America's Engineers: The People, Programs, and Projects of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Page 28

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS Engineering With Nature

The San Francisco Waterfront Study Project Delivery Team met June 5-8, 2023, in San Francisco to review proposed alternative plans for storm damage reduction along the city’s waterfront. The team is comprised of employees from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Port of San Francisco, and their consultants. The primary issue the study is investigating is flooding from large coastal storms, extreme high tide events, liquefaction failure of the San Francisco waterfront seawall from a major earthquake, and sea level rise. USACE PHOTO BY SARA GOODEYON

Flood risk on the Upper Guadalupe has been a concern for USACE and its partners since the 1980s – long before San Jose, the heart of Silicon Valley, became the nation’s 10th-largest city. Much of the adjacent land had already been purchased under a previous plan, parts of which were constructed beginning in 2007, but elements of the plan – including a long, straight secondary channel that would have increased the velocity of floodwaters in an area already notorious for flash flooding, and where endangered steelhead trout face significant challenges in making it upstream – were ultimately rejected by USACE. “So we started it again,” said Beagle, “under this umbrella of Engineering With Nature.” The new proposal establishes several f loodplain benches along the river, excavating through spaces that were parking lots and other little-used areas. “Those areas have the potential to provide a tremendous amount of riparian habitat, and to lower f lood stage and velocities,” Beagle said. “In most urban river corridors, one line of trees is kind of hanging off the edge of the bank, because they’ve built right up to the edge.” The Upper Guadalupe project provides San Jose and USACE a rare opportunity to both reduce flood risk and expand an urban riparian corridor along a 9-mile stretch of the river. Because it doesn’t rely on traditional flood-risk reduction features, such as riprap-protected banks, it is also $350 million less expensive than

24 I AMERICA’S ENGINEERS

the previous plan. “That’s made everybody really happy,” said Beagle. To King, this is the most salient feature of Engineering With Nature: USACE and its partners, in a single project, can achieve not only better flood protection, but also a host of other benefits – social, economic, and ecological – often for less than it would cost to design and build a traditional solution. The Corps of Engineers dredges about 200 million cubic yards of sediment from navigable waterways every year, he said. “That sediment is a resource,” he said. “We can leverage use of the sediment we generate through our navigation mission to restore or build wetlands, or even island systems. We’re integrating these additional features to reduce risks and create more value.” Many Engineering With Nature principles were developed in cooperation with international partners – including colleagues from Rijkswaterstaat, the agency that, since 1798, has protected the Netherlands’ low-lying landforms

along the North Sea coast. In September 2021, ERDC published the “International Guidelines on the Use of Natural and Nature-Based Features for Flood Risk Management,” representing the combined wisdom of more than 130 contributors and authors from more than 75 organizations around the world. ERDC is also in the process of composing the third volume of its EWN Atlas series, which showcases EWN principles and practices in action – mostly in USACE districts, but also featuring projects from all over the globe. “The success of the Engineering With Nature program,” said King, “involves more than just the Corps of Engineers. We owe success to a great many agencies and organizations and people. We all see the opportunity to do something that will make a difference: To achieve the engineering outcomes we all need – particularly when we consider future infrastructure needs – in a way that allows us to achieve other benefits that are equally important, and desperately needed.” AE


Turn static files into dynamic content formats.

Create a flipbook

Articles inside

Interview: Lt. Gen. Scott A. Spellmon, Commanding General and Chief of Engineers

16min
pages 14-16, 18-19

America's Engineers: The People, Programs, and Projects of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

18min
pages 20-21, 24-26, 28

USACE Launches $7.5 Billion Financing Program

6min
pages 30-31

ADVANCING INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS FOR CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CHALLENGES

7min
pages 32-34

USACE Buffalo District Constructs Emerald Shiner Passage Structure

3min
page 35

National Roofing Program Inspects Army Reserve Facilities Following Hurricane Ian

5min
pages 36-38

Pittsburgh District Breaks Ground on First Step in Updating Aging Navigation System on Upper Ohio River

5min
pages 39-41

Building Momentum: Bipartisan Infrastructure Law

11min
pages 42-45

Corps of Engineers Builds Underwater Sill in Mississippi River to Slow Saltwater Intrusion During Low Water Conditions

5min
pages 46-47

Mississippi River Drought Affects Navigation

4min
pages 48-49

USACE Hosts Reciprocal Mekong River Commission Exchange Visit

5min
pages 50-51

USACE Project Receives National Academy of Construction Award

3min
page 54

USACE Team Fights Floods in New England

5min
pages 56-57

New Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Complex Aims to Save Lives

5min
pages 58-59

PRESERVING INFRASTRUCTURE DELIVERS SUSTAINABILITY

10min
pages 60-63

Omaha District Completes First Construction Project Under Tribal Partnership Program

6min
pages 64-67

From a Bogey to Birdies, From Fairway to Flyway – Golf Course Gets a Mulligan, Converts to Habitat

4min
pages 68-69

Military and International Operations: USACE’s Founding Mission

16min
pages 70-75

TECHFLOW’S PIONEERING INNOVATION SHAPES THE FUTURE OF EV CHARGING FOR THE U.S. MILITARY

6min
pages 76-77

America's Engineers: The People, Programs, and Projects of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

11min
pages 78-81

Army Engineers Finalizing the U.S. Military’s $10.7 Billion Relocation Effort in South Korea

5min
pages 82-83

Army Engineers Construct Half a Billion Dollars in Family Housing Towers on Camp Humphreys

5min
pages 84, 86-87

Charleston District Teams up With Other Agencies for Nonstructural Flood Risk Management Project

4min
pages 88-89

New Barricade to Provide Vital Security at Savannah River Site

3min
page 90

America's Engineers: The People, Programs, and Projects of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

4min
pages 93-94

Environmental Remediation: USACE Expertise in High Demand

14min
pages 94-99

RISING HERO OF RESILIENCY

5min
pages 100-101

USACE Lowers Isabella Dam Risk Rating, Lifts Operating Restrictions After Unveiling Dam Improvements

5min
pages 102-103

LA District Preps for Hurricane Hilary, Keeps Public Safe, Captures Water from Storm

7min
pages 104-105

Multiple Agencies Collaborate to Provide Homeless Individuals Shelter Before Tropical Storm

5min
pages 106-107

Forecast Informed Reservoir Operations

16min
pages 108-113

USACE Supports the Fort Cavazos Safety Day Event

4min
pages 114-115

USACE Relies on Strong Partnerships With Its Customers, and Large and Small Businesses, to Deliver Quality Engineering Solutions

4min
pages 116-117

SWF Hosts Emergency Management Public Law 84-99 Outreach Session

2min
page 118

America's Engineers: The People, Programs, and Projects of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

12min
pages 119-120, 122-123

Strong Partnerships a Catalyst for Innovation

8min
pages 123-124

USACE Offers Planning Support to Mission Partners Around the Globe

4min
page 125

Engineering in the Cloud

8min
pages 126-127

Software Wins Innovation Award for Predictive Flooding Capabilities Following Fires

8min
pages 128-130

CRIDA Gets French and Arabic Translations

2min
page 130

Logistics Activity Supports Typhoon Mawar Response

5min
pages 131-132

Logistics Support Team Members Participate in Emergency Response Training

6min
pages 133-134

USACE Researchers Looking for Solutions to Great Lakes Water Quality Issues

5min
pages 135-136

ERDC Assists the New England District in the Management of Hydrilla

4min
pages 137-138

249th Engineer Battalion Powers Through Multiple Recovery Efforts

5min
pages 139-140
Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.