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SECURITY

Smart Security at the passenger screening checkpoint—revolution or evolution? By Gaël Poget, Manager, Smart Security, ACI World (Geneva Airport) Smart Security envisions a future where passengers proceed through security checkpoints with minimal inconvenience, where security resources are allocated based on risk and where airport facilities are optimized, thus contributing towards an improved journey from curb to airside. The Smart Security programme was created in 2013 as a partnership between ACI and IATA, bringing together many ideas and plans for the next generation of passenger screening. IATA’s Checkpoint of the Future programme had envisioned a seamless walk-through experience for passengers, while ACI’s Better Security programme similarly advocated a differentiated approach to security. In this article, we look at the overall programme, the progress that has been made and some of the hurdles that need to be overcome. In future issues of the ACI World Report, we will spotlight some of the components that have been implemented and the benefits they have brought. In order to realize the Smart Security vision, many elements need to fall into place, including advances in technology, changes in regulation, investment in infrastructure and acceptance of change from both passengers and staff. At the same time, aviation security regulation itself is changing, in particular with new requirements for greater emphasis on explosive detection. The challenge for Smart Security then, is to find new approaches that improve efficiency and effectiveness, but that also take into account the changing environment. Given the criticality of aviation security, an evolutionary approach is needed to ensure that security is never compromised and that each change is thoroughly tested, both on its own and in conjunction with all other measures. As a result, the approach that Smart Security has taken is to identify short-, medium- and long-terms goals in a blueprint, and 36

FEBRUARY 2016

then to test different solutions that achieve those goals. Over the past two years, several airports including Amsterdam Schiphol, Dublin, Hamad International, Melbourne, London Heathrow and Gatwick have launched pilots and operational trials to validate new concepts. Some of these trials may not be obvious to the passenger, but they each contribute to operational efficiency, as improved passenger experience or enhanced security. One set of trials tested different combinations of equipment, using body scanners and walk-through metal detector archways in various configurations to improve throughput and enhance security effectiveness. For example, an airport using a security scanner as a secondary device has achieved an overall processing rate of over 800 passengers per hour. In a similar trial, an airport tested using a security scanner as the primary device, removing the walkthrough metal detector, and achieved a rate of 300 passengers per hour

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ACI World Report - February 2016  

ACI World Report - February 2016

ACI World Report - February 2016  

ACI World Report - February 2016

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