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april 2011

ACHE


APRIL 2011

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mus ic what we’re listening to: summer

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what we’re listening to: heartbeats

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the perfect playlist for summer, featuring artists like best coast, foals, and neon indian.

a list of songs to get your heartbeat up, organized by beats-perminute.

arts melissa bailey

we present the wonderfully talented fashion illustrator melissa bailey from newcastle, england.

ann pajuväli

twenty-one-year-old estonian artist ann pajuväli shares her work with ACHE.


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note from ACHE

a letter by the editor-inchief of ACHE to readers of the magazine.

p ho to g r a p h y charlotte boeyden

interview with belgian twenty-two-year-old charlotte boeyden.

fashion

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kitty gallannaugh

interview with twentyyear-old fashion photographer kitty gallannaugh from london, england.

aëla labbè

we interviewed dreamy twenty-four-year-old aëla labbè from france.

elena kholkina

ACHE speaks with twenty-eight-year-old lena kholkina, russian fashion photographer.

kate pulley

interview with eighteenyear-old photographer kate pulley from tennessee.

mili malinovic

interview with mali malinovic, swedish fashion photographer.

crystin moritz

interview with crystin moritz, a twenty-threeyear-old photographer currently working in london.

w ri ti n g

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say hello to summer get ready for summer with all of the gorgeous sundresses and strappy wedges we could find!

style icon: autilia

autilia antonucci, lookbook star and fashion extraordinaire, shares her thoughts on style and pop culture.

lady of the woods

fashion editorial by holly broomhall, nineteen-year-old fashion photographer in new zealand.

world without time fashion editorial by twenty-three-yearold teresa queirós from portugal, featuring model margarita pugovka.

pop!

an assortment of beauty products for vivid colors and a bright face.

blush and lace

fashion editorial by dominic clarke, filled with soft colors and delicate fabrics.

stolen afternoon

fashion editorial by lauren withrow, seventeenyear-old photographer from texas, modeled by dillon duschene.

yesterdays // technicolor

two short writing pieces by beatrice z. hart, eighteen-year-old from atlanta, georgia.

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CR E D ITS jackie luo, editor-in-chief jackie f u, editor cover pic ture by kitty gallannaugh, featur ing model ana sta sia @ prof ile model s pic ture (p. 1 and 2) and pic ture ( below ) by j ackie luo, featur ing model emily cr i stof ich “paranoid” font by ke v in y uen kit lo pic tures in “s ay hello to summer” ( p. 23- 26) and “pop !” (p. 89- 90) cour tesy of websites li sted spec ial thank s to e ver yone who contr ibuted work to the mag a zine !


wel come to issu e # 2 of AC H E mag a z i ne ! hel l o, re aders! we’re b ack again w it h our apr i l 2011 issue, f i l le d w it h t he mo st t a lent and b e aut y t hat we cou ld f ind across t he on line communit y, and we re main e nd le ssly inspire d by young v isionar ies e ver y w here. we br i ng you t he s ame mess age we did l ast issue. we are on a s e arch for qu a l it y f rom a l l cor ners of t he world. we ne e d ar t ists, musici ans, d ancers, w r ite rs , desig ners, and w hate ver els e you c an imag ine. yout h, cre at iv it y, and in novat ion are our buzzwords. to submit, s end us your f u l l name, age, cit y and st ate/count r y, and any ot he r in for mat ion we m ig ht ne e d, a long w it h your work.

we are a c h emag azin e @ g mai l. c om ke e p liv ing you ng , ke e p ma k ing ar t, and ke ep re a ding ACHE .

love,

jacki e lu o e ditor-i n-ch i e f

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CHARLOTTE BOEYDEN charlotte is a t we nt y- t wo-ye ar-old photog rapher f rom ant wer p, b el g iu m and e ind hove n , t he net herl ands. she c aptures photog raphs t hat are rem in is c e nt of t he mid- t went iet h centur y and f i lms li ke the v irg in suic ides.


“ i’m ju st a g irl who would like to stay young fore ver. i study at the desig n acade my eindhoven and tr y to take a s much time as possible for photo g raphy.”

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ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Charlotte Boeyden: I photograph because I have to photograph. I live in a world of images. I see colors and light, and I want to capture them. I want to capture emotion at its purest. I want to find beauty in moments. That’s why I like to take a day out with my models. We laugh, and we talk, and, every once in a while, I snap a shot. They show me the truth, their flaws and imperfections. That way, I can find their true beauty. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? CB: About twenty months now. It has changed quite a bit since then! I started by taking self-portraits, which was a very different approach. It was much more staged back then. I think I’ve learned to look for the essence. My photos are more pure now. I used to come back from a shoot with hundreds of images to choose from – back then, I shot digital. Now I only shoot up to one or maybe two rolls of film.


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AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? CB: As a person, I’ve never really belonged. As a photographer, I think I can. AM: Who or what inspires you? CB: Life. AM: Why do you use film? CB: It feels more true to me. I like how real the effect of light is on a piece of film. It’s not manipulated; it is what it is. I’m more considerate when I use film, and it’s such a different approach. And it feels as if I’m capturing a moment. When I shoot digital, it’s like the moment passes me by, and I’m left with an imprint of an empty movement. However, I do admire the people who are able to capture moments in a digital manner! AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? CB: I look up to people like Mark Borthwick, who pushed the boundaries of fashion photography. He made me see that fashion photography can touch you, that it doesn’t have to be about slick images of way-too-perfect situations. He shows raw beauty, and his work is very intuitive. That’s the way I like to work, too! AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? CB: I’m starting to become pleased with my own work- that’s already quite the accomplishment. But I want to achieve many more things. I would love to do real editorials, work with fashion designers and models. I really want to get into fashion photography and create portraits that move people.

AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? CB: The mood of the moment, really. I don’t want to force anything. I try not to have any expectations when I leave for a shoot. The shots should be intuitive and spontaneous, or else they will look forced and fake to me. AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why? CB: A very big location with much variety, whether it is nature, a city, or a big building. I like walking around and being surprised by what I see. When I know the location too well, I probably won’t like the photos I made there so much. I would love to go to a country with a huge variety of nature. Belgium and the Netherlands look about the same everywhere! AM: Favorite books, movies, and bands/singers, and explain why you love them! CB: I’m so bad with “favorite” questions! I love it when music goes right through my soul, when you feel the emotion that went into making it. That’s why I love Bon Iver, Peter Broderick, Eddie Vedder, and many more. Classical music can really touch me, too, especially that by Bach and Satie. I have a record of Satie that is full of scratches that make the sound crisp in such a touching way. Gymnopédie No. 1 always gives me the shivers. I’m not much of a book reader. I have many books, but they are almost all covered in images. The one book that really got to me was Designing Design by Kenya Hara. It really puts you to thinking! Finally, I have many favorite movies, so I’ll just go for my favorite director, Sofia Coppola. I just love the world she creates.


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v ie w charlotte’s f lickr at charlotteboe yden.be

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model i s anastasia @ prof ile model s


twenty -ye ar-old p h otogr a ph er in london, engla nd

KITTY GAL L AN N A U GH

“I am a storyteller through a lens. I am shy and have an unhealthy obsession with consuming cupcakes. I have a head and heart full of dreams, and I want to change the world, even if just in a small way. My camera is my partner in crime, and I believe that everything can be achieved. Some call it naïveté; I just think it’s hope.”

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model s are lucie nontha, jj, jenny f i sher @ model s 1


model i s jj @ model s 1

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ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

Kitty Gallannaugh: I try to convey happiness and unseen beauty that others forget to look for. I try to capture time and a deep sense of nostalgia along with a soft atmosphere. In a way, I want to capture the world in a beautiful way because this world is so full of doom and gloom. I photograph because my camera is like an organ in my body; without it, I would probably fade away. I photograph because my mind is always inspired, and it is my release and a way to make my mark on this planet.

KG: I adore Tim Walker’s photographs. He really brings nostalgic romanticism to everything he sees through his lens, and he creates the most beautiful fairytales. He influences me to be brave and to think outside the box, trying things not many people have thought of doing before. He has definitely influenced me to create subtly-toned photos with soft and whimsical features.

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? KG: I have been shooting all my life. I had my first plastic camera at a young age, when my little obsession with freezing time really began. By the time I was thirteen, I started to experiment with digital photography and first started to edit my photos. By seventeen, I was working on a professional level. My photography over the years has changed drastically. You can definitely see that my style has become much more relaxed with how I compose photographs and frame the subject. I dread to think how I’ll view the photos that I take this year in another three years’ time! AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? KG: Youthful and crazy. AM: Who or what inspires you? KG: Everything inspires me, from the conversations I hear strangers having in the street to the songs I fall asleep to. I have a very open mind, and I find that that is my key to being able to pick up on bits and pieces of inspiration. Quotes and cuddles fill me with concepts and feelings that I want to portray through photography. I suppose I am a big believer in the idea that there really is beauty in everything; you just need to be able to find it. AM: Digital or film? Why? KG: Both! I hear that digital is the lazier option; you just snap and delete as you go, whereas film requires you to think, and you have to ensure the snap is perfect before you waste an exposure on it. Knowing all the functions of a DSLR camera, though, can be just as hard. I think both require huge amounts of thinking in very different ways. The only similarity is that whichever format you use, you can always create a timeless photograph. This is like asking a mother to choose her favorite child!

AM: Imagine you’ve been commissioned for an editorial for a fashion magazine. For which publication (i.e. Vogue, Nylon, etc.) would you most like to shoot? Why? KG: Every single one! It’d be so rewarding as a photographer. If I had to pick, I would particularly love to shoot for Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar because they really are the true gods of fashion magazines. I’d be honored if I could one day reach that high! It’s one of my ultimate career dreams. AM: How does fashion play into your work? KG: I try to capture fashion in a whole new light. As a young thing, I used to love flicking through glossy magazines and inspecting what every person was wearing, what pretty and bright colors they had on, and it would inspire me. Now that I can make similar images, I try to make fashion more fun and fresh, and to prove that a lot can be said through the use of garments. AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? KG: I’m forever growing. Between this time last year and now, I feel I have developed my style even more, met even more wonderful people, worked on really exciting projects, and just had lots of fun along the way. Every shoot I do is an achievement to me. I’d like to achieve a lot more in my lifetime, like shooting for big magazines, working on many new projects, and keeping it real and staying happy along the way. I just want to be happy.


model i s g reta @ model s 1 // makeup by laura nai sh

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model i s emily // makeup by jess heath


model i s emily // makeup by jess heath

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model i s emily // makeup by jess heath


v ie w kit t y’s por tfolio at kitty gallannaugh.com

model s are honour, poppy, and emily @ prof ile model s

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s a y h ello to

SUMMER

this season is all about lace, crochet, florals, and light fabrics. when the weather gets hot and humid, you’ll want clothing that’s airy, feminine, and comfortable without compromising your style. whether you plan on traipsing your way through the city or relaxing on the beach with your closest friends, the perfect wardrobe is always a must.


dresses

100.00 topshop topshop.com

630.00 malene birger ssense .com

70 . 0 0 l u c c a c o u t u r e shopnastygal.com

2 4.80 forever 21 forever21.com

85.00 unknown pixiemarket.com

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39.00 wanted urbanoutfitters.com

100.00 jeffrey campbell s hopnastygal.com

shoes 202.00 senso pixiemarket.com

348 .00 minimarket urbanoutfitters.com

25.80 forever 21 forever21.com


53.79 asos asos.com

12.80 forever 21 forever21.com

accessorie s

32.00 ganni pixiemarket.com

845.00 yves saint-laurent ssense.com

30.00 cheap m o n d a y shopnastygal . c o m

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STYL E IC O N

model i s autilia antonucci // photog raphy by thomas tow ns end


a utilia a ntonucci a lo okb o ok celebr it y, aut i li a hanna h mar y antonu c c i is a t went y-ye ar-old g irl f rom p er t h, aust ra li a. t hroug hout he r life, she’s had an af fe c t ion for a l l t hings b e aut if u l, and she is c ur rent ly study ing cre at ive a dver t ising and j our na l is m .

