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T HE U NIVERSITY

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S AN A NTONIO

N ATURAL R ESOURCES E ARTH

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E NVIRONMENTAL ~ S CIENTISTS

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E NGINEERS

V OLUME II, I SSUE 2

M ARCH 2007

UTSA’S BSE BUILDING RECEIVES DESIGN AWARD by Tim Brownlee (from March 07, UTSA Today and ASCE News Notes)

S PECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST :  BSE Bldg Awards

(Feb. 16, 2007) - UTSA recently received an Education Design Showcase 2006 award for the Biotechnology, Sciences and Engineering (BSE) Building at the 1604 Campus. Completed in December 2005, the 220,000-squarefoot facility was designed by FKP Architects of Houston. At a project cost of $84 million, the building design was driven by the need for interaction among researchers and graduate students, collaborative meeting spaces for researchers and leadingedge technologies. The BSE Building is the first of two buildings that will form a gateway to the university from the south. The five-story building houses offices for deans, faculty and graduate students and research and teaching laboratories for life sciences, chemistry, electrical engineering, and civil and environmental engineering. The building’s laboratory

environment is in keeping with UTSA’s vision to become a model, comprehensive research university that promotes linkages with San Antonio and South Texas and places students and faculty at the forefront of local and regional economic development. The design vision resulted in a building with core spaces used for secured laboratories, while featuring open and inviting public spaces with an atrium lobby, a café, displays, and art that promote the science and engineering disciplines. Education Design Showcase is an interactive online database for administrators, architects, facility planners and others involved in the planning, design and construction of education facilities nationwide. The site shares innova-

 Renewable Energy  UTSA Polar Research  EESE Announcements  Trip Reports!  Grants Opportunities!  Featured Jobs!

tive, practical solutions in planning, design and construction including details on project size, cost, location, funding method, delivery method, sustainability, development team and more. Each featured project includes a description with unique features, special challenges and solutions, and how educational needs were met through the building design. The awardwinning projects were evaluated by a jury of administrators, architects and facility planners for excellence in design and functional planning to meet education program needs.

I NSIDE THIS ISSUE : BSE B LDG

1

DOE F UNDING

2

P OLAR S TUDIES K ICK 3 - OFF S MALL F UEL C ELLS

3

UTSA R ESEARCH IN A NTARCTICA

4

W EATHER S ATELLITE 5 L AUNCH SAME L EADERSHIP

6

S CIENCE F AIRS

8

B ASURA B ASH / M EETING

9

G RANTS O PPORTUNITIES

10

F EATURED J OB A NNOUNCEMENTS

11

EESE C ONTACTS

12


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CONTINUING RESOLUTION BOOSTS FUNDING FOR EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY from the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) February 21, 2007 - A newly approved bill provides a significant funding increase for the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) for the remainder of the current fiscal year. In mid-February, Congress passed and President Bush signed a bill that will provide continued funding for the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year (FY) 2007, which concludes at the end of September. Such "continuing resolutions" are enacted in lieu of the traditional budgetary process.

directs the funds. The continuing resolution's impact on specific EERE programs cannot be ascertained at this point, since the bill does not specify how the funds will be distributed among EERE's programs. However, the bill requires DOE to report back to Congress with a spending plan within 30 days of its passage. See the White House press release, the full text of the bill, and for comparison, the EERE budget documents for FY 2008.

House Joint Resolution 20, also known as the "Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007," continues funding at FY 2006 levels for much of the federal government, but Section 20314 of the bill specifies that nearly $1.474 billion go to EERE. That represents a nearly 27 percent increase over the amount appropriated by Congress for FY 2006, but the effective increase is even greater, since the bill eliminates most if not all congressionally directed funds, or "earmarks." The lack of earmarks gives EERE a great amount of flexibility in how it

