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2 aceweekly.com July 2016


8 Calendar 12 Gigs July 2016 Volume 27, Number 7

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CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tread Editorial Assistant Atanas Golev Contributing writers (online + print) Evan O. Albert, Kenny Colston, Kevin Faris, Brian Gardner, Brian Powers, Raj Ranade, Nick Stump, Kakie Urch, Heather C. Watson, Tom Yates —— Intern Megan Friday —— Display Advertising 859.225.4889, ext. 235 ads@aceweekly.com Classified Advertising 859.225.4889, ext. 237 —— ACE is not responsible for unsolicited materials. ACE is published 24 times a year. COP Y R IGH T © 2016 We love mail! Send Letters to the Editor: editor@aceweekly.com 250 words or less. Include full name and daytime phone. To submit a calendar listing for consideration, email acelist@aceweekly.com. —— Display Ad deadlines are every Friday for the next week’s issue: Email ads@aceweekly.com. Space reservation, production art, and payment should be delivered no later than Fridays by Noon

Astrology Ace Classifieds

in this issue July, 2016

EDITRIX Rhonda Reeves

13 13

VOLUME 27, ISSUE 7

ACEWEEKLY.COM

on the cover p5 MOVE AND FEAST

Eat, Lexington! Restaurant Week is coming!

features P4 OUT AND ABOUT

Pics from St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Fair, Kentucky Statehood celebration at the Kentucky Proud Store, Bob’s Burgers cookoff

a&e p10 EAT July: Lexington Restaurant News p11 THE ART OF FOOD Grilled corn on the cob ... YUM p14 REAL ESTATE

What sold, where, and for how much?

p15 HOME AND GARDEN

Summer is in full bloom

Distribution ACE is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft. Ace racks and boxes are private property. Distribution of any other publications in an Ace rack or Ace box constitutes criminal trespass (trespass includes but is not limited to: college publications, Yard Sale flyers, tagging, and so on).

3 aceweekly.com July 2016


PHOTOS

Photos by Caitlin Granier

Bob’s Burgers Cookoff

Winner Sarah Arnett and Emcee Andrew Suthers of The Gastro Gnomes.

Photo courtesy of Lisa R. Kindel and Brian Taylor

Kentucky Statehood Day at the Kentucky Proud Store

Ed Puterbaugh and Don Parkinson

out & about with

ace

Visit the Monet, Grand Tour of Homes, July

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Fair

GM of Alltech Brewing and Distilling Jonathan Lang, Secretary of Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet Don Parkinson, and UnderSecretary of TAH Regina Stivers

Run For The Nun

4 aceweekly.com July 2016


Tuesday, August 2, 2016, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Kentucky American Water 2300 Richmond Road in Lexington Come explore the world of water! Enjoy a family-friendly evening that provides an up-close look at water – from river to tap. We’ll have demonstrations, exhibits, refreshments, children’s activities, treatment plant tours* and more! PARKING: Southland Christian Church on Richmond Road, behind Applebee’s and McDonald’s. Shuttle buses will transport visitors across the street to Kentucky American Water’s property. *IMPORTANT PLANT TOUR INFORMATION: For the safety of all of our guests, anyone touring the water treatment plant must wear closed-toe shoes, have a valid photo ID (adults) and not bring in large bags or backpacks. The tour is not wheelchair or stroller accessible. Sorry, no children under 9 years old will be permitted on tours, but they can enjoy lots of other fun and educational WaterFest activities!

(800) 678-6301 • www.kentuckyamwater.com

5 aceweekly.com July 2016


FEATURE

Eat Local Lexington Restaurant Week 2016 Brings Together the Town’s Diverse Culinary Community

BY ATANAS GOLEV

H

ope you’re hungry. Lexington Restaurant Week is set for July 21 July 30. During the 10 days, over 40 Lexington restaurants will be offering prix fixe menus for $26, a fraction of the typical tab. Some establishments are even offering two dine for $26 options. Why the odd price? One dollar of every ticket goes to LexArts this year. “We think it’s a great match as culinary art, performance art and works of art all enhance our lives and serve to create a stronger ‘sense of place’ for us here in the Bluegrass,” says organizer Connie Jo Miller. She is the one who brought Restaurant Week to Lexington in 2013, modeling it after similar events in other cities. Favorite restaurants always linger in Lexington’s memory as the culinary landscape shifts and reinvents itself every few years. “I’d love to do an online trivia contest,” says Miller, “just think about in Chevy Chase alone how many restaurants you could name … remember The Cape Codder, Chevy’s and Bugatti’s … The Little Inn, Levas’, Oriental Inn, Nellie’s… Cole’s location brings to mind The Stirrup Cup, Acajou, Furlongs.” Miller says that her very first favorite restaurant meal in Lexington was the Bing Cherry Chicken at the Coach House. You might not be familiar with Stanley Demos’s fine dining legend if you’re new to the area: it closed in 2001 (after more than three decades in business). But Lexington natives still mourned when the building at 855 South Broadway was torn down in 2013. But the more things change, the more they stay the same. While last year saw the closings of longterm restaurant vets like Bellini’s, Billy’s BBQ, Natasha’s, Atomic Cafe,

6 aceweekly.com July 2016

Connie Jo Miller, right, with Bill Samuels of Maker’s Mark at the last Lexington Restaurant Week Kick Off Party.

and a la lucie — Lucie is moving on to her next venture, Lucie’s Red Light, which will extend the burgeoning north Limestone culinary corridor. The Dish closed in Chevy Chase (replaced by culinary vet John Foster’s Sage Rabbit), but Trish will be opening Minglewood in the former a la lucie’s location. Coba Cocina recently closed its doors, but Greer Co. has partnered on the new Willie’s on Southland Drive. And there’s no shortage of new and successful ventures in town, including food trucks that have added successful brick and mortars — like Athenian (with two locations, and a third planned at the Summit), Middle Fork, Crank & Boom, Han Cook In. Lockbox at 21c has added an anchor at Upper and Main (with Lexington Diner thriving at Upper and Short, just one corner to the north). Gastro Gnomes and Paris’s Rooster Brew are teaming up for a new brick-andmortar venture in the Distillery District.

W

hen I started my agency in 1987 I gravitated toward restaurants they were my friends and clients ... and it was the ‘80s (one big party),” says Miller. “I worked with Robin and Keith at Cheapside, Debbie at Dudley’s on Mill, Logan’s Roadhouse, Sandy at The Bistro and other blasts from the past ... Coach House, Levas’, Café Max, Scores, Mesa Bar and Grill. I know the restaurant business and it is no easy venture. I admire those hardworking folks. Plus, I’m good at joining media and local

businesses in united marketing efforts – I did ‘dining downtown’ before the Downtown Lexington Corp. was even formed. Creating synergy and unions is powerful. Together we can do so much more.” This synergy is the driving force behind Restaurant Week. Keith Clark (who started Cheapside, and later created the Grey Goose), said, “After 30 years in the restaurant business, this promotion had by far the biggest impact of anything we’ve ever seen.” “We do this to increase awareness of all our great local restaurants,” says Miller. “Boosting their business, adding new patrons for the long run and keeping locally-owned restaurants thriving is what this event is all about. Locallyowned restaurants are a key ingredient in Lexington’s brand. These innovative entrepreneurs help define us here in the Bluegrass. A lively restaurant scene attracts new businesses and visitors to our area. They enhance our economy and the quality of our lives. Every dollar we spend at an independent restaurant returns three times as much to our local economy as one spent at a chain. Statistically we have more than our share of independent restaurants. They need our support.” Local restaurants have supported each other as well. There has been an especially symbiotic relationship between craft breweries and food trucks. And many of those food trucks, including Bradford BBQ, Han Cook In, J. Render’s, Rolling Oven, and Athenian Grill have added brick-and-mortar restaurants, as will the Gastro Gnomes soon. “The days in our pop-up set up outside West Sixth Brewing, Country Boy Brewing and Beerworks have by far been my favorite moments with Athenian Grill,” said owner Ilias Pappas, whose Athenian Grill will be participating in Lexington Restaurant Week this year. He’s encountered support at every turn. “While