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model i s autilia antonucci // photog raphy by daniella antonucci


ACHE Magazine: Describe your personal style. Autilia Antonucci: I have a very eclectic and quirky style. I can never stick to one thing; I’m always mixing and matching different styles, genres, and trends. Sometimes, I even refer to a mixed lolly bag as a metaphor for my style. AM: Who has influenced your style the most? How? AA: It would have to be Audrey Hepburn. She doesn’t currently influence me too much, but she was definitely the reason why I became so interested in fashion when I fell in love with her beauty and classic sense of style. AM: What is your favorite magazine? Why? AA: Lula is my most recent favorite. It has the most gorgeous editorials that make me feel as though I’ve stepped into some sort of dream. They also write great interviews, which is another big plus in my book! AM: If you had to choose ONE must-have accessory to keep forever, what would it be, and why? AA: It would have to be my charm bracelet. My aunt gave it to me when I was born and has given me a charm on each of my birthdays ever since. AM: What do you hope to achieve in fashion?

AA: In fashion, I hope to offer an interesting and inspiring point of view that encourages people to step outside of their comfort zone and feel good doing so. AM: Pick your favorite runway shows of all time. AA: Rodarte’s F/W 2008 show. I will want those ripped tights and spiky heels until the day I die! AM: Which decade would you like to live in, and why? AA: The late sixties, for sure. I don’t think a period in time has had better fashion and music or as cool a scene as was going on at the time. AM: What is your favorite thing about the place in which you live? How has it affected you? AA: I love the diversity in Perth! It’s so interesting to see so many different people walking around town. For me, it means that I can change my style from day to day and not have to worry about how I am dressing in comparison to the people around me. AM: Where do you see life taking you? AA: When I graduate from uni – which is soon! – I hope to travel loads and then commit to a job that complements my love for fashion.

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A U t ilia Anton ucci 's T OP L I STs B e st str e et s h o ps sportgirl

to p t ren d s in 2 01 1

billie & rose

collared shirts

zomp

creepers

vintage shops and the markets

white layering fringing feathers graphic prints

B E ST O N L IN E s ho ps topshop nasty gal princess polly spanish moss vintage

M O ST FAS HION AB LE mov ies

STONED 2005

THE VIRGIN SUICIDES 1999

FACTORY GIRL 2006

MARIE ANTOINETTE 2006

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S 1961


model i s autilia antonucci // photog raphy by daniella antonucci

v ie w autilia’s lookbook at lookbook.nu/ autilia and her blog at autilia.blog spot.com

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Meli ssa B a i l ey me lissa baile y is twe nty-two and live s in ne wcastle , e ng land. she is a third ye ar stude nt at sunde rland unive rsity, and she is studying il lustration and de sig n. he r inspire d fashion il lustra tions grace our pages for this issue of ACHE, and she shares some of he r thoug hts on he r work.


f a sh ion il lu str ations f or th e decem b er issu e of w h o’ s j a ck m a ga zine, u sing a seventies th em e.

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“

I a c t u a l l y d r e w t his c o m p le t e l y f r o m m y mind. i w as n 't t o o c o n c e r ne d w it h i t w h e n i s t a r te d i t a s a d o o d l e w h i ch just progressed.

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Ins p i r e d b y a r a n dom image I c ame ac r os s on a w e b s i t e I ' v e n o w completely forgotten! I've s t a r t e d s a v i n g a ll of the images I like, as I t e n d t o f o r g e t where they're from or what t he y a r e a b o u t i f I don' t. I c an al w ay s ge t i n s p i r a t i o n f r o m s mall places, and it's a shame w h e n I f or ge t the m.

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“

ins pir e d by the l ate s t Wil df ox c ol l e ction. The s hoot was french-themed, a nic e mix of ol d and new. I decided to add a Marie Antoinette quote because I like us ing ty pogr aphy .


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work?

everything up until now was just development, a way of finding my style and perfect subject matter.

Melissa Bailey: I try to convey femininity, but all aspects of it.

AM: How does fashion play into your work?

AM: How long have you been creating art? MB: Cliché, I know, but since I was really young. I can always remember being enthusiastic about drawing and painting. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as an artist? MB: When I draw, I get obsessed with drawing things perfectly. I can spend hours on something, but if I then look at it and it’s not quite right, I’ll rub the whole thing out and tell myself, “You can draw better, don’t be lazy, do it again!” As a person, I’m completely lazy, and I’m a mess! I’ll always have ink all over my hands and paint in my hair, but it’s just not as important to me. My work is always clean and delicate, whereas I’m clumsy and messy. AM: Who or what inspires you? MB: Fashion and other illustrators! When I see my friends’ work or look at illustration blogs and see something that just makes me say wow, I get inspired. Part of me thinks, “I want to do that, but better!” It’s good to think like that sometimes because it pushes you and sparks an urge in you to keep on creating and improving your abilities. At the moment, my favorite illustrators are Martine Johanna, Takato Yamamoto, Kelly Thompson, and Chamo San. I could go on, but I won’t! I’ve also always found the work of artists such as Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and Toulouse Lautrec very inspiring. AM: How did you get into art and illustration? MB: As I’ve said, I have always drawn. I painted a lot in school but never really knew what I wanted to do until I did an art course at college. From that, I almost went into fashion design but was only interested in the fashion illustration side, so I was advised to do an illustration course instead. Only since starting that have I begun to create illustrations that I am truly happy with. It feels like