DOE INVESTS $385 MILLION IN SIX CELLULOSIC ETHANOL PROJECTS from the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) March 7, 2007 - DOE announced on February 28th that it will invest up to $385 million in six biorefineries over the next four years. Once up and running, the biorefineries—located in California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, and Kansas—are expected to produce more than 130 million gallons per year (mgy) of cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol uses non-food plant materials such as switchgrass, wood chips, and sawdust to produce alternative fuel. While the refining process for cellulosic ethanol is more complex than that of corn-based ethanol, cellulosic ethanol yields a greater net energy benefit and results in much lower greenhouse gas emissions. The southern California plant proposed by BlueFire Ethanol will be built on an existing landfill and

use sorted green waste and wood waste to produce 19 mgy of ethanol. In LaBelle, Florida, ALICO proposes to build a 13.9 mgy ethanol facility that will draw on vegetative, yard, and wood wastes. In Emmetsburg, Iowa, Broin plans to expand its corn ethanol plant to produce 125 mgy of ethanol, a quarter of which will be cellulosic ethanol produced from corn fiber, cobs, and stalks. In Shelley, Idaho, Iogen will build a plant that will convert wheat straw, barley straw, corn stover, switchgrass, and rice straw into 18 mgy of ethanol. Range Fuels' proposed Soperton, Georgia, plant will produce 40 mgy of ethanol using wood residues and wood-based energy crops. And in Kansas, Abengoa Bioenergy will build a 11.4 mgy ethanol plant that will draw on corn stover, wheat straw, milo stubble, switchgrass, and other feedstocks. See the press releases from ALICO, Broin, Range Fuels, and Abengoa Bioenergy.


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UNITED STATES LAUNCHES NEW INTERNATIONAL POLAR Year nsf.gov/news Press Release 07-017 The United States marked the start of International Polar Year (IPY) on Feb. 26, 2007, with an event hosted by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Academies in Washington, D.C. Polar scientists discussed the latest research and expeditions to take place during IPY.

expeditions will take place over the next 2 years to study changes to permafrost, the melting of polar ice sheets, and marine life in the cold and dark. The research completed during IPY will provide a baseline for understanding future environmental change.

"As a nation, we have explored the frontiers of discovery and innovation on and off the ice," said NSF Director Arden L. Bement, Jr. Our support of research in the polar regions entails massive logistical challenges, and immense rewards. Today, we are refreshing our commitment to scientific leadership in the polar regions. And we are pledging our continued support of polar research and meeting the challenges that entails." International Polar Year is a global research effort to better understand the polar regions and their climatic effect on the Earth. More than 200 scientific

HYDROGEN-POWERED LAWNMOWERS? NEW SMALL-SCALE FUEL CELL DESIGN from nsf.gov/news Press Release 07-004 January 22, 2007 - In a breakthrough that could make fuel cells practical for such small machines as lawnmowers and chainsaws, researchers have developed a new mechanism to efficiently control hydrogen fuel cell power. Many standard fuel cell designs use electronics to control power output, but such designs require complex systems to manage humidity and fuel recovery and recycling systems to achieve acceptable efficiency. The new process controls the hydrogen feed to match the required power output, just as one controls the feed of gasoline into an internal combustion engine. The system functions as a closed system that uses the waste water to regulate the size of the reaction chamber, the site where the gasses combine to form water, heat and electricity. National Science Foundation (NSF) awardee Jay Benziger of Princeton University developed the new technique with his student Claire Woo, a recipient of an NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates award and now a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Berkeley. Woo and

Benziger published their findings in the February 2007 Chemical Engineering Science, now available online. The researchers believe the first applications for their technology will be in smaller engines. Fuel cells are currently inefficient on such scales due to the need for fuel recycling and excess hydrogen in standard designs. The researchers' new design is closed, so 100 percent of the fuel is used and there is no need for a costly fuel recycling system. "The system is ideal for small internal combustion engines that lack emissions controls and are highly polluting," said Benziger. "There is also no need for an extensive hydrogen distribution system for these small motors; the hydrogen could be supplied in returnable tanks such as the propane tanks used for gas grills." Benziger's next goal is to connect several of the new fuel cells together to increase power, a system that could potentially compete with cells now being tested in the automotive industry.


