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THE STUDENT VOICE OF ANTIOCH COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL

volume 56. issue 9. march 12, 2018 sequoitmedia.com. @achstomtom. @sequoitsports 1133 main street. antioch, illinois. 60002


March 12, 2018 | The Safety Issue

STAFF EDITORIAL

STARING DOWN THE BARREL

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e are not against the rights of one; we are for the inalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all. The First Amendment of the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right of the people peaceably to assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances. Being a student-run journalism program, we encourage all students to be educated on and exercise these five freedoms given to us by the Constitution. Even though all people, including teachers and students, have this right to express our liberties, the first amendment is not necessarily applicable in all cases. Because of the Supreme Court decision of Tinker v. Des Moines, public schools can regulate speech when they show that the expression would cause a “substantial disruption of or material interference with school activities.” However, some are choosing to take part in different forms of civil disobedience to protest this idea because the thing that is disrupting educational missions is the feeling of fear, not grievances of free speech. Civil disobedience is the active, professed refusal of a citizen to obey certain laws of the state, and/or demands, orders, and commands of a government. When students choose to participate in civil disobedience, they are not necessarily protesting against the school and its policies, they are trying to reach the governmental agencies; the desire to make a difference in society exists beyond the confines of schools. We want long lasting change for the betterment of all, and not short-term, half ass policies that try to band-aid real problems that need to be solved. One of the first people to recognize the idea of civil disobedience was transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau. He argued that individuals should not let the government overrule their own consciences, and people should make it their duty to avoid allowing the government to make them agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated by his disgust with slavery; he was a major abolitionist who believed that people may need to do something in order for a real change to happen. Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi was another famous figure to promote civil disobedience. He was an Indian activist who employed nonviolent civil disobedience for the Indian independence movement against British rule. After years of marching, fasting and leading many in protests, India’s independence was granted. Gandhi was a major proponent in this success and inspired millions of others, worldwide, to stand up for what they believe in. A prominent role model for nonviolent resistance movements, Martin Luther King Jr., believed in the idea of working together to make a real change. King fought for the equality of African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, and led many in various strikes, protests and boycotts that helped the cause, but the major turning point was when Rosa Parks broke an unfair law by refusing to give up her seat on a bus for a white man. Her one action sparked a huge chain reaction of events that eventually led to major change. Sometimes, in order to make a long lasting difference in society, we need to step out of our comfort zone and fight for what we know to be right. With recent events plaguing our world, someone needs to make a change. We are the change. We need to be the change because there is no other choice. We have to refuse to let this keep happening. Gun violence is not subsiding, and now is the time to stand up and say enough is enough.

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Editor’s Note: Unlike traditional magazines, none of the content in this magazine will receive a byline. Instead, the content is reflective of our staff as a whole. Additionally, we chose not to include a traditional staff box full of our names, but instead used the initials of the 17 that lost their lives in the Parkland shooting; their names are far more important than ours in this special publication. We also decided to scrap the magazine we originally planned to create this one, one we feel is more important than the content we were producing previously.

AA SB MDA ND AF JG CH LH CL GM JO AP MP HR AS CS PW mission statement

The Tom Tom seeks to not only be the premier source of student news, sports and lifestyles at Antioch Community High School, but it also aspires to do so with integrity, respect, responsibility and pride. The Tom Tom believes wholeheartedly in giving voices to the voiceless through unique engaging methods of storytelling, while engaging with the Antioch community to see diverse and challenging perspectives. In doing so, we choose to tell some of the more challenging or untold stories even when they can be controversial in order to make our community stronger, more caring, and more tolerant. This program envisions a holistic experience of quality journalism through print publications and digital content, as well as promotes student spirit and school culture through innovative and inspiring public relations and advertising campaigns. We are the Tom Tom. We are originals. It would be an awfully big adventure if you choose to come along with us and work as one community, One Sequoit.

