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T HE S OCIETY

OF

A MERICAN M ILITARY E NGINEERS

R ESOUNDING E CHO U NITED S TATES A IR F ORCE A CADEMY ~ E NGINEERING

AND

C ONSTRUCTION C AMP

V OLUME I, I SSUE 1

O CTOBER 2007 I NSIDE THIS ISSUE :

FALL IN … REGROUP YOUR FALL NEWSLETTER

Hello Echo! Boom … Boom! Your Engineering Flight Leaders wanted to contact you, in this form: 1) to catch up 2) to fill you in 3) to disseminate information 4) to remind you of deadlines. Plus, we’re Old School and don’t know how to use FaceBook or MySpace.

F ALL I N

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D EADLINES

1

T OM S YNOVEC

2

P AM G ROVER

2

F ARMER J OHN

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Included are messages from Tom, Pam, and Andrew. Enjoy the newsletter!

M ULTIMEDIA

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We’re backing YOU … 100%!

B UILD ,

It was our pleasure to meet you all … and we hope that each and every one of you is successful at college, in you chosen major, and in your future career. Please feel free to e-mail us with questions, for advice, or just to say Hi!

THEN

D ESIGN 4

REMEMBER YOUR APPLICATION DEADLINES! http://www.academyadmissions.com/admissions/howtoapply/

Just a friendly reminder …

By October 31 ...

If you haven’t done so, request and complete:

Contact your Congressman for nominations as soon as possible. Most congressional offices do not accept requests for nominations after October 31, but if you miss this date … PERSEVERE, and do it anyway! Appointments begin November 1st … and will continue till March 2008.

  

Your Precandidate Screening Kit Candidate Kit And mail everything back in

Good luck.

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N EWS F ROM T OM S YNOVEC @ T HE A CADEMY Competitions ~

Trips ~

Classes ~

My last meet was August 4th. I did well, and also set some new personal records. I wasn’t able to get pictures at this meet. I do have video from that meet, and pictures and videos from Collegiate Nationals (back in April). I’ll try to distribute these later in the Fall. My next meet is 27 Oct, which is the last event before the American Open in December.

Several of us recently traveled to the Naval Academy for the Air Force v. Navy football game.

I’m taking a lot of CE classes and a bunch of core classes that I don’t particularly care all that much for, like Aeronautical Engineering.

Kaipo-Noa KaheakuEnhada ran 101 yards and scored twice in the 4th QTR, leading Navy to a 31-20 win over Air Force on Saturday, before a record crowd (of 37,615) at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.

Application Suggestions ~ If you have any questions, send me an email. If I don’t know the answer, I can find someone who does.

See you next year … Tom.

C2C Thomas Synovec Scheduling NCO C09Thomas.Synovec@usafa.edu

Olympic Weightlifting Team CIC Cadet Squadron 36 "Proud Pink Panthers"

N EWS FROM P AM G ROVER @ C ARTER AND B URGESS Laramie Regional Airport.

Prairie Waters.

I’m working on a $1.8M airport upgrade in Laramie, WY. We are removing and replacing part of the concrete parking apron, originally constructed in the 1940’s. It has significant cracking due to the high clay content of the soil it was built on.

The next project I will be working on is called Prairie Waters. The client will be the city of Aurora, CO. I will be monitoring ~$350M in construction on 2 of 3 overall project phases. My responsibilities will be: 1) reviewing the construction contractor’s schedule, 2) negotiating contract changes, 3) assisting with conflict resolution, and 4) tracking all paperwork involved in this large, complex project.

When we replace the concrete apron, we’ll also remove an additional 2’ of clay bedding material, install under-drainage, and bring in 2’ of aggregate to further improve drainage.

Before: The start of excavation at the Laramie, WY Regional Airport. The 2-ft thick concrete apron will be removed and replaced; and drainage will be improved.

My involvement will last 2 years.

I am the owner’s agent, which means: I approve all materials that the contractor plans to use on the project, I verify installed quantities, sign payment applications, and verify that all the work has been performed according to plans and specifications. This is a 60-day project. The wind always blows in Laramie.

Tom and Farmer John say: Way to go, Pam! This is a very important water resources project for Colorado. See an article in the Denver Post about it here:

After: Excavation and earth moving has begun. 2-ft of coarse aggregate material will be placed under the new apron on this $1.8M airport upgrade.

http://www.waterinfo.org/ january-23-2007-tappingused-water-denver-post

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N EWS FROM ‘ F ARMER J OHN ’ @ CH2M HILL Electro-fishing.