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UTSA RESEARCHERS EXAMINE GLOBAL WARMING IN ANTARCTIC feature article by Kris Rodriguez in the UTSA Today (Feb. 12, 2007) - Hongjie Xie, UTSA assistant professor of earth and environmental science, and doctoral student Burcu Cicek are analyzing data on sea ice that they collected in December on a two-week trip to the Antarctic. As part of an expedition of scientists and educators from the United States, Chile and Sweden, the goal was to determine if global warming is affecting the South Pole. A report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change citing the loss of Arctic sea ice because of global warming echoes what many scientists have said for years. The Antarctic expedition in December was the next step in global climate research. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the 6,000mile Antarctic expedition gave scientists the opportunity to collect data aboard the Swedish icebreaker, Oden, during transit from Punta Arenas, Chile, to the United States' McMurdo Research Station on the Antarctic continent, south of New Zealand. The Oden was chartered by NSF to break through the ice to create a 25-mile long shipping channel for delivery of annual supplies to the McMurdo station. En route, the ship pushed through 1,700 miles of ice that surrounds the continent. "We now know what the sea ice really looks like, as far as its thickness and concentration,

and now we can compare the data collected to what we see in satellite imagery," said Xie. As part of the first research trip to the Antarctic, Xie and Cicek observed the sea ice and regularly transmitted meteorological data to the world weather observing network including water and air temperatures, wind speed and direction, visibility, cloud cover and atmospheric pressure. "As a student, it was an amazing once-in-a-lifetime experience getting to observe scientists from different countries as they conducted their own research studies," said Cicek. Other ongoing projects included observations of seals, penguins and seabirds; biological activity in the seawater; and temperature and salinity measurements in the ocean depths. Xie and Cicek will enlist the help of world-renowned sea ice expert Stephen Ackley to analyze their data in UTSA's Laboratory for Remote Sensing and Geoinformatics. With more than 30 years as a government scientist and educator, Ackley joined the research team last year as a UTSA associate professor of research, with more than a dozen trips to both the Arctic and Antarctic to his credit. His outstanding contributions to sea-ice research were recognized in 2004 when the Antarctic geographic feature, Ackley Point, was named after him by the U.S. Board of Geographical Names. "In the Antarctic, we are seeing some regional increases in the sea ice, along with regional decreases," said Ackley. "If you look at the totality of

it, it appears as if it hasn't changed very much over the last 30 years, but it has. Even though we're only seeing these regional changes and not a systemic decline in the amount of ice cover, it is still significant in terms of the way the regions are responding. We're finding that it's linked to global change in the atmosphere." The UTSA research team plans more Antarctic trips. In September, Ackley will take UTSA students and faculty on the U.S. icebreaker N.B. Palmer for a two-month trip through the Antarctic sea ice. For more information, visit the Laboratory for Remote Sensing and Geoinformatics Web site or contact Hongjie Xie at (210) 458-5445. From the top: UTSA Assistant Professor Hongjie Xie in the Antarctic

UTSA PhD Candidate Burcu Cicek at work on the icebreaker Oden

UTSA Associate Professor Stephen Ackley


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NATION'S NEWEST USAF ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE BEGINS OPERATION from Scientific Frontline, an SFL ORG Newscenter Publication VANDENBERG AFB, Calif., January 29, 2007 -- The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-17 Block 5D-3 spacecraft, built under contract for the U.S. Air Force by Lockheed Martin [NYSE:LMT], has been turned over to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for operational use worldwide. The ceremony was held at the Air Force Weather Agency at Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha, Neb., which is the primary user of the satellite data within the United States. DMSP F-17 was launched on November 4, 2006 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. "After several years of building, integrating, upgrading and testing DMSP F-17, our second Block 5D-3 spacecraft, it is enormously satisfying that it is now beginning its vital mission," said Michael O’Hara, Lockheed Martin DMSP program director. "Our partnership with the Air Force dates to the very beginning of the DMSP program with a common goal of ensuring that commanders have access to environmental data." The Block 5D-3 series accommodates larger sensor payloads than earlier generations. They also feature a larger capability power subsystem; a more powerful on-board computer with increased memory -- allowing greater spacecraft autonomy -and increased battery capacity that extends the mean mission duration. Starting with F-17, the attitude control subsystem has

