Page 1

Global Security Solutions: An Interview p.20

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: Francisco Garcia p.10

Homeland Volume 10, Issue 3 Fall 2012

INSIDE

The land of the free because of the brave

Security

®

p. 29

John Didden

William Flynn

Executive Summit Las Vegas Rio All-Suite Hotel

Complete schedule and discounts to stay at the Las Vegas Rio inside!

$6.50 U.S./$9.50 CAN

October 17 – 19

John Giduck

ABCHS: America’s Largest and Most Prestigious Homeland Security Organization


The American Board for

Certification in Homeland Security

The American Board for Certification in Homeland Security (ABCHS) and its sub-boards sponsor certification programs in various homeland security-related areas. The goal of each program is to validate the professional knowledge and skills of certified individuals in a particular area related to homeland security. This is no small task. The Association employs intricate processes for establishing certification program policy, enforcing ethics, developing tests, and operating continuing education programs. These processes align with industry standards (such as those set forth by the American National Standards Institute and the National Commission for Certifying Agencies) and are driven by Subject Matter Experts. In this way, those who hold certifications from ABCHS can be confident that their credentials are credible and relevant to their area of homeland security. Join today, along with the thousands who currently carry the ABCHS credential. Together we can protect what matters most—our families, communities, country, and way of life.

Together we can make a difference.

® Apply Now!

2 Inside Fall 2012 www.abchs.com 877.219.2519 Call theHomeland ChiefSecurity Association Officer at 877.219.2519 or visit us online at www.abchs.com ®

®


SUBSCRIBE TODAY and receive a

FREE BONUS ISSUE! INTERVIEW SOLUTIONS: AN

Business Office

Chief Association Officer Marianne Schmid

cao@abchs.com

The land

of the free

because of

the brave

SECURIT Y

editor@abchs.com

Editor Cheryl Barnett, BFA cheryl.barnett@abchs.com Curriculum Editor Van Shipley, AA, BA

van.shipley@abchs.com

Art Director Brandon Alms, BFA

brandon@abchs.com

Graphic Designer Stephanie Lindberg, BFA stephanie@abchs.com Web Designer Justin Casey, BS

justin@abchs.com

Each full-color issue of Inside Homeland Security® journal is packed with articles describing the latest information in the field. Subscribe today and get in on the action.

®

p. 29

1 year subscription

JOHN DIDDEN

$29.95 (4 Issues)

2 Year Subscription

WILLIAM FLYNN

tobRioeArll-1Suite Hotel OcVeg as Las

EDU COMPLETE SCH

LE AND DISCOU

NTS TO STAY

AT THE LAS VEG

ESTIGIOU AND MOST PR ’S LARGEST CHS: AMERICA

AS RIO INSIDE

D S HOMELAN

!

$49.95 (9 Issues)

JOHN GIDUCK

/$9.50 CAN

Summit Executive 7 – 19

GANIZATI SECURITY OR

To Subscribe:

ON

Call us at 877.219.2519

Yes! I want a 2 year subscription for only $49.95 IHSSUB0312

Mail to: Inside Homeland Security® 2750 East Sunshine Street Springfield, MO 65804

Editorial Office Senior Editor Julie Brooks, BA, MA

p.10

Issue 3 Volume 10, 2012 Fall

INSIDE

AB

2750 East Sunshine Street Springfield, MO 65804 877.219.2519 Fax: 417.881.1865

CISCO GARCIA

$6.50 U.S.

Inside Homeland Security® ISSN 2167-2261 (Print) ISSN 2167-227X (Online) is a publication of The American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, CHS®, 2012. ABCHS is dedicated to the credentialing, networking, and continuing education of homeland security professionals. The opinions and views expressed by the authors, publishers, or interviewees are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the ABCHS program, nor does the ABCHS program adopt such opinions or views as its own. The ABCHS program disclaims and does not assume any responsibility of liability with respect to the opinions, views, and factual statements of such authors, publishers, or interviewees, nor with respect to any actions, qualifications, or representations of its members’ or subscribers’ efforts in connection with the application or use of any information, suggestions, or recommendations made by the ABCHS program or any of its boards, committees, publications, resources, or activities thereof. For more information call toll-free 877.219.2519.

LIGHT: FRAN

d n a l e m Ho

RITY GLOBAL SECU

MEMBER SPOT

p.20

Name ____________________________ Address __________________________

Payment Enclosed Charge my Credit Card Visa _______________________________ MasterCard _________________________ Discover ____________________________ AmEx ______________________________

City______________________________ State ____________ Zip _____________ One Year $29.95

Two Year $49.95

Credit Card # ________________________ Exp. Date ___________________________ Signature ___________________________

or Subscribe Online today at www.abchs.com Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

3


Announcement to Readers

We’re on Kindle! If you’ve already marched into the future of reading, you know about Kindle. Now you can add Inside Homeland Security ® to your e-reading experience using Amazon’s standard-setting device.

M Haven’t taken the Kindle leap yet? Here are six reasons why you should not delay: 1. Same IHS, but easier to read: Adjustable type size, high-contrast digital ink, bolder fonts. 2. Contingency planning: Read in bed with no eyestrain. Read at the beach—no glare. 3. Preparedness: Online backup archiving on Amazon. 4. Continuity: Synch your reading to your laptop and wireless devices. 5. Resiliency: Battery life of up to one month. 6. Convenience: Weighs less than a single print issue. Takes up less space in your carry-on.

Julie Brooks Editor, Inside Homeland Security®


www.abchs.com | 877.219.2519

Volume 10, Issue 3

Fall 2012

contents

Executive Summit

October 17 – 19

Special Edition

p. 29

Las Vegas Rio All-Suite Hotel

12

06 Board Members

29 Summit Introduction

07 Announcements

30 Summit Insert

10 Member Spotlight

Schedule at a Glance Rio Hotel Info and Map Summit Schedule Sponsorship Info and Travel Tips

55 Provisional Members

31 Featured Keynote Speaker

07 CAO Sign

Border Patrol and Narco Terrorism 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

E xec u tive S u mmit 2 0 1 2

in eve r y iss u e

56 Newly Credentialed

Jan Hargrave

32 Association Keynote Speakers F eat u r es

08 Why Get Certified?

Homeland Security as a Field

20 Global Security Solutions

An Interview with Joel Yonkman By Trysta Herzog

24 Internet Defamation By Joshua K. Roberts

John Didden William Flynn John Giduck

34 Presenters & Panelists

35 ES-21 Breakout Sessions

53 ES-21 Application Fall 2012

Inside Homeland SecurityÂŽ

5


American Board For Certification in Homeland Security

ABCHS Executive Advisory Board Chair: Eric White, BS, CHS-V, FABCHS, CPS, ISMA-IV Vice-Chair: Barbara B. Citarella, RN, BSN, MS, DABCHS, CHS-V Secretary: John J. Sullivan, Jr., PhD, CHS-V E. Robert Bertolli, OD, BS, DABFE, DABCHS, CHS-V Brendalyn ‘Val’ Bilotti, RN, BS, CHS-V Jessica M. Cummins, DABCHS, CHS-V William H. Cummins, BA, CHS-V, CDP-I John W.A. Didden, CHS-III David J. Fair, PhD, CHS-V, SSI, CMC Thomas Givens, DABCHS, CHS-V David A. Goldschmitt, MD, FACEP, DABCHS, CHS-V Jeffrey S. Hatchew, JD Henry L. Homrighaus, Jr., DABCHS, CHS-V, PSNA, FABCHS David L. Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V Steven G. King, MS, MBA, CHS-V, CPP Sean Kinney, CHS-V, CMI-III, CFC Cathi Marx, DABCHS, CHS-V Robert L. McAlister, BS, CHS-V, DABCHS Wayne M. Morris, DBA, MA, CHS-V, CPP, PSP Andrew Neal, CHS-V, CISM, CIFI, CSC/I Janet M. Schwartz, PhD, FACFEI, DABCHS, CHS-V, CDP-I In memoriam, Nick D. Bacon, Senior Advisor to the board and First Chair of ABCHS American Board for Certification in Dignitary and Executive Protection, ABCDEP Chair: David L. Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V Vice-Chair: Edward Bailor, AA, BS, CHS-III Vern J. Abila Gerald A. Cavis, CHS-III Robert E. Colliver, CHS-III Dennis C. D’Alessio, CHS-III Jim Floyd, CDP-I, CHS-III Mark E. Garver, CHS-V Marc E. Glasser, MS, CHS-V, CPP, CEM Jeffrey D. Guidry, CHS-III Clint Hilbert, CHS-III Michael S. LoFaso, CHS-I Michael E. Nossaman, CHS-III Tony J. Scotti, CHS-III Howard L. Weisman, CIPM, CHS-V, CIPM, CMAS American Board for Certification in Infrastructure Protection, ABCIP Chair: Steven G. King, MS, MBA, CHS-V, CPP Vice Chair: John J. Sullivan, Jr., PhD, CHS-V Dale W. Cillian, DABCHS, CHS-V Sherman E. Copeland, Jr., CHS-V, SSI Robert J. Coullahan, CHS-V, CEM Patrick N. Cowan, MBCDRP, CHS-V, SSI, CDP-I, ATM W.D. Fitzgerald, CHS-III, CPP Marc E. Glasser, MS, CHS-V, CPP, CEM Michael W. Homick, PhD, EdD, CHS-V, DABCHS Kurt J. Klingenberger, CHS-V Benjamin Nieves, CHS-V, CPP Peter A. Petch, CHS-V, RPIH, CIPS, CIMT Paul E. Purcell, CHS-V Debra M. Russell, PhD, CHS-V, CMI-V Robert R. Sanders, CHS-V, CPP, CSP Shawn J. VanDiver, MS, CMAS, CHS-V, SSI, CTT+ Cecelia Wright Brown, DEng, MS, BA, CHS-V

6

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

Chair, Vice Chair, Secretary

Chief Association Officer (CAO)

Working Group SME’s Security Non-government org

American Board for Certification in Infrastucture Protection (ABCIP)

government law enforcement Emergency management public health

american board for certification in homeland security (abchs)

industry academia infrastructure protection

*Due to space, designations are limited to five per person.

American Board of Law Enforcement Experts (ABLEE) American Board of Information Security and Computer Forensics (ABISCF) American Board of Intelligence Analysts (ABIA) American Board for Certification in Dignitary and Executive Protection (ABCDEP) American Board for Certified Master Chaplains (ABCMC)

American Board of Intelligence Analysts, ABIA Chair: John W.A. Didden, CHS-III Vice-Chair: James C. Sartori, CHS-V, CNTA, IAC Michael E. Chesbro, CHS-III, CPO, CSS, SSI, CFC Nestor L. Colls-Senaha, MS, CHS-V Marquis L. Laude, CPP, CHS-V Rainer A. Melucci, BS, CSC, FACFE, DABFE, CHS-III Bo Mitchell, CBCP, CHS-V, CPP, CEM Anthony A. Saputo, CHS-V, MBA Janet Schwartz, PhD, FACFEI, DABCHS, CHS-V, CDP-I Jason S. Sprowl, CAS Johnie A. Sullivan, FBI (Ret), MBA, MCS, CHS-IV American Board of Information Security and Computer Forensics, ABISCF Chair: Andrew Neal, CHS-III, CISM, CIFI, CSC/I Shayne P. Bates, DABCHS, CHS-V, CPP Margaret Bond, MBA, CISM, CHS-V Rocco A. DelCarmine, CSSP, ISSPCS, CHS-III Clay Fielding, MCP, MCT, CHFE, RFC, GLFI Jim Kennedy, PhD, MRP, MBCI, CBRM, CHS-IV Gabriela Rosu, BS, MS, CHS-V Ron Schmittling, CPA, CITP, CISA, CIA Eric Svetcov, CISSP, CISA, CHS-III Marie Wright, PhD, CHS-V American Board for Certified Master Chaplains, ABCMC Chair: David J. Fair, PhD, CHS-V, SSI, CMC Vice-Chair: Leatha Warden, PhD, LPC, ACC-I, CMC James H. Ballard, DMin, CHS-I, CMC Mary Dobbs, CMC Rev. Robert F. Fountain, CMC Don Howe, PhD, CMC Jesus M. Huertas, PhD, CMC Joseph J. Prudhomme, PhD, ThD, CHS-II, CMC Charles V. Singletary, CHS-I, CMC William M. Sloane, PhD, JD, LLM Bruce D. Wright, PhD, CMC

American Board of Law Enforcement Experts, ABLEE Chair: Sean Kinney, CHS-V, CMI-III, CFC Vice-Chair: E. Robert Bertolli, OD, DABCHS, CHS-V, CMI-V Oscar A. Baez, Sgt. (Ret), CHS-III Donald Durbin, CHS-V Henry C. Grayson, II, CHS-III, CMI-III William R. Kushner, MS, CHS-IV Jonathan D. Rose, MD, CHS-V, CFP Stephen Russell, BS, DABLEE, CMI-II, CHS-III Warren L. Shepard, CAPT, SSI, CDP-I, CRC, CHS-V James L. Smith, JD, EdD, CHS-III Patrick E. Spoerry, PhD, CHS-V, CFC 2012 Editorial Advisory Board Scott R. Altemose, CHS-IV, CFC, SSI Chad R. Barnes, CHS-V, CDP-I, SSI Brendalyn Val Bilotti, RN, BS, CHS-V Jody Bissonnette, BA, CHS-III James D. Blair, DPA, CHS-V, DABCHS, FABCHS Robert D. Boyden, PhD, MS, FACFEI, CHS-III Kenneth Burkhalter, BS, SSI, CDP-I, CHS-V Patrick N. Cowan, MBCDRP, CHS-V, SSI, CDP-I Todd DeVoe, CHS-III Richard J. Hughbank, MA, MS, CHS-IV, CMAS Michael G. Oehler, PhD, CHS-III, CMC Irwin C. Harrington, PhD, CHS-I, CFPS, CFI Harry Risor, MS, CHS-V James L. Smith, JD, EdD, CHS-III Shawn J. VanDiver, MS, CMAS, CHS-V, SSI, CTT+ John J. Wassel, MD, CHS-V

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


C A O ’ s sign Greetings from ABCHS/CAO August 1, 2012 As we move closer towards the Executive Summit, I do hope you have all registered to attend this great event. This year we are having three speakers along with 18 panel discussions covering various topics. Not only will ABCHS board members be presenting, but all of the six sub-boards will be having panel discussions! This is a phenomenal opportunity to meet your fellow members and add knowledge to your field of expertise. Please make sure to check out in this “Special Edition” the listings of all the panel discussions. There is no better way to learn more in your area of expertise and have more than one presenter on a topic. Most panels have three or more panelists. You will also have the opportunity to ask questions to these great presenters. Additionally, we do have current openings on some of our sub-boards: ABCMC, ABISCF, ABLEE, and ABIA. If you are interested in applying for any of these boards, please call or submit your Bio/Résumé to me at cao@abchs.com for consideration. At that time, all sub-boards will be holding their annual board meeting before the beginning of the Executive Summit, and your information will be reviewed for consideration. We have recently formed the ABCHS Educational Committee. Their duties are to view any and all educational material (study guides, referencing etc.) for all certification exams. The team of individuals on all of our committees are doing an excellent job. I hope you have noticed the improvements Inside Homeland Security®, IHS, has made from each issue to the next. If you would be interested in submitting an article or column don’t hesitate to contact myself or our senior editor Julie Brooks at editor@ abchs.com. Thank you to all that have taken the time out of your busy schedule to complete the surveys we have been sending out lately. The Educational Committee has been very busy moving forward with updating many of our current certifications and preparing them for accreditation. We also have several new certifications coming soon, keep an eye out for the launching of these. Hats off to all of the members spending hours of their time helping by sitting on various committees to make all of this happen. With the accreditations coming up, all of our exams will be proctored as opposed to online. You will be able to test at hundreds of locations, including universities, colleges, and testing centers under the National College Testing Association (NCTA). The military will be able to take them worldwide at their bases using Pearson VUE testing centers. We will keep you updated on our progress with this process. You will see many exciting new changes before this year ends as we move forward with great speed to make ABCHS stand out as the leader in certifications within the Homeland Security field. Again, thank you for your continued support of the ABCHS program.

M ember N ews

Regards, Marianne Schmid Chief Association Officer, ABCHS

WANTED: Homeland Security Manuscripts Inside Homeland Security® is looking for original, unpublished, well-researched manuscripts from experts within the field. Please review the publication’s submission guidelines at http://www.abchs.com/ihs/ihs_submission.php. For questions, contact the editor by e-mailing editor@abchs.com or calling 877.219.2519, ext. 122.

Send Your Comments and Letters to Countersign E-mail IHS at editor@abchs.com or address mail to: IHS, Countersign, 2750 E. Sunshine, Springfield, MO 65804. Letters become the property of the journal, and it owns all rights to their use. IHS may edit letters for content and length.

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

7

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

7


The American Board for Certification in

HOMELAND SECURITY Homeland Security as a Field The field of homeland security arose in the wake of the incidents on the morning of September 11, 2001. The terrorist attacks on America that day gave rise to a shared understanding that our nation needed increased security to protect our homeland, and many functional areas essential to providing this security were identified soon thereafter. Today the field of homeland security is very broad, encompassing such areas as the more obvious Emergency Management and Transportation Security to those that might not instantly come to mind, like Agriculture and Environmental Science.

✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯✯ Certification Vision Statement:

The American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, CHS®

Our vision is to bridge the gap between government and non-government organizations (NGOs) in facilitation of common standards of knowledge in coordinating various scale responses to homeland security and national disaster events.

Within a couple years of what has come to be known as 9/11, the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, CHS® (ABCHS), a professional membership association was created to serve the professional needs of those working in fields related to homeland security. Since its inception, ABCHS has made significant contributions to homeland security. ABCHS has provided its membership with many Association-sponsored networking opportunities. The Association has also contributed to the homeland security knowledge base through its quarterly, peer-reviewed publication, Inside Homeland Security®, and through its development of training and continuing education activities.

Certification Mission Statement: Our mission is to provide homeland security professionals from government and non-government organizations (NGOs) with certification to assess their knowledge of the current prescribed response frameworks.

ABCHS as Developer and Administrator of Certification Programs Providing an in-place organizational structure for the development and administration of certification programs is another function ABCHS has served. The Executive Committee of the ABCHS Advisory Board has adopted the following statements to clarify the Association’s vision and mission for certification program development and administration.

ABCHS as Developer and Administrator of Certified in Homeland Security, CHS® Program The ABCHS Executive Committee has the authority and responsibility to develop the CHS program, consisting of three levels of certification which recognize the attainment of increasingly difficult homeland security-related knowledge and skills for eligible candidates who successfully complete program assessments, who complete continuing education requirements, and who act in accordance with the ABCHS Code of Conduct (to view the ABCHS Code of Conduct, go to: http://www.abchs.com/pdf/certificationResources_code.pdf). ABCHS awards to successful examinees the title “Certified in Homeland Security” followed by the level at which the individual is certified and the designation CHS followed by a dash and a Roman numeral indicating the level of certification. For example, a level 5 certificant is a CHS-V.

8

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


877.219.2519 • WWW.ABCHS.COM Certification Programs Sponsored by The American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, CHS® (ABCHS) and Its Sub-Boards ABCHS and its sub-boards sponsor certification programs in various homeland security-related areas. The goal of each program is to validate the professional knowledge and skills of certified individuals in a particular area related to homeland security. This is no small task. The Association employs intricate processes for establishing certification program policy, enforcing ethics, developing tests, and operating continuing education programs. These processes align with industry standards (such as those set forth by the American National Standards Institute and the National Commission for Certifying Agencies) and are driven by Subject Matter Experts. In this way, those who hold certifications from ABCHS can be confident that their credentials are credible and relevant to their area of homeland security.