Texas A&M Corps of Cadets.

The morning after returning home from Colorado, I reported to Leon Creek at former Kelly AFB (on the South side of San Antonio, TX). Leon Creek divides former Kelly AFB from Lackland AFB. Lackland is where all Air Force recruits go for basic training … and it can be extremely hot in the summer (ask Pam).

While Texas A&M is no longer an all-male military college, its Corps of Cadets remains the largest uniformed body of students in the nation outside the U.S. service academies. Currently, some 2,000 young men and women are Corps members. Those students have realized the Corps of Cadets offers them something extra; an opportunity to live a disciplined lifestyle while gaining practical experience in leadership and organizational management. Their participation in Corps operations allows them to hone these skills daily.

On Leon Creek, our company is teamed with HydroGeologic, Inc. Our Stream Biologist (Mike Mischuk), a Hydrogeologist (Bret Rahe), and I collected surface water, sediment, macroinvertebrate, and fish-tissue samples. To collect fish, we wore breathable chest waders. Mike and Bret carried $6,500 electrofishing backpacks. We repeatedly charged the water with 160V of electricity for 4 milliseconds, stunning the fish so that they can be netted.

Electrofishing: To survey fish species on Leon Creek, we used electroshocking equipment. 3 fish species from each site were sent to a lab where they are homogenized and analyzed by chemists (like STL chemist Kris Dusablon). Note: The photo is not

of us, but shows what we do.

Traditions.

Backup Plan: I had another project to post right, but decided to remind you to have a good backup plan. Make sure you are apply to other good ROTC schools: http://www.aggiecorps.org

Cadets in the Corps are at the heart of the Aggie Spirit. Because Texas A&M was a military college for most of its first 100 years, many of its most cherished traditions grew out of the Corps experience. The University's Bonfire, yell practice, Aggie Muster and Silver Taps traditions all originated with the Corps. Thus cadets consider themselves 'Keepers of the Spirit' and 'Guardians of Tradition.'

SAME Camp: Multi-Media 2007 Camp Photos: http://samecoloradocamp.org/gallery/v/2007/ Echo Flight Photos: http://www.same-satx.org/Gallery/scamp 2007 Promotional video: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=hKYktO2QgZo Concrete Beam Competition Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=gqvR7WLHjXI

Associate of Graduates at Doolittle Hall

Listen for our cheer in the Beam video! Echo!

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BUILD … THEN DESIGN: 2007 SAME USAFA ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION CAMP

If building the character of our nation’s youth was metaphorically likened to the planting of trees … I recently witnessed the birth of a great forest. Cultivation began at a remote engineering laboratory in the foothills to the Colorado Rockies. The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. – Anonymous From all corners of this Great Nation … and bases overseas … 60 high school students descended upon Colorado Springs to attend the annual SAME Engineering and Construction Camp. The weeklong camp, conducted at the

United States Air Force Academy (USAFA), is designed to stimulate interest in collegiate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs … especially in students who wish to join ROTC or attend one of the Military Schools. Program designers envision relationships started at the camp to follow an engineer throughout his/her career. Upon arrival on July 5th, recruits immediately deployed to Camp F.E.R.L … the Field Engineering and Readiness Laboratory. Camp F.E.R.L. is the brainchild of Retired Brigadier General David Swint, a former USAFA Civil Engineering professor who founded the complex in 1994. General

Swint understood these fundamental truths about engineering students: 1) they are hands -on learners, who 2) learn best by doing. Immediately following each practical lesson, understanding (in the mind of the student) is reinforced by discussion. General Swint conceived the open-air classroom as a simulated, remote airbase where students could break ground, lay concrete, construct wooden buildings, solve problems, and become immersed in the engineering craft. Fitting to Swint’s vision is the camp’s motto, ‘Build … then Design’. Campers were divided into 6 flights of 10 students: Alpha Flight, Bravo, Charlie, Delta,

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- The Engineering Reaction Course featured 6 stations, which tested problem solving abilities and teamwork. - One of the favorite events involved fabrication of a raft from ice-coolers and wooden planks. Teams floated out to rescue Wilson from the middle of a small pond. Wilson was a volleyball. - Flight time featured team-building activities, hiking, campus tours, sports, and discussions with Cadet leaders and Mentors. At each day’s end, everyone relaxed in luxurious sleep accommodations: 12-man General Purpose (GP) Medium tents on US Army cots. Bed linens were provided: Government-Issue (GI) Intermediate Cold-Weather (ICW) Olive-Drab (OD) mummy bags. The kids loved it almost as much as Echo Flight Mentor Pamela Grover from CarterBurgess (Denver).