THE TOM TOM STAFF

2017-2018


THE TIME WAS THEN; HERE WE ARE NOW

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A brief history of gun violence at schools reveals uncertainty and more questions.

chool shootings have become a country wide epidemic as of 2018. Within the first week of March, there have been 14 school shootings, which averages out to 1.5 shootings a week. Since the Columbine shooting in 1999, school shooting occurrences have spiked tremendously. Although there has been so many shootings, there is no common thread as to why people are making these horrible decisions. The earliest school shooting is dated back to the 1700s when Pontiac’s Rebellion—a group of Native Americans that attempted to change British policy making—killed a teacher and nine students. After the incident, school shootings continued to remain very rare up until the 2000s. Many people blame gun regulations and the National Rifle Association for the shootings. There is a common belief that it is very easy for minors to buy weapons illegally because there are no serious regulations and requirements to own a gun. While it is widely known that there are many loopholes to owning a gun, the government has not done anything to change the rules. Students should not be living in fear of going to school every day with the thought of a shooting possibly happening; however, it is up to us to make a change. On August 1, 1966, former Marine sharpshooter Charles Whitman climbed to the top of the main building of the University of Texas at Austin and began to open fire at people on the campus. Whitman shot and killed 18 people and injured 31. He was later killed by police. His motives are related to a brain tumor.

On July 12, 1976, custodian Edward Charles Allaway brought a semi-automatic rifle to California State University and shot and killed seven people and injured two others. He later gave himself up to the police. His motives are to be related to paranoid schizophrenia.

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March 12, 2018 | The Safety Issue

“EVERYONE AT PARKLAND WAS HAVING A NORMAL DAY UNTIL THAT HAPPENED, AND THE SCARY THING IS THAT IT COULD HAPPEN ANYWHERE.” JUNIOR // GRACE WEBER

“When I think about school shooting I think of all of the innocent students,

staff and law enforcement who lost their lives to a senseless tragedy. I believe that gun laws should continue to be looked at often to make sure that the United States is providing the best measure of safety possible. While I believe that we should continue to honor the second amendment, I strongly believe that the United States needs to be cautious about who’s hands they put a gun into.The Government and FBI need to take some warning signs they are given more seriously before it’s too late. In many tragedies that happen involving school shootings, the felon has had many run ins with the law prior to the shootings.” SOPHOMORE // SARA JILLY

On November 1st, 1991, former graduate student Gang Lu shot and killed four faculty members and injured a one student. Lu then shot himself before police arrived to the scene. His motives could be related to physiological problems.

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“We need to have more things in place to help our troubled youth. If we are able to identify problems at an earlier stage, maybe things like this are less likely to happen. People need to care about one another more.” MATH TEACHER // ARNOLD GLAPAJONE

“WE SHOULD NOT HAVE GUNS THAT CAN KILL PEOPLE IN THE PLACES WE ARE SUPPOSE TO FEEL SAFE.” SOPHOMORE // GRACE NANCE

“I THINK WE NEED TO HAVE BETTER SECURITY, BUT NO MATTER HOW MUCH SECURITY YOU HAVE IT’S NEVER GOING TO BE ENOUGH.” FRESHMAN // ASHLYN SUNDELL

“I think our school is safe because of the security guards and the rules and regulations that we placed to make it easier for everyone to know where every kid is.” SENIOR // FARAZ KHAN

“I feel pretty safe; I don’t think anything would happen because our security guards protect our school and the doors.” JUNIOR // NICK BAUM

On April 20, 1999, two teens named Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold dressed in trench coats and went to Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. The two killed 13 people and injured more than 20. After their spree, they turned the guns on themselves and committed suicide. This shooting started the national debate about gun control and school safety.


“I THINK THAT LOCKDOWN DRILLS ARE GOOD PRACTICE FOR THEORETICAL SITUATIONS, BUT YOU CAN ONLY PREPARE SO MUCH FOR THE LIVE EVENT ITSELF. YOU THINK DIFFERENTLY IN THE PREPARED, ANNOUNCED DRILL THAN AT THE TIME EXACTLY.” SOPHOMORE // MATTHEW BOHN

“I think it is sad that in today’s society we have to think and fear about situations like this. Schools should be seen as a safe environment for everyone. I feel safe here, but that is only because I have never been put into a situation where I was in fear.” SENIOR // SYDNEY KRAUS

THE FIGHT OR FLIGHT RESPONSE While some look at the screen and say they’d do differently than the victims, research says otherwise.