FEATURE our Chevy Chase location was under construction, customers and neighbors were stopping by daily bringing us water or coffee, checking in to see the progress, and excited about us opening, talking about menu recipes, etc. ” And what does Pappas think that the Lexington food scene has to look forward to? Perhaps, he speculates, paradoxically, we may be going back to the past.. “The last few years, restaurateurs drive the trends forward with innovative concepts, but my opinion as I listen and serve hundreds of customers daily is that the consumers want us to go backwards. What I mean with that is that the customers want freshly cooked, simple home style recipes on a budget and fast. What they used to have on their grandmothers’ table many years ago cooked with the same passion but a lot more often than every couple of months. That, I believe, would be the next trend and will be here to stay.” The inspiration behind Athenian was to bring authentic Greek cuisine to Lexington, and “having my friends and customers try the dishes I had growing up in Greece,” says Pappas. Expectations are being met. “Best thing I’ve eaten elsewhere in Lexington: moussaka and salad combo at Athenian Grill. Love that stuff,” says Drew Carpenter, one of Magee’s Bakery’s senior bakers. Also sous chef. Also front end assistant manager. The hats and titles change daily, he says. Magee’s is another one of the local businesses participating in Restaurant Week. “We’ve taken a bakery a step farther,” Carpenter says. “All of our sandwiches come on pastries made in-house. We don’t buy roast meats for our line. We roast them. We don’t buy gravy mix, chicken salad, or cheat on our products. At Magee’s we don’t go to all the effort to create a beautifully layered croissant, and then put an unworthy ingredient on top of it. We love this too much.”

E

levator pitches from other restaurants who want you to visit during Restaurant Week? Distilled at Gratz Park Inn’s Mark Wombles says, “Casual elegance with a menu that speaks to you in aesthetics and in taste.” “We want people to get an idea of what our food is like at Holly Hill inn,” says Ouita Michel, the chefpreneur behind Holly Hill Inn, Windy Corner, Smithtown Seafood, Wallace Station, Midway Bakery, an upcoming venture planned at the Summit, and another in the old Courthouse on Cheapside Square. “We

want them to see what our brand of hospitality is really like. We’re a small place and it’s a beautiful time of year to come and see all the gardens out in the countryside. We try to make the best, most beautiful food we can.” The Holly Hill Inn menu during Restaurant Week will feature all Kentucky Proud ingredients, including pork chops from Stone Cross Farm and rotating local vegetables. Dave Fuller, owner of Charlie Brown’s at Chevy Chase, has another strategy to lure diners: “Get more bang for your dollar.” He said besides the nice portions, everything being made from scratch, and the unique ambience, the in-restaurant library is also a treasure trove: a patron once found a $100 in one of the books he was perusing during his meal. “With so many options, This is your chance to venture out try new restaurants or reacquaint yourself with an old favorite while they are all ‘strutting their stuff,’ “ says Miller. “Today, the Lexington Restaurant Scene is progressive and sophisticated – second to none. We have some extremely talented chefs in our midst.”

“Locally-owned restaurants are a key ingredient in Lexington’s brand. These innovative entrepreneurs help define us here in the Bluegrass. A lively restaurant scene attracts new businesses and visitors to our area. They enhance our economy and the quality of our lives.”

LEXINGTON RESTAURANT WEEK 2016 ®

—Connie Jo Miller

Wombles, who’s behind Midway’s Heirloom and Mezzo, along with Distilled at Gratz Park, agrees, “I think we have made improvements in Lexington’s dining scene just from the variety of locally-owned restaurants that have opened recently.” Michel is also optimistic about recent developments in the Lexington culinary scene, especially how many young people are going into the business. “I feel like there’s a lot of opportunity for young cooks and a lot of personal expression, and I think that there are people that are putting their personalities into their businesses.” She mentions Middle Fork, County Club, Blue Door, National Provisions, Crank & Boom, Sorella Gelateria, and Athenian Grill.

Lucie Slone will soon be serving up her culinary creations at Lucie’s Red Light, which will be a part of the North Limestone scene.

Miller adds, “Lexingtonians are known to be educated and creative, innovative and spirited. Perhaps that’s why we are home to more than our share of really great creative restaurants. We go out — we party - we like our Maker’s Mark. We embrace and support a vibrant restaurant community.” And what does the future have in store? “Ask Ouita,” quips Miller. Looking into Michel’s crystal ball, we might be seeing some great news for local food, including more artisanal food and vegan options. “I actually think that we’re going to see less growth in the fast food section … more and more independent and small chains are gonna take more and more of the market share, so there won’t be an expansion of those chains. That’s happening now and it might accelerate, because on a national scale that’s happening. They want local food and local businesses.” Cheers to that.

Ouita Michel (Holly Hill Inn, Windy Corner, Smithtown Seafood, Wallace Station, Midway Bakery) has more new ventures on the way. 7 aceweekly.com July 2016


䈀氀甀攀最爀愀猀猀 䘀愀椀爀 眀椀氀氀 戀攀 䨀甀氀礀 ㄀㐀ⴀ㈀㐀

BALL Lexington

Legends vs. Rome, 6:30 pm, Legends ballpark

COMEDY

Piff the Magic Dragon, 7:15 pm, Comedy Off Broadway

3

MUSIC

Lexington Singers: I Love My Country, 7:30 pm, The Mall

MUSIC

Patriotic Music Concert, 8 pm, Transy’s Morrison Lawn

RUN

Bluegrass 10K, 7 am, downtown

RUN

4

The Great Buffalo Chase 5K, 8 am, Buffalo Trace

FEST

Fourth of July Street Festival, 9 am - 6 pm, Main Street

FOURTH OF JULY

Parade, 2 pm, Main Street

FIREWORKS

Commonwealth Stadium near Alumni Drive, 10 pm

HORSE

5

Lexington Junior League Charity Horse Show, The Red Mile (through Saturday)

READ Book Launch:

Hannah Pittard reads and signs Listen to Me, 6 pm, Morris Book Shop

ART Opening

Day: Vision 20/200, artwork by visually impaired children and adults, Headley-Whitney

6

MUSIC

Thursday Night Live: Five Below Band, 5 pm, Cheapside Pavilion

THEATRE

7

ART Amanda

8

Crum gallery opening reception, 4:30 pm, John G Irvin Gallery

BIZ Professional Women’s

SummerFest: Jesus Christ Superstar, 7 pm, Woodland Park (through Sunday)

HG BGTdeTours:

Tinderbox Circus Sideshow, 10 pm, Cosmic Charlie’s

Warehouse Block Block Party, 5 - 9 pm, National Avenue

pm, Comedy Off Broadway (through Sunday)

7 pm, EKU Center for the Arts

Forum July Luncheon, 11:30 am, The Campbell House Chaumiere des Prairies, 5:45 pm, Nicholasville