MB: It is everything! Fashion is the main thing that drives me when creating something. When I’m creating personal work, first, I will look at my favorite fashion blogs and troll through a stockpile of fashion-related images that I’ve collected through the years to look for inspiration. On the fashion blogs, there is always something new and fresh and amazing. Fashion never stays still; it’s always moving, and that’s what I want to emulate in my work. AM: What have you achieved so far with your work, and what would you like to achieve? MB: Like I’ve said before, I see a lot of my work as a kind of personal development. But that could just be me being self-critical. In a way, I don’t know if that will ever stop. In the future, I’d like to feel like I’ve really pushed myself. I’d like to work with other people on collaborative projects. AM: What music do you like? MB: This changes frequently, but at the moment I love Joan Baez, Robert Johnson, Ratatat, and Timber Tambre. AM: Which movies/magazines/etc. have influenced your work? MB: I draw a lot from magazines. I love the crazy shoots they do because they often provide reference material for things you wouldn’t normally see. I especially like Pop, i-D, Vogue, and Nylon. As for films, I actually can’t think of any that have consciously influenced me. Of course, I have my favorites – they’re either ridiculously girly or completely depressing. 10. What is one piece of advice that you would give to aspiring artists? Draw and create what you love, and lots of it. And never stop!

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“

T his i l l u s t r a t i o n was s impl y ins p i r e d b y a p i ct u r e of one of t h e N A S T Y G A L m o d els. I love the c lot h e s o n t h a t s ite , s o i alw a y s f i n d t h e m e asy to draw. I w o r ke d o v e r t h e s k e tc h digital l y .

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This is actually a c oupl e of y e ar s old now. It was based on a f as hion e d itorial featured in Look magaz ine . It l ooked quite Eighties b ut I jus t r e me mbe r b eing pul l e d in by the model's eyes.

v ie w meli ss a’s website at meli ss abaile y illu stration.co.uk

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Aテ記A


LABBÈ

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a Íl a l abb è is a twe ntyfou r-ye ar- old photogr aphe r f rom br itt any, f r anc e. f rom an e arly age, she d e vote d hers elf to d anc e, a p assion t hat le d he r to amsterd am w here she stu d ie d t he ater d ance at t he hoges cho ol vo or de ku nste n . b ack in f rance, she b e c ame inc re asing ly i nte re ste d in photog raphy. to d ay, she works as a f re el anc e photog rapher and c onte mp orar y d anc e r.

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ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Aëla Labbè: To create and to share my vision is a need and a purpose after which I go unwaveringly. My work is made up of my memories, my emotions, my hopes, my thoughts, and my inner turbulences. There is a certain wistfulness about it — a shroud of reverie, perhaps. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? AL: For two years. From digital to film, where I’ve really found myself. My photographs change as I am changing as a being, getting older and seeing life differently due to personal experiences and encounters. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? AL: Nostalgic, melancholy, dreamy, dark. I, as a person, am not different from who I am as a photographer; I am what my pictures are! My life is as blurred as some of my photos. AM: Who or what inspires you? AL: Inspiration overwhelms me ceaselessly, day and night. It comes from different things like dance, theater, cinema, painting, history, mythology, literature, poetry, and music, as well as the place I live in — my parents’ house is like a museum full of secondhand objects. Other inspirations are nature itself, my travels, and my family, especially my nephews, who are all over my galleries. Then, to give you some names, Pina Bausch, choreographer, Vania Zouravliov, illustrator, and for photographers, Lewis Caroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, David Hamilton, Alison Scarpulla, and Ellen Rogers. AM: Film or digital, and why? AL: I prefer film for its grain and dust. It fits better with the kind of mood I love. But I think that the final result, film or digital, edited or not, is the most important. Besides the camera you use, what makes a beautiful picture has to do with your eye and your heart, the way you see the world and the human you are.

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? AL: I don’t have a favorite photographer; I discover so many amazing images and talented people every day. However, I feel particularly touched by Sally Mann. The way she portrays childhood is amazing. Besides common themes of innocence and beauty, she has touched on darker themes such as insecurity, loneliness, injury, fear, and death. This is something I feel really connected to. AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? AL: I understand better what and how I want to create. But to learn is a neverending story.… I need to develop more technical skills. Because I am self-taught, it takes me a lot of time to get there. Even if it is not an end in itself to me, I know it is a necessity. Also, I would love to have my own darkroom. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? AL: Timeless, dreamy, magical, and mysterious, in order to escape reality and reach imagination. AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why? AL: I have many places where I love shooting! Here in Brittany, we have plenty of magical, mythical, and mystical places! In my house, in my garden, by the river, in the forest, at the sea, in abandoned houses... I feel very lucky to have all of these opportunities. AM: Favorite books, movies, and bands/singers, and explain why you love them! AL: My favorite books are The Unbearable Lightness of Being, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and The Little Prince. Then, movies that I love are The Hours, The Double Life of Veronique, The Girl on the Bridge, Frida, The Virgin Suicides, La Mentira, and many old silent black-and-white films. I listen to Matt Elliot/Third Eye Foundation, Sigur Rós, Soap&Skin, CocoRosie, Arvo Pärt, and Clara Rockmore. The list is much longer, and to explain why I love them would take ages! I will just use words that, to me, are connected with all of those books, movies, and musicians: poetry, philosophy, dreams, impalpable beauty, imagination, nostalgia, loneliness, melancholiness, mystery, and madness.


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v ie w aëla’s f lickr at f lickr.com/ photos / aela


WHAT WE’RE LISTENING TO:

SUMMER summer is our time of freedom, our time to let everything go and just breathe. in anticipation of the coming months, get ready with the following list of songs that are perfect for lounging around home or relaxing on the beach.