also been enhanced with the integration of a second inertial measurement unit using ring laser, versus mechanical, gyros to provide greater precision pointing flexibility. DMSP is used for strategic and tactical weather prediction to aid the U.S. military in planning operations at sea, on land and in the air. Equipped with a sophisticated sensor suite that can image visible and infrared cloud cover and measure precipitation, surface temperature, and soil moisture, the satellite collects specialized global meteorological, oceanographic and solar-geophysical information in all weather conditions. The DMSP constellation comprises two spacecraft in near-polar orbits, C3 (command, control and communications), user terminals and weather centers. Following DMSP F-17, three satellites remain to be launched and are maintained at Space Systems' operations in Sunnyvale, Calif. for storage, functional testing, and upgrading. The spacecraft are shipped to Vandenberg for launch when requested by the Air Force. Since 1965, 44 Lockheed Martin DMSP satellites have been launched successfully by the U.S. Air Force. Now in its fourth decade of service, the DMSP has proven itself to be a valuable tool in scheduling and protecting military operations on land, at sea and in the air. The Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif. manages the DMSP program. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, a major operating unit of Lockheed Martin Corporation, designs, develops, tests, manufactures and operates a full spectrum of ad-

vanced-technology systems for national security, civil and commercial customers. Chief products include human space flight systems; a full range of remote sensing, navigation, meteorological and communications satellites and instruments; space observatories and interplanetary spacecraft; laser radar; fleet ballistic missiles; and missile defense systems. Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin employs about 140,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2005 sales of $37.2 billion.


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UTSA DELEGATE TO 2007 SAME LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Meeting Perspectives from a San Antonio Post (TEXOMA Region) SAME Student Member In neither astrology nor crystal balls do I hold stock. Nonetheless, during a break between this January’s Colorado blizzards … I caught a glimpse of the future. Reassuring was the vision; and should you allow, I will expound with testimony. It began last summer, when preregistration opened for the January 2007 SAME Leadership Conference. I had recently completed ‘The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership’ by John C. Maxwell; and by attending such a meeting, I hoped to witness in practice, the leadership theories outlined in Maxwell’s text. It is with my gratitude then, that the San Antonio Post graciously sent me to Denver for the conference as their Young Student Member delegate. And if my expectations were high, they were not offtarget. During those two days of sessions, new Post Leaders were briefed on SAME Organization, Strategic Perspectives, Today’s Mission, and the new (ClearVantage) Association Management System (AMS). At the same time Mr. Matt Metcalf, a PE from AMEC Corporation, mentored student leaders in: 1) Academic Post Leadership, 2) Military Engineering, 3) Personal Finance and Stewardship, and 4) What to Expect after Graduation. These fine student leaders represent today’s ROTC, the nation’s military academies, our pre-commissioned officers, and those planning to enter civil service. The twenty-three young men and women in attendance proudly represent the following schools: the University of California at Davis, Texas A&M, Virginia Tech, the University of Kentucky, the University of Kan-

sas, the University of Iowa, Brooklyn Polytechnic, Colorado School of Mines, the University of Texas at San Antonio, the University of Louisville, Stanford, Vanderbilt, the University of Maryland, and the Air Force Academy. On three occasions during the meeting, student leaders were exposed to invaluable mentoring opportunities … around a common conference room table. Character role models of exemplary accomplishment, and from three different branches of service, narrated their epic life journeys. Each assemblage was followed by a personalized question-andanswer session. Students met with Rear Admiral Richard F. Barror during breakfast. Admiral Barror is the Chief Engineer of the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) and a Senior Advisor to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). He candidly painted his adventure from EIT in Alaska, to PE, to Rear Admiral during response to Hurricane Katrina. Barror’s advice, regarding the start of a young engineer’s career, was: “go find a septic tank … and jump in it!” His underlying message was: “seek out challenging tasks that others are not willing to do, learn from them … and do this all your life. Use these [experiences] as personal growth opportunities.” Other maxims presented by Barror were: “Get as much variety’ in experience’ as you can: design, technology, software … and

keep going. Learn the business aspect, become a consultant … become an expert.” “Take remote assignments when you are young.” “Don’t be afraid of risk.” “You can learn, even from failure.” “Learn to say no, even to golden opportunities.” And most importantly, “Do not compromise your integrity.” During brunch, students met with Colonel Timothy A. Byers. Tim Byers is the Director of Installations and Mission Support at Air Combat Command (ACC) Headquarters, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. The Colonel was kind enough to describe, from the bottom up, the engineer’s perspective of the Air Force organization: “the base engineer is similar to a city manager … and at the command level the budgets are bigger, projects are larger in scope, and responsibility is at its highest.” By highlighting the role of the USAF in mission readiness, response to 9/11, its presence in the Pacific, and energy; he emphasized: “We’re looking for hard-to-fill positions in engineering, TelComm, and Intel. We’ll bring you in as leaders with significant responsibility early. You’ll oversee big teams addressing issues from UXO to building renovation.” At mid-day, student leaders attended lunch with Lt. Gen. Carl A. Strock, PE.