MOVIE Hollywood Movie Classics: The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), 7:15 pm, Kentucky Theatre

CONCERT

Guns N’ Roses, 8 pm, Paul Brown Stadium (Cincinnati)

GIGS

COMEDY Jon Reep, 7:15

THEATRE Studio Players: CLUE The Musical, 8 pm, Carriage House Theatre (through Sunday)

MOVIE Cult Film Series:

Suicide Club, 8 pm, Al’s Bar

8 aceweekly.com July 2016

THE DUDE

15th Annual Lebowski Fest, Louisville (through Sat)

FEST

COMEDY Jerry Seinfeld, MUSIC

Summer Nights in Suburbia: Rebel Without a Cause, 7 pm, MoonDance Amphitheatre

COMEDY Weird Al Yankovic, 8 pm, PNC Pavilion (Cinci)

EVENT

Rollergirls of Central KY vs. West Kentucky, 4 pm, Heritage Hall

FEST

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Whippoorwill Festival, Red River Gorge (through Sunday)

EAT Hike for Beer with a Twist, 6:30 pm, Shaker Village


Pavilion (Cinci)

DISC GOLF

Super Summer Slammer 7, 8 am, Jacobson Park

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MOVIE Lyric Summer

Film Series: Lilies of the Field, 3 pm, Lyric Theatre

ART Opening

11 12 13 14 15 16

Reception: Sparks and Marks, Gordon Gildersleeve, Lawrence Tarpey, 5:30 pm, ArtsPlace

EAT Pick and Prep with

BALL Lexington Legends

Chef Ranada West-Riley, 6 pm, The Apiary

CONCERT Paul

Barber Shop Quartets, 6:45 pm, Lyric Theatre

vs. Greenville, 2 pm, Legends ballpark

McCartney, 8 pm, US Bank Arena (Cincinnati)

WOODSONGS MUSIC

Southland Jamboree: Blue Belles, 7 pm, MoonDance Amphitheatre

GARDEN

KIDS

Marvelous Mayhem and DAHLicious Mischief, 1 pm, Joseph-Beth

KIDS

Family Film: Monsters University, 1 pm, Farish Theatre

Birdhouse Display and Silent Auction begins, 8:30 am, Arboretum

MOVIE Hollywood Movie Classics: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), 7:15 pm, Kentucky Theatre

ART Paint on the Patio

and Potluck: Van Gogh’s Sunflowers, 6 pm, Fusion Gallery

CULTURE History to

FAIR

The Bluegrass Fair, Masterson Station

FEST Concours

d’Elegance, Keeneland (through Sunday)

Forecastle (Louisville)

ART

Gallery Hop, 5 pm

FUNDRAISER

MUSIC

Wounded Warrior Ride, 9 am, Man O’War Harley-Davidson

Live: Better Off Dead, 5 pm, Cheapside Pavilion

Phoenix Fridays: 7Horse, Star and Micey, Warren Byrom, 5:30 pm, Phoenix Park

Poppins, 7 pm, Lexington Opera House (thru Sunday)

Market, 6 pm, Distillery District Parking Lot

Here Come the Mummies, 7 pm, Manchester Music Hall

Series: Farms to Food, 7 pm, Kentucky Horse Park

Tim and Eric Awesome Show’s David Liebe Hart, 8 pm, Al’s Bar

MUSIC Thursday Night

THEATRE The Lex: Mary

SHOP The Distillery

THEATRE As You Like

EAT Seed to Feed Dinner

It, 7 pm, Summerfest, Woodland Park

Chew On: Jim Hoffmann: “Illustrated Newspapers of the Civil War”, 6 pm, McConnell Springs

FEST

KIDS

Lexington Children’s Theatre: The Little Mermaid, 2 pm, LCT (thru Sun)

GIGS

MOVIE Fountain

GIGS

Films: Rocky (40-Year Anniversary), 9 pm, Triangle Park

MUSIC

Big Band and Jazz: Osland Dailey Jazztet, 7 pm, Ecton Park

MOVIE Singing in the

Rain, 9:30 pm, Waveland

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 EAT

BALL Lexington Legends vs. Asheville, 2 pm, Legends ballpark (thru Monday)

THEATRE Studio Players: CLUE The Musical, 2:30 pm, Carriage House Theatre

MOVIE Lyric Summer

Film Series: Selma, 3 pm, Lyric Theatre

COMEDY Ian Bagg, 7:15

pm, Comedy Off Broadway

WOODSONGS

John McEuen and Bill and the Belles, 6:45 pm, Lyric Theatre

MUSIC Southland

Jamboree: Joe Mullins, 7 pm, MoonDance Amphitheatre

Big Band and Jazz: Colonel’s Choice, 7 pm, Ecton Park

MUSIC

MOVIE Hollywood Movie

Medium Cool, 7 pm, Farish Theatre

Pescatelli, 7:15 pm, Comedy Off Broadway (thru Sat)

FILM Classic Film:

Classics: The Birds (1963), 7:15 pm, Kentucky Theatre

COMEDY Tammy CONCERT

Hall and Oates, Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue, Sharon Jones and the DapKings, 7 pm, Riverbend

GIGS

Atlas Genius and Bear Hands, 7 pm,

Lexington Restaurant Week (through July 30)

THEATRE SummerFest:

Jesus Christ Superstar, 7 pm, Woodland Park (through Sunday)

EAT Lexington Women

Chefs Farmers Market Dinner with special guest Iron Chef Elizabeth Faulkner

KIDS

Lexington Children’s Theatre: The Little Mermaid, 7:30 pm, LCT (through Sunday)

EAT

RUN

HORSE

HORSE

Shepherd’s House Run For Recovery, 7:30 am, Keeneland

Woodford Humane Society Bone Appetit Day, 11:30 am, Ashford Stud

BreyerFest, KY Horse Park (thru Sunday)

KIDS

KY Poet Laureate George Ella Lyon, Marcia Thornton Jones, and more, 6:30 pm, Carnegie Center

MOVIE Fountain Films: Elf (Christmas in July), 9 pm, Triangle Park

HG

HBA Grand Tour of Homes, 5 pm (thru Sunday)

Stone Age Live Model Horse Show, 9 am - 4:30 pm, Lexington Convention Center

EVENT

Woodford Humane Society Freedom Fest, 5:30 - 11 pm, Ashford Stud

TENNIS Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships, Hilary J. Boone Tennis Center (through Sunday)

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 HG

RUN BreyerFest 5K, 8 am,

Kentucky Horse Park

BALL Lexington Legends vs. Columbia, 2 pm, Legends ballpark (through Tuesday)

MOVIE Lyric Summer

Film Series: Lean on Me, 3 pm, Lyric Theatre

THEATRE SummerFest:

Jesus Christ Superstar, 7 pm, Woodland Park

TENNIS Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships, Hilary J. Boone Tennis Center (through Sunday)

KIDS

Family Film: Charlotte’s Web, 1 pm, Farish Theatre

WOODSONGS The

Earls of Leicester, 6:45 pm, Lyric Theatre

MUSIC

Southland Jamboree: Dean Osborne, 7 pm, MoonDance Amphitheatre

FUNDRAISER

Lexington Humane Society Mutt Putt, 11 am, Marriott

MUSIC Big Band and

Jazz: Lexington Concert Band, 7 pm, Ecton Park

CONCERT Troubadour:

Colvin and Earle, 7:30 pm, Lexington Opera House

DANCE

NYC circus theater Constellation Moving’s Trenches, an aerialdance-theatre production focused on WWI, 8 pm, Downtown Arts Center