WHY GET CERTIFIED? Potential Benefits to the Field:

Potential Benefits to Employers:

• Standardizes practices and/or standards within an industry

• Improves customer satisfaction

• Advances the specialty/field

• Increases competence level of employees

• Increases cooperation between organizations in the same discipline

• Useful in making employment decisions

• Provides a means for an industry to self-regulate Potential Benefits to Those with Current Certification: • Grants recognition of knowledge and skills by a third party • Enhances professional reputation • Provides personal accomplishment • Supports continued professional development • Demonstrates a high level of commitment to the field of practice • Demonstrates a specific level of knowledge and skill • Increases opportunities for career advancement and/or increased earnings • Validates skills and knowledge • Communicates credibility • Serves as a differentiator in a competitive job market • Meets employer or governmental requirements

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

• Provides professional development opportunities for employees • Ongoing enhancement of knowledge and skills • Increases confidence in employees’ abilities • Demonstrates employers’ commitment to competence • Provides means to establish and enforce an ethical code • Provides compliance with industry regulation/ government requirements • Increases safety Potential Benefits to the public: • Provides means to establish and enforce an ethical code • Standardizes practice and/or standards within an industry • Advances the specialty/field and increases cooperation between organizations in the same discipline • Helps in identifying qualified service providers • Increases confidence in service providers • Provides disciplinary process to follow in case of complaints

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

9


member spotlight

Francisco

Garcia It highlighted for me the ONE TEAM, ONE FIGHT concept and was an outstanding experience overall. 10

Inside Homeland Security速

Fall 2012

M

CDP-I, SSI, CHS-V

aster Chief Petty Officer Francisco T. Garcia was born in Brooklyn, NY. He graduated from Automotive Vocational High School in June 1980.

He entered the Navy in October 1982 through the Delayed Entry Program and in December 1982 he attended boot camp at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Illinois.

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


His first duty assignment was aboard USS PUGET SOUND (AD-38), Gaeta, Italy. Other ship assignments include: USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN-69), Norfolk, Virginia, USS HARPER’S FERRY (LSD 49), San Diego, CA, and USS KITTY HAWK (CV-63), Yokosuka, Japan. Shore Duty assignments include: Naval Station, Keflavik, Iceland, Naval Air Station, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Georgia, Naval Station, Rota, Spain and Naval Air Station, Sigonella, Sicily. He is currently serving as the Senior Enlisted Advisor, Senior Enlisted Physical Security Specialist, and Senior Enlisted Instructor for the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, Security Training, Assistance and Assessment Team, Sigonella, Sicily. He met his wonderful wife Mildred of 21 years and they have three beautiful children, two sons and a daughter, Francisco Jr., Antonio, and Dinayda. Master Chief Garcia’s personal awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (six awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (two awards), Enlisted Surface Warfare Insignia, Enlisted Aviation Warfare Insignia, and various other personal and unit awards. I’ve heard you are currently the most senior Master-at-Arms Master Chief in the United States Navy. What are some of the duties of a Master Chief Petty Officer in the Navy? Yes, I am presently the most Senior Master-at-Arms Master Chief in the United States Navy. As one would say, I am the “Top Cop” in the Navy. As a Master Chief, I am responsible for mentoring all sailors in the customs and traditions of the United States Navy. I am also responsible to my Chain of Command to ensure that my sailors are properly trained, physically fit, mentally sound, and ready to complete their assigned mission. A Master Chief Petty Officer acts as the senior enlisted representative and advisor to a command’s leadership. In my case, I advise a military officer in charge of a local military detachment; for enlisted military personnel-specific matters, a special agent in charge of NCIS offices in Europe and Africa; and the command leadership for our organization’s headquarters in Norfolk, Virginia. As mentioned above, I also act as an informal mentor and ‘sounding board’ for more junior Master-at-Arms personnel throughout the Navy. I have served on several selection boards for Navy-wide advancement programs and routinely participate in forums dedicated to formulating both personnel and Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection policy Navy-wide.

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

After working in the Navy for over 30 years, what stands out most? It is the people that really make this job worthwhile. I once read that the easiest way to be successful is to surround yourself with lots of talented people and don’t forget to return the favor. There were many talented people, young and old, who have helped me be successful during my Navy career. And hopefully I have been able to make at least some kind of difference in their lives, because they have sure made a difference in mine. I also want to give a special thanks to my wife, sons and daughter who had to endure the many deployments, PCS Moves, and the uncertainty of Navy life. Now that retirement is upon you, do you have any thoughts as you reflect upon time spent? I would not hesitate one minute to enlist in the United States Navy all over again. It has been nothing less than a remarkable educational life experience, which no university can match. I was fortunate and blessed to visit countries such as Italy, Japan, Spain, Iceland, Australia, Mauritius, Finland, Israel, Greece, Thailand, France, Yugoslavia, Ukraine, England, Poland, Panama, Columbia, Barbados, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and Africa to name a few. I must admit that even though I visited so many countries and learned many different cultures, it made me appreciate how fortunate I am to live in such a wonderful country as that of the United States of America. Do you have any advice to those who are just joining the Navy, or for those who are thinking of joining? • Be professional. Care about your job. Never be indifferent about the way you do your work. • Be enthusiastic. Be proud of what you do and energetic about learning and teaching others to do a great job. • Be loyal. Practice loyalty to the Navy, your command and organization on a daily basis. If you want others to be loyal, you should settle for no less from yourself. Master Chief Garcia’s four basic laws: Law #1 Honesty and Integrity in Every Action Law #2 Take Care of Your People Law #3 Know Your Job and Equipment Law #4 Strive for Improvement What are the benefits of attending the Executive Summit? Attending the 2011 Executive Summit allowed me to network with Government, State, and Private sector security professionals in support of homeland security. It highlighted for me the ONE TEAM, ONE FIGHT concept and was an outstanding experience overall.

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

11


CE Article: 1 CE credits

2011 The number of Border Patrol agents went from 10,000 agents in 2005 to 17,000 in 2011. To get credit and complete the article, please go to http://www.abchs.com/IHSFA0112. If you have special needs that prevent you from taking the exam online, please contact the registrar at 800.423.9737. This article is approved by the following for 1 continuing education credit: The American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, CHS® provides this continuing education opportunity for those individuals Certified in Homeland Security, who are required to obtain 30 Certification Maintenance Unit’s (CMU) per 3-year recertification cycle. After studying this article, participants should be better able to do the following: 1. Describe how drug trafficking and terrorism have been around for a number of decades, and it is only recently that terrorists have formed an alliance with drug traffickers to help fund their organizations by way of trafficking, manufacturing, and transporting drugs. 2. Explain the current alarming problem of illegal immigration through the southern border, and the identification of OTM (“Other than Mexicans”) individuals coming from nations not friendly with the United States. 3. Discuss how narco-terrorism is a global problem, and that our nation perceives drug trafficking and terrorism as a destruction to life, liberty and a threat to our sovereignty. 4. Discuss how counter measures to mitigate the problem need to be fast, strong, and enforced constantly. These measures are a combination of policies and infrastructure to deter and minimize illegal immigration from the southern border.

KEYWORDS: Narcoterrorism, Hezbollah, Shining Path, Abu Nidal TARGET AUDIENCE: Homeland Security Professionals DISCLOSURE: The author has nothing to disclose PROGRAM LEVEL: Intermediate PREREQUISITES: None

12

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Border Patrol and Narco Terrorism By Victor M. G u e mb e s C H S - III ,

IAC

The Border Problem

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

2010

The population of the United States has surpassed 300 million people, according to U.S. Census Bureau statistics of 2007. The official poverty rate for the same year was 12.5%, which corresponds to over 37 million Americans (Project America, 2007). However, living in poverty in the United States cannot be compared to the deep poverty in developing nations. This disparity makes the United States a magnet for illegal immigrants to cross our borders seeking better opportunities, even if they live under American poverty standards. Our nation’s two borders have always been a playground for illegal immigrants. Without a doubt, the southern border with Mexico has been making headlines. Not all illegal immigrants who enter the United States through the southern border are from Mexico. There is evidence that Middle Eastern immigrants have used this route to gain entry to the United States. The security of the border depends on both countries to defend their interests. Mexico has accused the United States of targeting Mexicans with harsher enforcement of immigration laws and stronger and more difficult fences. However, the southern nation has not done enough to secure its southern borders against illegal immigration (Skinner, 2006). The problem of border control lies in the hands of The U.S. Border Patrol. Is the United States safer by building a fence along the U.S./Mexico line, and by executing an operational control of 44% of the entire borderline? Probably not. Is the United States safe by providing airtight control to 15% of the borderline only?

Probably not (Bedard, 2011). The problem is not only illegal immigration, but also the traffic of illegal drugs and the continuous bloody confrontations between rival drug cartels in their ambition for controlling the border market. Before policies are made, the terrain has to be demarked. A football team cannot play and strategize a game if the boundaries of the field are not properly marked. Once the field is clearly marked, then the proper rules of the game can be followed and enforced, as well as preparing a good strategy to win the game. Drug trafficking counterattacks and strategies are useless if the borders are partially guarded, and the lack of surveillance only results in an uncontrollable flow of illegal immigrants and drug traffickers into the United States. A little over 870 miles are under the operational control of the Border Patrol. The coverage is only 44% of the entire borderline. However, just 129 miles are under full control, the rest under managed status, which is the equivalent to random checks at other critical points of entry. This leaves the critical and sad reality of 15% of the border under full control. In Yuma, Arizona, the border is locked down as it should be, making it an almost impossible free pass to the country. The number of Border Patrol agents went from 10,000 agents in 2005 to 17,000 in 2011. In 2010, Border Patrol agents caught 445,000 illegal persons and seized over 2.4 million pounds of marijuana that never made it to the American streets (Bedard, 2011). The unsecured border is also an invitation to terrorist cells to infiltrate the American territory with little or no difficulty, which increases the potential for more danger to the nation.

Border Patrol agents caught 445,000 illegal persons andFallseized over 2012 Inside Homeland SecurityÂŽ 2.4 million pounds of marijuana...

13


2010 The Department

of Homeland

Security issued

an intelligence

alert regarding

a possible

border crossing

attempt by

a Somali named

Mohamed Ali...

The Infiltration of Terrorists

A Kuwait newspaper reported that a Hezbollah terrorist organization employed Mexican nationals with ties to Lebanon to setup a strong network to target Israel and the U.S.

14

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

Photo Credit: Gerald L Nino / CBP.gov

2010

It is very important to understand how human smuggling networks operate in Mexico. There are groups that specialize in smuggling individuals from countries associated with terrorism for high fees, due to the tremendous amount of risk and consequences the smugglers are exposed to. This is not the business of regular smugglers, but trained and experienced people who may also have a criminal record and find this challenging opportunity a profitable one. The well-known “coyotes” are experts in longrange surveillance and road marches during nighttime, and they are the scouts that take groups of people across the border without detection by the U.S. authorities. This activity has become a serious business; only those who can afford the high prices risk the no-guarantee journey. These groups, as well as regular human smuggling organizations, often use the same routes to and across the border that drug traffickers use. Because of the high profits, the cartels, more formally known as transnational criminal organizations, own the “rights” to smuggle people since they know all activity that occurs along these routes, taking the cartels to a different battle level among them in their ambition to monopolize the business. In 1993, little or no attention was given to the message sent during the first attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, a 25-year-old citizen of Iraq, entered the United States through JFK International Airport (Mylroie, 1995). Yousef is the son of a Pakistani mother and a Palestinian father who grew up in a working class suburb in Kuwait and trained in one of Osama bin Laden’s guerrilla camps. His first exposure to real confrontation was when he joined the terrorist organization Abu Sayyaf in the Philippines. He was one step ahead of the U.S. authorities in that he was aware of the flexibility and vulnerabilities of the American system. He was granted political asylum (IPT, 2008). Although Yousef did not enter through any border, he knew the system would allow him to stay under political asylum. However, this circumstance contributed to the immigration-flow disaster during those years that, little by little, has been threatening peace and sovereignty in the United States. Yousef not only masterminded the first terrorist attack. He was also able to watch from the Brooklyn Bridge as his almost successful plan to take down the entire World Trade Center unfolded. Tremendous damage was done, and panic was imminent. Eight years later, 19 Middle Eastern terrorists closed the chapter

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Saddam Hussein is dead, Osama Bin Laden was eliminated, Muammar Qadafi was executed... to shut down Wall Street and its surroundings after the events of September 11, 2001, which changed the course of the United States and the future of terrorism in the world. As with many other crises, the nation took remedial action after the damage was done. The initial countermeasures were the creation of the 9/11 Commission to investigate the terrorist attacks, and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, which simply put several organizations under the same umbrella. Agencies began to share intelligence to alert each other of terrorist threats. Authorities stepped up security in all ports of entry to the nation, especially the airports under the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). New regulations and laws, such as the USA Patriot Act, put America under the microscope of its own government. We have done a lot since then, and we have progressively identified and stopped future terrorist plots from inside the country and from the outside, with the cooperation of other nations that stuck with the United States in the war on terror. However, we emphasized airports too much and forgot about our borders, a more complex area and a very dangerous one. At the airports we are able to know in advance of a flight coming to our territory as well as the origin of the flight, and we have access to the roster of passengers in order to take preventive measures upon arrival, or at least to create an airtight control if necessary. At the borders, there is no control whatsoever, and as illegal immigrants use the 56% area of unguarded territory to enter the country, terrorists also use it. We remain blindfolded and hesitant to declare failure in our control for national security. Over 10 years have passed since the 9/11 attacks. Saddam Hussein is dead, Osama bin Laden was eliminated, and Muammar Qadafi was executed by the rebels. This is a triumph for the world, but not the end of the war. The war on terror continues, and different tactics will be utilized. Forces have shifted to other regions, training will be intensified, and the hatred for the Western hemisphere and its allies will remain alive. Experts on the Middle East are warning Americans that the wave of Middle Eastern immigrants entering the country could soon become a tsunami, flooding the streets of our communities, our classrooms, and our corporations. Terrorist intelligence cells have already figured out the vulnerabilities of our borders in both Canada and Mexico. However, it is better to ally with “coyotes” from Mexico who do anything for money than to try to get in through the northern border. Experts on the Middle East have also

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

warned us of this point of entry. In the United States there are still entities under the nonprofit organization umbrella collecting donations to support terrorist organizations around the world. Adnan Shukrijumah, an important al-Qaeda operations member, according to U.S. intelligence officials, was suspected of hatching a plot to smuggle a dirty bomb or materials to manufacture one across the U.S./Mexico border. Fortunately, there is no indication that Shukrijumah’s purported dirty-bomb plot ever got very far (Longmire, 2011). With America’s inefficient and halfway-tough immigration laws, we are simply placing the red carpet for terrorists, exposing nothing but the safety of our own citizens. We still refuse to see and learn the lessons of an uncontrollable immigration that has brought several European nations to their knees. Are we waking up anytime soon? In July 2010, a Kuwaiti newspaper reported that a Hezbollah terrorist organization employed Mexican nationals with ties to Lebanon to set up a strong network to target Israel and the United States. Also in 2010, the Department of Homeland Security issued an intelligence alert regarding a possible border-crossing attempt by a Somali named Mohamed Ali, who is a member of Al-Shabaab, a Somali-based al-Qaeda ally with links to the deadly attack on American soldiers in the notorious “Black Hawk Down” incident in the Somali capital. U.S. Representative Sue Myrick, R-NC, asked Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano for more information on Hezbollah’s presence along the U.S./Mexico border and requested an intensive intelligence operation to identify and evaluate the network’s presence and any possible connections with drug cartels. In addition to this inquiry, something very unusual was noticed in the southwestern states’ prisons. Several gang members started to display tattoos written in Farsi. Typically, the Congresswoman said, seeing tattoos in Arabic is not too out of the ordinary, but Farsi should merit a little more attention for possible links to Iran and its army of Hezbollah terrorists. The problem is that tattoos in Farsi have also been seen on drug cartel individuals in Mexico. It is obvious that there is an influence somewhere to a certain degree, a degree we must not underestimate. Unlike immigrants that come from Central or South America, Middle Eastern individuals are used to the roughness of the terrain, and they are very skilled in the construction of tunnels. They can build incredible tunnels, as they do at the Israeli borders. The combination of terrorist organizations and drug cartels gives a new meaning to the threat against America: narcoterrorism.

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

15


Terrorism has Grown globally at a rapid speed. The Union Makes the Force Are we ready to confront not one but two forces that individually have proven to overcome our reactions and attitude towards them as a problem? Are we ready to compromise our political relations with Mexico if no support and adherence to the fight against drugs and terrorism is obtained? In 1983, this author was a member of the Peruvian Police force and a dedicated member of the Sinchis, a specialized counterterrorism and counternarcotics elite team that fought against the forces of the terrorist organizations Shining Path and MRTA (Movimiento Revolucionario Tùpac Amaru), as well as drug traffickers. It was around that year when the term narco-terrorism was introduced, not only as a concept but also for a new type of training for Sinchis. The term, introduced to Peruvian Congress by President Fernando Belaunde Terry, alerted not only the law enforcement paramilitary team of Sinchis but also specialized teams from the army and navy. Two monsters, two destructive forces, two different agendas, and one modus operandi in common: war. Terrorism has grown globally at a rapid speed, and Islamic radicalism has been the major force that contributed to this worldwide threat. Terrorism is a monster of many hands that operates with international capabilities by feeding satellites abroad against the same goals: war against all infidels, destruction of Western ideology and its people, and the complete eradication of Israel and Jews from the face of the earth. Narco-traffic is a multibilliondollar business worldwide with enough powers to seduce people, politicians, military personnel, government key personnel, and anybody who is exposed to its multiple hands as well. Like terrorism, powerful international drug cartels also feed satellites abroad as part of their secret organization where money is the creed. Both monsters have different agendas: one is socio-political-religious and the other one is simply money. This was the starting point for the use of the term “narco-terrorism” in 1983. However, the term differs a little bit in how it is used now. The terrorist organization Shining Path had political reasons in its agenda to fight against the democratic government. Their members had the armament power, knowledge of survival and rescue, paramilitary training, and thousands of members ready and committed to die 16

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

for their cause. The powerful drug cartels had the money and an irresistible cause: greed. Then the creation of a more powerful force was born. The terrorists needed more money to buy armament and explosive devices as well as financial sources to support hundreds of cells around the national territory. The drug cartels needed protection in their coca fields, distribution centers, and illegal airfields in the deep places of the country and jungle regions. The homegrown terrorist organization with chauvinistic roots had no external support from any other terrorist organization; it was merely a Peruvian natural-born chaos. The resources were limited. Some type of support was obtained with armament and members from the highlands of Peru and Bolivia, and in the 1990s there were some military operations that revealed ties with the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARCs). But this was not enough. On some occasions, news reports revealed the possible infiltration of terrorists from Abu Nidal to negotiate for armament. It was the perfect exchange of money for protection, and both forces helped each other. This was the start of narcoterrorism. Each force was good at what they did—terrorist acts and drug smuggling, production, and export. They both needed each other to survive, and they both shared a philosophy written with blood in their own separate creeds: war. The concept of war is utilized to describe the confrontations they experienced with the military and special operation teams from the naval and police forces. If something went wrong or did not represent the best interest of their cause, the prompt elimination of their own people never was a matter of discussion. It simply happened. The union made the force, and along with it, the 1980s and 1990s were the most crucial decades of narco-terrorism the Peruvian has yet to experience. The streets of Lebanon or Lima were the epicenters for many confrontations from dawn to dusk. In the remote villages in the Andean region, terrorist cells were providing protection to several airfields used by drug lords; the terrorists were on the lords’ payrolls, and one hand washed the other. The armament was coming from several parts of the world, but mainly from the Colombian black market. There were AK-47s from Iran, Kalashnikovs from Russia, Stars from Spain, Fusil Automatique Léger (FALs) from Belgium, and several other explosive devices and materials. Terrorists were prepared to organize their own www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Photo Credit: Sengo Perez/KRT

subversive propaganda, and they were invisible during the dissemination process of the same. Their voices were heard all the way to the most unknown corners of each region due to propaganda. Most of the women involved with Shining Path were spouses of leaders breaking the tradition of Machismo-Leninism (Splintered Sunrise, 2008). Many airfields, after detection from the defense forces, were kept intact due to the successful confrontation of terrorists against the defense forces. Terrorists also helped in the construction of many airfields as they mastered the land, dealt with inclement weather, and had no other objective but to fight for the destitution of the democratic government in exchange for a socialist-communist brand. In recent years, narco-terrorism has become a growing threat that has received attention from different countries around the world. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) defines narco-terrorism as the “participation of groups or associated individuals in taxing, providing security for, or otherwise aiding and abetting drug trafficking endeavors in an effort to further, or fund, terrorist activities.� As globalization has allowed for the interconnectivity of world markets, it has also allowed for global trade in the illicit market. Mexico is not the exception to this advantage that has allowed cartels to smuggle drugs to American streets, which consequently contributes to the increase of arrests for drug-related matters, making a high percentage of American prison inmates drug-related cases. Are there any possibilities for ties between Mexican drug cartels and elements from Islamic Jihad,

1992 Jailed Shining Path leader Abimael Guzman jestures through the bars at the National Police Headquarters in Lima, Peru.