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SAME STUDENT LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE, CONT’D As you are well aware, General Strock is our current SAME President for 2006-2007. General Strock is Chief of Engineers and Commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In this position, Strock leads the largest military and civil works engineering organization in the world, which provides vital services to the United States and other countries, globally. He was inaugurated SAME President at the 2006 SAME Joint Engineer Training and Education Conference in New Orleans. Upon acceptance of this role, the General diplomatically offered a few concise and tactfully delivered words of thanks. His confidence infused the room with a willingness to follow. This short speech is why I ‘signed up’ to attend the SAME Leadership Conference. Back in Denver though, during lunch, student leaders were blessed with up-close-and-personal exposure to General Strock’s calmunder-fire breed of wisdom. In his words, he interpreted his job description as: “Chief of organization, manpower, resources, engineering capability, budgets, bulldozers, and bridging”. The General patiently discussed all facets of military engi-

neering with respect to his 25,000 men and women in the $6B (to $16B) Public Works Command, and 10,000 more in the $20B Civil Command. Stock described his organization’s role in readiness, the structure of his counterparts’ organizations, he provided insight regarding the ‘keys to success’ for a military engineer, and graced listeners with maxims on his leadership perspective. Some of these follow: “You are who I was, sitting at this table 35 years ago.” “Do not forget that helping others can take your minds off uncomfortable situations.” “To succeed, you need to exact your tasks [as if you are doing them] better than anyone has done them before … not out of gainsmanship or competition.” “To learn leadership, you need to … get new experiences, accept responsibility, learn new things.” “Purpose, level, and intent. You should understand these [points] ‘two levels above yourself’ in management … and be able to communicate them to your subordinates.” He also stated that he “has arrived at a point in his career where he is aware of his ability to lead, but is not compelled to lead everything he gets involved in.” Strock’s address was salted with words like … integrity, covenant, and doctrine … indicating his authority, wise counsel, and leadership … to be the just, selfless,

and trustworthy kind. After lunch, General Strock shook hands and took photos with students in the Hotel lobby. To each he offered kind words or brief conversation. Most impressive was the General’s ability to relate with all, as if we were previously acquainted … as if we met a second or third time. To compare the SAME Leadership Conference to a three-course meal, a chartered bus tour to the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) was the icing on the cake. Partly guided by graduating Sr. Cadet Steve Klenke, student leaders visited the USAFA Chapel, the Gift Shop, and the snow covered grounds of the USAFA SAME HS Engineering Summer Camp. Complete was an example of a house that is constructed by high school students attending the camp. The dwelling, ultimately, is loaded on a flatbed trailer and carried (for donation) to a nearby Native American Indian Reservation. Fitting it would be then, for one of the visiting student leaders to return as a 2007 camp mentor. No doubt, these fine young men and women are our future leaders. Equipped with the life lessons delivered by Admiral Barror, Colonel Byers, and General Strock … and provided wise grooming and mentoring on your behalf, our future is in their good hands. The vision is reassuring. Submitted by ACG, Mar-07


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A MULTITUDE OF SPRING SCIENCE FAIR OPPORTUNITIES!! ! get involved in our community … get engaged in science ALAMO REGIONAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING FAIR - MARCH 15-17   

The Fair will be held at Bill Greehy Arena Athletic Center at St. Mary’s University Volunteers are needed for judges Judging will take place on Friday, March 16, from about 8:30 am - 1:00 pm. Check-in time for the judges is 7:30 am - a free continental breakfast will be provided.

SAME is sponsoring $150 prizes for the 1st Grand Prize winners in the Junior and Senior Division of the Engineering portion (Fair 1) of this event Please contact Dick Kochanek at (210) 536-5471 / (210) 884-9731 or richard.kochanek.ctr@brooks.af.mil / dkochanek@satx.rr.com if you are interested in participating.