FUNDRAISER

American Red Cross Disaster Blaster, 7 pm, Kentucky Horse Park

CONCERT Coldplay, 7

pm, Yum Center (Louisville)

MOVIE Mr. Smith Goes to

Washington (1939), 7:15 pm, Kentucky Theatre

LIT Holler Poets Series, 8 pm, Al’s Bar

DANCE

Constellation Moving’s Trenches, 8 pm, Downtown Arts Center

MUSIC

Thursday Night Live: Tim Talbert Project, 5 pm, Cheapside Pavilion

MUSIC Positive Hits

Tour, 7 pm, EKU Center for the Arts (Richmond)

HBA Grand Tour of Homes, 5 pm (thru Sun)

HG

Fairy Tales talk in conjunction with Natalie Frank exhibition, 6:30 pm, UK Art Museum

COMEDY John

Kentucky Florist Association: Revival, Campbell House Inn (through Sunday)

LIT Reading

CONCERT

Witherspoon, 7:15 pm, Comedy Off Broadway

KIDS

Troubadour Series: Lyle Lovett and His Large Band, 7:30 pm, Lexington Opera House

Jurassic Quest Dinosaur Expo, 9 am, Heritage Hall (thru Sun)

MOVIE Fountain

Films: Top Gun (30 Year Anniversary), 9 pm, Triangle Park

9 aceweekly.com July 2016


Eat July: Openings and plenty of food events NEWS

but it reopened in January 2014, just in time to save us from the grocery-less downtown abyss caused when the Euclid Kroger closed down for the rooftop parking remodeling project. The future of the Shorty’s space is unknown.

Big Shake’s Hot Chicken is opening on 867 South Broadway. It will be the first of several Big Shake restaurants Chef Shawn Davis is planning to open in Lexington.

Table 310 has a new owner: Daniel Marlowe. Marlowe has been in the restaurant business for 20 years. The restaurant is now introducing a variety of Ornish-friendly meals a la carte.

Blue Sushi Sake Grill has announced that it will be opening in The Summit at Fritz Farm, the new mall scheduled to go up on the corner of Man o’War and Nicholasville. Other restaurants confirmed for the Summit include Ouita Michel’s Honeywood concept, J. Alexander’s, Shake Shack, Crank & Boom, Athenian Grill, and Ted’s Montana Grill. BurgerFi will reportedly be a new addition to the Coliseum Plaza on the corner of Rose and Euclid. The Plaza was bought by Phil and Lee Green last year. The casual burger joint will be using the space recently vacated by Sweet Mango and Campus Cafe.

The building that formerly housed CoachCraft on 360 E. Main Street will become Carson’s Food & Drink. The 167seat restaurant/bar will use 5,000 of the available 10,000-square-feet, leasing the other half of the space. It will be open for lunch and dinner at first, with a plans to eventually serve brunch on weekends. J. Render’s BBQ has made the leap from a local food truck to a full-on brick & mortar. They are now open and serving smoked meats, soups, salads, and sandwiches at Beaumont Circle. Lexington Restaurant Week 2016 will be from July 21 - July 30. More than 40 local restaurants are serving up $26 multi-course meals for the fraction of the typical tab. These special prix-fixe menus are updated daily. LexArts is the beneficiary organization of this year’s Restaurant Week; $1 of each

10 aceweekly.com July 2016

EVENTS Life Brewpub recently opened at 2628 Richmond Road. special prix-fixe meal will support local arts organizations. Participating restaurants include Athenian Grill, Azur, Brasabana, Charlie Brown’s, Cheapside, Columbia Steakhouse, Distilled, Doodles, Dudley’s, enoteca, The Grey Goose, Holly Hill Inn, Life Brewpub, Magee’s, Malone’s, Stella’s, Willie’s, Windy Corner, and many more.

Life Brewpub, located behind Qdoba on Richmond Road, next to Parisa, had its Grand Opening in June. The pub is scheduled to be open 7:30 am - 10 pm from Sunday - Thursday, and from 7:30 am midnight on Friday and Saturday. A new Penn Station is opening this summer at Idle Hour Shopping Center off of Richmond Road. This will be the fifth Lexington Penn Station East Coast Subs location.

Shorty’s, the Urban Market on 163 West Short Street, has closed down, five years after the original ribbon cutting. Shorty’s had already closed once in September 2013,

The Great American Pie Contest and Ice Cream Social, a Lexington Fourth of July tradition, is at the Cheapside Pavilion at noon on Friday, July 1. The Professional Women’s Forum July Luncheon is at The Campbell House on Wednesday, July 6 at 11:30 am. Renee Shepard, president of Downtown Lexington Corporation (DLC) joins as the speaker for the July luncheon.

On July 7-8, the Holly Hill Wine Guild presents Blending Australia. Join the Holly Hill Inn Wine Guild Director, Steve Mancuso, to taste and compare Australian blends of Shiraz, Grenache, and Cab. Seatings available at 6 pm and 7:30 pm both days. The Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill hosts a Fresh Food Adventure on Saturday, July 9 at 6:30 pm. The theme: Hike for Beer with a Twist, featuring Goodwood Brewing. On July 11, the Apiary hosts Pick & Prep: More Ways with Green Tomatoes, featuring Chef Ranada West-Riley. The Lexington Diner and Creative Table’s Chef

Ranada will workshop fresh ways (other than just frying) to transform end-ofharvest green tomatoes into tasty dishes. All ticket purchases benefit Seedleaf. The Professional Women’s Forum Ice Cream Social is at Crank & Boom on Tuesday, July 12 at 4:30 pm. This will be an ice cream & cocktail social full of networking opportunities.

The Seed to Feed Dinner Series presents Farms to Food at the Kentucky Horse Park on Friday, July 15 at 7 pm. Featuring chef Jacob Coronado of 8Up Elevated Drinkery and Kitchen in Louisville. All of the meat and veggies will be entirely from Scott County farms and the dinner will benefit the Farms to Food Bank participant Amen House.

GleanKY’s largest annual fundraiser, Burgers & Beats, is at Wallace Station in Midway on Sunday, July 17 at 5 pm. The picnic-style event features food by Chef Ouita Michel, music by The Swells, a silent auction, and activities for children. Since 2010,

To submit a Lexington, Kentucky food, wine, or spirits news item for consideration in Ace’s Best Bites, email acelist@ aceweekly.com. To submit a Lexington Food, Wine, or Spirits Event to be considered for the Ace calendar, please go to the Ace online calendar, and click “Submit” (upper right on the Menu bar). For restaurant advertising, call Ace Advertising at 859.225.4889 x229.


FOOD

FOOD

By Tom Yates

Grilling corn on the cob

Fun and downright fabulous Fire. Heat. Smoke. It’s summertime and the grilling is easy.