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland SecurityÂŽ

17


1983

Israel along the Egyptian border have decreased to a minimum the flow of illegal African immigrants (World News, 2011). A sophisticated radar system along the border to alert Border Patrol agents of potential crossings before immigrants reach the fence. Arresting illegal immigrants and cutting off social welfare programs to them. Implementation and enforcement of tough economic sanctions to businesses that hire illegal immigrants.

2005 1.2 million illegal aliens were apprehended.

18

Inside Homeland Security速

Fall 2012

It was around

of the southern border. Similar fences in

that year when

be considered throughout the entire length

the term narco-

A secure, state-of-the-art border fence must

terrorism was

introduced...

Possible Solutions

Hezbollah, or Hamas to create a powerful force against the sovereignty of the United States? There have been warnings for years that Hezbollah had partnered with Mexican drug cartels. Michael Braun, a former DEA chief of operations, reported that Hezbollah utilizes the same criminal weapons smugglers, document traffickers, and transportation experts as the drug cartels (Mauro, 2011). There are 1.57 billion Muslims living in the world, distributed over all continents. More than 300 million Muslims, about one-fifth, live in countries where Islam is not the majority religion. Of the total Muslim population, 12% are Shia Muslims and 88% are Sunni Muslims. By 2009, the Muslim population in North, Central, and South America reached 4.6 million. In North America, 2.5 million Muslims live in the United States, 110,000 live in Mexico, and 657,000 live in Canada (Pew Research Center, 2009).

Feeding the Cub Between Canada, the United States, and Mexico, the Muslim population reaches over 3.2 million. From the north to the south, it represents the vertebral column of a religious force in North America. At no time does this writer discredit the benefits or enrichments of Islam as a religion. This presentation reveals only the potential for radicalism, which is in fact formed by those who take the rich religion of Islam to a different level, which is unacceptable to the majority of Muslims who believe in peace and harmony. Islam deserves the same respect other religions also deserve. Alerts for radicalization in Canada and Mexico should be the main focus of observation, concentration, and analysis by the American intelligence community. Stronger immigration laws are imperative, the closure and monitoring of borders is not a matter of discussion, and the immediate stoppage of granting political asylum to anybody in tears must be microscopically analyzed. Mexico may be experiencing a monotheistic revolution, or it should be close to it. Mexicans are embracing Islam by the thousands, leaving the old scriptures of Catholicism for their own choices, not imposed. The capital already has two mosques, and many major cities are already the center of attention for religious heads looking for conversion at the speed of the light. It is believed that Syrians and Turks brought some of the seeds of Islam (Al-Nasr, 2011). In Mexico, as in most South American countries, Indian communities are the forgotten people of their own governments; they are condemned to live in shantytowns, away from the Mestizo or white population. They have no education and live under poor conditions without opportunities or aspirations

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


The threat is imminent but not all Americans are aware of it of any kind. Most of them practice Catholicism as an imposed religion. Muslim envoys targeted these communities as the saviors to their needs with a clever approach. The teachings of the Quran open their eyes to a new horizon, and they see no discriminatory parameters among Muslims. If you are a Muslim, you are welcome to the Muslim world. Close to 300 Tzozil Indians converted to Islam, something that put the government of former president Vicente Fox under alert (Glusing, 2005). Leaders of Shining Path had the responsibility of assigning a committee on education purposes to disseminate Marxist-Leninist ideology scrambled with Maoist philosophy to entire villages, and they forced their members to adapt to their principles and to think and act against the government. They distributed food and water and set up improvised classrooms to train under-age people and enlist them in the cause. A 2006 Congressional report on border threats titled “A Line in the Sand: Confronting the Threat at the Southwest Border” was prepared by the House Committee on Homeland Security Subcommittee on Investigations. The report indicated that 1.2 million illegal aliens were apprehended in 2005 alone. From those arrestees, 165,000 were classified as OTM (Other than Mexicans) and 65,000 of these were from “special interest countries,” which it is defined as nations that could export individuals that could bring harm to our sovereignty in the way of terrorism (World Net Daily, 2010). Amazingly, these illegal immigrants came from Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, Pakistan, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The ground has been tested, the seeds have been planted, the fruits start to have some flavor, and eventually the roots will be as strong as they are in Canada and inside American territory. The threat of illegal immigration cannot be underestimated: it is still a threat. In January 2011, Border Patrol agents found a copy of the book In Memory of Our Martyrs, published by Iran’s Ministry of Islamic Guidance, which raised concerns of the possible entry of Islamist suicide bombers from Iran into the United States through the southern border. Customs and Border Protection statistics show that from 1999 through 2010, 329 Iranian nationals were apprehended by the Border Patrol. The threat is imminent, but not all Americans are aware of it (Kimery, 2011). U.S. officials dismantled a plot to assassinate the Saudi Ambassador to the United States after an informant revealed that terrorists from the Middle East were willing to pay $1.5 million to a Mexican drug cartel to take care of business. FBI Director Robert Mueller said that it could have cost many lives (Miller, 2011).

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

References Al-Nasr, M. (2011). Mexico discovers Islam: A new generation of Muslims is introducing Islam to Mexicans. Islamic Population Worldwide. Retrieved from: http://www.islamicpopulation.com Bedard, P. (2011, February 16). Politics, Border Patrol controls just 44 percent of South. U.S. News & World Report, retrieved from: http://www.usnews.com Glusing, J. (2005) Globalization: Islam is gaining a foothold in Chiapas. Spiegel International. Retrieved from: http://www.spiegel.de Investigative Project on Terrorism (2008). Individual Terrorists, Ramzi Yousef. Retrieved from: http://www.investigativeproject.org/profile/105 Kimery, A. (2011) Insight & analysis for government decision makers. Homeland Security Today. Retrieved from: http://www.hstoday.us Longmire, S. (2011) Terrorist infiltration of the U.S.: Are we looking at the wrong border? Homeland Security Today. Retrieved from: http://www.briefings. hstoday.us/ Mauro, R. (2011). Hezbollah sets up shop in Mexico. FrontPage Magazine. retrieved from: http://www.frontpagemag.com Miller, S. (2011). Iran assassination plot: Terrorists join forces with Mexican drug cartels? The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved from: http://www. csmonitor.com Nelson, E. (2010). Hezbollah terrorist operatives in Mexico. U.S. Border Control. Retrieved from: http://www.usbc.org Pew Research Center (2009). Mapping the global Muslim population, a report on the size and distribution of the world’s Muslim population. Washington DC. Project America (2007). Poverty: U.S .population, official poverty rate. Retrieved from: http://www.project.org Skinner, D. (2006). USAWC Strategy Research Project, Illegal Immigration across the U.S.- Mexico border. U.S. Army War College. Retrieved from: http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/ksi499.pdf Splintered Sunrise (2008) The Reductionism of Sendero Luminoso, retrieved from: http:// http://splinteredsunrise.wordpress.com/2008/07/10/ the-reductionism-of-sendero-luminoso U.S. Census Bureau (2011). Fact finder. Retrieved from: http://factfinder.census.gov World Net Daily (2010). Foreign terrorists breach U.S. border. Retrieved from: http://www.teaparty.org

A bo u t t h e Au t hor Victor M. Guembes, CHS-III, IAC is an expert in counterterrorism and security operations who works as a Security Agency Manager for Weiser Security Services, Inc. in Florida. A former 2nd Lieutenant in the Peruvian Police Force counterterrorism elite team “Sinchis,” and former Sergeant in the US Army. He is a member of Alpha Phi Sigma, National Criminal Justice Honor Society, Eta Theta Chapter-University of Phoenix, and FBI-Infragard.

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

19


Global Security Solutions

An Interview

with Joel Yonkman

Yonkman’s company, Emergency Response Global Security Solutions (ERGSS) offers emergency management training to organizations on federal and local levels.

By Trysta Herzog for Inside Homeland Security®

I

n a world with increasing natural and man-made disasters, organizations on local and federal levels are looking to experienced and capable

companies in the training and consulting fields of emergency management. Joel Yonkman, director of operations at Michigan-based Emergency Response and Global Security Solutions (ERGSS), says his company can offer that and more. He sat down with Inside Homeland Security® to explain the importance

of their work and how they have become a “one-stop shop for emergency response organizations.” 20

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

What sparked the foundation for Emergency Response and Global Security Solutions? The way that it started was with a group of folks with significant emergency management and response backgrounds considered experts in their fields traveling around the country and delivering education to response organizations across the country on behalf of the government. We would go out and train first response organizations in all disciplines throughout the country in various aspects of emergency response and management. Being representatives of the government, the scope of what we could do was very limited. We would end up getting a lot of folks coming up to us after a class or a course and say, “Hey, that’s great information and we understand it, but we really don’t know how to apply it,” or “We’d like to take this information and develop it into [an] emergency operations plan.” After years of providing training we www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


A photo provided by Joel Yonkman, depicting a training session performed by an Emergency Response Team (ERT).

Joel Yonkman, CHS-III will be a panelist

realized we could put our skills to better use by providing additional services outside of what was allowed through our contract for training. As a result, I ended up creating the company and began to work with first response organizations around the world to provide services meeting the specific needs of each organization.

at the 2012 Executive Summit (ES-21) as

Yonkman went on to explain that the company was divided based on where they saw their clients could benefit from ERGSS the most, composing of three categories: training, consulting, and special operational support.

with local, state, and federal “first re-

By leveraging our vast network of subject matter experts we can offer customized training in areas such as police, fire, EMS, and public health. Part of our consulting division looks at assisting organizations in the development of cutting edge and functional emergency operations and business continuity plans. Finally, we offer our subject matter experts to clients to provide unsurpassed operational support and services. For example, we had numerous people deployed to the BP oil spill that were in command-level positions in which we were involved in writing emergency operations plans while others were involved in demobilization and resource tracking of thousands of personnel and pieces of equipment, stretching across three states as well as ocean bound assets. We developed the company under the premise that we would be a one-stop shop for emergency response organizations. We have a very vast network of people from all first-response disciplines around the world. Regardless of the size or type of project, whether operational, planning, or training, you are provided a team of subject matter experts that fit the requirements and objectives of each organization and project. That was one of the founding philosophies of the company that we always follow and take a great deal of pride in. 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

part of the breakout session titled, Private Sector Emergency Preparedness and Responses. The panel will discuss communication, cooperation, and collaboration sponders.” It is scheduled to take place on Friday, October 19th from 10:15 a.m to 12:15 p.m.

In addition to their national efforts in the United States, ERGSS is also involved in overseas endeavors as well­—with a base of operations located in the Eastern European nation of Kosovo.

What kinds of services do you provide overseas? We offer all of the same services that we offer in the United States. We offer various types of operational services such as incident management, security services, and bodyguard services like we offer in the state of Texas. In addition, we offer custom training and consulting services such as emergency operational plan and business continuity plan development. Looking to broaden their business opportunities, Yonkman pointed to their overseas growth as a way to branch out. Part of our plan (for expansion), at this point, is continue our training and consulting, with an emphasis in 2012 to grow our security services in the state of Texas and expand into other states within the continental U.S. We will continue to operate and expand services abroad in the European market. Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

21


The client list for ERGSS runs the gamut from local to federal government, many of which get grants for training and consulting through homeland security and other public-funded grants. The company has encountered many types of agencies through their much-needed services.

Who benefits from your services? We’ve been subcontracted to provide services to private, as well as governmental, organizations. These organizations range in size from the local level up to, and including, the federal government. Our staff has been involved in the response to and planning for local incidents, as well as those of national significance.

What kind of services would local-level clients be looking for from ERGSS? On a local level, all of our services are scalable to meet the complexity of each individual client’s needs. We service many local private and governmental organizations, whether it is our custom training, consulting, or operational services. One area that is catching a lot of visibility right now is Business Continuity Planning.

What is Business Continuity Planning? Business Continuity really started in the IT realm—what do we do when your computers and e-mail are not working or you get a virus? Can we back it up at another location? How do we

keep things going with our reliance on technology? Well now this concept has taken on an entirely different meaning because now many people have recognized it’s not just IT, it’s everything. Outside of IT, Business Continuity Planning is the development of a plan that allows for continued operations in the wake of a disaster. This plan is developed with a focus of ensuring day to day operational activity will continue regardless of what happens. For private companies this is crucial to their survival. How do you ensure your financial solvency and minimize your downtime? What we do is come in and assess your hazards as well as the impact each would have on your day-to-day operations. Once completed we develop a plan and build redundancies to ensure the production quotas can be met in as short of a time as possible based on the assessment and the needs of the client. For example, let’s say you have your main office with 500 employees, a product you produce, production quotas and deadlines you have to meet to ensure your profit margins, and one horrific night a tornado comes through and completely wipes out your building. In other words we develop your plan B. In addition to continuity planning we can provide incident management services. For example, in the wake of a disaster, we can send a team to liaison with local emergency agencies to make sure your issues are addressed. Again, these are people who can talk the language and know what to say, as well as who to say it to minimize the impact of your personal disaster.

ERGSS Contact Information Michigan office:

3970 US 131 South / Suite C #260 / Cadillac, MI 49601 Phone: 616.334.5204 Fax: 888.522.6978 Email: info@ergss.com

Texas office:

401 Congress Avenue / Suite 1540 / Austin, TX 78701 Phone: 512.782.4468 Email: info@ergss.com

Kosovo office:

Arberia Komuna E Re 3-1 / Prishtine, Kosovo Phone: +381.49.144.044 Fax: +011.1.888.522.6978 Email: ergss-usa@ergss.com

Photo provided by Joel Yonkman entitled, “Avery Island”.

22

Inside Homeland Security®

Website: www.ergss.com

Fall 2012

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Are You Prepared to Answer a Cry for Help?

CMC0312IHS

Certified Master Chaplain, CMC ® The American Board for Certified Master ChaplainsSM (ABCMC)

Online Continuing

Education Programs Medical Services Fire and Rescue Mental Health Emergency Hospice Hospital 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

Created by The American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, CHS®, the ABCMC is an educational-based, multidisciplinary, professional network of chaplains who support homeland security. ABCHS’s diverse membership includes over 200 specialty fields within the local, state, federal, and private sectors of the homeland security arena. Identified and recognized as chaplains with specialized expertise and experience, these active practitioners and professionals are committed to providing critically needed ministerial, psychological, and spiritual support and intervention services to homeland security fields and victims of crisis and traumatic events.

For more information, please call: 877.219.2519 o r visit u s at www.abch s.co m/ce rtif icate/ cm c.php ® Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security

23


...when something defamatory is posted on the internet about you, 90% of your fellow countrymen have access to it.

24

Inside Homeland Security速

Fall 2012

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


nternet defamation Defamation The freedom of speech is one of the most fundamental rights of an American citizen. That liberty is not unchecked however, as there are numerous laws against unbridled free speech. The laws prohibiting defamation are one such example. Generally speaking, defamation is the issuance of a false statement to a third party that causes a person or entity to suffer harm. Slander involves the making of defamatory statements by an oral (spoken) representation. Libel involves the making of defamatory statements in a printed or fixed medium, such as in a magazine or newspaper. Today, most courts treat both forms of defamation the same. In my last article (Winter 2011), we looked at the elements of a cause of action for defamation. We also examined several of the defenses, the “truth” being principal among those. While there may be other causes of actions for publishing unflattering information about another individual (i.e. disclosing embarrassing medical records), it is not considered defamation if what is disclosed is the truth. Public figures also have the added requirement to prove that the defamatory statement was made with malice or an intent to cause harm. A Changing Medium While the laws in America relating to defamatory statements have gradually evolved over the years, the mediums by which defamatory statements are disseminated have changed rapidly with the advent of the internet. Decreasing are the days of defamation by print and television media where the defamatory comment is viewed only by the limited audience of that medium’s circulation. These outlets are being replaced by communications via web pages that stay posted for limitless periods of time to be viewed anew each day by any reader.

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

There are just over 7 billion people on planet Earth. Statistics from the International Telecommunications Union tell us that 2.1 billion people, or roughly 30% of the world’s population, have internet access. Compared to ten years ago, when only about 360 million had internet access, that is an increase of 480% worldwide. In North America there are 350 million people, and 272 million have internet. When you whittle that down to just the United States, you find that nine out of ten Americans are online. So when something defamatory is posted on the internet about you, 90% of your fellow countrymen have access to it.

Most defamation litigation in the United States stems from attacks on a person’s professional character or standing which can affect their ability to make a living. When you factor in social networking sites and smart phones, a defamatory statement can now be sent instantaneously to the very people that you would least want reading it. The internet has spawned a new brand of high tech lynching that the law has not only failed to keep up with, but has actually protected. As opposed to print or television media, whom often perform at least cursory fact checking as they can be held liable for defamatory material they publish, internet service providers (“ISP”) have been provided a statutory defense anointing them immune from damages for defamatory material that may be published via their websites. To understand this dichotomy in the law, it is important to retrace the history of internet law. The Evolution of Internet Defamation Law In 1991, as the internet was just gaining popularity, CompuServe, an online service provider, hosted a journalism forum which contained a blog area titled “Rumorville USA.” It was on this site that an entity known as Cubby was so defamed. So Cubby sued CompuServe for defamation. In Cubby, Inc. v. CompuServe, Inc., 776 F. Supp. 135 (S.D.N.Y. 1991), CompuServe argued that it was merely a “distributor” of third party content—akin to a newsstand or bookstore—and that it should not be held liable as a “publisher” of the defamatory statements. The Court agreed with the publisher/distributor distinction and sided with CompuServe, but held that even a mere distributor could be held liable once they know or have reason to know of a defamatory posting on its website and fail to delete it. Thus, while the decision classified an ISP as a mere “distributor,” it created an

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

25


affirmative duty on their part. After receiving a complaint regarding an online posting, the Cubby decision put the ISP in the unenviable position of having to either take down the posting or defend its truthfulness. While the Cubby decision caused concern in the ISP community, it was not until four years later and the Stratton Oakmont, Inc. v. Prodigy Services Co., 1995 WL 323710 (N.Y. Sup. Ct. 1995) decision that the ISP community took action. Stratton Oakmont involved facts and legal arguments similar to Cubby, but the Court ruled that Prodigy was in fact a “publisher” of the defamatory material and not a mere “distributor” of the same, and saddled it with traditional publisher liabilities, including being legally responsible for defamatory content. This decision sent shockwaves through the ISP community as they could now be held liable for defamatory postings via their web pages. The ISP community argued that the amount of information communicated via interactive computer services was so staggering that it would be impossible for service providers to screen each of the millions of postings for possible defamatory statements. If faced with potential liability for each message posted on their boards, ISP’s might choose to severely restrict the number and type of messages posted. So ISP lobbyists, under the guise of protecting free speech, petitioned Congress to immunize service providers to avoid any such restrictive effect. And it did not take long after the Stratton Oakmont decision in 1995 for a landmark piece of internet legislation to be passed in the United States called the Communications Decency Act of 1996. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act provides immunity from liability for providers of “interactive computer services” who publish information provided by others, stating: “No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider” (47 U.S.C. § 230(c) (1)). The problem with this legislation is that it unwittingly cast the veil of immunity to the makers of the defamatory statements as well. For over a decade, the statutory immunity provided ISP’s cast such a large shadow of protection that there was little litigation even attempted for online defamation. However, in the last few years, some of those so defamed have fought back and won.