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hen people watch a horror movie, they know what they are watching is not real. They understand that what is going on is staged with paid actors and different sets; yet, these different scenes seem so realistic they make everyone jump out of their seats. These movies may be fake, but all of the feelings and sensations we have are real, bringing these nightmares to real life. If these fictional stories can affect people and scare them, then what would the effects be if someone were to live through a real life horror story, like a school shooting? The outcome of experiencing a real life horror movie is much more extreme than one that someone would get through a TV screen. School shootings are the real life horror movies in today’s society. With the frequency of these attacks rising, not many people know the emotional and psychological scars left on the survivors and their families. The scary part is, is that these scars can last for life and never fade away. A majority of these long-lasting effects can be traumatic stress symptoms, causing the victims

On March 5, 2001, Charles Andrew Williams brought a revolver to Santana High School in Santee, California. Williams shot and killed two students and injured 13 others. His motives stemmed from wanting to mimic Columbine’s outcome.

to become anxious or depressed and always feel scared for their safety. While some of these witnesses can come out of these events with only a short-term issue, others can be affected their entire lives and develop chronic psychiatric disorders. These types of events can cause a decrease in grades and school performance, as well as decreasing social and emotional growth. All of these negative impacts can be passed on to family members and friends as well. According to a Penn State University study, less than one percent of youth homicides happen in a school setting, but this doesn’t change the effect they leave on all of those involved, and oftentimes those who are not. Being a bystander in a school shooting can lead to different issues psychologically, emotionally and physically. These types of problems can lead to many different end results, including school enrollment decreasing. The Washington Post stated that they found a large decrease in school enrollment of schools with past issues of these incidents, as well as schools in the general area. Going along with enrollment decreasing, grades had a direct correlation and declined. There is no question that school shootings have a very negative impact in its aftermath. As the debate for what should be done in reaction to recent events continues to unfold, many argue nothing will ever be able to take back those lives that were lost or those lives that will be affected forever. Getting help as soon as possible from professionals is the best way to help conquer or even just contain the aftermath of these issues. No one is alone, nor ever should be alone. Supporting those who have gone through a lot and continue to do so is the best cure anyone that has gone through these situations could ask for.

The Rocori High School shooting occurred September 24, 2003, in Cold Spring, Minnesota. Freshman John Jason brought a handgun into school and shot and killed two students. Jason claims his intentions were to kill because he was bullied for his acne.

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March 12, 2018 | The Safety Issue

THE NEAREST POINT ON A TEARSTAINED MAP: A GLIMPSE AT THE DEADLIEST SCHOOL SHOOTINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY

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March 12, 2018 | The Safety Issue

ASKING FOR CONTROL

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The battle over legal ownership of a firearm is highly debated; so, should students be the ones to decide how the laws should change?

t could be anyone. If they are in the wrong place at the wrong time. For some, this could be in the cafeteria or even in their first grade class. Nowadays, going to school can put anyone at risk of gun violence no matter the age, gender or race. As school shootings and threats become more common, many people are starting to question the rules and if the second amendment should still be followed. “I think that there should be strict gun laws,” junior Jack Holston said. “Guns kill people and school shootings are a huge problem in America. We should make it difficult to purchase weapons, and we shouldn’t be able to have guns on us. People need to give up the second amendment because with it, we are allowing too many people to have guns.” One of the many ideas that has been a topic of discussion is the idea of getting rid of guns completely. Politically that is almost impossible, so other ideas have been brought into the argument. Some people believe in the idea of getting rid of military grade rifles and automatic weapons while still allowing pistols and hunting guns. Other people believe in the statement, “guns don’t kill people, people kill people,” they think gun violence is not a problem. On the other hand, some people believe arming teachers could be another way to create a safer classroom. “I think it’s becoming a crucial factor in today’s society as something that’s needs to be taken serious and needs to see tangible solutions,” junior Carrie Miller said. “We need to start taking actions in the right direction such as implementing policies that

as a whole moving in the right direction to protect ourselves from the tragic accidents that seem to be occurring more frequently.” With billions of ideas based on morals and political beliefs, no one agrees on the same solution to end gun violence as a whole. Despite the disagreements, Oregon is one of a few states taking steps to limit the accessibility of guns by banning ownership for people with domestic violence convictions. Although there has been some backlash, the overall outcome has been positive and supportive. But still, the best way to end this violence is unknown. “I think that gun violence is a tragedy, especially when it’s in mass shootings like in Florida, but guns are not the problem because as long as there are people out there who have a will to hurt people they will hurt people,” sophomore Daniel Bemis said. “Guns aren’t the problem, but the solution, arming people in authority, who have been background checked and are capable of owning a gun should be armed.” No matter the political viewpoint, students deserve the right to be safe in schools and that is a fact everyone agrees on. Until a decision is made, people

require students to wear their IDs all the time. We need to start making changes like this to get society

will continue to protest and stay hopeful that a change will be made to keep students and teachers safe.