Can anything possibly be better than grilled locally grown fresh corn on the cob slathered with melted butter and doused with salt? Yep. Elotes. Mexican street corn. Smeared with mayo or crema, rolled in cojita cheese, sprinkled with ground chili, and brightened with fresh lime juice, elotes ups the ante on our beloved grilled summer corn candy. It’s simple, fun, and downright fabulous. Don’t let the ingredients form a roadblock. Sure, there’s the whole mayo thing. Can’t tolerate mayo? Use crema, sour cream, or butter. Want to take a leap of faith? Try a teeny weeny bit of jarred mayo or whip up a batch of airy, tangy, creamy, and easy homemade mayo. Don’t want to bother with sourcing cojita cheese? Crumbled feta or good quality parmesan are great substitutes. Celebrate summer. Snag a few ears of fantastic corn and fire up the grill. Elotes. Mayo. Scratch made mayonnaise is unbelievably simple to throw together. After cracking 1 whole Elmwood Stock Farm organic egg into a small mason jar, I added 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar, 3 tablespoons neutral canola oil, 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, a quarter of a teaspoon dried mustard, salt, pepper, and a pinch of sugar. Using a handheld immersion blender, I creamed the mix before slowly drizzling in an additional 5 tablespoons canola oil. Within seconds, it emulsified into a creamy dream. A mayonnaise miracle. I slid the mayo into the refrigerator to chill and fired up the grill. Corn. There are no rules when it comes to grilling corn. Shucked or unshucked? Soaked or dried? Wrapped or naked? It’s really doesn’t matter, if you keep an eye on it during the process. The caramelized toasty bits are fine. Cinders, not so much. I was lucky enough to stumble across fresh (newly harvested) Lincoln County corn at the farmers market. Still damp from

the morning harvest, the fresh corn was a total win. So, I’m a husk on kind of boy when it comes to grilling corn. The silks are another matter. Some folks don’t bother removing the silks before grilling because they burn away from the heat and flames. Well, I guess I fall in the middle. You see, I grew up on a farm with a zero tolerance for corn silks. My father had kitchen drawers filled with very odd corn silk removing gadgets. No silks allowed. Period. Ever. Although I’m not quite that fussy, I removed some of the silks. After peeling back the husks, I scraped away most of the silks, loosely formed the husks back over the corn, and tied the ends with a few wayward husk scraps. When the fire died down, I spread out the glowing coals, and tossed the ears onto the grill. While I didn’t bother soaking the corn, I did spritz the ears with water after they hit the heat. I poured myself a glass of wine, sat down next to the inferno, and turned the ears of corn every few minutes. As the husks burned away, bits of corn kernels singed and caramelized from the heat. After 10 minutes or so, I pulled the corn from the grill and scraped away the burned husks before peeling back the inner husks to reveal the candied corn. Steamed. Charred. Caramelized. Gorgeous. While the corn was still warm, I brushed it with the lime spiked mayo, tumbled cojita cheese over the top, dusted it with ancho chili powder, and finished with fresh lime zest before scattering lime wedges and fresh cilantro to the side. Crunchy sweet summer corn. Light creamy mayo. Salty cojita cheese. Spicy ancho chili. Bright fresh lime. Perfect. Not into wearing corn all over your face, hands, hair, and elbows? Try esquites, the daintier street corn salad version. Simply cut the corn off the cobs after grilling and toss the kernels with all the remaining good stuff. Summer has arrived. It’s time to get your grill on.

11 aceweekly.com July 2016


GIGS/CONCERTS

July 2016 Radio 80 O’Neill’s Warped Tour 11 am Riverbend (Cinci)

FRIDAY, JULY 1

The Footsteps | DJ Lee Roy | Champs of the Sun 9 pm Al’s Bar El Escapado 8 pm Best Friend Bar Wray 7 pm The Green Lantern Buckcherry 6 pm Manchester Music Hall Superfecta O’Neill’s Zac Brown Band 7 pm Riverbend (Cinci) Lisa Raymond 6 pm Talon Winery Dawg Yawp 9 pm Willie’s

FRIDAY, JULY 22

Drunk By Dusk: Local Rock and Roll Extravaganza: All Saints Fade | Dead on Fire | Atomic Thrillride | HourFall | Las Vicious | Radiolaire | Damage Therapy | All Saints Fade | Kentucky Ugly 7 pm Al’s Bar Street Gnar | Gold Light Al’s Beer Garden Mandy Ray 10 pm Chevy Chase Inn Summer Nights in Suburbia: Kentucky Salsa Allstars 7 pm MoonDance Amphitheatre Radio 80 O’Neill’s Clinton Spaulding 6 pm Talon Winery

SATURDAY, JULY 2

Bty Slp | Warhammer | New Bravados | Wol & Weeps 7:30 pm Al’s Bar Summer in the City: Knowledge | DJFu 9 pm 11th Frame Lounge (Southland) Superfecta O’Neill’s Papa Jim N’Da’Naw’lins Sho 4 pm Talon Winery The Void Nation 6 pm Tin Roof Big Sound Harbor 9 pm Willie’s

SUNDAY, JULY 3

Tiki Gruv: ATL. Eddie Gold | McBeezy | Ployd 7 pm Al’s Bar Lexington Singers: I Love My Country 7:30 pm The Mall Patriotic Music Concert 8 pm Transy’s Morrison Lawn

Superfecta O’Neill’s Paul McCartney 8 pm US Bank Arena (Cinci)

MONDAY, JULY 4

Barber Shop Quartets 6:45 pm Lyric Theatre Southland Jamboree: Blue Belles 7 pm MoonDance Amphitheatre

Sam Lewis Willie’s

TUESDAY, JULY 5

Def Leppard | REO Speedwagon | Tesla 7 pm Riverbend (Cinci)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 6

Jeff Lyman and Arte Bratton O’Neill’s Matt Gerwin 8 pm Parlay Social Guns N’ Roses 8 pm Paul Brown Stadium (Cinci) Barenaked Ladies 7 pm Riverbend (Cinci)

THURSDAY, JULY 7

Jim Lord | Jayson Erik Alcott 10 pm Al’s Bar Will Solomon 9 pm Willie’s

FRIDAY, JULY 8

Zen Highway | Churches&State | Under New Order 9 pm Al’s Bar DJ Mayor 9 pm Al’s Beer Garden Travis Harris & The West Coast Turnarounds 8 pm Austin City Saloon Summer Nights in Suburbia: Rebel Without a Cause 7 pm MoonDance Amphitheatre Warehouse Block Block Party: StarDevils 5 pm National Avenue Encore of Lexington O’Neill’s Weird Al 8 pm Riverbend (Cinci) Thomas Birl 6 pm Talon Winery The Bats 8 pm Willie’s

SATURDAY, JULY 9

Graveyard Romeos 8 pm 11th Frame Lounge Bendigo Fletcher | The Logos 9 pm Al’s Bar Salute The Moon | I Like You | Season Ten 9 pm Al’s Beer Garden Aly’An 10 pm Austin City Saloon Wayne Whitehouse O’Neill’s John Ford 4 pm Talon Winery Jay Taylor 9 pm Tin Roof Church and State | White Buffalo Woman 9 pm Willie’s Rock the Block: Boogie G and the Titanics 5:30 pm Winchester

SUNDAY, JULY 10

Them God Damn Bangs | He’s Dead Jim | Nominees 9 pm Al’s Bar

12 aceweekly.com July 2016

SATURDAY, JULY 23

County-Wide 8 pm Austin City Saloon The Rough Customers | Sleep Over | Sempervivi 10 pm Cosmic Charlie’s Usual Suspects Band 8 pm Red Mile Mike Archer 4 pm Talon Winery

Lyle Lovett and His Large Band will perform July 29 at 7:30 p.m. at the Lexington Opera House.

MONDAY, JULY 11

Colvin and Earle will be in concert July 26 at 7:30 p.m. in the Lexington Opera House.