Beach Insider blog. The untrue blog rantings as to Mr. Brandon’s shortcomings as a professional led to a $1.8 million judgment against Wizeman. Brandon v. Wizeman. In 2011, in Obsidian Finance Group, LLC v. Crystal Cox, an Oregon court also took action against online defamation. At the time, Obsidian Finance Group was a financial advisory firm which was managing the bankruptcy of Summit 1031, a real estate company. Crystal Cox, a self-proclaimed “investigative blogger,” maintained blogs on obsidianfinancesucks.com, summit1031sucks.com, and bankruptcycorruption.com, amongst various others, and accused Obsidian of “tax fraud, fraud against the government and hiring hit men.” Ultimately, the allegations were found to be untrue and the finance company was awarded $2.5 million. Also last year, in Anderson v. KSTP & Blaha, a holistic healer in Minnesota was awarded $1 million after she was publicly and falsely accused of prescribing a treatment plan that led to a suicide attempt of a patient. The jury found that the ABC news affiliate, KSTP, acted with reckless disregard for the truth when it ran a report about naturopathic advice Susan Anderson allegedly gave her client, Cheryl Blaha. According to the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, naturopathic medicine is “based on the belief that the human body has an innate healing ability.” Healers teach patients to use “diet, exercise, lifestyle changes and cutting edge natural therapies” to combat disease, the association’s website states. “This case was about not paying attention to the truth,” said Anderson. “I’ve been bullied my whole life practicing holistic health, and this time I decided enough is enough.” The jury agreed. Ultimately, no one should have to suffer the embarrassment of being defamed on the internet; however, the nature of the internet as well as laws protecting ISP’s make it all too easy for perpetrators to get away with these acts. Personally, I have been involved in seven cases over the past year involving internet defamation. Although none have gone to trial to date, in each case that has been resolved, the defamatory material was removed from the internet. So for those that are willing to engage in the fight, there appears to be light at the end of the tunnel!

Fighting Back In 2006, Orix Capital Markets, LLC, a financial company from Texas, foreclosed on an apartment complex owned by a family from Houston. The foreclosure triggered a series of legal disputes between the family and Orix, during which a family member launched www.predatorix.com. The site contained several defamatory comments about Orix, including that it committed “tax fraud and violated criminal racketeering laws.” In 2009, the court dismissed the claims leveled against it by the family and a Texas jury awarded Orix $12.5 million for the postings that were ultimately found to be untrue. Orix Capital Markets, LLC v. Super Future Equities, Inc. In 2009, Scott Brandon, the head of an ad agency and a former lawyer, filed a defamation lawsuit in South Carolina state court against Donald Wizeman over statements published on the Myrtle

Joshua K. Roberts has been a partner with the law firm of Hazelrigg, Roberts & Easley, P.C. since 1998. The firm is headquartered in Springfield, Missouri with a satellite office in Ozark, Missouri. His principle practice areas include civil litigation and criminal defense. Josh is a member of the Missouri, Springfield Metropolitan and Christian County Bar Associations and a featured speaker on Law Talk, KWTO 560 AM. His largest recent verdict or judgment was $1.9 million in the case of Warner v. Greenleaf. Away from law, Josh is an Elder and Deacon in his church, enjoys teaching Sunday School and playing bass guitar in the praise band. In his spare time he enjoys spending time with his family and coaching his son’s football and basketball teams.

26

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

A bo u t t h e A u t hor

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security速

27


WE’VE GOT YOUR BACK. J O I N O U R O N L I N E C O M M U N I T Y AT Text VETS to 69866 to get started.

D A T A A N D M E S S A G E R A T E S M A Y A P P LY.

28

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


1 .87 7. 219. 2519 www.t he exe cutivesum mit. net/ihs


REGISTER TODAY! Advanced Registration Deadline is

THIS YEAR’S SUMMIT IS LOCATED AT

The Rio

in beautiful Las Vegas

Oct. 1 st

The goal of the annual Executive Summit is to bring together top professional leaders. Hosted by the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, the American College of Forensic Examiners International, the American Psychotherapy Association, and the American Association of Integrative Medicine. The Executive Summit is an extraordinary, multidisciplinary event that brings together professionals from homeland security, forensics, psychotherapy, and integrative medicine disciplines with the common goal of learning. Attendees have the unique opportunity to network with others in their immediate discipline, as well as be exposed to professionals who they may not normally come in contact with. The Executive Summit facilitates connections and contacts that otherwise may not be made. Presentation sessions cover a variety of topics and are lead by top industry leaders, including John Didden, William Flynn, John Giduck, and many others. These presentations offer valuable continuing education credits.

ASK US ABOUT OUR

PAYMENT PLAN! Contact Member Services at

877.219.2519

for more information or to register.

w w w. theexecutivesummit .ne t/i hs

30

Inside Homeland SecurityÂŽ

Fall 2012

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


General Session

Keynote Speaker

Jan Hargrave

AABB OOUU TT

After authoring books on business body language, courtroom nonverbal communication, and relationship body language, Jan Hargrave felt that it was time to put her skills to work in a people-reading area that has always been dear to her heart: analyzing poker tells. Here she gives us some of her best tips for reading that Poker Face! Jan Latiolais Hargrave

teaches you the ways in which your body communicates to the world around you. Her information could help you to “read” your clients, your family, your prospects, your associates, and, in fact, everyone around you. Author of Let Me See Your Body Talk, Freeway of Love, Judge The Jury, Strictly Business Body Language, and Poker Face, this popular speaker, distinguished educator, talk-show guest of The Lifetime Channel, Fox News, The Montel Williams Show, The Learning Chanel, Great Day Houston, E-Entertainment Television, and The Ricki Lake Show, reveals all the “hidden messages” you use in your everyday life and shows you how to stop the lies and uncover the truth—in any conversation or situation. Working with thousands in the field of personal growth and self-expression through seminars and workshops for the past 15 years, Ms. Hargrave continues to inspire and train leaders in many of today’s leading corporations, such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Merrill Lynch, Starbucks, Rockwell, ESPN, Mars Chocolate, Oracle, Apple, ExxonMobil, Chase Manhattan Bank, NASA, El Paso Energy, Bank of America, and at the USA MWR Training and Development Center in Heidelberg, Germany. 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

excerPt from POKER FACE: Bluffing A sublime satisfaction arises from playing a mentally challenging and financially risky game with only oneself to blame for either victory or defeat. In poker it is not only what is in a person’s hand that counts, it is what the other players think is in his hand. If a person bets as though he has better cards than he actually has, it is called bluffing. Whether a shrewd player holds a trashy hand or a stellar hand, with practice he can bluff others into throwing more money down. Because people tend to guard their important belongings, a player can bluff an opponent into thinking he has poor cards by carelessly handling them and not protecting them. Poker research has proven that a player who deliberately exposes a strong card is bluffing and probably holding a weak hand. A woman who reaches for her chips and threatens to call is likely to follow through and actually call. A male, after bluffing with an aggressive touch of his chips, is likely to simply throw his cards away rather than call. Players remember denominations (such as king, seven, deuce) more readily than they do suits. When bluffing at the proper frequency, not only does a player gain by forcing opponents to fold winning hands, but also creates an element of disguise with his legitimate hands. Poker research has proven that a player who deliberately exposes a strong card is bluffing and probably holding a weak hand.

A person constantly communicates with others in ways that he hardly even realizes. For example, two people are walking toward each other down a busy street; one goes to the left, one goes to the right. Communication is taking place even though no words were spoken. Nonverbal tells have an authentic implication on a person’s poker relationships, and for those parts of his livelihood that depend on communication with others. A poker player’s “tells” indicate the strength or weakness of his hand, just the way a pedestrian on a crowded street gives signals indicating his next step. People are constantly giving directions or telling each other what kind of internal experiences they are having, what they want, and how they are feeling without even using words. Every true emotion a person feels and thinks triggers certain actions and muscles to respond accordingly. Knowing this, a poker player can mislead others of his wants and desires through trickery and bluffing. These signals happen within a twentieth of a second, but can reveal a poker player’s next move. In poker, bluffing is challenging, but it spices up the game. Understanding the nonverbal communication tells of deception should definitely be a significant part of a player’s arsenal, but not his only weapon at the poker table.

Fall 2012 Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security® Inside Homeland Security®

31 3


Keynote Speakers AmericAn BoArd for certificAtion in homelAnd security

John Didden, CHS-III ABCHS Pre-Conference Session: It’s Not Too Late..Yet Wednesday, October 17th

Start Your Day Off Right! Join Dr. Zhoaming Chen for an interactive Tai Chi and Hypnosis session Thursday and Friday.

Based upon Chinese ancient wisdom and philosophy, Tai Chi exercise originated from China, and is widely accepted all over the world. It is a martial art for balance and body awareness via slow and graceful body movement combining breathing and mental exercise. It has been proven to be helpful for pain control, anxiety, and gait training. Hypnosis is an ancient modality of treatment. It is a state of inner attention and focused concentration, which is different from awake or sleep states. People who practice hypnosis can easily get relaxed both mentally and physically. Therefore, self-hypnosis can be used for health maintenance. On the other hand, hypnosis is employed by health practitioners to treat a variety of medical conditions such as pain control, weight loss, insomnia, anxiety, and smoking cessation.

Dr. Zhoaming Chen has been practicing Tai Chi, Qigong/Meditation for decades. He is a board certified neurologist and licensed acupuncture physician.

32

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

Time: 3:00pm – 5:00pm

Mr. Didden served in the Armed Forces for 37 years, with 24 years in the Intelligence and Counter-Intelligence Services. His core activities were accentuated at terrorist organizations such as the Baader Meinhoff Group, the IRA, and the Rote Armee Fraction. His last position during his government tenure was Chief Industrial Security of the Ministry of Defense. For certain specific services to his country the Queen of the Netherlands, Juliana of Orange Nassau awarded him a rank in the Knighthood of Orange Nassau in 1977. After leaving the service, Mr. Didden operated in the commercial industry for 23+ years, having positions as CEO and MD of Risk Management Companies and his own Security Consultancy Company. During this tenure he was living and working in the Middle East and operated in Asia and North Africa.

William Flynn ABCHS General Session Friday, October 19th

Time: 8:00am – 10:00am

Mr. William Flynn was designated Acting Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Infrastructure Protection in February 2012. Prior to his current position, Mr. Flynn was designated Deputy Assistant Secretary of Infrastructure Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, in November 2010. In that role he was responsible for supporting the Assistant Secretary in leading the coordinated national effort to reduce risk to the Nation’s critical infrastructure posed by acts of terrorism, and increasing the Nation’s preparedness, timely response, and rapid recovery in the event of an attack, natural disaster, or other emergency.

John Giduck, JD, CHS-V ABCHS General Session Friday, October 19th

Time: 8:00am – 10:00am

Mr. John Giduck has traveled and worked throughout the world, including working in Russia and the former Soviet Union for almost two decades. He has provided training for U.S. state and federal law enforcement, government agencies, and special operations military units. He is a current member of the Advisory Board of the College of Disaster Medicine and Management of Philadelphia University where he teaches master’s level terrorism courses. He is the author of several books and is currently working on his next book, which is about the terrorist attacks on Mumbai, India in November 2008.

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Additional Keynote Speakers AmericAn AssociAtion of integrAtive medicine

1 Veronica Anderson, MD 1

As host of the weekly talk radio show Wellness for the Real World with Dr. Veronica on BlogTalkRadio and Old Grumpy Radio Networks, she reaches over 7 million U.S. listeners (over 20 million worldwide) each week. Dr. Veronica explores life from the intersection of health, politics, and pop culture. Listeners return for more of her head-on approach to issues with her unique blend of Western and non-Western medicine, holistic solutions, and spirituality. Dr. Veronica has emerged as a smart, outspoken, fun-loving voice for healthy living in today’s media.

2 AmericAn PsychotherAPy AssociAtion

2 Nicholas Cummings, PhD, ScD

3

4

For 60 years Dr. Nicholas Cummings has been instrumental in predicting the course of mental health, and in shaping it. He served under two U.S. Presidents (Kennedy and Carter), has advised the U.S. Senate Health Subcommittee, the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, the U.S. Department of Health, and other agencies. He anticipated the industrialization of healthcare, time-focused psychotherapy, the medicalization of psychiatry, the decline of psychotherapy, the professional school movement, and the rise of non-doctoral psychotherapy, among other predictions. His ability to see the future earned him Psychotherapy Networker’s title of “Psychotherapy’s Soothsayer,” in 2005. He has been awarded six honorary doctorates for his prescience.

AmericAn college of forensic exAminers institute

3 Henry Lee, PhD, FACFEI, DABFE 5 877.219.2519

Dr. Henry Lee is Chief Emeritus of the Connecticut State Police, Founder and Professor of the Forensic Science Program at the University of New Haven, editor of seven www.abchs.com

academic journals, author/co-author of 30 books and over 300 articles. Over the past 40 years, Lee assisted in the investigations of more than 6,000 cases, including war crimes in Bosnia and Croatia, the suicide of President Clinton’s former White House attorney, Vince Foster, review of the JFK assassination, and the death of JonBenet Ramsey.

4 Cyril Wecht, MD, JD, CMI-V, CFP Cyril H. Wecht, MD, JD, is a forensic pathologist, attorney and medical-legal consultant. Dr. Wecht is president of the medical staff at Saint Francis Central Hospital in Pittsburgh and is actively involved as a medical-legal and forensic science consultant, author, and lecturer. Dr. Wecht has organized and conducted Postgraduate Medical-Legal Seminars in more than fifty countries throughout the world in his capacity as Director of the Pittsburgh Institute of Legal Medicine. Dr. Wecht has frequently appeared on nationally syndicated programs discussing various medicolegal and forensic scientific issues, including medical malpractice, drug abuse, the assassinations of both President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, the death of Elvis Presley, the O.J. Simpson case, and the JonBenet Ramsey case.

5 Mark Sarafik, MS, VSM Mark Safarik is an internationally recognized expert in the analysis and interpretation of violent criminal behavior. As a former California police detective in violent crimes, Mr. Safarik’s law enforcement career spans more than 30 years. Serving with distinction for 23 years in the FBI, he spent over half of his career as a behavioral crime analyst in the FBI’s National Center for Analysis of Violent Crime. As one of the senior and most accomplished profilers in the unit, Mr. Safarik led consultation efforts on many high profile national and international violent crime cases and shares his expertise in the analysis of various types of homicides and complex crime scene behavior. Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

33


Summit Presenters & Panelists N. Ackvan

S. Agarwal

G. Allen

S. Appelrouth

E. Bailor

S. Bates

J. Bautista

R. Bertolli

W. Besse

V. Bilotti

J. Blair

B. Bryant

R. Byrd

J. Caccavale

P. Canion

J. Calton

M. Calton

L. Casparis

G. Cavis

R. Ches

B. Citarella

R. Colliver

N. Colls-Senaha

R. Coullahan

W. Cover

S. Crimando

C. Croan

W. Cummins

G. Dahl

R. DelCarmine

J. Didden

L. Doyle

G. Dresnek

S. Eanes

J. Ellis

P. Etu

M. Fagel

G. Frank

S. Gabriel

M. Garver

J. Giduck

M. Gilbert

T. Givens

M. Glasser

D. Goff

D. Goldschmitt

V. Griffin

R. Hall

R. Hamden

V. Hemphill

D. Howe

J. Huertas

R. Hughbank

R. Hughbank

J. Hutson

S. Jefferson

D. Johnson

W. Kimble

S. King

S. Kinney

K. Klingenburger

E. Kreuter

M. Kupchek

M. Laude

B. Leeming

R. Martinelli

C. Marx

K. Miller

S. Miller

R. Minniti

J. Moore

W. Morris

A. Neal

R. O’Donnell

J. Owen

T. Owen

J. Prudhomme

P. Purcell

K. Ramsland

D. Reidenberg

D. Reuben

D. Russell

S. Russell

B. Sargent

J. Sartori

J. Sawyer

J. Schwartz

S. Sharma

C. Singletary

D.E. Smith

J. Sullivan

W. Tasker

K. Theriault

R. Torgerson

S. VanDiver

R. VanVoorhis

J. Waltz

H. Weisman

E. White

R. Whitman

34

M. Withrow

Inside Homeland SecurityÂŽ

J. Yonkman

Fall 2012

Not pictured: M. Bond, C. Cope, C. Fielding, J. Fowler, R. King, W. Kushner, J. McFetridge, M. Peoria, J. Petrelli, J. Priebe, G. Rosu, A. Saputo, S. Somers, P. Spoerry, E. Svetcov, J. Wagner, C. Wright-Brown. www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


BREAKOUT SESSIONS

ES

21 American Board for Certification in Homeland Security

37

American College of Forensic Examiners Institute

42

American Psychotherapy Association

48

American Association of Integrative Medicine

51 Schedules are subject to change without notice.

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

35


Member Testimonials “I think it’s very important that every healthcare provider get exposed to our techniques and medications…I think the Summit is much less commercial than many of the other associations that I go to; I believe this is a big benefit. The people are less aggressive, more holistic.” — Shashi Agarwal

“This is an organization that not only trains you and provides you with extraordinary courses and instructors…the quality of people that I have met here has been stimulating and admirable…this is a place where creativity thrives” — Jan Schwartz

“ACFEI is all encompassing with many professions under its umbrella. The caliber of the members that are here in the association, that you can join and network with in one place. My CFN background has really made a difference in my patient’s care and also when I testify in court.” — Heidi Bale

“This is the group to be with, because you are surrounded at the conferences with hundreds of people like you. It’s a great way to network because all of us have the idea to make our country the safest place to be.” — Cathi Marx

“I strongly recommend everybody that has the same passion of integrative medicine and qualified training to join. AAIM has lots of members with different specialties under the umbrella of one organization.” — Zhaoming Chen

Check out these video testimonials and many more online today at www.theexecutivesummit.net/ihs 36 24

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


ABCHS

Schedule is subject to change without notice.

American Board for Certification in Homeland Security Wednesday, Oct. 17th 03:00 PM — 5:00 PM

1

ABCHS Pre-Conference Session: It’s Not Too Late...Yet

aBStraCt: Our country’s vital interests are tied directly to international trade and imports and exports of necessary goods and services ranging from energy products, steel and agricultural goods, to high technology electronics and computer equipment. Terrorist attacks in other countries can directly affect our economies of scale.

PreSenter: John Didden, CHS-III Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 03:00pm – 05:00pm

aBStraCt: In this sesssion attendees will learn the latest global terrorist developments and their links to the United States of America. It will also discuss the latest information of the underestimated threat coming from the Iranian regime. The presentation will provide observations and advice on how the USA and its citizens can/ should improve the fight against terrorism. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss the latest developments of homegrown and international terrorism, and 2. Explain what the USA can/should do to increase the fight against terrorism.

Thursday, Oct. 18th 09:30 AM — 11:30 AM

2

Protecting Our Homeland: Domestic and Transnational Threats

Moderator: Robert Hughbank, CHS-III PaneLiStS: John Giduck, CHS-V; Richard Hughbank, CHSIV; John Didden, CHS-III; David Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V; Marc Glasser, FABCHS, CHS-V; Mike Fagel, CHS-IV, CDP-I; Bob Bryant, CHS-V, CMAS Ces: 2.0 ABCHS 877.219.2519

tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am www.abchs.com

3

1

The Important Role of Cyber Security in Protecing the Homeland

Moderator: Andrew Neal, CHS-IV PaneLiStS: Shayne Bates, FABCHS, CHS-V; Gabriela Rosu, CHS-V; Margaret Bond, CHS-V; Eric Svetcov, CISSIP, CISA; Rocco A. DelCarmine, CHS-III; Clay Fielding, MCP, MCT, CEH, CHFE, RF. CHS-I Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am

aBStraCt: This will be a panel discussion of the impact cyber security has on protecting the United States. The panelists will present on several topics including critical cyber infrastructure protection, likely cyber-based attacks, the impact of cloud technologies, and portable devices. A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

2

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Describe how cyber-attacks can impact homeland security, 2. Discuss the importance of basic cyber security in preventing successful attacks, 3. Describe the impact of cloud technologies and portable devices on cyber-attacks and cyber security, 4. Explain our dependence on the nations cyber infrastructure, and 5. Discuss how to strengthen homeland security through your organization’s cyber-security policies. Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

3

37


4

Planning, Response & Recovery for Special Needs Population

Moderator: Barbara Citarella, RN, MS, DABCHS, CHS-V PaneLiStS: David Goldschmitt, MD, CHS-V; Paul Purcell, CHS-V, CDP-I; Joe Moore, CHS-V; Linda Doyle, RN, CHS-III, CDP-I, CFN, CMI-III

4

5

Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am

aBStraCt: Natural disasters were unprecedented around the world last year and disaster preparedness continues to remain a daunting task in the face of budget constraints and leadership fatigue. The definition of “special needs” with respect to disaster planning has a much broader context than one would think, and as such, requires a greater depth of vertical and horizontal integration across the preparedness network. The Department of Homeland Security has redefined special needs based on functional limitations. This new definition now includes those individuals without transportation, children, and those who are dependent on medication. Recovery and sheltering for people with special needs is exceptionally difficult when the recovery is long term. This lively, interactive discussion will provide timely insight into short and long term planning needs, sheltering challenges, transportation, communication, and partnerships.