WALK IN THE PARK Beach House SOMETHING IN THE WAY Best Coast WALKING ON A DREAM Empire of the Sun GO DO Jónsi WAITING ON YOU Sun Airway BERMUDA Kisses SEASIDE The Kooks MOTH’S WINGS Passion Pit SUN HANDS Local Natives SOLITUDE IS BLISS Tame Impala BERLIN, WITHOUT RETURN... Voxtrot KITES Geographer DEADBEAT SUMMER Neon Indian THE GENERAL SPECIFIC Band of Horses VACATION VACATION U.S. Royalty CHECK OUT ACHE’S PLAYLISTS ONLINE AT PLAYLIST.COM/ACHEMAGAZINE!

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l ady o f the wood s ph ot ographed and style d by hol ly broomhal l hai r and make up by asrita sing h model i s c arol i n e scale s at g iant manag e me nt


cors et // c ar niva l sk ir t // st y list’s ow n f ur c ap e // st y list’s ow n b elt // st y list’s ow n

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jump er // maur ie & e ve b o ots // chaos & har mony b elt // st y list’s ow n


dress // t he c ass ette s o ciet y c ardigan // st y list’s ow n b elt // st y list’s ow n

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shir t // topshop


top w it h b o dysuit // maur ie & e ve sho es // mo del’s ow n

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b o dysuit // maur ie & e ve sk ir t // st y list’s ow n


b o dysuit // maur ie & e ve shor ts // t he c ass ette s o ciet y

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elena kholkina

model i s kr i stina @ al model management


e le na kh olki na i s t we nt y - e i g ht ye a r s o l d a n d l i v i n g i n m o s c o w, r u s s i a . h e r p i c t u r e s s h o w i nti m a cy a nd deli c a c y i n g i r l s w ho a r e yo u n g a nd b e a u ti f u l b u t f l awe d .

ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Elena Kholkina: I take pictures for two reasons. First, I’m antisocial, so it’s easier for me to talk to people while doing something. Second, I like the quality of still images, how it changes reality. When doing model tests, I mainly want to show how young the person is. With other shoots, I’m mostly interested in the strange beauty of little awkward moments in life. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? EK: I got my first camera long ago and took pictures of travels. Yes, it has changed a lot, and I’m sure it will change more. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? EK: Sometimes I’m very quiet, and sometimes I’m very not. AM: Who or what inspires you? EK: It’s different every time, but the people who have inspired me the longest are Tom Waits, David Lynch, Jim Jarmusch, Ryan McGinley, Roberta Ridolfi, and Patty Diphusa. I’ve just come back from India, and, currently, I’m very inspired by this colorful country and the great Russian photographer Sergey Maximishin.

AM: Digital or film? Why? EK: Usually film, but I use digital, too. Film makes me happy with its texture; I love grain. Digital I like for being able to control what I’m doing. I’m still learning, so it’s often good to see where I’m heading. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? EK: I don’t even know by now! There are so many great people you learn from. AM: Imagine you’ve been commissioned for an editorial for a fashion magazine. For which publication (i.e. Vogue, Nylon, etc.) would you most like to shoot? Why? EK: I have every respect for Vogue, but for now, I’m more interested in not-overly-glossy magazines – Vice, Dazed & Confused, and 10 Magazine. AM: How does fashion play into your work? EK: Clothes can make or destroy the picture, so they’re utterly important. I love working with young designers and casual clothes. AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? EK: I’ve only started, so no special achievements, really. I’d love to be able to live by taking pictures and do more travel photography.

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“i’m mostly interested in the strange beauty of little awkward moments in life.�

model i s kr i stina @ al model management

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model i s zhenja @ al model management


model i s olga @ al model management

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model i s anthea @ al model management


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model s are anthea @ al model management and ig g y @ aquarelle


v ie w elena’s por tfolio at offonroad.com

model i s anthea @ al model management

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B e at r ice Z. Har t, 1 8 ( At l ant a, GA )

yest e r d a y s the rain leaves ugly streaks along the stained glass windows – gray today, as they had been yesterday. it paints the walls of the stone church the same gray: uninspiring, meaningless, inconsequential.

window buried in a book.

he stares stoically up at st. peter with his tearstained cheeks.

her hand in his. the light fading, as he struggled to keep her there, solid and whole and safe.

his feet rest on the worn gray kneeler in front of him. he wonders suddenly if he is the first to sit and watch the rain against peter’s window, the first to come to this morbid little place in search of nothing but solitude. he imagines the faithful – desperate, pleading, crying for deliverance or decisiveness from their silent savior, falling over themselves to swear off vices they know they will not escape. he did not come to think of god and man and death. he came to think of nothing at all. yet he finds himself struggling to recall different times, times of color and light and warmth. of sylvia. he does what he can to shut her out. she was so long ago. sylvia with her cold eyes, her porcelain skin, her powder blue lips. he puts his focus onto peter, whose tears grow fat and heavy as they splatter against the glass. that is not the sylvia he wishes to remember. that is the absence of sylvia; he desires the excess. he fights to see her smile, nose wrinkling daintily, skin glowing gently in the fading light of spring. he frowns; sylvia was not dainty. she was not graceful, or ladylike, or well-behaved. she would not be his if he had seen these things in her. he fights to watch the steel blue eyes light up with quiet awe as she sat at the

buried in a box. buried in his head. peter’s tears slow.

the screeching flatline. porcelain. he closes his eyes and shuts out thoughts of her soft brown hair across his gently moving chest. the biting of the lip as she received a rose the color of her cheeks. the sunken cheeks, gray against gray. he fights to hear her, but she shakes her head and touches her hand to the stitches at her throat. he quickly counts raindrops on peter’s window. sylvia alive on the bed. sylvia dead on the table. sixty-five, sixty-six, sixty-seven, sixtyeight... sylvia alone in his arms. sylvia surrounded by strangers. seventy-two, seventy-three, four, seventy-five...

seventy-

sylvia with him in the moonlit park. sylvia with the oncologist in the operating room. ninety-eight, ninety-nine, one hundred, one hundred one... peter begins to cry again. there, there.


