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ANDREW MICHAEL CIAMMAICHELLA


Table of Contents

*all design projects in chronological order

miscellaneous

i

studio project

constructed work

educational cooperative

pg 1 Resume pg 2 Maryhurst Gardens pg 3 Lower Howards Creek Winery pg 4 Rupp Arena District pg 5 Olentangy Commons pg 6 A Solution for Urban Agriculture pg 7 NuLu Food Park pg 8 Sustainable Living pg 9 Campus RainWorks Competition pg 10 Louisville Waterfront Development pg 11 Turfland Mall Redevelopment

pg pg pg pg

12-13 Construction Experience

14-15 Construction Documents

16 Digital Rendering

17 Photography


Andrew Michael Ciammaichella 3334 Foxcroft Drive Lewis Center, OH 43035 (614) 582-1741 andrew.ciammaichella@gmail.com Landscape Experience Narrative: Since the age of 15 I have been involved in the landscape industry. Within the initial two years I performed a multitude of maintenance tasks, including mowing, pruning, and other miscellaneous services. Subsequently, I transitioned into the construction sector, laboring on both commercial and residential projects. Within this time, I learned many trade skills that have been instrumental in bridging my understanding of design, materiality and construction. My focus as of late has been on improving design and managerial skills, fostering client relations, and compiling bids. Program Knowledge: 3DS Max Adobe InDesign Adobe Illustrator Adobe Photoshop AutoCAD LT Google Sketchup Microsoft Excel Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Word

Education University of Kentucky College of Agriculture Lexington. KY Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture May 2014 Inducted into Sigma Lambda Alpha, honors society for LA Cumulative GPA: 3.39 Cumulative GPA in Ma jor: 3.55 Professional Landcare Network (PLANET) Wooster, OH Landscape Industry Certified Technician August 2011 Experience Environmental Management, Inc. Plain City, OH Landscape Architecture Intern, Laborer June 2007 – Present Interned under professional landscape architect Drafted designs, compiled bids, and supervised projects Labored in construction sector and learned trade skills Labored in maintenance sector NBBJ Olentangy High School Mentorship Program Columbus, OH Interned under professional architects and interior designers September – November 2008 Completed redline content changes Fostered design skills Skills Leadership: Inter-Greek Programming Assembly Chair, January 2010 – May 2011 Kappa Alpha Order Hobbies: Automobile Mechanics, Fitness, Music Production, Target Shooting, Woodworking References Dennis Karem, ASLA, RLA (employer) Director of Sales and Marketing, Environmental Management Inc. 8220 Industrial Parkway, Plain City, OH 43064 (614) 876-9988 Dr. Thomas J. Nieman (instructor) Professor, University of Kentucky S-305 Agricultural Science, Lexington, KY 40546 (859) 552-3532 Tom O’Neil (personal reference) President, O’Neil Financial Services Agency, Inc. 80 Dorchester Square, 2nd Floor, Westerville, OH 43081 (614) 580-5110

1


Maryhurst Gardens [2010]

A

Maryhurst is a place of new beginnings for young girls who have been traumatized by unimaginable abuse; abuse that often causes sensory disorders. For that reason, the design focus is on each sensory type. The partitioned design allows each sensory type to have its own personal space. The sensor garden is a space that allows for peace and reflection. Inspired by Japanese Zen gardens, the environment gives the girls a space they can call their own while employing limited materiality. Evergreen trees block off space for the avoiders, which will create a personal and intimate outdoor room. This will allow the girls to tune out all distractions around them and find peace outside. For the bystanders who require sensory inputs, a music and color garden will be implemented which will activate the senses. Seekers want to jump on everything and survey the entire area. A bouldering wall allows them to climb around and achieve that sense of adventure. The rock inspired water feature, which flows to the end of the space, will create what feels like an outdoor adventure. The rope bridge across the creek will also create a scary yet exciting experience.

2

A

2

1

1

2


Lower Howards Creek Winery [2011]

B

A D The area of Lower Howards Creek contains a narrow, heavily forested gorge with spectacular cliffs and waterfalls and the ruins of a historic settlement. In the early 1820’s, the valley was an industrial corridor with numerous mills, distilleries and manufacturing operations. In the last sixty years, much of the previously cleared area has returned to forest. Adjacent to the once-cleared valley floor are steep, forested hills. Today no one lives in the area. The historic resources of Lower Howard’s Creek are abundant and important, as they provide enduring evidence of the once-thriving community that existed on this site.