01:00 PM — 03:00 PM

is Intelligence Worth and 5 What Do We Need It? Moderator: David Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V PaneLiStS: Jan Schwartz, PhD, CHS-V, CDP-I; Marquis

6

Laude, CHS-V; Nestor Colls-Senaha, MS, CHS-V; James Sartori, CHS-V, DABCHS, CNTA; Anthony Saputo, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm

aBStraCt: The topics for discussion include:

• • • • •

The intelligence cycle The analytic process The challenges to analytics Resources Training

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

7

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss the methods of and the importance of professional analyzing intelligence.

Safety & Security: 6 Perception vs. Reality Moderator: Steven Crimando, MA, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm

PaneLiStS: Gregory Allen, CHS-III; Stuart Eanes, CHS-III; Stephen Somers, CHS-V; James Blair, DPA, FABCHS, CHS-V; Mike Fagel, CHS-IV, CDP-I, Thomas Givens, DABCHS, CHS-V; Lawrence Lavine, DO, MPH, CHS-V; Robert Hall, CHS-V, SSI

8 38

aBStraCt: This panel discussion will evaluate the public’s perception of security and safety issues compared to realistic expectations. On the surface the government is perceived to have a plan for every possible emergency

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

we face, from vaccines and antidotes for each chemical, biological, or radiological toxin, to emergency management of a nuclear explosion. Aside from finger-pointing between agencies about who is responsible…what is the reality? Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss response communication and whether or not it is heading back in the right direction since the breakdown of 9/11; 2. Discuss airline security and if the TSA has made airline travel safer in the last decade; 3. Discuss our nation’s emergency management community and their ability to respond to a Hurricane Katrina-like disaster; 4. Discuss the intelligence community and their ability to identify threats; and 5. Describe emergency services’ abilities to deal with an unconventional attack (chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear).

Security Through 7 Homeland Hometown Security Moderator: Wayne Morris, DABCHS, CHS-V PaneLiStS: Val Bilotti, RN, BS, CHS-V; Eric White, FABCHS, CHS-V; John Sullivan, PhD, DABCHS, CHS-V; Cathi Marx, DABCHS, CHS-V; William Cummins, DABCHS, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm

aBStraCt: Protecting the American way of life has been the responsibility of every citizen since the establishment of our Nation. However, consider this question: Since the conception of our country, are we getting better or worse at leveraging each citizen to protect it? Too often, average citizens and small organizations are unable to see how they contribute to the mission of protecting the homeland as the complexity of collaboration between large Public Sector organizations continues to evolve. In the years since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the Private Sector has emerged as a critical part of securing the nation, but more must be done. To prevent a patient, resourceful, and committed adversary from destroying our way of life, every citizen must be clear about the role that they play. From participating in large coordinated campaigns like “See Something, Say Something” to citizen level training like Citizen Corps, to electing local officials that care about securing the Nation, each citizen must understand the consequences of their actions and inactions. This discussion is about the effective translation of the federal DHS vision, mission, and objectives to the small town business owner and then to each citizen of the United States. We understand that freedom is not free and that generations of men and women have sacrificed to protect the country, but we now face a very different kind of enemy. One that can hide in our communities, schools, churches, and government until they decide to strike. The fight has come to our shores and the stakes have never been higher. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


1. 2. 3. 4.

Discuss the intent, capabilities, and method of operation of the radical terrorist, Describe the framework for the Federal DHS organization and how it works to reach out to the community and citizens, Discuss what role ABCHS plays in the equation, and Explain what you can do in your place of business, place of worship, and community to protect America. 03:15 PM — 05:15 PM

The Necessity of Search Management in 8 SAR Team Deployment

PaneLiStS: James Blair, DPA, FABCHS, CHS-V; Raymond Hamden, PhD, CHS-V; Linda Doyle, DABFN, RN, CFN, CMI-III, CHS-III, CDP-I Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

aBStraCt: This session will discuss the important roles of mental health and crisis intervenor professionals in the aftermath of a catastrophic disaster, and specifically a terrorist attack. A major crisis that involves thousands of victims can become overwhelming. In many cases, the first responders require as much counseling as the victims of the disaster. In some cases, the counselors themselves will need counseling after completing their job in a crisis event.

Moderator: Mark Withrow, FABCHS, CHS-V tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm

aBStraCt: It begins with a phone call. Someone is reported missing and a decision is made to activate a search team. Seconds count, the clock is ticking, and the next few hours are critical in saving a life. The presenters explore the decision-making process and the necessary steps involved in SAR deployment. Paramount to the SAR team’s success is an experienced Search Manager who has trained in ICS. A discussion of SAR components and the team’s interaction with law enforcement is presented along with industry best practices in an effort to establish lessons learned during some of the nation’s high profile search cases. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Describe the genesis of ICS, 2. Define SAR, 3. List the SAR components, and 4. Discuss the advantages of SAR.

9

The Value of Prior Military in Homeland Security

Moderator: Vanessa Griffin, CHS-IV PaneLiStS: Rick Whitman, MA, CHS-III; Ronald Torgerson, FABCHS, CHS-V; Matthew Peoria, MSSI, CHS-III; Jose Bautista, CHS-V; DE Smith, CHS-V; Jeffrey Fowler, CHS-III Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm

aBStraCt: There are millions of men and women in the

private sector that have prior military experience. Many have undergone extensive training in the areas of nuclear, chemical, and biological warfare. They have much to offer in the manner of suggestions and recommendations for protective measures and equipment against such attacks in our local communities. Properly equipped, they can be instrumental in assisting and supplementing first responder groups.

Post-Disaster Trauma: 10 Mental Health and Crisis Intervention Moderator: Marilyn Gilbert, PhD, LPC, CHS-III, DPA, FABCHS, CHS-V 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

9

Friday, Oct. 19th

PaneLiSt: George Dresnek, CHS-I Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm

08:00 AM — 10:00 AM

11 ABCHS General Session Keynote SPeaKerS: William Flynn, Acting Assistant Secretary, National Protection and Programs Directorate Office of Infrastructure Protection and John Giduck, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

10

tiMe: 08:00am – 10:00am

10:15 AM — 12:15 PM

Private Sector Emergency Preparedness 12 and Responses Moderator: William Cover, MS, CHS-V PaneLiStS: Paul Purcell, CHS-V, CDP-I; Joel Yonkman, CHSIII; William Besse, CHS-V; Jim Sawyer, CHS-III; Bruce Leeming, CHS-V; Ricco Ches, CHS-V, DABCHS Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

11

tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

aBStraCt: Interactive panel and group discussion on the private sector communication, cooperation and collaboration with local, state, and federal “first responders.” Discussion topics include: updating emergency contact lists; the value of rapid response disaster reports; evaluation impact statements; and local strategic assessments from multiple disciplines and division perspectives.

13 Threat Assessment

11

Moderator: David Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V PaneLiStS: Gerry Cavis, CHS-III; Mark Garver, CHS-V; Howard Weisman, CHS-V; Rick Colliver, CHS-III; Marc Glasser, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

aBStraCt: Threats in the workplace can occur for many

reasons. Sometimes threats are received in response to labor events such as reductions-in-force, plant closures, strikes, or hostile terminations of problem employees. Often they are received as a result of domestic violence that has found its way into the workplace, or because of increased publicity of other graphic violence in our soFall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

12 39


13

ciety. Whether you are a protection specialist collating protective intelligence, a human resources professional assigned to a troubled employee, or a security manager just trying to maintain a safe workplace, it becomes vital to understand how to expediently manage threatening behaviors and comments so that those targeted remain safe and the workforce remains productive. In this day and age of lean budgeting, how do you know how much security is appropriate? In this program, you will learn how to: identify which characteristics of behavior can alert you to an individual’s propensity for violence; evaluate the significance of suspicious correspondence and other communications; choose between appropriate investigation and intervention strategies; and determine when clinician involvement is indicated. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

14

15

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Explain the difference between targeted violence and non-specific violence, 2. Describe the difference between “making” a threat and “posing” a threat, 3. Discuss the thinking and behavior processes associated with violence escalation, 4. Design a threat management program/process in your organization, 5. Evaluate potential intervention/mitigation strategies, 6. Qualify and quantify levels of risk that an individual might pose, and 7. Determine when law enforcement or clinician involvement is indicated.

The Latest Trends & Techniques for Critical 14 Infrastructure Protection Moderator: Robert Coullahan, CHS-V, CEM PaneLiStS: Steven King, MS, MBA, CHS-V; John Sullivan, PhD, DABCHS, CHS-V; Kurt Klingenburger, CHS-V; Cecelia Wright-Brown, DEng, MS, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

16

tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

aBStraCt: This interactive panel of experts will share with you their lessons learned from years of experience working critical infrastructure protection at all levels of government as well as in the private sector. Panelists will discuss the most current programs and resources from the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. Learn how you can better protect the facilities, networks, and systems responsible for our American way of life. The Homeland Security Information Network (HSIN), InfraGard, various security vulnerability assessment tools, Protective Security Advisors, DHS OneView, Common Operating Pictures, and many other free resources available to ABCHS members will be presented with ample opportunity for audience participation. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

17 40

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Use free resources available to improve the protection of critical infrastructure assets, facilities, networks, and systems;

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

2.

3. 4.

Discuss lessons learned from mistakes and experiences senior homeland security professionals have gained from years of critical infrastructure protection; Discuss specific ways geospatial technology can enhance security, emergency response, and critical infrastructure protection; and Describe new training opportunities for homeland security professionals, including Mission Critical TV, Naval Postgraduate School, the Emergency Management Institute, and many more. 01:45 PM — 03:45 PM

15 Many Faces of Chaplaincy Moderator: Charles Singletary, CMC PaneLiStS: Joseph Prudhomme, PhD, ThD, CMC, CHS-III; Don Howe, CMC; Jesus Huertas, DMin, DBS, CMC Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm

aBStraCt: This panel discussion will include a 10 minute overview of various venues of specialized chaplaincy by each panel member. The remainder of time will be dedicated to a question/answer session with the audience and among panel members. The discussion is designed to give a broad overview of some of the more popular areas of chaplaincy, and answer questions pertaining to those areas of specialized chaplaincy including military homeland security, addiction and PTSD among vets, law enforcement, and hospital chaplaincy.

Forensic/Criminal Investigation 16 Responsibilities for Law Enforcement

Rank and File Structure When Responding to a Criminal Incident Moderator: Steve Russell, CHS-III PaneLiStS: Sean Kinney, CHS-V; Patrick Spoerry, PhD, CHS-V, CFC; William Kushner, CHS-V; Walter Kimble, DABCHS, CHS-V; Debra Russell, PhD, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm

aBStraCt: This panel discussion will cover the following topics: • Discussion of the first responding officer’s responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation, • Discussion of the criminal investigator’s responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation, • Discussion of the forensic specialist’s responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation, • Discussion of the supervisor’s responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation, and • Discussion of the public information officer’s responsibilities and duties at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation.

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 5. Describe the responsibilities of each responder in terms of forensic and criminal investigations following a criminal incident.

17 Psychology of Terrorist Recruitment Moderator: Robert Hughbank, CHS-III PaneLiStS: Richard Hughbank, CHS-IV; Raymond Hamden, PhD, CHS-V ; Debra Russell, PhD, CHS-V Ces: 2.0 ABCHS

tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm

aBStraCt: Terrorists and terror regimes today have the desire to influence the global population with either religious or political ideology [Ethno-Geographic Terrorists]. Such motive of aggression could be the “power to kill” without remorse [Psychopathic Terrorists]. Such belligerence may be an act of revenge for a personal disaster experienced [Retributional Terrorists]. Some experts would argue that terrorism may not be due to protracted social conflict - poverty and lack of education. Yet others focus on just these factors of basic human needs. What is the making of a terrorist? Why would some people give their lives for destruction at home or in a foreign land? Recruitment of adolescents may not be so difficult for terror management. Teenagers have three factors to achieve: gain independence, development of their own identity, and achieve emotional stability. The terror regime may offer gainful income, heroism, and fame, and offer a personal mission for the common good. Adults, men and women, will be vulnerable to acts of aggression and involve their family to die for a cause too. Honor is an intrinsic motive that drives loyalty to ethnic groups. The factors to investigate are not limited to only one group or culture. History of loyalty to the ethnic religion may also be accompanied by a history of interpersonal aggressiveness or competitiveness. How much can psychodynamic theory predict when focused on the common emotional consequence (e.g., anger), of antecedents (retribution, integrity)? The discussion will entail how terrorists think, feel, and behave, along with the neuro-physical factors and environmental influences. To understand who is vulnerable to recruitment by terror organizations, this panel will guide the participants through the psychology of purpose to understand terrorists.

DON’T FORGET! You can make your own personalized schedule at www.theexecutivesummit.net

Keep track of your schedule and

spend more time enjoying the

AMAZING attractions this city has to offer.

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss neuro-physical factors and environmental influences on terrorists, 2. Explain the making of a terrorist, and 3. Describe how much psychodynamic theory can predict when focused on the common emotional consequence.

VISIT TODAY!

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

www.theexecutivesummit.net/ihs 17 Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®


ACFEI American College of Forensic Examiners Institute Thursday, Oct. 18th 09:30 AM — 11:30 AM

1 1

Pitfalls in Forensic Science — Lessons Learned in High Profile Cases

2

42

2

CSI Odontology

PreSenterS: Cyril Wecht, MD, JD, CMI-V, CFP and Henry Lee, PhD, FACFEI, DABFE

PreSenterS: James Hutson, DDS, FACFEI, DABFD, CMI-V and Robert Byrd, DDS, FACEFEI, DABFM, DABFE

Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am

aBStraCt: The discussions in this session will be based

1

law enforcement officials, and academic programs, and the National Academy of Science Report of February 2009 will be discussed.

upon the personal, professional involvement of Dr. Wecht and Dr. Lee in various capacities. Cases involving major political figures, including President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Mary Jo Kopechne (Senator Ted Kennedy), Ron Brown, and Vincent Foster will be discussed. Inadequate post-mortem examination by nonforensic pathologists, or the failure to have an autopsy performed, will be emphasized. Incompetent handling of complex cases by attorneys who do not comprehend the complex medical and forensic aspects of a homicide case, and who therefore fail to consult with appropriate experts, will be reviewed. In addition, high profile cases involving celebrities and non-celebrity cases, which have come to be very well-known and extremely controversial will be presented, including Elvis Presley, Tammy Wynette, Jeffrey McDonald, Jean Harris, Sunny Von Bulow, Chandra Levy, Waco Branch Davidian Fire, O.J. Simpson, JonBenet Ramsey, Anna Nicole and Daniel Smith, Laci Peterson, Phil Spector, Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, and others. These are cases in which complex forensic scientific issues were of critical importance in determining whether the death was a homicide, accident, or suicide. Overarching matters regarding the various forensic scientific specialties will be reviewed. Suggestions regarding proper medical-legal, forensic scientific investigation will be offered for physicians, attorneys, forensic scientists,

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am

aBStraCt: Odontology crime scene investigation constitutes scientific methods, physical evidence collection, and deductive reasoning in problem solving a series of events that encompass a crime scene and its victims. The manner in which a crime scene is examined and processed is critical to the success of the investigation. Evidence that is missed, contaminated, and corrupted can have a devastating effect on the case legally by keeping justice from being served and preventing closure for the victim’s next of kin. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss the significance of odontology in crime scene investigations, and 2. Discuss an applicable rule of evidence introduction which governs the science in the courts.

3

Forensic Accounting Hot Topics Panel Discussion

Moderator: Robert Minniti, CPA, DABFA, Cr.FA PaneLiStS: Lamar Casparis, CPA, FACFEI, DABFA, Cr.FA; Stewart Appelrouth, CPA, FACFEI, DABFA, Cr.FA; and Eric Kreuter, PhD, CPA, FACFEI, DABFA Ces: 2.0 NASBA, ACFEI

tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Schedule is subject to change without notice. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.learningmarket.org.

01:00 PM — 03:00 PM

4

Use of Force and Electronic Control Weapon Investigation and Analysis

Moderator: Ron Martinelli, PhD Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm

aBStraCt: This session will introduce attendees to the

methodologies used by court recognized experts to investigate and analyze law enforcement use of force. The course will cover use of force as a general concept, and then will focus more specifically on the use of electronic control weapons (ECW). The material covered in this course will be immediately useful for law enforcement professionals, trainers, attorneys, and risk managers. There are no prerequisites or advanced preparation needed to attend and benefit from this course. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Differentiate between deadly and non-deadly force evaluations, 2. Describe the importance of agency policy in law enforcement use of force, 3. Evaluate a law enforcement use of deadly force using the applicable federal standards, and 4. Investigate law enforcement use of an electronic control weapon.

5

How to Steal from your Employer

PreSenter: Robert Minniti, CPA, DABFA, Cr.FA

boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.learningmarket.org.

Civil Management of Sex Offenders 6 The in New York State PreSenter: Paul Etu, PsyD, FACFEI, DABPS

2

Ces: 2.0 American Psychological Association, NBCC, CBBS, ASWB, ACFEI tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm aBStraCt: The NYS Sex Offender Management and Treatment Act (SOMTA) became effective in 2007. The legislation created a process for the civil management of certain sex offenders upon completion of their prison terms. SOMTA also requires risk assessment of sex offenders by qualified staff upon their admission to prison, as well as prison-based sex offender treatment to be provided by the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS), including residential treatment. SOMTA established a process to review certain sex offenders in the custody of “Agencies with Jurisdiction” for the purposes of civil management. The law requires the NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) to evaluate and recommend individuals for civil management and provide treatment to individuals found by the court to be in need of civil management. More specifically, the statute provides for the Commissioner of Mental Health to designate multidisciplinary staff, case review teams, and psychiatric examiners to identify potential persons suffering from a mental abnormality that predisposes them to sexual recidivism and who may require civil management. It also requires OMH to develop treatment plans for persons released to the community under “Strict and Intensive Supervision and Treatment (SIST)” and to establish secure treatment facilities for persons deemed “dangerous sex offenders requiring confinement (DSORC)” (NYS OMH Annual Report on SOMTA, 2011).

aBStraCt: This class will review asset misappropriation

NYS is the only jurisdiction of the 20 states, DC and the federal government which have such laws in place to have developed and fully implemented a two-level system of civil management of recidivistic sex offenders, including in-patient confinement and community-based placement. Out of the more than 1600 individuals reviewed by the SOMTA team annually, now only about 4% are recommended for civil management. This presentation will discuss this process in detail, with an emphasis on the assessment, treatment, and legal issues involved.

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Describe the evaluative process used by NYS in the assessment of sex offenders under SOMTA, 2. List the common assessment techniques used in the assessment of sex offenders in the civil management process, 3. Discuss the static and dynamic risk factors statistically related to the risk of sexual re-offense, 4. Discuss the most common treatment methodologies used with recidivistic sex offenders, and

Ces: 2.0 NASBA, 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm

deLivery Method: Group Live FieLd oF Study: Specialized Knowledge and Applications PrerequiSiteS: None PrograM LeveL: Overview advanCed PreParation: None

frauds that were in the news in the past year with an emphasis on employees stealing from their employers. It will provide an introduction to asset misappropriation and how employees get around the system to steal from their employers. The discussion will include real world examples of employee theft and discussion on what allowed it to occur, how it could be investigated, and what internal controls were missing or circumvented in the crime.