TUESDAY, JULY 12

Matt Gerwin 8 pm Parlay Social The Misty Mountain String Band 9 pm Willie’s

THURSDAY, JULY 14

Lung 9 pm Al’s Bar Thursday Night Dive: RC and the NightShades 7 pm Break Room at Pepper Thursday Night Live: Better Off Dead 5 pm Cheapside Pavilion Gears | Sins of Spira | Noble Giants | Don’t Wait Up 8 pm Cosmic Charlie’s Kickin It On The Creek Preview Party: The Wooks | Tyler Childers | The Jenkins Twins 7 pm Manchester Music Hall Keith Urban | Brett Eldredge | Maren Morrs 7:30 pm Riverbend (Cinci) The Fairfield Four 9 pm Willie’s

FRIDAY, JULY 15

MONDAY, JULY 25

The Earls of Leicester 6:45 pm Lyric Theatre Southland Jamboree: Dean Osborne 7 pm MoonDance Amphitheatre Big Band and Jazz: Lexington Concert Band 7 pm Ecton Park Troubadour Series: Colvin and Earle 7:30 pm Lexington Opera House Dream Dates Pop-Up Concert 6:30 pm The Raven House

pm Manchester Music Hall Stairway II Zeppelin O’Neill’s Lauren Mink 4 pm Talon Winery Buffalo Wabs | The Price Hill Hustle 9 pm Willie’s

SUNDAY, JULY 17

I’m So Dead Tour: The Upset Victory | The Stolen | Mike Schiavo 5 pm Broomwagon Kingslayer 9 pm The Green Lantern

MONDAY, JULY 18

SPYING | Jandergan 9 pm Al’s Bar Woodsongs: John McEuen | Bill and the Belles 6:45 pm Lyric Theatre Atlas Genius | Bear Hands | The Moth 9 pm Manchester Music Hall Southland Jamboree: Joe Mullins 7 pm MoonDance Amphitheatre

SomethingDifferent: DJ Always | WarrenPeace | Outhere | Kymbo 10 pm Al’s Bar Experimental Music Showcase 9 pm Al’s Beer Garden Freakwater | Morgan Geer’s Drunken Prayer 9 pm Cosmic Charlie’s Dr. Dog 11 pm Headliners (Louisville) Forecastle Festival Louisville (through Sunday) Vinyl Richie O’Neill’s Phoenix Fridays: 7Horse Star and Micey Warren Byrom and the Fabled Canelands 5:30 pm Phoenix Park The Retro Vibes 6 pm Talon Winery Cale Tyson | Michaela Anne 9 pm Willie’s

TUESDAY, JULY 19

SATURDAY, JULY 16

THURSDAY, JULY 21

David Liebe Hart | Dr. Paul | Melted Hair | Ondezvous 8 pm Al’s Bar Tiki Gruv: Reggae Party 7 pm Al’s Beer Garden Here Come the Mummies | Street Corner Symphony 7

Greener Time O’Neill’s Jazz on the Porch 3 pm Talon Winery

TUESDAY, JULY 26

Brett Ratliff 6 pm Al’s Bar Big Band and Jazz: Osland Dailey Jazztet 7 pm Ecton Park Slipknot | Marilyn Manson | Of Mice and Men 6:30 pm Riverbend (Cinci) Taylor Knighton 9 pm Willie’s

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13

SUNDAY, JULY 24

Big Band and Jazz: Colonel’s Choice 7 pm Ecton Park Peter Frampton | Gregg Allman 7:30 pm Riverbend (Cinci)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20

Flying Things | Home Grown Head Band | Idylwild 9 pm Al’s Bar Matt Gerwin 8 pm Parlay Social Hall and Oates | Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue | Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings 7 pm Riverbend (Cinci) Jordan English 11:45 pm Tin Roof George Molton 8 pm Willie’s The Caribbean | ATTEMPT (Solo) 9 pm Al’s Bar Thursday Night Live: The Twiggenburys 5 pm Cheapside Pavilion The Vagabonds | Jericho Woods 10 pm Cosmic Charlie’s

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27

Matt Gerwin 8 pm Parlay Social Disturbed | Breaking Benjamin 7 pm Riverbend (Cinci) Coldplay 7 pm Yum Center (Louisville)

THURSDAY, JULY 28

Noble Giants | Powell | Isle of Eight 9 pm Al’s Bar The Past 8 pm Best Friend Bar Thursday Night Live: Tim Talbert Project 5 pm Cheapside Pavilion Positive Hits Tour 7 pm EKU Center for the Arts (Richmond)

FRIDAY, JULY 29

Annandale 9 pm 11th Frame Lounge Whistling Jug Series 8 pm Al’s Beer Garden Mike Archer 7 pm The Cellar Josh Flagg 8 pm The Green Lantern Troubadour Series: Lyle Lovett and His Large Band 7:30 pm Lexington Opera House 50 Shades of Male 9 pm Manchester Music Hall Summer Nights in Suburbia: Patrick McNeese Band 7 pm MoonDance Amphitheatre Kung Fu Grip O’Neill’s Journey | The Doobie Brothers | Dave Mason 7 pm Riverbend (Cinci) Porcelain 6 pm Talon Winery Demi Lovato | Nick Jonas 6 pm Yum Center (Louisville)

SATURDAY, JULY 30

Dana Massive Bour-Bon (Paris) Kung Fu Grip O’Neill’s Chris Carpenter 6 pm Talon Winery Newtown 5 pm Willies

SUNDAY, JULY 31 Mike Twardy O’Neill’s


Free Will Astrology

By Rob Brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): During winter, some bears spend months hibernating. Their body temperatures and heart rates drop. They breathe drowsily. Their movements are minimal. Many hummingbirds engage in a similar slow-down — but they do it every single night. By day they are among the most manic creatures on earth, flapping their wings and gathering sustenance with heroic zeal. When the sun slips below the horizon, they rest with equal intensity. In my estimation, Aries, you don’t need a full-on immersion in idleness like the bears. But you’d benefit from a shorter stint, akin to the hummingbird’s period of dormancy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Dear Dr. Brezsny: A psychic predicted that sometime this year I will fall in love with a convenience store clerk who’s secretly a down-on-his-luck prince of a small African country. She said that he and I have a unique destiny. Together we will break the world’s record for dancing without getting bitten in a pit of cobras while drunk on absinthe on our honeymoon. But there’s a problem. I didn’t have time to ask the psychic how I’ll meet my soulmate, and I can’t afford to pay $250 for another reading. Can you help? - Mopey Taurus.” Dear Mopey: The psychic lied. Neither she nor anyone else can see what the future will bring you. Why? Because what happens will be largely determined by your own actions. I suggest you celebrate this fact. It’s the perfect time to do so: July is Feed Your Willpower Month. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Of all the concert pianos in the world, 80 percent of them are made by Steinway. A former president of the company once remarked that in each piano, “243 taut strings exert a pull of 40,000 pounds on an iron frame.” He said it was “proof that out of great tension may come great harmony.” That will be a potential talent of yours in the coming weeks, Gemini. Like a Steinway piano, you will have the power to turn tension into beauty. But will you actually accomplish this noble goal, or will your efforts be less melodious? It all depends on how much poised self-discipline you summon. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Once upon a time, weren’t you the master builder who never finished building your castle? Weren’t you the exile who wandered aimlessly while fantasizing about the perfect sanctuary of the past or the sweet safety zone of the future? Didn’t you perversely nurture the ache that arose from your sense of not feeling at home in the world? I hope that by now you have renounced all of those kinky inclinations. If you haven’t, now would be an excellent time to do so. How might you reinvest the mojo that will be liberated by the demise of those bad habits? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, I have selected three aphorisms by poet James Richardson to guide you. Aphorism #1: “The worst helplessness is forgetting there is help.” My commentary: You have the power to avoid that fate. Start by identifying the sources of healing and assistance that are available to you. Aphorism #2: “You do not have to be a fire to keep one burning.” My commentary: Generate all the heat and light you can, yes, but don’t torch yourself. Aphorism #3: “Patience is not very different from courage. It just takes longer.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You may not know this, but I am the founder and CEO of Proud To Be Humble, an acclaimed organization devoted to minimizing vanity. It is my sworn duty to protest any ego that exceeds the acceptable limits as defined by the Geneva Convention on Narcissism. However, I now find myself conflicted. Because of the lyrical beauty and bighearted charisma that are currently emanating from your ego, I am unable, in good conscience, to ask you to tone yourself down.