EXXON-MOBIL TEXAS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING FAIR - APR 5-7  

The Fair will be held at Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center Apr 5-7 Volunteers are needed from UTSA to help with judging on Friday, April 6, from about 8 am - 2 pm.

Come out to see interesting projects, to mentor, and field questions about UTSA. Please contact our very own Stuart Birnbaum at (210) 458-5467 or stuart.birnbaum@utsa.edu if you are interested in participating.

SA BEST (SAN ANTONIO BOOSTING ENGINEERING, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY) GEAR (GETTING EXCITED ABOUT ROBOTS) 2007 COMPETITION - APRIL 28  

     

SABEST is an organization which attempts to expose area high school students to science and engineering. The local organization branched out by offering a trial program called GEAR, a robotics competition for elementary and middle school students. GEAR started in 2001 with the goal of generating interest among students to pursue a career in engineering, science and technology related fields and also to show them that math and science can be fun. The game challenges are designed to encourage students to think at higher levels and to show them how everyday math and science apply to the real world in the relative safety of a classroom lab environment. See http://www.gear.sabest.org for more information. Volunteers are also needed for the competition on Saturday, April 28, at the UTSA (1604) Rec Center (No robotic experience needed. Just be ready to have fun!): Refs - 10 needed Scorers - 4 needed Judges - 6 needed Staging - 5 needed Registration - 4 needed


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IT’S TIME FOR A SPRING ROUNDUP !! ! EESE Meeting on Friday, March 23rd at Big’Z (after seminar) Next item slated on the docket is a casual meeting at Big’Z Burger Joint … right after seminar on March 23rd. We can discuss academic news, Basura Bash plans, and EESE direction. Come out and see your old friends. First arrivals will be there between 5:30 and 6:00. Big'z Burger Joint

2303 N Loop 1604 W San Antonio, TX 78258

“… they serve excellent hamburgers, fries with chipotle mayo, and Mexican-vanilla milk shakes ...” - Patricia Sharpe, “Where to go Next in Texas”

BASURA BASH: IT’S PAY BACK TIME! EESE is meeting at Bolner’s on San Pedro Creek This is the 13th year for the popular San Antonio River cleanup project. It is the single largest all volunteer community based project in San Antonio. We expect up to 2500 volunteers this years. EESE members need to sign up with Keith Muhlestein. 

E-mail him at: Keith.Muhlestein@BCB.com

or call his office at 210-678-3311

We’ve adopted the San Pedro Creek Zone and need to get as many EESE volunteers as possible. Keith has attached a flyer for the event day meeting location (Bolner's Meet Market, 2900 S. Flores at 8:00 AM) and an alternate contact (Lani Cabico 678-3315). Get in touch with Keith on event day by calling: 845-3734. He’ll be coordinating the event from the Mitchell Street Bridge next to Bolner's Saturday morning. We look forward to seeing everyone there. Thanks. Keith Muhlestein, PhD Student


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G RANT O PPORTUNITIES A BOUND !! ! The following solicitations were announced through the UTSA Office of Research Development (UTSA-ORD). ORD offers grant and scholarship notification services, and searchable databases. Learn more about UTSA-ORD here: http://www.utsa.edu/research/ and access more UTSA ORD services here: http://www.utsa.edu/research/get_Started/funding.htm SUBJECT

AWARD

DEADLINE

URL

* DOI/USFWS: Coastal Program

NP

2/1/2008

http://www.fws.gov/coastal/CoastalProgram/

EPA: Disappearing Diporeia in the Great Lakes

$200k for 4 awards over 3-yrs

03/22/2007

http://epa.gov/glnpo/fund/rfp/diporeia/gl20071a.pdf

EPA: Pollution Prevention, P2

est. $20k to $180k over 3-yrs

04/02/2007

http://www.epa.gov/p2/pubs/grants/ ppis/2007fpp2grant.htm

*EPA: Safe Drinking Water in Rural Puerto Rico

$75,000

4/13/2007

http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do? oppId=12621&mode=VIEW

* Joyce: Environment Grants

NP

4/16/2007

http://www.joycefdn.org/GrantList/ HowToApply.aspx

09/30/2007

http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do? oppId=12347&mode=VIEW

9/28/2007

http:// a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan20071 800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2007/E72833.htm