A

B C

D

C This site was chosen for the program of vineyard and winery. Through the meticulous process of visiting different wineries and creating different case studies, important inventory components were chosen for analysis maps. These maps were used to find suitability for building and vine planting based on the criteria outlined by industry professionals. The design concept behind this site employed both sustainability in the environmental and historical sector, which was in correlation with the site’s current use of a nature preserve and archeological dig.

3


Rupp Arena District [2012] 3

A

A 2 Institutional Recreational Commercial

1

2 4

3

4

4

1

Residential Mixed-use

Linked to the entrance of Rupp Arena, the Arena District includes shops and restaurants that line the predominant streets. This forms the design and brings establishments full of atmosphere through a network of nightlife corridors. In addition, residential development atop and surrounding these thriving businesses will establish this district as the emerging urban neighborhood. With 94 rowhomes, 20 townhouses, and over 1,000 luxury condominiums, studio apartments and flats - residents of this area will truly be able to embrace the energy of the city and be within walkable and bikable distance of city employment. Plaza and park spaces thread quasi-controlled chaos among the linear structure. These spaces bring interactive fountains and cafe space, as well as permanent performance bandshell, water gardens and a plethora of lawn and garden space.


Olentangy Commons [2012] D

C A

A

B

B

C

This project required a complete redesign of the Apartment complex, Olentangy Commons. Each of the 115 units had to be measured and evaluated: a week long process given to me to complete. Once all the information was collected and processed, I was given the task of designing each unit along with the Leasing Center. Landscape Architect Dennis Karem and I, establised a project bid of $300,000. Crawford Communities approved, and within three weeks of starting the design process, removal of plant material began. I was tasked with project supervisor of phase one, which included the leasing center and three surrounding apartments (not pictured).

D

5


A Solution to Urban Agriculture [2012] The main program implements the theory of modular design which subdivides the larger system of urban agriculture into smaller parts which then can be individually created and utilized in a multitude of applications. These multi-use modules can then be stacked to form the predominant structure on site: a mixed-use vertical farm. The site also includes a contemporary art museum, flexible plaza space, retail space and luxury condominiums.

A

living / working module

2

1 C

B

B

farming module A

C 1

6

2


NuLu Food Park [2012] The overall design concept is a clear division of spaces which extends forth from the exterior to the interior. As the boundaries begin to blur, the interior becomes an extension of the landscape. This was achieved by envisioning the space as a floor plan where the different program uses were separated into rooms. The concept for implementation of a food park was arrived at in correlation with the Louisville street food community. This space on the south - west end of the site acts as a home base for local food trucks and can be adapted for selected festivals. When this space is not being utilized, the proposed biergarten located to the east and implied amphitheater to the north become the focus of activity. The center structure on the site supplies residential lofts to the community and the last structure remaining houses a design firm.

D

A

C

B

B concept

C

A 1

D

1

7


Sustainable Living on Prall Street [2012] Net Metering

Floorplan

screening trees photovoltaics fruiting trees

utility service

planting module water basin living module shower

watercloset bench

meter home bed

solar power

Maintenance

Compost

fan

waste

pump

couch

In anticipation of lowering the ecological footprint, both the landscape and living modules were designed to be a portrait of sustainability. All power on site is generated from solar energy and participates in net metering. greywater is treated on site through biofiltration to be re-purposed. The Lavatory composts the waste of the residents to be utilized on the multitude of raised planters and fruiting trees on site that compose the diet of the residents

West Section

B

biofilter waterfall

A filtration zone

retaining wall clean water

Biofiltration

8

A

B

South Section

table kichen unit

inverter


Campus RainWorks Competition [2012]

impervious pervious

5 B Greenway

Hardscapes

short

tall

moderately short

medical center

1

A

moderately tall

2

C 4 3

Height Diagram This urban neighborhood is bordered by Virginia Avenue, Limestone Street, Waller Avenue, and a railroad system. As a common cut-through for students, faculty and others, there was a pressing need to redevelop the site into more of a destination. Through the development of a greenbelt system, both pedestrians and cyclists are successfully able to transverse the site in a safe and pleasant manner. The site offers a variety of experiences, ranging from a shopping center, multitudes of greenspace, an increase in student residences and expansion of University of Kentucky facilities. By using a variety of sustainable practices, this neighborhood benefits not only the people of the community but the entire city of Lexington.