On March 21, 2005, Jeffrey Weise took the lives of 10 Minnesota citizens including himself. He started by killing both his grandfather and his grandfather’s partner, then took what guns he could find in his house and killed seven more people at Red Lake Senior High School. When police arrived on the scene, he ended the massacre by shooting and killing himself.

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“IT’S UNFORTUNATE THAT THINGS HAVE COME TO THIS, BUT WE’RE AT A POINT WHERE WE ALL NEED TO LEARN TO DEFEND OURSELVES.” ATTENDANCE CLERK // LAURA WRIGHT

“I BELIEVE TEACHERS SHOULD BE GOING THROUGH COURSES TO BETTER HANDLE THESE THINGS… TO BETTER PROTECT THE STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL.” JUNIOR // WILLIAM PIPER

On October 2, 2006, Charles Carl Roberts IV brought a gun to West Nickel Mines School, shooting and killing six people including himself. The other five victims were Pennsylvanian girls between the ages of seven and 13.


PUT ON THE BLUE LIGHTS Community High School District 117 implemented a number of procedures and technologies in the past few years in order to improve both school’s campus safety. New systems are already being put in place to make ACHS and LCHS even safer for the upcoming school year.

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or every plan or goal, there is nearly always something that could fall apart and there is nearly always something that has the potential to go awry. The students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, or any students that have fallen victim to school shootings, would never have expected their safety procedures to fail. According to the Community High School District 117 website, there are three advanced security systems currently implemented district-wide: BluePoint alert solutions, Navigate Prepared and Navigate Respond. The BluePoint website states that their Rapid Emergency Response Systems are like a fire alarm for local police, but in the event of a threat in the building. Besides notifying law enforcement, the system also contacts all building occupants of the current situation. The CHSD 117 website cites how the system triggers emergency management protocols: overhead announcements, law enforcement contact and allowing the intruder to know police are on the way. The Navigate Prepared and Navigate Respond systems are both used to help communicate safety procedures and plans to ACHS staff members and local emergency response teams, according to the website. This includes the emergency exit route plans and safety actions. To further include the technology side of protocols, Navigate Respond eases the attendance count in emergency situations. The system is reportedly connected to the Student Information System’s program.

Before emergency procedures are needed, there are services for students to use to protect themselves and others. According to the CHSD 117 website, Text-a-Tip started on January 17, 2017. The text messaging system helps students provide anonymous tips focused on preventing alcohol and drug use and many other risky behaviors in students. Students can also reach out to Antioch’s Student Services department for concerns. Support groups are an option for struggling students as well. Student Services offers groups for those with grief, stress and conflict issues. These protocols and procedures are planned to protect staff and students from emergency issues; but are these protocols going the distance we need them to? In the event of a lockdown, students and teachers are taught to lock the door and stay clear from view of windows, but in a real situation this is not enough to keep a threat from getting into the room. Taking other actions such as barricading doors with furniture and other classroom items would more effectively keep an intruder out. At a recent institute day meetings, teachers were provided information on the upcoming transition to ALICE drills and the procedures involved with this different style of security. Administrators and teachers will be trained over the summer and an institute day immediately before the next school year. Students will be trained in the first week of school in ALICE drills. Along with making our drills more practical, committees and monitors could be put into place. Even with multiple security guards, it can be easy to get in and out of the school without being noticed. The security guards alone cannot ensure that an intruder will not be able to enter the school. Creating a group such as a safety committee to discuss how to make our school safer will allow students to give their perspective as well as take action in making our school a more secure place. Even with multiple security systems, there is still room for improvement; we can never be too safe. As for now, students and staff will continue to follow the training given.

“...for the most part I do think that I feel safe in the school. Although, I feel like there are always things that could happen no matter what. There are things that you avoid, like if someone is angry you just avoid it.” JUNIOR // SERENA NOBLE

On April 26, 2007, on the campus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia a senior at the university by the name of Seung-Hui Cho shot up the school. He killed 32 people (five faculty members, 27 students) and wounded 17 others.

The Northern Illinois University shooting occurred February 14, 2008. Graduate student Steven Kazmierczak opened fire into a crowd killing five people and injuring 17 others. Kazmierczak took his life minutes before the police reached him.