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

3

4

5

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

6 43


5.

Describe the basic legal issues related to the civil management of sex offenders.

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American College of Forensic Examiners International maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

7

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP™) and a cosponsor of this event/program. The American College of Forensic Examiners International may award NBCC-approved clock hours for events or programs that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP maintains responsibility for the content of this event. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is an approved provider of the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, approval PCE 1896. Course meets the qualification for 2.0 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.

8

This organization, The American College of Forensic Examiners International approval number 1052, is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards 400 South Ridge Parkway, Suite B, Culpepper, VA 22701. www.aswb.org. ASWB Approval Period: 09/15/2010 to 09/15/2013. Social workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval. Social workers will receive 2.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course.

03:15 PM — 05:15 PM

Employees Gone Rogue: 7 Defending Your Organization

9

Moderator: Brad Sargent, CPA, FACFEI, DABFA, Cr.FA PaneLiStS: Michael Kupcheck, AVA; Jane McFetridge, JD; Jason Priebe, JD; Ron King, JD Ces: 2.0 NASBA, ACFEI

tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm

deLivery Method: Group Live FieLd oF Study: Specialized Training and Applications PrerequiSiteS: None PrograM LeveL: Overview advanCed PreParation: None aBStraCt: Join forensic accountants, electronic discovery experts, and litigating attorneys in a panel discussion of safeguarding an organization from the inside. Topics will include: data management and retention, internal controls, liability, pursing wrongdoers and stories of worst-case scenarios come true. This highly interactive panel will encourage audience questions and participation. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Describe forensic techniques to use to catch bad acts, 2. Discuss damage that highly motivated employees can cause to an organization, 3. Identify various avenues of destruction employees can use to sabotage an organization from the inside 4. List the steps to implementing a more effective internal control structure. 44

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.learningmarket.org.

Analyzing and Interpreting Behavior in the 8 Serial Murder and Sexual Homicide Crime

Scene: How to Operationalize Modus Operandi, Ritual, and Staging Behavior

PreSenter: Mark Safarik, MS, VSM, Supervisory Special Agent, FBI Ret. Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm

aBStraCt: This lecture will provide violent crime investigators, crime scene technicians, medical examiners, coroners, forensic nurses, and attorneys assigned to investigate, process, conduct examinations, and prosecute such cases a framework for analyzing the dynamic interaction that occurs between the offender, victim, and scene and then using that analysis to interpret crime attributes such as motive, victimology, risk level, cause of death, weapon use, injury severity, and the degree of planning and organization. Examination of these various behavioral attributes will be applied to complex homicide and sexual assault cases, and examines behavioral linkage in serial homicide cases. This lecture will also include discussion of investigative and prosecutorial considerations and the awareness of the important aspects of evidence collection and processing. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. List the three main behavioral manifestations identified at violent crime scenes, 2. Identify the three main purposes that an offender engages in behaviors further identified as his modus operandi (MO), and 3. Define Staging behavior and its significance at a crime scene when recognized by law enforcement.

Behavioral Forensic Assessment: 9 Using Applied Behavior Analysis in

Forensic Psychology

PreSenter: Douglas Ruben, PhD, FACFEI, DABPS Ces: 2.0 ASWB, CBBS, NBCC, ACFEI tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm aBStraCt: Advances in police forensic analysis account

for widely used evidence-detection procedures pinpointing relevant facts traceable to a crime. A similar scientific process of elimination appears lagging in forensic psychological evaluation, where abstract constellations of psychopathology remain unreducible to specific units of behavioral evidence, and are not causally connective to surrounding events. The diagnostic nosology of DSMIV-TR offers a promising step, but falls short of criteria to classify criminal behavior by its stimulus-response relationships. By “operationalizing” criminal behavior, quantifiable distinction occurs between types of responses www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


(concurrent, sequential) and types of stimulus conditions under which criminal behaviors are probable to occur. Functionally selecting and isolating patterns of behavior accomplishes two goals. First, it strengthens measurement and prediction of crime recidivism. Second, it organizes behaviors into a logically meaningful and causal sequence supporting the forensic psychologist’s expert testimony. This application of operationalism in forensic evaluations is called Behavioral Forensic Analysis (BFA). Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Identify six behavioral standards for empirically derived forensic evaluations; 2. Identify and describe behavioral deficits, excesses, liabilities, and assets; 3. Describe the eight parts of a functional analysis relative to individual assessment; 4. Identify reliable symptoms of positive/negative reinforcement, and positive/negative punishment; 5. Differentiate topography from function of behavior, response sequences from concurrent responses; 6. Give examples of translating psychometric results into units of measurable behavior; 7. Give four behavioral uses of IQ tests; and 8. Explain the role of reliability assessment in behavioral analysis. This organization, The American College of Forensic Examiners International approval number 1052, is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards 400 South Ridge Parkway, Suite B, Culpepper, VA 22701. www.aswb.org. ASWB Approval Period: 09/15/2010 to 09/15/2013. Social workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval. Social workers will receive 2.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is an approved provider of the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, approval PCE 1896. Course meets the qualification for 2.0 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP™) and a cosponsor of this event/program. The American College of Forensic Examiners International may award NBCC approved clock hours for events or programs that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP maintains responsibility for the content of this event.

Friday, Oct. 19

th

08:00 AM — 10:00 AM

10 Ponzi Schemes and Digital Currencies PreSenter: Stewart Appelrouth, CPA, FACFEI, DABFA, Cr.FA Ces: 2.0 NASBA, ACFEI

tiMe: 08:00am – 10:00am

deLivery Method: Group Live FieLd oF Study: Specialized Knowledge and Applications PrerequiSiteS: None PrograM LeveL: Intermediate advanCed PreParation: None 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

aBStraCt: There is no doubt that advancing technologies will eventually make paper currency and coins obsolete. The emergence of the digital age has brought about digital currencies. There are clear advantages to the use of digital currencies, but it’s the disadvantages and the criminal mind exploitation of such that is mostly unknown. This session will examine the criminal involvement as well as the limited U.S. legislation, and regulate to help curb such crime. How digital currencies can be funneled into the U.S. and exchanged for U.S. dollars with little risk of detection will be discussed. In addition, this session will cover how digital currency is a perfect avenue of money laundering. The presenters will discuss the emergence of a new, virtually untraceable digital currency that has the capability of funding terrorist activities. Other topics to be covered include: a secret website designed for the purpose of buying and selling illegal drugs with the use of only the virtually untraceable digital currency; and Ponzi schemes, how they work, how to spot them, famous Ponzi schemers, and how to minimize the possibility of getting scammed or “roped” into one.

10

11

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss digital currencies, 2. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of digital currencies, 3. Describe how a Ponzi scheme works, and 4. Explain how to spot a Ponzi scheme. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.learningmarket.org.

Collapses, Crashes, Mass 11 Explosions, Devastation: Forensic Engineering &

Technology is There

PreSenter: George Frank, FACFEI, DABFE, Cr.FA additionaL PreSenterS: John Petrelli, FACFEI, DABFET, CFC; James Waltz, MBA, FACFEI, DABFET; Jennifer Wagner, PhD; and Cam Cope, DABFE, DABFET Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 08:00am – 10:00am

aBStraCt: The field of forensic engineering and tech-

nology covers a very wide spectrum from the familiar civil, structural, electrical, soil, and chemical, to the more modern sciences of nuclear, microbial, software, and tissue. Some of the most significant events over the past years, the Hyatt Regency walkway collapse, Columbia Space Shuttle, TWA Flight 800, Northridge Earthquake, Oklahoma Bombing, 9-11, and the I-35 Bridge failure all have had intensive forensic investigations involving specialists in engineering and technology, yet little media coverage was reported on the effort put forth by these professionals as to what their findings were and/or how such findings would affect future development of similar projects, advanced engineering including new and more creative three dimensional design methodologies and Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

45


12

continued expansion in determining the environmental influences on new and old materials. Events affecting the field of forensic engineering and technology are an everyday occurrence affecting the lives of many, from the single home owner to major corporations and governmental agencies, and run into the hundreds of billions of dollars every year. Surprisingly, many events requiring the skills of a qualified forensic engineer are not met, due to the limited number of professionals available in the many fields of Forensic Engineering and Technology. This session will provide information on the importance of the field of forensic engineering and technology through a series of actual cases. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

13

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Define the field of forensic engineering and technology, 2. Demonstrate through actual cases how and why the field of forensic engineering and technology is an integral part of the overall field of forensic science, 3. Explain how the field of forensic engineering and technology fits into importance of people’s everyday lives, and 4. Compare and discuss how the field of forensic engineering and technology interacts with other fields of forensic science.

The C-IQ: 12 Varieties of Criminal Intelligence PreSenter: Katherine Ramsland

14

15

Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 08:00am – 10:00am

aBStraCt: Since the 19th century, we’ve sought ways

to penetrate a criminal’s mind, based on the assumption that comprehension offers a tool for stopping – even curing – them. From Lombroso to psychoanalysis to profiling to brain research, we’re still seeking a way to quantify offender intelligence (C-IQ), because some street-smart offenders still elude whatever the devices measure. This seminar will present the notion that predators have their own form of intelligence, and while some assessment devices have value, none have yet shown us what a high C-IQ might achieve. We’ll be looking at the various instruments designed to penetrate the criminal mind, attempts by mental health practitioners to crystallize criminological insights, the value of behavioral evidence, and what neuroscience today tells us. The target criminal population (male and female) will include sexual predators, healthcare killers, stalkers, “dupicians,” subclinical psychopaths, and serial killers. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

16

46

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. List the types of assessment instruments that try to measure or describe criminal intelligence, 2. Critique ineffective approaches to offender intelligence, 3. Reference recent studies on the associations between brain scans and violent behavior, 4. Recognize and counter the strategies of narcissistic immunity, and ®

Inside Homeland Security

Fall 2012

5.

Devise an effective method for assessing criminal intelligence relevant to a specific professional context. 10:15 AM — 12:15 PM

on Non-Accidental 13 Identification Injuries in Children PreSenter: Sue Gabriel, EdD, MSN, MFS, FACFEI, CFN Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

aBStraCt: Non-accidental childhood injuries occur dai-

ly, affecting tens of thousands of children annually. The evaluation of suspected child abuse involves many challenges and uses a complexity of decision-making skills by multidisciplinary team members. Health care providers can play a large part on this team when they are skilled in identifying injuries in children that are intentional and non-accidental in nature. It is important to be knowledgeable in normal growth and development, recognize disparities in the story of how the injury took place, display cultural competency, possess knowledge of normal child care practices, awareness of how parents react to the injury and its severity, and if there is a time delay in seeking treatment for the injury. Health care providers at all levels should be trained in the recognition and appropriate documentation of non-accidental injuries in children. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. List various non-accidental injuries seen in children, 2. Define what are normal and abnormal injuries seen in children, 3. Identify disparities in the story versus the injury, and 4. List ways in which they can increase documentation skills of injuries.

Middle East Awareness Training 14 for Law Enforcement PreSenter: Nia Ackvan, JD Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

aBStraCt: The Middle East’s population currently exceeds 300 million, and like any growing region, cross cultural understanding is a significant factor when dealing with the people of this region. However, there are many preconceptions and stereotypes of the Middle East that may obscure a thorough understanding of the region’s cultural dynamics. As such, this session is designed to provide law enforcement officials with some of tools needed to ensure they gain a more comprehensive understanding of the region itself and the values, attitudes, and motivations associated with the people of this region. This, in turn, will aid law enforcement officials in establishing the necessary rapport needed to effectively elicit information when conducting interviews and interrogations on Middle Eastern subjects. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss the various deposition styles and how to prepare for a deposition. 2. Explain why depositions are conducted. 3. Describe the proper way to testify in a courtroom. 4. Analyze the importance of clearly communicating with retaining attorney during the 877.219.2519 life of the case. www.abchs.com


Forensic Examiner’s Role in 15 The Risk Management and Compliance PreSenter: Lamar Casparis, CPA, FACFEI, DABFA, Cr.FA deLivery Method: Group Live FieLd oF Study: Specialized Training and Applications PrerequiSiteS: None PrograM LeveL: Intermediate advanCed PreParation: None Ces: 2.0 NASBA, ACFEI

tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

aBStraCt: Forensic examiners have specific training and

experience that allows them to address compliance measures in unique ways. Forensic examiners who are also CPAs have specific training in matters of internal control, producing the financial results of operations, data collection, and insuring the reliability of that data and financial information. This session uses psychopathic and sociopathic attributes to study how individuals can manipulate organizational data and financial operations to defeat internal control systems and influence organizational compliance. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Describe the general control, data, and financial environment relating to compliance, 2. List the 20 general attributes of psychopathic and sociopathic behavior, 3. Discuss how the 20 general attributes can interact with the general control environment and their effect on data and financial information reliability, and 4. Develop testing methodology to trap errant behavior violating compliance in an organization. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.learningmarket.org.

01:45 PM — 03:45 PM

Does an Expert Witness Prepare for a 16 How Deposition and/or Trial: The Do’s and Dont’s PreSenter: Kevin Theriault, FACFEI, DABFE, CFC Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm

aBStraCt: This interactive lecture and workshop will

provide the participants an opportunity to learn acceptable practices to use before, during, and after depositions and trials. Examples of deposition styles will be presented, as well as discussed during the presentation. The purposes of depositions will be discussed as well as what an expert can expect during a deposition. We will discuss courtroom dynamics and how experts should testify during direct and cross-examinations in trials to make their testimony believable.

877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss the various deposition styles and how to prepare for a deposition, 2. Explain why depositions are conducted, 3. Describe the proper way to testify in a courtroom, and 4. Analyze the importance of clearly communicating with retaining attorney during the life of the case.

17 10

Zimmerman & Trayvon Martin: 17 George 911 Audio Tapes Analysis & Forensic

Voice Indentification

PreSenterS: Tom Owen, FACFEI, DABFE, DABRE and Jennifer Owen, DABRE, DABFE Ces: 2.0 ACFEI

tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm

aBStraCt: Mr. Owen is listed as a witness in the upcom-

ing trial of George Zimmerman in Florida that involves the death of Trayvon Martin. This presentation will trace Mr. Owen’s early conclusions in March based on aural spectrographic and biometric voice analysis that Zimmerman was not the voice yelling for help in the 911 call and that Zimmerman did not say the word “coons” in his 911 call, but said the word “punks”. His technical methodology and analysis of voice disguises, whispers, and screams will also be discussed in detail.

17

the Work of a Forensic Engineer 18 Coordinating into the Expert Forensic Report on Economic

Damages Related to a Fire Event and in Defense of a Claim of Subrogation PreSenter: Eric Kreuter, PhD, CPA, FACFEI, DABFA

18

deLivery Method: Group Live FieLd oF Study: Specialized Training and Applications PrerequiSiteS: None PrograM LeveL: Intermediate advanCed PreParation: None Ces: 2.0 NASBA, ACFEI

tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm

aBStraCt: This session will discuss a recent case involv-

ing a fire in a large building where the damage claim was paid by an insurance carrier; then the carrier filed a claim of subrogation against a contractor who then sought to refute the merits of the claim and the calculation of damages. This effort required tight coordination of two fields of forensic expertise: accounting and engineering. Highlights of the process from selling the engagement to writing the expert reports will be covered, breaking new ground at ACFEI to present a case with combined expertise spread over multiple experts. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.learningmarket.org.

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

47


Psychotherapy Association

American

American Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Association Association American Thursday, Oct. 18th 09:30 AM — 11:30 AM

1 1

Restoring Psychotherapy as a First Line Intervention

PreSenter: Nicholas A. Cummings, PhD, ScD Ces: 2.0 American Psychological Association tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am aBStraCt: Psychotherapy is in precipitous decline, with

referrals down 40% in the past decade. This has resulted in a glut of psychotherapists with stagnant incomes, and there is no end in sight as psychotropic medicines increasingly replace psychosocial interventions. Dr. Cummings will discuss how this came about, and what needs to be done to restore psychotherapy to its rightful and effective place in behavioral care.

2

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. 2.

3. 4.

48

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American College of Forensic Examiners International maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Inside Homeland Security®

Discuss how it came about that psychotropic medications replace psychotherapy as the first line intervention; Describe how years of mental health insisting on its own “silo” apart from physical health has isolated psychotherapy and alternative care from mainstream healthcare, and the importance of integrated care that includes not only mental health, but also alternative care; Explain the meaning and implications of the “medicalization” of mental health; and Describe how psychotherapy was the primary mental health intervention before 1980, the changes since, and how the delivery of psychotherapy today is so different from this previous ideal. Fall 2012

01:00 PM — 03:00 PM

2

Is Mental Health Going the Way of Kodak?

Moderator: Jon Caccavale, PhD, MS Ces: 2.0 American Psychological Association, NBCC, CBBS,

ASWB

tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm aBStraCt: The failure of mental health practitioners

to adopt new strategies and adapt to current trends has resulted in a steep decline in the utilization of psychotherapy by consumers. A major factor has been the shift of mental health services into primary care settings along with medications increasingly seen as first line treatments for mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Since many in the medical field do not or cannot distinguish between the different types of mental health providers, this confusion has resulted in misconceptions as to which provider can provide specific services. Subsequently, although erroneous, there is a perception among many referral sources that there is a shortage of providers, thereby limiting access of patients to quality care. On the other hand, providers of mental health services have not been able to develop strategies that can effectively address the economic forces that limit both access and referrals. Consequently, there is a significant probability that mental health providers will be seen as obsolete and irrelevant to healthcare. We will discuss these trends and strategies that practitioners can utilize to thrive in the current mental health environment. www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Schedule is subject to change without notice.

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Describe the economic forces that are confronting mental health practitioners, 2. Discuss how creative destruction works in mental health, and 3. List specific strategies to thrive in a hostile economic environment.

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Describe the relationship between chronic medical and behavioral conditions and rising healthcare costs; 2. Identify the behavioral conditions that have a body of evidence showing that targeted, focused behavioral treatment can lead to a medical cost offset; 3. List the essential components of effective integrated care and define psychopathology, efficiency, and population health management; and 4. Identify the key quality metrics that will be the focus of the Accountable Care Organization model describe the opportunity for integrated behavioral care to improve these quality metrics.

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American College of Forensic Examiners International maintains responsibility for this program and its content. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP™) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. Sessions (or programs) for which NBCC-approved clock hours will be awarded are identified in the program bulletin (or in the catalogue or Web site). The ACEP is solely responsible for all aspects of the program. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is an approved provider of the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, approval PCE 1896. Course meets the qualification for 2.0 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California board of Behavioral Sciences. This organization, The American College of Forensic Examiners International approval number 1052, is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards 400 South Ridge Parkway, Suite B, Culpepper, VA 22701. www.aswb.org. ASWB Approval Period: 09/15/2010 to 09/15/2013. Social workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval. Social workers will receive 2.0 continuing education clock hours in participating in this course.