B e at r ice Z. Har t, 1 8 ( At l ant a, GA )

techn ico lor It rained again today. He walks along the sidewalk, bathed in the misty glow of the street light, his hands shoved into his pockets, his head ducked against the chill. It rained again today, he thinks, stopping at a crosswalk. It rained yesterday. The rain serves as a reminder of how lonely and fragile everything is. He jumps back as a cab flies past, leaving a wall of water in its wake. He stares after it, wondering who was sitting in its backseat, where it was going. Anywhere but here, he thinks, anywhere less gray. “Who are you?” It comes suddenly, a sound like laughter bubbling just beneath the surface. He blinks and turns, slowly, to find her standing there with her spiky hair, her violet eyes, her orange nails. He blinks at her. Slowly. “I’m–” “Not your name. Who are you?” He stammers. She raises an eyebrow playfully. He watches the oil flash across the surface of a puddle. “Who are you? What do you stand for?” “I don’t–” “That’s exactly what we’re going to figure out.” The street seems less crowded these days, as figures cling to buildings for fear of a sudden shower. He watches her look up at buildings and smile, as if she sees the sun hiding behind thunderclouds. They wait at crosswalk after crosswalk, intersection after intersection, and all

the while, she asks the same question. “What do you stand for? Who are you? What do you stand for?” He can only stare at the puddles with their dancing colors. He blinks too hard, and suddenly, the street is full of sound–bodies jostling, shifting past and pressing forward, an endless wave of motion. She watches them with a curious expression on her face. “What do any of you stand for?” Nothing, he thinks, as people rush around him, scarcely noticing him standing stationary on the sidewalk. Nothing at all. He turns and sees her smiling sadly, her bright eyes tinged with a sense of loss. “We stand for nothing. We stand for no one.” “Who’s we?” Her head cocked to one side, she bites her lip and watches him sift through history in search of an answer. He stares at the puddles with their swirling technicolor. “Who are we?” A cab sends the colors flying – the sudden crash of realization. His eyes widen and he whips around. “We’re nobody.” She smiles that curious smile at him, waiting. “We are a generation of nothing and no one.” “That, my dear,” she whispers to him, “is what we are here to change.” The downpour resumes.

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K A TE PULLEY k a t e p u l l e y i s a n e i g h t e e n - year-old photographer from a small town n e a r n a s h v i l l e , t e n n e s s e e . s h e hasn’t lived much, or long, in the world, a n d s h e w a n t s b r i l l i a n t a d v e ntures but has yet to leave insipidity. she l ik e s u nc o n v en ti o n a l b ea u ty a n d en c h a n tm en t. k a te h a s a tw i n si ste r, w h o d ou b l es a s her m o del , a nd a lo t o f pen t- u p bew i lder m en t.

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kate e v oke s no stalg i a and dreamine ss in he r w or k . a s she s ay s, “ i photog raph be cau s e i fe el i ne e d to.” ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve?

Kate Pulley: A sort of resplendent allure. I photograph because I feel I need to. Honestly, I usually dread the actual task but feel like it’s my part to carry out. I often come across places and say, “That would make a good picture!” It sometimes bothers me that I can’t capture something. But when I end up with a result to my liking, it is so gratifying!

KP: I’ve found so many great people through this art form. And a lot about myself, cliché as that may sound. When I take a photo that I like, it’s very satisfying. I’ve been published a few times, here and there, and sold a few prints. But for now, it’s just a really important hobby and my best form of expression. If any sort of employment comes out of it, I’d definitely be pleased. But I plan to stick to it either way.

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? KP: I started really shooting at the end of 2007, when I bought my first instant camera. I’ve definitely developed and defined my style through the years. My photos grow with me. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? KP: I’m a demure pessimist who sees beauty in nature and melancholiness. AM: Who or what inspires you? KP: Music and other photographs are my main muses, as well as light, seasons, nostalgia, and weather. AM: Why do you use film? KP: I sometimes shoot in digital, and it’s generally difficult for me to capture the style or mood that I am trying to convey. While I enjoy experimenting with anything that I can get my hands on, I ultimately end up back in my zone of comfort. Film often gives off an ethereal feel in its tones and imperfections. It is more intimate and selective. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? KP: A sort of beauty that takes the everyday and mystifies it. I think I need to see the world in that way sometimes. AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why? KP: Outdoors. Not only is it ideal when shooting with film, I just love nature at its best. It’s so much easier to come across beauty and a subject. It works for itself. AM: Favorite books, movies, and bands/singers, and explain why you love them! KP: My favorite book is The Little Prince, or Le Petit Prince. It’s so like the way I wish to approach life. My favorite movie is actually Penelope! I can’t really explain why I love it so much. It’s sort of ridiculous, but it always puts me in a good mood. I love the characters, set, styling, and lightheartedness. “Hoppípolla” by Sigur Rós, at the end, doesn’t hurt either. My all-time favorite bands are Seabear – Sindri Már Sigfusson! – and Sleeping At Last. For the musicians, themselves, and their lyrics. They’ve really made a difference in my life. Music is so important in art!

KP: There are so many, I couldn’t choose! It changes with time and my mood. I can say I’ve discovered my true favorites through Flickr, though.

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v ie w kate’s f lickr at f lickr.com/ photos / kateandthepulle y

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model i s marg ar ita pug ovka

photo g raphed by teres a que ir贸s

wo rld w i t hout t ime


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MILI MALINOVIC


model i s sylv ia s oldo // styling by mili malinov ic // illu stration by masha kar pu shina

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ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

Mili Malinovic: I grew up watching my mother paint and talk about art. It was quite an inspiration to me, seeing how invested and motivated she was. In my late teens, I found a love for cinematography and the beauty of conceptualizing. This triggered a thought of capturing ideas as memoirs, and later on, I discovered a way of doing so with a camera. When I photograph, I try to go for a character, a story. I look at the pictures as paintings or books. Something that evokes feelings and creates a thought process. I want the viewer to feel a connection and investment.