In fact, I hereby grant you a license to expand your self-love to unprecedented proportions. You may also feel free to unleash a series of lovely brags. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The next 28 days will not be a favorable period to sit around passively wishing to be noticed. Nor will it be a good time to wait to be rescued or to trust in others to instigate desirable actions. On the other hand, it will be an excellent phase to be an initiator: to decide what needs to be done, to state your intentions concisely, and to carry out your master plan with alacrity and efficiency. To help ensure your success during the next 28 days, make this declaration each morning before breakfast: “I don’t want to OBSERVE the show. I want to BE the show.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “In life, as in bicycling, pedal when you have to, coast when you can.” So says author James Lough, and now I’m passing on his advice to you — just in time for your transition from the heavy-pedaling season to the coasting-is-fun phase. I suspect that at this juncture in your life story you may be a bit addicted to the heavy pedaling. You could be so accustomed to the intensity that you’re inclined to be suspicious of an opportunity to enjoy ease and grace. Don’t be like that. Accept the gift with innocent gratitude. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “When a jet flies low overhead, every glass in the cupboard sings,” writes aphorist James Richardson. “Feelings are like that: choral, not single; mixed, never pure.” That’s always true, but it will be intensely true for you in the coming weeks. I hope you can find a way to tolerate, even thrive on, the flood of ambiguous complexity. I hope you won’t chicken out and try to pretend that your feelings are one-dimensional and easily understandable. In my opinion, you are ripe to receive rich lessons in the beauty and power of mysterious emotions. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Pop artist Andy Warhol said that in the future, everyone would be famous for 15 minutes. His idea had a resonance with the phrase “nine days’ wonder,” which as far back as Elizabethan times referred to a person or event that captured the public’s fascination for a while. You Capricorns are entering a phase when you’re far more likely than usual to bask in the spotlight. Between now and September 2017, I bet you’ll garner at least a short burst of glory, acclaim, or stardom — perhaps much more. Are you ready for your close-up? Have you prepped for the influx of attention that may be coming your way? AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of my readers, Jay O’Dell, told me this story: “After my cancer surgery, a nurse said to me, ‘You may as well try magical thinking. Regular thinking hasn’t helped.’ I said to the nurse, ‘Well, why the hell not?’ That was seven years ago.” In bringing O’Dell’s testimony to your attention, I don’t mean to suggest you will have any health problems that warrant a strong dose of magical thinking. Not at all. But you may get wrapped up in a psychological twist or a spiritual riddle that would benefit from magical thinking. And what exactly is magical thinking? Here’s one definition: The stories that unfold in your imagination have important effects on what actually happens to you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let’s talk about X-factors and wild cards and strange attractors. By their very nature, they are unpredictable and ephemeral, even when they offer benevolent breakthroughs. So you may not even notice their arrival if you’re entranced by your expectations and stuck in your habitual ways. But here’s the good news, Pisces: Right now you are not unduly entranced by your expectations or stuck in your habits. Odds are high that you will spy the sweet twists of fate — the X-factors and wild cards and strange attractors — as they float into view. You will pounce on them and put them to work while they’re still fresh. And then they will help you hike your ratings or get the funding you need or animate the kind of love that heals.

HELP WANTED Sensor Circuit and System Engineer (Lexington, KY) Designing embedded circuit systems for moisture sensors for dew point measurement. Software development for sensor data collection, data modeling, and sensor calibration. Developing and improving dew point sensor calibration system. Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering required. Must be proficient in C and C+, embedded system design, dew point sensor calibration system. Mail resume to Advanced Semiconductor Processing Technology, LLC, 3124 Hemingway Ln, Lexington, KY 40513

Sr. Business Analyst in Lexington, KY: Responsible for defining and documenting requirements, specifications and test plans, in addition to having an in-depth knowledge of the SDLC process. Responsible for identifying and analyzing user requirements. Requires: (1) Masters + 1 yr exp. OR (2) Bachelors + 5 yrs exp. Mail resume to: TempurPedic Management, LLC, 1000 Tempur Way, Lexington, KY 40511, Attn: HR.

Farm to Table Coordinator - Community Farm Alliance is hiring an Eastern Kentucky Farm to Table Coordinator (EKY F2TC) responsible for coordinating and implementing CFA’s Eastern Kentucky market development work-plan that builds regional and community food systems, with a special focus on Farm to Institution. The EKY F2TC will work directly with farmers, farmers markets in CFA’s Farmer’s Market Support Program, public schools and other institutions, private enterprises, and other organizations to build a local food supply chain network for institutional markets in Eastern Kentucky. The position is also responsible for coordinating and integrating CFA’s Program of Work in Eastern Kentucky that specifically a) builds CFA’s EKY membership, b) identifies and develops EKY CFA Leadership, and c) helps to build regional collaboration in a 21-county region in Southeast Kentucky supported with funding by the Economic Development Administration and the Appalachian Regional Commission. To apply: send resume, cover letter, along with 2 writing samples, 3 professional references and 2 personal references to Martin Richards Executive Director P.O. Box 130 Berea, KY 40403.

Pet Pick

Hank

8 years old 32 lbs Beagle

Handsome AND loveable...that’s Hank! This cutie is a mature beagle who will greet you with a tail wag, a kiss (or two, or three) and a friendly hello the moment you see him. If you are looking for a companion who enjoys cuddling on the couch, but is always up for a good long walk and exploring session when the mood strikes, then Hank is the beagle for you. He is ready to be part of a loving family and bring love each day! Stop by the adoption center to meet Hank or give us a call at 859-873-5491 to learn more. Photo by Regi Goffinet

Ace Weekly and the Woodford Humane Society remind you to spay and neuter your pets. 13 aceweekly.com July 2016


Real Estate

REAL ESTATE: Properties recently sold in Fayette Co. May 18 May 27 May 20

Apr 20 May 20 May 11 May 19 May 31 May 19 May 16 May 31 May 16 May 27 May 26 Jun 3 May 6 May 19 May 23 May 19 May 27 May 16 Jun 2 May 26 Jun 3 Jun 1 May 13 May 23 May 9 May 27 May 27

40502

1802 LAKEWOOD DR 120 CHINOE RD 427 ANDOVER DR

2152 ISLAND DR 304 CULPEPPER RD 517 CHINOE RD 417 QUEENSWAY DR 345 DUDLEY RD 1164 LAKEWOOD DR 1449 LAKEWOOD DR 315 KINGSWAY DR 616 AUTUMN LN 1161 TABORLAKE WALK 3320 OVERBROOK DR 356 QUEENSWAY DR 640 CHINOE RD 771 CHINOE RD 3422 FLEETWOOD DR 1181 INDIAN MOUND RD 316 DUDLEY RD 243 IDLE HOUR DR 1016 FONTAINE RD 3302 BROOKHILL CIR 135 IDLE HOUR DR 132 S ASHLAND AVE 132 BASSETT AVE 313 MELBOURNE WAY 105 VICTORY AVE 723 CAMINO DR 828 MELROSE AVE