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March 12, 2018 | The Safety Issue

SHE SAYS #ENOUGH

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Senior Madison Mahoney is finding a way to help students make an impact: walking out.

n light of recent events regarding the school shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School, walkouts across the country are being organized for multiple dates. Students from different schools and different states are taking charge of the future for themselves and the entire country, planning a number of peaceful protests to insure that their voices are being heard. For students at Antioch Community High School, senior Madison Mahoney is doing everything in her power to make the walkouts as productive and meaningful as possible. “I think that by people—students, younger generations especially—taking a stand and stepping up to it to make a change [will] actually to do something about it,” Mahoney said. Mahoney, along with the assistance of other students and a few teachers, has been working to organize each walkout individually; the first walkout being March 14 and the second being April 20. She has already created a number of social media accounts for the anticipated walkouts on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to keep students at ACHS updated on everything they will need to know to participate or, if they don’t wish to walkout, to stay in the loop. Along with updates on social media networks, Mahoney also plans to release a series of emails and flyers out to the student body for those who do not go on social media or for those who simply want more information. If students at ACHS wish to participate in the walkouts, they will be recognizing the lives lost at Stoneman Douglas High School on March 14 and spreading the idea that enough is enough; as the frequency of mass shootings increase, so does the number of lives lost. “For the walkouts we are protesting Congress’ inaction to do anything about the gun violence that has risen throughout [the country in] these past few years,” Mahoney said. “Our message is to show that we are unified, we are putting our foot down and enough is enough.” Though there are many reasons a person may wish to walk out of the school, the walkouts at ACHS are meant to show that students stand together and wish to use their voices to make a statement about violence throughout the country. “Everything that happens through the government, these are all things that are affecting us,” Mahoney said. “We are all in a democracy and a democracy is governed by the people, so all people should have a say [in] at least some part of what’s going on within our world.” Despite the fact that every person may have different beliefs, the walkouts at ACHS are a chance to allow those who wish to have their voices heard to speak up for what they believe in. For Mahoney, the nationwide walkouts are an important step in a movement that can help insure that next time, there will not be a need for mourning and the giving of condolences; there will be no next time.

On February 27, 2012, Thomas Lane II starting shooting at random, killing three students and wounding three others at Chardon High School in Chardon, Ohio. Possible motives are related to mental illnesses and family issues.

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“SCHOOL SHOOTINGS ARE HORRIFIC, AND THE GOVERNMENT NEEDS TO FIGURE OUT FAR BETTER WAYS TO CARE FOR OUR KIDS SAFETY.” PARAPROFESSIONAL // SUZANNE CHAMBERS

“I kind of feel safe in our school against gun violence because we’ve really never had to worry about guns in Antioch. It’s never really been a big issue here, but in places like California and Florida, it’s been a huge issue for a while.” SENIOR // NATHAN CAVANAUGH

The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting happened on December 14, 2012, in Newtown, Connecticut. The shooter was a 20 year old named Adam Lanza who had fatally shot 20 students between the ages of six and seven, along with six adult staff members in the school. The incident was the deadliest mass shooting at either a high school or grade school in U.S. history and the fourth-deadliest mass shooting by a single person in U.S. history.


SO FAR IN

20 8

Since Sandy Hook

239 At least

Gun Related Incidents:

7,670

Incidents Involving Gun Violence

3,657 2,114 480

December 14, 2012

School shootings nationwide

Victims of the shootings Injuries

= 10 Victims

Deaths

= Killed = Shot

People below the age of 17 killed or injured

34

Mass Shootings (four or more victims)

Walkout Dates MAR

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The Women’s March’s Youth EMPOWER group is planning a walkout for 17 minutes at 10 a.m. to honor the 17 lives lost at Stoneman Douglas.

The Umpqua Community College shooting happened October 1, 2015. Undergraduate student Chris Harper-Mercer shot and killed an assistant teacher and eight other students. Eight students were injured as well. Harper-Mercer later killed himself after the police arrived to the scene. His motive is believed to be from his interest in other mass shootings.

APR

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National School Walkout is organizing a walkout at 10 a.m. on the 25th anniversary of the Columbine shooting.

On February 14, 2018, Nikolas Cruz walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High with an AR-15 and a backpack full of ammunition. He shot and killed 13 students and four teachers. 16 others were injured as well. Although his motives are unknown, they could be related to possible mental illnesses.

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The Tom Tom | March 12, 2018  

Special Edition: The "Safety" Issue

The Tom Tom | March 12, 2018  

Special Edition: The "Safety" Issue

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