MM: I try to not get invested within the world of photographers. There are many, and all of them are good in their own way. I just want to be myself, so I try not to compare. Once you start doing it, the less orginal you become. The real challenge is to think outside of the box and challenge yourself. If I had to name people that influence me, it would be Conrad Hall and Christopher Boyle. These men have an eye for cinematography, spontaneous and organic portrayal of emotions. Frida Kahlo, great artist with a wicked mind and surrealizm. McQueen for creating dreams of darkness and romance. Tim Walker for originality and playfulness.

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? MM: I started discovering the love for photography quite late. It was never a dream of mine, but the more I did it, the more satisfaction it gave me. Realizing that both art and cinematography could be used as a plot, everything came together beautifully, and my love was established. I’ve been shooting professionally for two years. The sense for detail, light, and concept keeps evolving with each experience. The more I do it, the better I want to become. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer?

AM: Imagine you’ve been commissioned for an editorial for a fashion magazine. For which publication (i.e. Vogue, Nylon, etc.) would you most like to shoot? Why? MM: Since I’m more on the experimental side without any boundaries or limits, I’d love to work with publications that are supportive of individuality and new talent. Dazed & Confused, i-D, Another, Interview, and Italian Vogue are the ones that stand out for me, photography- and context-wise. They are open to the creative and the different. AM: How does fashion play into your work?

MM: I’m an ordinary guy, often a dreamer and escapist at times. I am fascinated by beauty and complexity of human nature. I often get to experience the escapist side of myself while shooting. I get to relive the ideas and thoughts I have in my head. It’s like directing a movie and seeing bits and pieces fall into place. It provides me with a healthy balance.

MM: Fashion is definitely a huge addition to photography. Clothes are characters and mood alternatives. I believe that clothes make a man; naked people have no impact on the society. I don’t believe in labels, either, because the exclusivity for me lies in the material, detail, color, or shape. I’ve done styling in some of my photo shoots. It’s a hard work with a fulfilling purpose.

AM: Who or what inspires you?

AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve?

MM: I get inspiration from everything. Mostly movies and surroundings. Lately, I’ve also been drawn to materials, patterns, furniture, and antiquity. I believe that inspiration comes in periods, depending on my attitude and interests at the moment. Many of the shoots I’ve done have also been inspired by the dreams I’ve had. AM: Digital or film? Why? MM: I’ve recently begun shooting digital, and I’m completely fine with it. Since everything happens so fast nowadays with the technology, deadlines, and time zones, it’s quite necessary if you want to survive in this business. However, nothing can replace the raw effect of film. The atmosphere it creates can’t be manually retouched or added to a digital shot. The excitement factor during the development stage is a huge plus. I have a special bond to film.

MM: I have been traveling a lot and discovering the beauty of our world. Meeting awesome people and experiencing their creativity and love for work gave me a kick. Hopefully, it continues this way. I’m happy as long as my work is available to people and they enjoy it as much as I do.


model i s natali r ingqv i st // hair and makeup by ers ana malkoc // photog rapher’s assi stant i s mikael larss on

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model i s chloe memi s e v ic @ ford model s // styling by mili malinov ic


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model i s chloe memi s e v ic @ ford model s // styling by lass e r ude nord // hair and makeup by ida kyller man


model s are cos ette and linda @ sweden model s // styling by mili malinov ic // hair and makeup by ida kyller man // photog rapher’s assi stant i s s elva tepedino

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model i s sylv ia s oldo // styling by mili malinov ic // illu stration by masha kar pu shina


model i s sylv ia s oldo // styling by mili malinov ic // illu stration by masha kar pu shina

v ie w mili’s f lickr at f lickr.com/ photos / o_milay _o

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shor ts // kate moss for topshop s o cks // wolford


BLUSH AND LACE phot ographe d by dominic clarke st yle d by lynn huang h air by claire g re ch makeup by robe rta ke arse y model i s je ssica ove rsie r at e lite

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shir t // sp ark le & fade ve st // a lice & oliv i a s o cks // wolford


dress // topshop b elt // ant hrop olog ie l ace hold-ups // st y list’s ow n sho es // of f ice

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blous e // p au l & j o e sister sk ir t // 3.1 phi l lip lim l ace hold-ups // henr y hol l and pl at for ms // of f ice


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shir t // f u l lcircle b elt // cos sk ir t // pins and ne e d les

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ANN PAJUVÄLI a t w e n t y - o n e -y e a r - o l d f a s h i o n i ll u s t r a t o r a n d artist from tallinn, e s t o n i a , a n n pajuväli went to an a r t s - b a s e d h igh school and studied applied arts. she currently works a s a n a s s i s t ant in a photo studio. w e d i s c o v e r e d h e r b r i l l i a n t s k e t c he s o n l i n e a nd had to expose her work to the readers of ACHE.


INSPIR ATION model i s andrej pejic in vog ue par i s, “r ive gauche et libre” by mer t alas and marcu s pig gott

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INSPIR ATION model i s nadja auermann in vog ue italia, “ black i s back” by ste ven mei s el


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work?

AM: What have you achieved so far with your work, and what would you like to achieve?

Ann Pajuväli: I’m kind of a lazy perfectionist. The girls I draw are all about perfection in an unperfect way. After I have finished a drawing, it seems complete, but it really comes alive after a second look, when I can see the flaws. I don’t like to use erasers, probably because I’m too lazy to remake anything. However, I like those messy lines and scribbles. That roughness to me is perfection.

AP: To me, the biggest compliment is to be an inspiration. The idea that something I’ve made can influence somebody, and, as a result, there will be a new piece of art, is overwhelming. For the future, I just hope to grow as a person and develop in my work that way. AM: What music do you like?

