

Guest Speakers

Classes/ Workshops

Classroom Presentations

Mental Health Committees

2 12 4 11 7 4 4 13 1 8 7 n/a 13 14

n/a 3 2 11 1 1 n/a 3 7 n/a 1 2 1 3

3 5 20 13 9 4 11 11 n/a n/a 95 3 11 2

n/a 4 2 25 1 2 n/a 2 n/a n/a 2 2 2 n/a

n/a 2 3 46 1 1 n/a 1 n/a 4 1 6 n/a n/a

3 10 25 22 3 n/a n/a 5 13 n/a 29 12 4 n/a

n/a 79 n/a 23 2 n/a n/a 20 n/a n/a n/a 8 2 8

1 n/a 1 n/a 1 n/a 1 1 n/a 1 1 1 1 n/a

100

35

187

42

65

126

142

Totals

9 115 57 151 25 12 16 56 21 13 136 34 34 27 9

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Appendix C Table 21: Complete Overview of Mental Health Evaluation Metrics at the 14 Students’ Associations

Active Student Involvement

Research Participants

Online Visitors

MH Supporters & Volunteers

New Services

Community & Campus Connections

Promotional Materials

Total Reach of Students

SAKC

413

n/a

n/a

14

n/a

5

n/a

1213

SAGPRC KUSA SANQC CSA SAMRU

3826 200 3162 1004 800

n/a n/a 1616 n/a n/a

n/a n/a 1794 7443 238

n/a n/a 63 5 20

n/a n/a 4 n/a n/a

4 3 42 5 3

1141 n/a 2132 2 2

8500 650 8500 8459 4851

NAITSA

2300

n/a

n/a

10

n/a

5

11920

8300

SARDC SAOC SABVC SAITSA ACADSA SAMHC LCSA Totals

2000 880 975 90 800 993 2931 20,374

250 n/a n/a 5 12 25 n/a 1,908

10 n/a 3 3 26 42 21 217

n/a n/a n/a 11 1 n/a n/a 16

1900 n/a 1000 10000 6 31 1549 29,683

5000 2000 7500 15000 1100 1000 4231 76,304

SAs

102 n/a n/a n/a 1100 116 n/a 10,793

16 1 n/a 30 20 21 10 165

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Appendix D: List of ACMHI Approval Panel Members for the 2014-2015 Term Keith Dobson, University of Calgary (Chair) 

Clinical Psychology, Cognitive-Behavioural Models of Psychopathology, Cognitive-behavioural Therapies, Stigma, Evidence-based Practice, Professional Issues

Sharon Matthias, Owner/Consultant Areas of interest/publications include:     

Moving from Complex Problems to Desired States. Part 1 Problem Resolution and Complex Problems Designing a Sustainable Health System and a Healthy Community Organizations Working Together in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors Innovation in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors Knowledge Mobilization and Utilization Essentials

Sheena Abar, University of Alberta 

Coordinates a team of Community Social Workers at UAlberta who are responsible for extending the spectrum of services offered to support the overall health and wellness of the campus community. Through preventative action the team engages with partners from campus and surrounding area to strengthen capacity, provide bridges to resources, and advocate for greater inclusivity. The main goal/function of the team is foster and celebrate connection and resiliency on campus. This position combines my work at two previous post-secondary institutions with my formal social work training, allowing me to work directly with individuals and groups in developing creative solutions to the issues that arise from everyday situations.

Bernadine Wojtowcz, University of Lethbridge 

Mental health, Mental illness, Crisis, Crisis intervention, Crisis management, Community mental health, Suicide, Suicide intervention, Suicide prevention, Depression, Mood disorders, Personality disorders, Psychosis, Anxiety disorders, Stigma, Mental status assessment

Ione Challborn, Canadian Mental Health Association - Edmonton Region 

Executive Director of CMHA, a registered not-for-profit, registered charity/foundation, making mental health matter in our community by promoting mental health and supporting the resilience and recovery of people affected by mental illness.

Janki Shakar, University of Calgary 

Mental Health of Employees Experiencing Mental Illness, Support Needs of Employers, Mental Health Difficulties Among Post-Secondary Students, Domestic Violence in Visible Minority Immigrant Families, Needs of Family Caregivers of People Experiencing Disability.

Anthony Joyce, University of Alberta 

Psychotherapy Research, Evaluation, and Treatment Effectiveness

Jian Li Wang, University of Calgary 

Work Place Mental Health, Stigma Against Mental Illness, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Early Identification and Prevention of Mood/Anxiety Disorders. Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Appendix E: Direct Student Feedback Peer Counsellor, on SAGPRC’s Peer Counselling program: “Getting involved in peer counseling was a defiant stepping stone towards my career. My overall experience was terrific and I would recommend it for anyone. The knowledge gained from this program is life-long and helps with all aspects of our daily lives as well as professional life. Thank you for the unforgettable experience and to everyone that invested their efforts and power towards helping us become better people and better helpers.” Student, on SAGPRC’s Peer Counselling program: “I saw a peer counselor because I needed to talk about being stressed because of an online course I was taking. I was overwhelmed and didn’t think I could finish it. I talked to the peer counselor and she helped me relax and gather my thoughts. After talking for a while, I felt better and calmed down so I could go back to class and finish my test. I left feeling better, and I am happy to know that I have someone at school to talk to if I need to again.” Student, on SAITSA’s meetUP Support Group event: “It helps me to reduce negative thoughts. I hope this event can be held every week.” Student, on ACADSA’s Lunch + Learn workshops: “Having these programs at school is such a good idea. Being able to talk about and discuss important health issues while at school is important because it’s difficult to find time for it outside of school. It’s also a great way to take a break from the day!” Student, on LCSA’s Wellness Wednesdays: “I am the least stressed when I get free breakfast! Thanks guys!” Student, on ACADSA’s Stress Management seminars: “I enjoyed being able to focus on supporting my health at school. Something I wouldn’t likely be able to address without this help.”

Alberta Students’ Executive Council Suite 35, 9912 106 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

2014–2015 ACMHI Closing Report