A

B 2

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

academic residential wetlands retail industrial

C

9


Louisville Waterfront Development [2013]

B

A Uniquely located beneath an expressway, The design solution calls for the redefinition of River Road by removal of two lanes of traffic and addition of bike lanes, parking, and pedestrian pathways. Replacement of existing mooring cells with less outsized barriers shall also occur. To add additional noise mitigation, I-64 will be retrofitted with Acrylite noise barriers on the road deck and paneling on the underside. The unusual shape of the waterfront allows for pockets of water filtering plantings which, in accord with permanent turbidity barriers, make the water more attractive to visitors. Wherever applicable, vegetation is added to breathe new life into the urban environment.

B

C

10

C A


Turfland Mall Redevelopment [2013]

351 trees aded 6,340 sq. ft. rain gardens 80 tons carbon sequestered 222,529 sq. ft. retail 20,534 sq. ft. restaurant 138,897 sq. ft. medical 26 housing units

1 B

2 On this abandoned site the prevailing concept is to turn the idea of the mall inside out, in response, giving stores external street frontage. As a result the space embodies a more main street or town center feel. This site is a pedestrian oriented site, which adds an interesting dynamic. With the presence of D1 Sports and the athletic fields, parents can shop while their children are practicing. With restaurants on site as well, a post-game meal can be had without even getting into the car. As an added benefit, injuries that occur on site can be treated at the medical center.

A

2

B

A 1

11


Construction Experience : Franklin Park Community Gardens Owner: Franklin Park Conservatory Construction Manager: Miles McClellan 2100 Builders Place Columbus, Ohio 43204 Project Executive: Patrick Lawler Phone: 614.487.7744 Architect: MSI - Chris Kimbrel Contract Amount: $1,511,740.00 Work Performed: Unit Paving: Clay pavers, Concrete pavers & Permeable pavers Stone Paving: Bluestone Pavers Irrigation: Complete Irrigation System Landscaping: Trees, Shrubs, Perennials, Soils & Drainage Lawns: Seed & Sod Limestone Curbs Fountains Brick Curbing Hardwood Fencing & Gates Cedar Arbor & Trellis

Drawn By: MSI

12


Construction Experience : The Scioto Mile - Bicentennial Park

Drawn By: MSI Owner:

Columbus Downtown Development Corporation Construction Manager: Messer Construction Company 3705 Business Park Drive Columbus, Ohio 43204 Project Executive: Jeff Ruschau Phone: 614.496.0975 Architect: MSI -John Petrushka Phone: 614.621.2796 Contract Amount: $1,847,548.00 Work Performed: Unit Paving : Clay pavers 23,800sf Stone Paving: Bluestone Pavers 5500sf Architectural Pre Cast: Steps, Veneer, Caps Granite: Paving, Veneer, Caps, Plinths, Bollards & Fountains some of this work was done on elevated floor system to allow the water flow underneath. Irrigation: Complete Irrigation System

13


Construction Documents While a student at the University of Kentucky, there were a multitude of classes focused on the technical aspects of design. These courses included exposure to grading and drainage, construction details, dimensioning, lighting, irrigation, and planting design. My unique experience in the landscape construction sector has

14

allowed me further insight into how things are assembled. These skills have been instrumental during my tenure at Environmental Management, Inc. wherein I was tasked to complete construction documents as well as directly supervise landscape construction crews. The following contains selected examples.


15


Digital Rendering

16

With the evolution of the landscape architecture profession, the representation techniques have also evolved towards a more efficient and realistic outcome. There is a large variety of different software that allows designers to represent in three dimensions. The above representations were completed using 3ds Max, which is currently the leader in 3D modeling software.


Photography

17


Andrew Michael Ciammaichella 3334 Foxcroft Drive Lewis Center, OH 43035 (614) 582-1741 andrew.ciammaichella@gmail.com


Portfolio of Selected Works