NSF: Arctic Research Opportunities not provided - Arctic Research and Education

11/10/2007

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2006/nsf06603/ nsf06603.htm

NSF: Geobiology and LowTemperature Chemistry

$4M for up to 30 awards

07/16/2007

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2006/nsf06563/ nsf06563.htm

NSF: Geomorphology and Land Use Dynamics

$2.5M for up to 30 awards

07/16/2007

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2006/nsf06564/ nsf06564.htm

NSF: Hydrologic Sciences

$7.4M for up to 30 awards

06/01/2007

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2006/nsf06545/ nsf06545.htm

NSF: Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences

NTE $1M over 5-yrs

04/04/2007

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2007/nsf07539/ nsf07539.htm

* NSF: Math & Science Scholarship Support

$125k/yr

10/10/2007

http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do? mode=VIEW&oppId=11543

NIST: Building Research and Coop- est. $5k to $150k erative Agreements over 3-yrs * NOAA: Extramural Research

* Indicates new posting for March

NP


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A REA J OB P OSTINGS … J UMP

ON ‘ EM !

IN THE ‘ENVIRONMENTAL & WATER RESOURCE’ ARENAS Arcadis

Project Engineer

Austin

http://www.bbl-inc.com/BBLInc

BS, 5-yr

Arcadis

Staff Scientist

Austin

http://www.bbl-inc.com/BBLInc

BS, 5-yr

B&V

Entry Level Civil Engineer

San Antonio

http://www.bv.com/careers/index.aspx

BS, EIT

CH2MHILL Energy Engineer / AEE CEM

San Antonio

http://careers.ch2mhill.com/

BS, 8-yr, PE

COSA

Management Intern Program

San Antonio

$3,333 / mo

MS

COSA

Public Works Engineer

San Antonio

$4,400 - $6,500 / mo

BS, 4-yr, PE

COSA

Sr. Public Works Engineer

San Antonio

$5,580 - $8,400 / mo

BS, 6-yr, PE

CPS

Power Plant Engineer

San Antonio

http://www.cpsenergy.com

BS, 3-yr

EarthTech Civil / Environmental Engineer

San Antonio

http://www.earthtechcareers.com

BS, 8-yr, PE

EarthTech Environmental Engineer

San Antonio

http://www.earthtechcareers.com

BS, 15-yr, PE

EPA

Env. Engineer/Scientist

Dallas

$4,583 - $8,500 / mo

Apply

SAWS

Engineering Technician I

San Antonio

$2,287 - $3,088 / mo

AS

SAWS

Engineering Technician II

San Antonio

$2,482 - $3,351 / mo

CAD, 2-yr

SAWS

Graduate Engineer I

San Antonio

$3,509 - $5,263 / mo

BS, 2-yr, EIT

SAWS

Hydrogeological Sepcialist

San Antonio

$3,234 - $4,851 / mo

BS, 4-yr

SAWS

Project Engineer - Facilities

San Antonio

$4,150 - $6,225 / mo

BS, 5-yr, PE

SAWS

Project Engineer - O&M Engineering

San Antonio

$4,150 - $6,225 / mo

BS, 5-yr, PE

SAWS

Project Engineer - Water Resources

San Antonio

$4,150 - $6,225 / mo

BS, 5-yr, PE

SAWS

Supervisor, Groundwater Resources

San Antonio

$3,807 - $5,711 / mo

BS, 2-yr, EIT

TCEQ

Env. Eng. Monitoring Specialist V

Austin

$3,544 / mo

BS

TCEQ

Hydrologist II

Austin

$3,332 / mo

BS, 2-yr

Tetra

Engineer / Geologist III

Houston

http://www.tetratech.com/career/

BS

Tetra

Environmental Scientist

Austin

http://www.tetratech.com/career/

BS

Tetra

Sr. Environmental Professional

Dallas

http://www.tetratech.com/career/

BS, 8-yr

Tetra

Staff Geologist

Austin

http://www.tetratech.com/career/

BS

TPWD

Natural Resource Specialist III

Hebronville

$3,332.50 / mo

BS, 2-yr

TPWD

Natural Resource Specialist I-IV

Brownsville

$2,328.83 - $3786.28 / mo

I-IV: varies

TPWD

Natural Resource Specialist I-V

Jasper

$2,328-$4,155 / mo

I-IV: varies

TPWD

Natural Resource Specialist VI

Kerrville

$4,589.88 / mo

BS, 5-yr, PE

URS

Ecological Risk Assessor

Austin

http://www.urscorp.com/Careers

BS, 8-yr

URS

Entry Level Air Quality Specialist

Houston