AP: Pencils have been my companions since I was able to hold them.

AP: I like The Kinks, The Animals, Nick Drake, Patti Smith and The XX, James Blake, ZAZA, Caribou, Yeasayer – oh, my, the list could go on and on. There are tons of really good music for every mood. I just fell in love with France Gall – Teenie Weenie Boppie.

AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as an artist?

AM: Which movies/magazines/etc. have influenced your work?

AP: I tend to fade away from reality, and I enjoy losing my head in the clouds, but still, I have to feel the ground under my feet. I try to be constantly moving and evolving in everything I do.

AP: I am charmed by Haruki Murakami’s surreal realism and Tim Walker’s photography. And I’ve always loved Gustav Klimt.

AM: How long have you been creating art?

AM: Who or what inspires you? AP: A new day, morning sun, and a cup of strong coffee, sketchbooks and pencils, people and their stories, photographs and the idea that they can capture a passing moment, and definitely other artists. AM: How did you get into art and illustration?

AM: What is one piece of advice that you would give to aspiring artists? AP: I would need some advice myself! But I think it’s important to experiment and exceed yourself to get better. Feedback is also great, good or bad – it keeps things alive, so make yourself visible. And always stay real to who you are.

AP: I have always been surrounded by creative people, and I have been drawing and making things since I can remember. To me, expressing yourself through art is a natural way to live. AM: How does fashion play into your work? AP: A lot of my inspiration comes from fashion photography, especially the girl portraits I draw. Fashion is like body language, another way to express yourself. In my work, clothes are a fun way to personalize a character.

v ie w ann’s f lickr at f lickr.com/ photos / anag uann

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INSPIR ATION model i s lourdes fer nandez, al s o know n as r u ssian red


INSPIR ATION model i s hannah f rom i love fa ke blog by jolijn snijders

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Cry st in Mor i tz


model i s gerda

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c ry st in is a t wenty -th ree-year-ol d ph otograph er c ur r e nt l y i n l o n d on. she was born in 1987 in magdeburg, g e r m a ny a n d graduated from lette-verein berlin as a s t at e - a p p r o ve d p hotographer. she is currently a personal assistant to ph otograph er axel h oedt .

ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

Crystin Moritz: I am a visual person. When I hear a song or read a book, I see pictures in my inner eye, so it was quite logical for me to express myself through photography and art. The most important thing for me is to transfer an atmosphere. I love to look at photographs and see a story behind them.

CM: I have several ones. I love Francesca Woodman, Corinne Day, Doug Dubois, Wendy Bevan, Paolo Roversi, and Axel Hoedt. They all inspire me in the way they look at their subjects.

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? CM: I have been taking pictures since I can remember. I always had a camera, but I started to photograph in a more serious way with the SLR camera of my father. At fifteen, I got my first digital camera, which was good to experiment with and to find out what was interesting to me. But I was bored quickly and changed to analog again when I was nineteen. During this whole process, I found out that the most interesting thing for me is people, and so I specialized in portraits and fashion. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? CM: Easygoing. AM: Who or what inspires you? CM: Everything. Mostly nature, a certain light or smell. Movies, books and music are very essential, but the past decades are absolutely inspiring. AM: Digital or film? Why? CM: Film. Digital photography was a good way to find out what I was interested in, but very soon, it was too clean and predictable for me. I love the thrill when I open an expired polaroid or play with chemicals in the darkroom. But I don’t condemn digital because it is very helpful for certain issues.

AM: Imagine you’ve been commissioned for an editorial for a fashion magazine. For which publication (i.e. Vogue, Nylon, etc.) would you most like to shoot? Why? CM: I think it is quite obvious – Vogue, for sure. I think it is still an accolade for every photographer. AM: How does fashion play into your work? CM: What I like most about fashion is that completely fictitious aspect. For me, this world is not about truth or reality but about illusions and dreams. It is my individual view on things. AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? CM: There are people who appreciate and love my work, which is a big achievement for me. It is important to have positive feedback, as photography is just as good as its viewer. Additionally, I got a scholarship whereby I have the chance to work in London now. One day, I would love to launch a photo contest, especially for fashion photography because I really miss that.


model i s gerda

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clothes by julie eilenberger and julian zigerli // hair and makeup by claudia rotoli


model i s elaine // clothes by glor ia landenberger // hair and makeup by li s a z eitler

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model s are yona and claire // clothes by glor ia landenberger // hair and makeup by li s a z eitler


model s are yona and claire // clothes by glor ia landenberger // hair and makeup by li s a z eitler

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v ie w cr ystin’s por tfolio at cr y stinmor itz.com

model i s yona // clothes by glor ia landenberger // hair and makeup by li s a z eitler


WHAT WE’RE LISTENING TO:

HEARTBEATS if you’ve been looking for good songs for a workout, we have some right here! organized by beats-per minute, from least to greatest, our playlist will get your heart beating faster.

WHAT STARRY EYES KNOW (two door cinema club vs. ellie goulding) Neon Hitch THE 808 TRACK (feat. mighty high coup) Bassnectar IN FOR THE KILL (skrillex remix) La Roux ON TO THE NEXT ONE (feat. swizz beatz) Jay-Z WILDSTYLE METHOD (feat. 40 love) Bassnectar WONDERMAN (feat. ellie goulding) [bare noize remix] Tinie Tempah FANCY FOOTWORK Chromeo ANNIE (designer drugs remix) Anthonio RUDE BAPTISM (rihanna vs. crystal castles) Rihanna

CHECK OUT ACHE’S PLAYLISTS ONLINE AT PLAYLIST.COM/ACHEMAGAZINE!

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stolen afternoon p ho to g r a p h ed by la u r en wi th r o w mo d el i s di llo n du sc h en e


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a ch e m agazin e

ACHE Magazine April 2011  

issue #2 of ACHE magazine, a quarterly magazine created by and for young people around the world. released on april 26, 2011.

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