Echo, and Foxtrot. The kids bonded fast … so within a day, most of the camper’s names were replaced by encrypted handles and sophisticated call names like: Scarecrow, Reefer, Farmer John, Romeo, Fiber, An-Tanna, and Geicko. “Students lived, built, and learned … and hopefully reaffirmed their commitment to become [military] engineers,” said Army Major Hugh Cronin. Cronin is a Civil Engineering instructor at the Academy and was Officer-in-Charge during the 2007 camp season. The week was busy. - Flights constructed 2,000 pound steelreinforced concrete beams, which were competed on load-bearing. The winning beam supported 13,500 pounds. - Students designed, built, and tested an operational irrigation system, which was evaluated on cost-effectiveness. - Campers constructed wooden storage buildings, which were donated to non-profit organizations.

“All flights had a wonderful time. They learned a great deal about teamwork and leadership,” said Assistant Professor Cronin. Cronin teaches Airbase Design and Performance and Computer Applications for Civil Engineers. Following evening meals, students were exposed to a Young Engineers panel or guest speakers who shared wisdom on: leadership, career development, and Academy admissions. Distinguished speakers included: Dr. Robert D. Wolff, P.E. (Executive Director of SAME) BG Gregg F. Martin (NW Division Commander of USACE) COL (ret) Hal K. Alguire, P.E. (25-Year SAME Fellows Investee and RVP award recipient) LTG John F. Regni (USAFA Superintendent) MAJ David A. Gwisdalla, P.E. (USAFA CE Instructor) COL William ‘Trapper’ Carpenter (USAFA Director of Admissions) USN CAPT William J. Beary, P.E. (NORAD Chief of Engineers)

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- USACE CE Department Chief Mentor: COL (ret) Kurt Ubbelohde - Leo Daly The 12 Flight Mentors represented the following A/E Organizations: - AFCESA - Carter-Burgess - Conti Corporation - CH2M HILL - Langley AFB

- Shaw Group - Sundt - Washington Services - Weston Solutions - Wright-Patterson

Most impressive was the good crop of youngsters.

Assigned to each flight was an Academy cadet (a Flight Leader) who shepherded students through the action-packed agenda. Flight Leaders are three -years senior to the high-school students … so they are great role-models and are critical to the success of the camp. By week’s end, most campers wanted to ‘grow up and be just like their Flight Leaders’ … they wanted to study engineering at the United States Air Force Academy (like Sophomore Cadet Tom Synovec and Junior Cadet Jackie Taylor). All around, I was personally impressed with the 2007 SAME USAFA Camp organization, planning, and attention to detail. The camp is blessed with abundant support to ensure its efficient operation. Represented at the camp were 3 Uniformed Services, 60 campers, 6 Flight Leaders, 12 Mentors, 12 Camp Directors, and support from over 25 consultants and/or USAF facilities. Our immediate leadership did a fine job coordinating this multifaceted event. Hats off to:

For the students, the SAME Camp was an invaluable once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to investigate their vocational interest in engineering, ROTC, and/or attendance at one of the Academies. No doubt, these fine young men and women are this country’s brightest … who testify to disciplined instruction in our homes and schools. Provided continued wise grooming and mentoring on your behalf … they shall file in with our nation’s future leaders … and become the next generation of Good Old-Fashioned Americans.

It was my pleasure to meet all of you.

Farmer John, Co-Mentor: Echo Flight (AKA — Mr. Andrew Gayley) Project Engineer, CH2M HILL Andrew.Gayley@ch2m.com

Integrity first

Camp Director: LTC (ret) Scott Prosuch - Tetra Tech

Service before self

Camp OIC: MAJ Hugh Cronin

Excellence in all we do

“There comes a special moment in everyone’s life, a moment for which that person was born. That special opportunity, when [you] seize it, will fulfill [your] mission — a mission for which [you are] uniquely qualified. In that moment [one] finds greatness. It is [their] finest hour.” - Winston Churchhill, 1874—1965 6 of 6

2007 (Oct) - SAME E/C Camp - Resounding Echo  

Fall Newsletter for Echo Flight - 2007 SAME E/C Camp, USAFA.

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