http://www.urscorp.com/Careers

BS

URS

Entry Level Chemist

Several in Texas

http://www.urscorp.com/Careers

BS

URS

Entry Level Geologist

Several in Texas

http://www.urscorp.com/Careers

BS

URS

Environmental Engineer

Several in Texas

http://www.urscorp.com/Careers

BS

URS

Environmental Scientist

Several in Texas

http://www.urscorp.com/Careers

BS

URS

Water Resources Project Engineer

San Antonio

http://www.urscorp.com/Careers

BS, 7-yr, PE

USGS

Supervisory Hydrologist

San Antonio

$5,250 - $8,166 / mo

Apply

USGS

Supervisory Physical Scientist

San Antonio

$5,250 - $8,166 / mo

Apply

S TAY

TUNED .

T HE

CURRENT OUTLOOK IS GOOD !


V OLUME II, I SSUE 2

P AGE 12

2005 – 2006 EESE OFFICERS

EESE Affiliations

Faculty Advisor

and Membership

Kyle Murray, Ph.D.

Kyle.Murray@utsa.edu Section President

Andrew Gayley

agayley@lonestar.utsa.edu Section Vice President

Blake Weissling

bweissling@hotmail.com Section Parliamentarian

Gwen Young

gwyo@earthlink.net

Section Communications Director Summer Barber

summer.barber@utsa.edu DSC Representative

Evelynn Mitchell

evelynn@satx.rr.com ASCE Committee Chair

Emeka Ovuegbe

ehawkyns@yahoo.com

A&WMA Committee Chair Marla Roberts

maples77@gmail.com GIS Committee Chair

Pam Colby

pamela.colby@technologyffwd.com

CORRESPONDENCE Officer Mailbox eese@lonestar.utsa.edu EESE Website URL lonestar.utsa.edu/eese Newsletter Editor Summer Barber

summer.barber@utsa.edu EESE Newsgroup Links eese@lists.sis.utsa.edu

https://lists.sis.utsa.edu/mailman/listinfo/eese

THIS NEWSLETTER EESE Natural Resources is an informal monthly publication released during the first week of every month during regular semesters. UTSA Student Activities, EESE, nor its officiating board are responsible for opinions or statements printed in this newsletter. The deadline for submittals to the next edition of the newsletter in the fourth Friday of the month. Send faculty spotlights, project highlights, course offerings, conference reports, and member articles to: eese@lonestar.utsa.edu.

EESE membership is easy – there are three ways to join: 1) by e-mail, 2) at the next meeting, or 3) registering with the listserv. Currently, EESE is loosely affiliated with the following organizations: Air and Waste Management Association (A&WMA, http://www.awma.org) American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE, http://www.asce.org/asce.cfm) Environmental Water Research Institute (EWRI, http://www.ewrinstitute.org) National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP, http://www.staep.com/STAEPHome.htm) Society of American Military Engineers (SAME, http://www.same-satx.org) EESE dues and refreshment funds are included with the purchase of a $20 group t-shirt (per annum). Surplus proceeds are used for photo-

The EESE Newsgroup The EESE Newsgroup is moderated by EESE officers and is hosted by the UTSA Office of Information Technology (OIT), Student Computing Services. Visit the OIT at: http:// www.utsa.edu/infotech/.

OIT Student Computing Services

Systems are secure, user-friendly, and the EESE group is moderated. If your address was part of the old newsgroup system, it was migrated over to the new system. Feel free to unsubscribe if you are on the list by mistake. Manage options, subscribe, or unsubscribe (i.e. if you are going on vacation) using the graphical interface at: https:// lists.sis.utsa.edu/mailman/listinfo/eese. Thank You.

“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” - Albert Einstein, 1879 - 1955

2007 (Mar) - UTSA EESE Natural Resources  

Newsletter for the Earth, Environmental Science, and Engineering graduate student organization at UTSA.

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