03:15 PM — 05:15 PM

Solution: Upgrading the 3 The Masters Level Clinician Moderator: Ronald O’Donnell, PhD Ces: 2.0 American Psychological Association tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm aBStraCt: Healthcare reform is leading to changes that

will disrupt and transform the delivery of behavioral health treatment in the United States. The Primary Care Medical Home model will result in a shift from traditional specialty behavioral care delivery outside of the medical healthcare system to integrated behavioral care within primary care and other medical settings. Healthcare reimbursement will increasingly be based on financial performance incentives, or pay for performance models, that are based on both quality of care and cost-effectiveness. The typical specialty behavioral care provider is ill-prepared for this tremendous transformation. The focus of this presentation is on the clinical and management skills that will be essential for the 21st century behavioral clinician to not just survive but thrive. The Arizona State University Doctor of Behavioral Health program will serve as a model for upgrading the skill set of masters level behavioral providers to meet this impending market demand. 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American College of Forensic Examiners International maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

3

4

Friday, Oct. 19th 08:00 AM — 10:00 AM

4 Ethics Panel Discussion Moderator: Daniel Reidenberg, PsyD, FAPA, MTAPA, CRF Ces: 2.0 American Psychological Association, CBRN tiMe: 08:00am – 10:00am PaneLiStS: Clifton Croan, MA, LPC, FAPA; Stan Sharma, PhD, FAPA; Wayne Tasker, PsyD, LPC, LCSW, DAPA, BCPC; Gerald Dahl, MSW, PhD, FAPA, CRS; Donald Goff, PhD, MTAPA, DAPA

There are numerous ethical demands placed on psychotherapists and helping professionals. In the past, most ethical violations revolved around billing issues and boundary violations. Other common areas where therapists find themselves struggling are conflict of interest, confidentiality, release of information, and promotion/ marketing. However, with technology advances, therapists are now finding themselves struggling with clients wanting to communicate online through email, connecting through social media platforms, and by text messages. In this session come listen to the experts discuss how to recognize these common dilemmas and how to best deal with them to protect your clients’ rights and best interests. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Identify common ethical dilemmas; 2. Discuss what consultation and advice opportunities are to help resolve ethical dilemmas; 3. Describe key concepts in recognizing your limits and boundaries; and 4. Describe how to tell a colleague that they are in too deep.

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

49


The American College of Forensic Examiners International is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American College of Forensic Examiners International maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 13133 for 2.0 contact hours.

5

10:15 AM — 12:15 PM

Impact of a Parent Training Program on 5 Parental Stress Levels and Family

Environment Variables in Families with a Child Diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder PreSenterS: Kenneth Miller, PhD, Susan Miller, PhD and

Richard VanVoorhis, PhD

Ces: 2.0 American Psychological Association tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

5

5

6

aBStraCt: Presenters will describe a study conducted

with parents of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at the Rich Center for Autism on the campus of Youngstown State University. They will describe the impact of the Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) on parental stress levels and dimensions of family environment that include Family Relationship, Personal Growth, System Maintenance, and Change. Presenters will provide a rationale for the study, including a brief literature review, description of the research methodology, provide results of the study, and discuss implications of the study for therapists and health practitioners in a wide range of settings. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss the primary components of the Triple P (positive parenting program), 2. Describe the effectiveness of the Triple P program with various populations, 3. Critique the research and design methodology used to determine the impact of the Triple P program on parental stress levels and family environmental variables, and 4. Apply findings from this study in professional practice. The American College of Forensic Examiners International is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American College of Forensic Examiners International maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

01:45 PM — 03:45 PM

6 Best Practices in Geriatric Treatment PreSenterS: Wayne Tasker, PsyD, LPC, LCSW, DAPA, BCPC

and Jon Ellis, PhD Ces: 2.0 American Psychological Association tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm aBStraCt: One of most promising, yet challenging

populations that has emerged in the mental health field is the treatment of geriatric clients. This population has increased significantly and is only going to become a larger segment of our society over time. The mental health needs of geriatric clients will entail both unique therapeutic approaches as well as require a better understanding of what issues affect this group’s therapy needs. The complexity of accurately identifying and diagnosising geriatric problems is at best difficult, due to the integration of medical, social, and psychological factors involved. While some geriatric problems are less complex and straight forward in terms of treatment approaches, others require shifting through many years of medical and family history as well as other social factors that often cannot be retrieved accurately from the client. Medication issues can play a major role in the psychological condition of the geriatric client and can produce mood changes. These can be temporary in scope, but confused for a serious mental health condition. These are just a few of the obstacles that face the clinician in the treatment of geriatric clients. The purpose of this workshop is to help the clinician develop skills that will aid in the process of clearly identifying a mental health issue in geriatric clients. By looking at clients through a multi-dimensional approach, the clinician will be prepared to more accurately diagnose and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. A special emphasis will be given to those geriatric clients that are residents of nursing homes or assisted living facilities. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Identify common psychological conditions in geriatric clients, Develop treatment approaches for behavioral and emotional problems in the elderly, Identify “layers” of mental health issues and ways to narrow treatment focus, List factors that impede therapeutic work with geriatric clients, and Explain loss/grief issues as underlying dynamics in many geriatric problems.

The American College of Forensic Examiners International is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American College of Forensic Examiners International maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

6 50

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


AAIM

Schedule is subject to change without notice.

American Association of Integrative Medicine Thursday, Oct. 18th 09:30 AM — 11:30 AM

1

Billion Dollar Doctor Branding & Marketing: From Pauper to Profits for Doctors

PreSenter: Veronica Anderson, MD Ces: 2.0 AAIM

tiMe: 09:30am – 11:30am

aBStraCt: This session will be a mini-business school for doctors. It will include a discussion on the difference between branding and marketing, and how to do it with integrity as a physician. Dr. Anderson will discuss a 10-Step Plan that allows any physician to get themselves noticed by colleagues as well as their ideal patient. There will be an extensive discussion on what makes an effective and profitable website, including why and how to blog effectively, traditional and social media marketing to produce profits, profiling and acquiring your ideal patient, information marketing, and outsourcing to run a more efficient practice. The audience will hear elements of Dr. Veronica’s program The Buck Starts Here for Doctors and pieces of her best-selling book Billion Dollar Doctor. In addition, there will be a brief discussion of how she started her radio show Wellness for the REAL World and built it into a lucrative venture with millions of weekly listeners worldwide, as well as her new Web TV series Help! My Practice Sucks. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. 2. 3.

Discuss techniques to gain the desired clientele, List ideas to gain financial control over using your credentials and talents to gain more income, and Describe what makes an effective and profitable website. 01:00 PM — 03:00 PM

Naked Calories: How Micronutrients Can 2 Maximize Weight Loss, Prevent Disease and Enhance Your Life PreSenterS: Jayson Calton, PhD, FAAIM and Mira Calton, CN, FAAIM, BCIH Ces: 2.0 AAIM

tiMe: 01:00pm – 03:00pm

aBStraCt: Despite out of control obesity rates, we are in the midst of a hunger crisis. But unlike our ability to recognize a grumbling stomach and feed it, most of us 877.219.2519

www.abchs.com

will go years without ever knowing that our bodies may actually be starving--for the vitamins, minerals and other essential elements needed for them to function properly. Micronutrient deficiency is America’s hidden epidemic. It is the most widespread and dangerous health condition of the 21st Century and is at the heart of many of today’s most common and life-threatening health conditions and diseases. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Describe what is a naked calorie, Discuss what causes micronutrient deficiency and explain how prevalent these deficiencies are, List everyday micronutrient depleters, Describe how deficiency cause disease, Explain is micronutrient deficiency linked to obesity, and Describe what makes a well-formulated supplement.

1

03:15 PM — 05:15 PM

\3

Clinical Intuition: A Practical Demonstration

PreSenter: Vito Hemphill, DC, DMBM Ces: 2.0 AAIM

tiMe: 03:15pm – 05:15pm

aBStraCt: This session will be an interactive lecture and demonstration of how clinical intuition testing techniques can be used in the field of integrative medicine for diagnosis and treatment of physical, chemical, emotional, and spiritual issues. You will observe how Dr. Hemphill is able to ask specific questions and get intuitive answers directly from each patient’s body. The answers will provide valuable information to accelerate the healing process. Arm resistance testing and leg motion testing will be demonstrated on audience volunteers. You will see how these testing procedures can be used to test medications, natural supplements, and food to determine proper dosage and avoid allergies. Clinical intuition can also be used to diagnose and treat subtle body imbalances to heal psychological issues. Dr. Hemphill will use audience volunteers to demonstrate how he is able to access key information that is useful for psychotherapists, psychiatrists or any other clinician that wants to help patients with psychological issues. You will observe how very specific details can be obtained from each patient without any verbal communication, and how you can develop a treatment strategy using this new information. Fall 2012

Inside Homeland Security®

2

2

3 51


Learning oBjeCtiveS:

4

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss how intuition can be used practically in integrative medicine, 2. Describe priority testing of drugs and natural supplements and how to determine accurate dosage, 3. Discuss how information about emotional issues can be defined and presented to the patient, 4. Explain how subtle body treatment protocols can be determined using these testing procedures, and 5. Discuss how providers can use drug/supplement test kits and how all this medication testing can be done in less than two minutes with each patient.

Friday, Oct. 19th 08:00 AM — 10:00 AM

4

Integrative Yoga: Research Data and Clinical Implications

PreSenter: Shashi Agarwal, MD, FAAIM, BCIM Ces: 2.0 AAIM

5

6

tiMe: 08:00am – 10:00am

aBStraCt: Yoga is practiced by over 13 million Americans on a regular basis. According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), yoga is one of the top 10 CAM modalities used by Americans. And its popularity is growing. Having its origins in India thousands of years ago, yoga is a mind-body practice. The Yoga Sutras (aphorisms) describe eight limbs of practice: yama (moral behavior); niyama (healthy habits); asana (physical postures); pranayama (breathing exercises); pratyahara (sense withdrawal); dharana (concentration); dhyana (contemplation); and samadhi (higher consciousness). Commonly practiced yoga sutras in the USA include physical poses (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayamas) and meditation (dharana and dhyana). Regular practitioners of yoga exercises report an increase in flexibility and strength, an improvement in posture, and better mood and concentration. Growing scientific evidence also indicates a beneficial impact on many disease states, such as high blood pressure, chronic low-back pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, diabetes mellitus, HIV, immune dysfunction, osteoarthritis, insomnia, and multiple sclerosis. This presentation will focus on the latest scientific studies establishing the benefits of integrating yoga in clinical practice. Some medically useful yoga exercises will also be discussed and demonstrated. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. Discuss the latest scientific studies establishing the benefits of integrating yoga in clinical practice, and 2. Demonstrate medically useful yoga exercises. 10:15 AM — 12:15 PM

5

Our Body: The Toxic Waste Dump

PreSenter: Phylis Canion, ND, DCCN Ces: 2.0 AAIM

tiMe: 10:15am – 12:15pm

aBStraCt: The human body has been described as a wonder, a marvel, and a miracle-yet no words seem adequate to describe it fully…until now. Because our Stan52

Inside Homeland Security®

Fall 2012

dard American Diet (SAD) now contains toxic food contaminants and additives known as aluminum, aspartame, BHT and BHA, caffeine, fluoride, food colors, mercury, MSG, nitrates and PCB’s, and other untested synthetic additives added for aesthetic and marketing purposes, should we now refer to the human body as a Toxic Waste Dump? In addition to the additives that are intentionally added to foods and the contaminants in packaging material, toxic levels are elevated through the addition of pesticides, herbicides, growth hormones, and microwaved food wrapped in plastic. The average American now consumes his body weight in sugar each year, compared to the average sugar consumption in the 1900’s which was five pounds per person. An additional forty pounds of artificial sweeteners, including high fructose corn syrup, can also be added. Could the toxins in our diet be the leading cause of obesity and the rise of all disease? This presentation presents a simple instruction into effective ways to reduce food toxins, increase immunity, and bring awareness of how to live a healthy lifestyle. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. List ways to reduce food toxins, 2. Discuss how to increase immunity, and 3. Demonstrate an awareness of how to live a healthy lifestyle. 01:45 PM — 03:45 PM

6

The Innate Wisdom of the Body/Mind Matrix: Finding the Roots and Connecting the Dots

PreSenter: Sherri Jefferson, BCIH Ces: 2.0 AAIM

tiMe: 01:45pm – 03:45pm

aBStraCt: This workshop will explore different aspects of the mind. Definitions using anatomy, physiology, quantum physics, holographic theory, philosophy, and spirituality will be discussed. Movement based exercises will be used as a means to experience our freedom and our restriction of movement. Movement is an expression of our mind which we are experiencing in each moment. Each exercise is an opportunity to become more aware of who we truly are. Innate wisdom and its connection to System Theory and the Cybernetics of Cybernetics will be discussed. Participants will be given the opportunity to explore their inner world with exercises such as dyads, triads, and creative visualization. Ethics, appropriate boundaries, and accurate empathy will be discussed from this paradigm. This workshop is an opportunity for self exploration, growth, and discovery both professionally and personally. Learning oBjeCtiveS:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to: 1. List at least three different definitions for the term “human mind,” 2. Discuss the biological definition of the term “Innate Wisdom,” 3. Discuss the significance of a system theory paradigm, 4. Engage in at least four different exercises targeted to facilitate integration of the right and left hemispheres of the brain, and 5. Describe interactive exercises to experience interacting with another person while experiencing brain integration. www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


1

4 Easy Ways to Register:

2

ONLINE

www.theexecutivesummit.net

FAX

(417)-881-4702

ES-21

2012

EXECUTIVE SUMMIT

OCTOBER 17-19, 2012 LAS VEGAS, NV RIO ALL-SUITE HOTEL

3

AMERICAN COLLEGE OF FORENSIC EXAMINERS INSTITUTE AMERICAN BOARD FOR CERTIFICATION IN HOMELAND SECURITY AMERICAN PSYCHOTHERAPY ASSOCIATION AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

PHONE

(800) 423-9737

4

MAIL

2750 E. Sunshine Springfield, MO 65804

ATTENDEE INFORMATION (please print) Name

Member ID #

Address City

State

Phone (

)

Fax (

)

Name of Emergency Contact Emergency Contact Phone (

Zip E-mail Relation

)

EXECUTIVE SUMMIT REGISTRATION Wednesday, October 17–Friday, October 19 All registration rates include one ticket to the Annual Banquet. Registration with one association grants you full access to all conference sessions. Student and group pricing is available; please call for details. Please check the primary association with which you wish to be affiliated (Check only one): ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑

American College of Forensic Examiners Institute (ACFEI) American Board for Certification in Homeland Security (ABCHS) American Psychotherapy Association American Association of Integrative Medicine (AAIM)

❑ One-Day Summit Pass $299 ❑ Thursday, October 18 ❑ Friday, October 19 ❑ Additional Banquet Ticket $100

REGISTRATION FEES: early Bird (before 8/1/12)

Advanced registration (before 10/1/12)

late/on-site (10-1-12 - 12/919/12)

Member

$709

$779

$849

Life Member (save 10%)

$638

$702

$764

Active Duty Military Member

$659

$729

$799

Please circle the appropriate registration rate.

PAYMENT PROCESSING ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑

Total Amount Due: $ ___________ Check enclosed (payable to ACFEI, ABCHS, AMERICAN PSYCHOTHERAPY ASSOCIATION, or AAIM) Purchase Order Card Number __________________________________ Exp ____________ MasterCard/Visa American Express Name (as it appears on card) _______________________________________ Discover Signature _________________________________________________________ Payment Plan: Please accept $_________ (min. $142) as a down payment and charge $_________ (min. $100) per month until balance is paid in full. Balance must be paid off by September 15, 2012.

CANCELLATION POLICY: All requests for cancellation of conference registration must be made to Association Headquarters in writing by fax, mail, or e-mail. Phone cancellations will not be accepted. All cancelled/refunded registrations will be assessed a $75 administrative fee. All refunds will be issued in the form of credit vouchers and are pro-rated as follows: cancellations received 4 or more weeks prior to the conference=100% refund (less $75 administrative fee); cancellations received less than 4 weeks but more than 1 week prior to the conference=50% refund (less $75 administrative fee); cancellations received 1 week or less prior to the conference=no refund. For more information on administrative policies, such as grievances, call (800) 423-9737. The performance of this conference is subject to acts of God, war, government regulation, disaster, strikes, civil disorder, curtailment of transportation facilities, or any other emergency that makes it impossible to hold the conference. In the event of such occurrences, credit vouchers will be issued in lieu of cash. Conference schedule is subject to change. Please be prepared to show photo identification upon arrival at the conference. A $20 NSF fee will be assessed for each returned check.

Special Services: ❑ Please check here if you require special accommodations to participate in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Please attach a written description of your needs.


Special Pricing for Executive Summit attendees.

Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino Make your reservations now! The Rio hosts more than 2,500 suites, providing spectacular views of Las Vegas. Every suite offers more than 600 square feet of spacious luxury, including a separate dressing area, couch, 32-inch TV, table with chairs, hairdryer, in-suite refrigerator, iron, ironing board and complimentary in-suite safe. A discounted rate of $175/night has been established for Executive Summit attendees. To make your reservation, call (888) 746-6955 and reference group code SRACFE2. You can also book at www.theexecutivesummit.net/hotel. 3700 W e s t F l a m i n g o R oa d | l a s V e g a s , n e Va d a 89103

R e s e r vat i o n s | 8 8 8 . 7 4 6 . 6 9 5 5


Provisional Members

Provisional Members Guillermo Acevedovengas Nicodemus Acosta Sean Aguilar Augustine Aguirre Krystal Airall Jeffrey Alleman Lorenzo Allen Jaime Arbelaez Michael Arnhart Alberto Arosemena Frederick Asuncion Patricia Aughtry Alexander Aviles Christopher Baker Preston Ballentine Miles Barnes Brennan Barrett Seth Baty Alyssa Bechore Agileo Bello Dustin Bennett Edwin Bennett Joshua Bennett Eric Bergsohn James Berkvam James Bibel Michael Bibera Lorna Blackburn Lee Blanc Shane Blanchard Wade Bloomer Justin Bongat David Bounsana Jessica Brasel Brandon Briggs Ryan Brinkerhoff Jaymie Brinkmeier John Briody 877.219.2519

Patrick Brock Robert Brodie Christopher Brookman Michael Brooks Jr. David Broomes Amy Brown Brian Brown Larry Brown Brett Brown Anna Buckley Shawn Buckman Brian Burch Jack Burch Danielle Burkes Maurice Burnett Kenneth Butcher Mark Byers Christopher Byington Erwin Caldwell Jose Calles Asterio Caras Jr. Dawn Carlton Wayne Carpenter Jose Carrillo Angie Carter Kayla Cavallaro Selene Ceballo Nicholas Ciampoli Brandon Clapp Shavon Clarke Douglas Clements Eddie Coats Jr. Marc Cobb Shawn Collins William Conkle III Brittney Cook Justin Cook Tiff Cook Luis Corniel Rodolfo Cortina Jr.

www.abchs.com

Michael Cosio Benjamin Council Jr. Christopher Cowart Raymond Cowell Chase Cox William Crawford Colby Creighton Brian Crenshaw James Cruz Thomas Cunningham Nathan Czuhajewski Michael Daniel Travis Darling Gregory Davis Jimmie Dean Jr. Raymond Dearing Hillary Deems Brian Delaney Colleen Dibble Nathanael Dillard Thomas Ditewig Paul Donald Justin Dove Laquinta Dover William Eason Alex Eck Kyle Edwards Stephanie Edwards Giraud Elliot Shannon Elliott Reginald Epps Aries Escudero Julia Esquivel-Ramirez Caleb Evans Richard Fairbourn Victorio Fazzino Tyrone Ferguson William Fidler Jr. Aaron Fitzgerald Nathan Flint Joshua Florentino Alberto Flores Marvin Flores Deleon Herschel Flowers Jr. Robert Folendore Justin Foxworth Jesse Francis Claudia Freeland Paris Fuentes-Alfaro Heidi Gaddis Scott Gallagher Ordice Gallups David Gavaldon Floyzell Gay

Debra Gethers Nicole Gieder Dennis Goins Kevin Goldsmith Lee Goodner Ryan Grange Seth Greenberg James Griggs James Gross Jr. Guillermo Guzman Eric Hancock Yvonda Handley Jared Hargis Stephen Harris Richard Harry Ashley Harvey Cory Hays Charles Heiden John Heiland Jr. Coty Henson John Hepworth Marcelino Hernando Bradley Herschberger Alauna Hetherington Timothy Hewitt Michael Hoar Jr. William Hoddinott Derek Hoffman Seth Hollingsworth Davad Holman Russell Holton Jr. Travis Honas Ronrico Hooks Kenneth Hornfeldt Michael Hovis III Ashley Hubbard John Hunt David Jaeger Troy Jansen James Jansma John Jasken Katrina Jennings Brandon Johnson Cody Johnson Justin Johnson Cherokee Johnson Jenyfer Johnson Jolyn Jones Marlan Jones Christopher Jordan Eboni Joyner Chris Kampbell Daniel Kavanagh Matthew Kelley Fall 2012

Kandace Kelsey Timothy Kenney Michael Kessler Sean King Xavier King Carolyn King George Klima William Klingler Gary Kluemper Bradley Knight Christopher Kordish Daniza Kramer Timothy Krieger Kyle Kurzendoerfer Matthew Lacy Marcus Lane Kevin Lang Rodley Langston Philip Laramie Brian Ledgerwood Alan Lemire Joseph Lendley John Lewis Jason Limbach Darrel Link German Liracarrillo Jeffrey Lischke Jr. Marvin Little Mario Lopez Karen Lugo Shawn Luiz Paul Luna Abelardo Manansala Wayne Marcus Daniel Mariner Jose Marquezgonzalez Alex Marrondiaz Edward Marte Alecia Martin James Martin Bobby Martinez Bernabe Matro Jr. Tommy Mauldin Bryan Maule Jr. David McClurg Andrew McClusky Laudrey McCray Kevin McGill Timothy McGinnis Billy McGowan Caleb McGrath David McIntyre Leonora McKenzie Jeremiah McLean Inside Homeland Security速

55


Provisional Members and Newly Credentialed Rondu McMaster Anthony McPherson Gregory Meier John Melendez Jr. Eric Mendes Gregorio Mendez Jr. Adlai Mendoza Erik Mendoza Joe Mendoza John Mendoza Jedidayah Merriweather Ryan Miletello Grace Miller Lawrence Mills Daniel Milos Rekeshia Moore Nicole Morehouse Christopher Morris Jasmine Morrison Theodore Morrison Daniel Morse Bradly Mueller Travis Mueller George Mulford III James Murphy Robert Murphy III Nicholas Naymon Patrick Neill Breeanna Nelson Kimberley Nelson Robin Nicely Nicholas Nicoloff Brian Nielson Nathan Null John Oestereicher Lauren Ogden Bok Oh Angel Oliveras Jr. Larzon Ong Pablo Ortiz Gregory Parkinson Oscar Parra Rajan Patel Elizabeth Patrick Michael Pellegrino James Penney Edgar Peralta Juan Pereyra Jordan Perkins Eric Phillips Wendy Phillips Peter Piedra Lawrence Pieper 56

Inside Homeland Security速

Kathleen Pierce Anthony Pieske Charles Pietzman Shanekwa Pittman Adam Popp Darail Porter Kenneth Pospisil Felicia Powers Brian Preachers Jamie Preciado Nicholas Prince Jeremy Proctor Marisa Rainey Gustavo Ramirez Jr. Jeffrey Ramondetta Nelson Ramos Jr. Anthony Reanue Curtis Reedy Debbie Remele Scott Rhead Leroy Rhem Jr. Lisa Ribocoff Anthony Rice Nicholas Rice Aaron Richards Daniel Richter Josef Rivera Jerrad Roberts Kelli Romero Joshua Roundy Christopher Rugile Oscar Ruiz Walter Salinas Hoke Sanders Christopher Santee Jose Santos Mark Schilleman Matthew Schmidt Ryan Schnitzler Nachelle Scott Herman Scott Juan Scull Joshua Serencses Brandon Shambaugh Dean Shapley Cheryl Shaw Aungenetta Shelton Michael Shelton Larry Sherrill William Shippey Milton Shirleson Momar Shirley David Shoemake Gary Simmons Fall 2012

John Simmons Nyah Simmons Walter Simmons Jr. Matthew Simonini Luis Skeberis Carl Slater Jr. Charles Smiarowski Adam Smith Andrew Smith Brian Smith Mark Smith Shannon Smith Christian Soseman Elsee Spencer III Robert Spencer II Dylan Spratt Wanda Squirewell Jesse Stadler Jeffrey Starck Tyler Stein Samantha Stoelting Daevon Storey Alexander Straker Norranut Sutakul Adam Swain Roger Swigert Erica Tanner Timothy Taton Nyiesha Taybron Angelo Taylor Timothy Taylor Brian Teart Joshua Thomas Rodney Thomas Wendy Thomas Wayne Thomason Russell Tomka Ricardo Tovar April Townsend Evan Trombley Charles Turner Carrie Tyler Andrew Uncapher Freddy Urcuyo Raul Urenaabreu Manuel Vasquez Amery Vasso Miguel Vazquez Jr. Julio Vela Demetric Wade David Wahl Nikki Wallace Deneetra Weaver Lenward Weaver

Korrin Webb Christopher Weeks Tiffany Weir Michael Welch Patrick West Dwayne White Cicely Wiggins Mike Wilson Tinisha Witt John Wojdylak Angelo Woodrow Travis Yellowhair Tavarz Young Christopher Youngman Michelle Zacco Keafer Zuber

Newly Credentialed Vern Abila Cesar Abreu Nicodemus Acosta Juan Alba Robert Alcantar Jr. Miranda Alexander Matthew Allan Paul Allen Anthony Allen Joe Allen Patrick Allison II Flora Alquicira Joseph Alvarez Jason Anastos Eric Andersson Antonio Araujo Ronald Armstrong Tangela Arnold Luis Arroyo Jr. Ray Asuega Everest Austerman Rick Avalos Jason Ayres Chandar Badger Terrence Bailey Tyler Baker Christopher Baker Amy Ball Courtney Ballinger Carly Barrett Seth Baty Kenneth Bell Sr. Whitney Bellow Dustin Bennett Darryl Benson Eric Bergsohn

Nestor Bernardo Eric Besserud Daniel Bieber Luis Bispo Shane Blanchard Jessica Boeckman Matthew Bohringer Michael Boldizsar Robert Bole David Bounsana Quentin Bowens Kathleen Bowman Dylan Boyd Michael Braun Jr. Timothy Bridgeman Joshua Bright Jaymie Brinkmeier Patrick Brock Kevin Brooks Michael Brooks Jr. Kent Brown Lavetrice Brown Aaron Buchs Jack Burch Joseph Burchfield Kenneth Burkhalter Cameron Burrows Ashley Burton-Goode Roger Byassee Jr. Mark Byers Mark Byers Raul Caban III Scott Cabrera Eric Caflisch Erwin Caldwell David Campbell Kareen Campbell Darrin Campbell Eddie Campos Francisco Cancel Jr. Keith Cannon Lou Warren Canton Tamela Caples Kathi Carmack Jason Carpenter Jonah Carpenter Wayne Carpenter Tyson Carter Norris Cason Jr. Darrell Caudill Kayla Cavallaro June Centeno Garret Chadek Christopher Chandler www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Newly Credentialed Antonio Chavezplata Danielle Church Jamie Ciceron Anthony Cinardo Casey Clark David Clark III Marc Cobb Matthew Cohara Sheldon Colin Casey Combes Jimmy Combs Denise Contreras Tiff Cook Wesley Cooper Charles Corbett Jr. Ernesto Cortez Jr. Robert Cotter Franklin Courtney Michael Cousar Brian Cracchiola William Crawford Colby Creighton Brian Crenshaw Kevin Crocker Marques Crockett Arturo Cruz Jr. Fredrick Cuffy Silvia Cureses Michael Daniel Jennifer Daniels James Darnell Andrew Daub Adam Davis John Davis Ernest Davis Providencia Davis (Turvis) Hillary Deems Francisco Delacruz Brian Delaney Osmany Delbrey Brazelton DeLeon Agerneh Demissie Blaise Dento Colleen Dibble Kevin Doby Zachery Dolan Joshua Donahoe Paul Donald Justin Dove Laquinta Dover Stephen Doyle Jacob Dronzin Nicole DuBeck Robert Duker Jr. 877.219.2519

Paula Dumas Joseph Dunka Jason Dupre Prince Dykes Nicole East Christopher Edge Clement Edionwele Aaron Edson Kyle Edwards Stephanie Edwards Shannon Elliott Michael Ellis William Enriquez Reginald Epps Rodney Ericson Glenn Erkenbrack Maurice Evans Ryan Evans Pablo Facun Miguel Falcon Adam Fancher Emerson Fandialan Robin Ferguson Billy Ferguson Felix Fernandez Nicholas Fessler Jeffery Fick Molly Fischer Christopher Fleming Cristina Flores Randolf Foronda Jennifer Fowkes Donald Fowler III Anthony Fox Justin Foxworth Randall Francis Jamie Frantz Random Frie Robert Frier Jr. Alexander Frost Paris Fuentes-Alfaro Heidi Gaddis Scott Gallagher Ordice Gallups Francisco Garcia Lorenzo Garcia Araseli Garcia Jose Garcia Francisco Garcia Cathy Garcia Colin Gardape Jason Garland Jovanna Gaston-Puello Keontez George

www.abchs.com

Nathan George Michael Gerty Thelma Gibson Dennis Goins Josh Gold Robert Goldinger Jr. Kevin Goldsmith Jason Gomes Evodio Gomez Mario Gomez Jose Gonzales Cristobal Gonzalez Jr. Lee Goodner Jacob Green Matthew Green Brooks Gregory Dejuan Grenion Sean Griffin James Griggs James Gross Jr. Dean Gushikuma Denise Gutierrez Jose Gutierrez Steven Hacker Matthew Hackett Eric Hall Samuel Hall III Maria Hall Mionca Hall Kuamaine Hamiter Eric Hancock Yvonda Handley Alicia Hanrahan Jared Hargis Johnnie Harris Stephanie Harris Richard Harry Brian Hart Jr. John Hart Leon Harvey Jr. Johnny Harvey Ashley Harvey Marcus Harwell Mathieu Hauser Jeremy Healey Scott Heckert Lisa Helman David Hennessy Warren Henry Sr. Coty Henson Cruz Hernandez Walter Hernandez Raymond Hershey William Hill

Stephen Hippelheuser William Hoddinott April Hodge Diante Hodge Ernest Hoffman Seth Hollingsworth Matthew Homer Brandon Hooks Jared Horn Carlos Horne Kenneth Hornfeldt Patrick Hosier Namon Houston Mark Howell Jacob Hubbard Chad Hubbell James Hudson Brian Hughes Michael Hughes Tramaine Hunden John Hunt Warren Hurdle Russell Hutchins Terrence Ingram Elias Inoa Eitan Israel Donald Jacobs Phillip James Eric James Troy Jansen James Jansma John Jeffries Tarnisha Jenkins Adam Jerscheid Scott Johnson Jenyfer Johnson Justin Johnson Thomas Johnston Ashley Jones Gussie Jones Nathan Jones Scott Jones Christopher Jordan Anthony Joyce Mark Jupiter Jr. Anjela Jurich Edmund Karasiewicz Sean Karpinski Jason Kaye Jeremy Kelley Jason Kelley Robert Kendall John Kennedy Jonathan Kessell Fall 2012

Carolyn King George Klima Bradley Knight Momodu Koroma John Kostelnik Kyle Kostreba George Kraynak Daniel Kregstein James Krempasky Timothy Krieger Frank Kuras Kyle Kurzendoerfer John Lally Vanel Lamour Stefani Landino Ketri Landrum Marcus Lane Kevin Lang Faye Larkins Hewitt Kristin Laura Edwin Lazo Charles Leader Brian Ledgerwood Kang Lee Alexander Lennon Stacy Leverett-O’Leary Kenny Lewis Jr. John Lewis James Linville Jeffrey Lischke Jr. Lechristopher Lomax Kyle Long Jamie Makowka Duane Mallett Katishra Mann Joshua Manning Eric Marcotte Daniel Mariner Ross Markajani Timothy Marks William Markson Raymond Marquez Jr. Keith Marshall Sheila Marshall James Martin Jim Martinez Bryan Martinez Santos Brian Matteson Bryan Maule Jr. James May David McClurg Amber McCrackin Billy McGowan Kaylie McGrath Inside Homeland SecurityŽ

57


Newly Credentialed Caleb McGrath Megan McKee Nathan McKoy James Meares Jr. Steven Medrano Maritza Mejia Andres Mejia John Melendez Jr. Eric Mendes Erik Mendoza Joe Mendoza Joshua Meng Hermes Mercadopadilla Calan Merchlewitz Jedidayah Merriweather Benjamin Miller Joel Miller Grace Miller Daniel Milos Michael Misiak Ashley Mitchell Daniel Mohorick Abbey Mongosa Marvin Montgomery Rekeshia Moore Patrick Moreland Bob Morgan Daniel Morse Lorne Murphy Shaun Murphy Benjamin Murray Keith Mutz Zebulon Nelson Kimberley Nelson Renato Ngo Michael Nguyen Robin Nicely Nicholas Nicoloff Michael Niedermaier Brian Nielson Brian Nirdlinger Jr. Edward Northway Ratsamy Nouansacksy Nathan Null Dan O’Brien Lauren Ogden Asia Ohumba Onoriode Ohwevwo Danielle Oliver Daniel Omlor Jr. Arnel Ortega Charlie Ortiz Pablo Ortiz Nasasha Outlaw

Charles Owens Jr. Christopher Padron Breanna Palmer (Torres) Michael Palyok Jr. Sean Parker Kyle Parkinson Gregory Parkinson Oscar Parra Brandon Pauley Matthew Pellegrino Teresa Penacordova Brian Percle Zuley Pereira Juan Pereyra Dario Perito Justin Pfeffer Carl Pfeffer Peter Piedra Jeremy Pilkenton Carlos Pires Jr. William Pittman Shanekwa Pittman Thomas Platt Jr. Matthew Pradon Brian Preachers Jamie Preciado Meaghan Presnell Margaret Price Jermaine Profit Jason Pusch Roden Quibuyen Gage Radtke Muhammad Rafique Gustavo Ramirez Jr. Melvin Ramos Pamela Randall Stephen Rasmussen Shanna Read Joseph Rector Martha Rector Curtis Reedy Alex Reeves Brittany Reich Ryan Reynolds Leroy Rhem Jr. Gincie Rhodes Nicholas Rice Steven Ridgley Brandy Riggs Joshua Rivera Gerrena Roebuck Christina Rojo Devoya Rollins Michelle Roman

58

Fall 2012

Inside Homeland SecurityÂŽ

Nelson Romeu Luis Rosario Jonathan Rose Alan Ross Joshua Roundy Tabatha Royston Michael Rubiaco Mark Rudes Christopher Rugile Edward Ruiz Manuel Ruiz Meaghan Russell Kenneth Ryan Sarah Saldana Walter Salinas Roberto Salvador Miriam Samuels Jason Saria James Sartori Virgil Savage II Jinelies Sawyer Tricia Scanlon Timothy Scarbrough Kenneth Schmidt Christopher Schmitt Tricia Schnare LeeAnn Schott Joshua Serencses Frank Serio Sr. Dennis Serrano Fabian Serrano Villegas Scott Sewell Christopher Shaffer Darin Shaffer Brandon Shambaugh Cheryl Shaw Daniel Shearer Jr. Aungenetta Shelton Dwayne Shepard Jr. Jeremy Shepard Justin Sherman Larry Sherrill Ellen Shifflett William Shippey Jason Sikora Gary Simmons Walter Simmons Jr. Timothy Skelton Carl Slater Jr. Charles Smiarowski Heath Smith Viron Smith Jerry Smith Kevin Smith

Lou Smith Matthew Solberg Charles Soliday Susana Solomon Ismael Sosa Christian Soseman James Sprools Jr. Jesse Stadler Paul Stallbaum Jamie Stanton Eric Starr Bryce Stenholm Joshua Stephenson Jason Stewart Shawn Stewart Timothy Stewart Christopher Stills Samantha Stoelting Nicholas Stonehocker Dwight Stout Christopher Stover Jeffrey Strauch Norranut Sutakul Mark Svatek Adam Swain Stephen Sweatt Roger Swigert Kale Swing Carrey Switzer Timothy Switzer Jr. Timothy Taylor Angelo Taylor Karen Terry Jason Thibodeaux Walter Thomas James Thurber Jessicarose Thurber James Toole Elyana Torres Larry Tran Matthew Troupe Jeremie Trujillo Todd Tucker Robert Turner Erica Turner Charles Turner Nathaniel Tuwaiq Krista Vargas Jesus Vargas Jr. Amery Vasso Eureka Vaughn Jr. Justin Vedder Russell VerNooy David Vest

Oscar Villaman Ruben Villanueva Oscar Villarreal Brian Walters Matthew Warren Michael Welch Aaron Welin Melburn West Patrick West Bo Whitaker Mark White Harry Wickhorst Richard Wilkens Chauncy Williams Antoine Williams Nicholas Williams Charliea Williams Cheri Williams Ashley Wilson Courtney Wilson Jordan Winding Susan Woerner Steven Wood Steven Woodel Angelo Woodrow David Yanvary Matthew Young Tavarz Young Erica Zeuske Thomas Zimny

New Diplomates Darshan Bath

New Life Members Jennifer Calder Ernest Davis

www.abchs.com

877.219.2519


Order your ABCHS logo products today! Logo products that state “Certified in Homeland Security” are available only to those individuals who currently hold the credential(s) CHS I, II, III, IV, or V. B A

A. ABCHS WOMEN’S DRESS SHIRT $55

D

COLORS: light blue, sage, or cream • SIZES: S to XXL

B. ABCHS MEN’S DRESS SHIRT $55

COLORS: gray, sage, or black • SIZES: S to 3XLT

C. ABCHS PATCH $5 D. ABCHS LAPEL PIN $5

F C E

E. ABCHS MEN’S FLEECE JACKET $60 COLOR: black • SIZES: S to 3XL

F. ABCHS MEN’S POLO SHIRT $48

COLORS: black, red, tan, or seafoam green • SIZES: S to 3XL H

ABCHS WOMEN’S POLO SHIRT $48

COLORS: black, red, or seafoam green • SIZES: S to XXL

G. ABCHS MEN’S T-SHIRT $24 COLOR: black • SIZES: S to 3XL

G

H. ABCHS MEN’S CAMP SHIRT $55

I

COLOR: black • SIZES: S to 3XL

I. ABCHS MEN’S ALL-WEATHER JACKET* $60 COLOR: black • SIZES: S to 3XL *Please circle one: with or without back imprint

J. ABCHS PADFOLIO $20 BACK

K. ABCHS HAT $15

COLOR: black • SIZES: one size fits all

L. NEW! ABCHS WALL PLAQUE $49

L

J

2750 E. Sunshine, Springfield, MO 65804 K

Phone: 877.219.2519 • Fax: 417.881.1865 • Web: www.abchs.com Item

Name

Size

Quantity

Total

I.D. Number Deliver To (Street Address Only): Address

Sub-Total

City/State/Zip Please DO NOT send cash

Shipping & Handling (see chart on the left)

LOGO0212IHS

Rush Delivery SHIPPING COSTS: • Lapel pin $5.00 • 1 item (other than above) $12.00, 2 items $13.00, 3 items $14.00, 4 items r Check/Money Order $15.00, 5 items $16.00, 6 items $17.00, 7 items $18.00, 8 items $19.00, 9 items $20.00, add $1.75 for each additional item. Credit Card Number • Standard overnight add $30.00 to number of items cost. 877.219.2519 • International shippingwww.abchs.com add $50.00 to number of items cost. Signature • Allow 4-6 weeks for delivery.

Total r Mastercard/Visa

r Am. Express

Fall 2012

r Discover

Exp. Date Inside Homeland Security®

59


Inside Homeland Security® Journal The American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, CHS® 2750 East Sunshine Street Springfield, MO 65804 www.abchs.com Toll-Free 877.219.2519 • Fax 417.881.1685

TOREGIS D TER AY

AMERICAN BOARD FOR CERTIFICATION IN HOMELAND SECURITY ANNUAL MEETING

AT T E N D T H E A N N U A L

SUM

E XE EX C M II TT E CU UT TI IVVEE S U M M

22001 12 2

October 17-19, 2012

To Register: call toll-free 877.219.2519 | or visit www.theexecutivesummit.net/ihs

Inside Homeland Security® Fall 2012  

Inside Homeland Security®, the official peer-reviewed, quarterly journal of the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, is yo...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you