14 aceweekly.com July 2016

$1,443,500 $1,225,000 $1,180,000

$900,000 $885,000 $690,000 $675,000 $675,000 $670,000 $650,000 $625,000 $620,000 $595,000 $570,000 $541,250 $455,000 $438,000 $433,000 $430,000 $416,000 $375,000 $365,000 $356,000 $340,000 $325,000 $325,000 $315,000 $312,000 $310,000 $309,000

May 25 May 23 May 9 May 19 May 24 May 9 May 23 May 9 May 17 May 6 May 23 May 26 May 27 May 25 May 11 May 23 May 27 May 26 May 27 May 27 May 24

774 ABBOTT RD 3185 LAMAR DR 994 EDGEWATER PL 111 WOODLAND AVE 3304 NANTUCKET DR 650 CENTRAL AVE 461 MARQUIS AVE 658 CENTRAL AVE 334 OLDHAM AVE 2414 LAKE PARK RD 210 DESHA RD UNIT 3 415 MARQUIS AVE 3398 MONTAVESTA RD 244 ST MARGARET DR 150 ST MARGARET DR 2414 LAKE PARK RD 500 LAKETOWER DR 1320 GRAY HAWK RD 2044 ST TERESA DR 101 S HANOVER AVE 236 ST ANN DR

$285,000 $272,000 $268,000 $250,000 $240,000 $210,000 $185,000 $182,000 $180,000 $162,500 $158,000 $152,000 $142,500 $139,000 $138,000 $123,000 $121,250 $118,000 $117,000 $115,000 $83,000

Jun 3 May 25 May 20 May 16 May 26 May 25 May 27 May 17

40503 337 ARCADIA PARK 212 MELBOURNE WAY 115 ARCADIA PARK 342 BLUEBERRY RD 158 GOODRICH AVE 119 WABASH DR 1321 GRAY CT 2402 HEATHER WAY

$325,000 $264,900 $252,000 $250,000 $241,000 $240,000 $239,900 $227,500

May 26 May 23 May 18 May 31 May 31 May 27 May 24 May 25 May 31 May 13 May 13 May 25 May 25 May 25 May 16 May 27 Apr 29 May 27 Jun 1 May 26 May 20 Jun 3 May 19 May 31 May 23 May 19 May 10 May 24 May 25 May 19 May 27

133 ROSEMONT GARDEN 3464 GRASMERE DR 904 QUARTER HORSE CT 111 GOODRICH AVE 546 FOGO CT 407 PICADOME PARK 2309 SOUTHGATE DR 592 LONGVIEW DR 126 VENICE PARK 512 FAIRFIELD DR 473 BOB O LINK DR 631 WORCESTER RD 565 SEATTLE DR 3454 TISDALE CT 2791 CLAYS MILL RD 565 SEVERN WAY 1625 NICHOLASVILLE RD 386 STRATFORD DR 220 ZANDALE DR 357 CROMWELL WAY 267 CLEARVIEW DR 3016 REDBUD CT 2387 HEATHER WAY 2100 CLAYS MILL RD 478 PASADENA DR 2450 MILLBROOK DR 616 BURBANK CT 101 CHELAN DR 600 VINCENT WAY 483 OSPREY CIR 354 STRATFORD DR

$226,500 $225,000 $223,000 $215,000 $210,000 $209,900 $184,000 $180,000 $180,000 $179,900 $179,000 $177,000 $176,000 $174,900 $172,500 $172,000 $169,500 $165,000 $165,000 $163,000 $163,000 $161,500 $158,900 $155,900 $155,000 $150,000 $150,000 $147,000 $145,000 $144,000 $143,500

May 20 May 16 May 17 May 25 Jun 2 May 6 May 18 May 6 May 19 May 17 May 19 May 17 May 26 May 20

103 GOODRICH AVE 1088 HIGBEE MILL RD 221 REGENCY POINT PATH 102 GOODRICH AVE 3061 WACO RD 610 CECIL WAY 585 SHERIDAN DR 2057 REBEL RD 600 VINCENT WAY 600 VINCENT WAY 545 HOLLYHILL DR 591 LAMONT DR 175 MALABU DR UNIT 37 2121 NICHOLASVILLE RD

$140,000 $138,000 $130,000 $130,000 $127,000 $127,000 $126,700 $125,000 $118,000 $115,000 $105,000 $105,000 $66,000 $64,000

May 13 Jun 1 May 17 May 24 May 16 May 24 May 27 May 11 May 31 May 27 May 4 May 19 May 20 Jun 3 May 25

40504 1960 CAMBRIDGE DR 1365 SADDLE CLUB WAY 2074 OLD NASSAU RD 848 MASON HEADLEY RD 1765 HEADLEY GREEN 2127 GEORGIAN WAY 988 MAYWICK DR 832 MASON HEADLEY RD 1050 DELLA DR 936 MAYWICK DR 2071 GEORGIAN WAY 1769 YORKTOWN RD 1749 GETTYSBURG RD 2104 VIOLET RD 1921 ALEXANDRIA DR

$902,880 $289,000 $274,900 $225,000 $216,000 $213,500 $181,900 $180,000 $175,000 $165,000 $158,175 $147,500 $143,100 $130,000 $130,000


Home and Garden May 3 May 13 May 16 May 27 May 27 May 13 May 23 May 19 May 26 May 31 May 11 May 31 May 16

1903 WESTMINSTER DR 1757 YORKTOWN RD 121 DELMONT DR 224 MANDALAY RD 1017 DELLA DR 2121 TALISMAN RD 1050 MAYWICK DR 251 SIMPSON AVE 867 CHERYL LN 2055 DEAUVILLE DR 2213 JASMINE DR 1175 ALEXANDRIA DR 768 DELLA DR

$128,000 $126,900 $126,000 $117,500 $115,000 $110,000 $107,500 $97,000 $91,500 $85,000 $85,000 $79,900 $70,000

May 25 May 13 May 19 May 31 May 16 May 19 May 26 May 23 May 27 May 17 May 20 May 23 May 17 May 23 Apr 15 May 20 May 20 May 24 May 19 May 25 May 16

40505 2113 PATCHEN LAKE LN 1804 GOODPASTER WAY 1411 N LIMESTONE 1977 LACLEDE CT 639 KINGSTON RD 1609 GAYLE DR 2109 CORIANDER LN 2105 CORIANDER LN 839 HENRY CLAY BLVD 2449 WANDA CT 604 SHAFTSBURY RD 2362 PIERSON DR 860 MARCELLUS DR 1532 LINDY LN 568 BELLCASTLE RD 1912 BRYNELL DR 832 HENRY CLAY BLVD 1848 ENDON DR 708 PIONEER LN 1623 STRADER DR 426 ST ANTHONY DR

$450,462 $450,000 $279,000 $215,000 $180,000 $150,000 $142,920 $139,000 $137,000 $135,000 $135,000 $120,000 $119,000 $116,500 $111,000 $109,500 $106,000 $105,000 $100,000 $98,000 $93,900

May 24 May 16 Apr 28 May 25 May 12 May 24 May 24 Apr 25 May 4 May 16 May 13 May 20 May 6 Jun 3 May 12 May 27 Jun 2 May 27 May 27 May 11

513 ANNISTON DR 134 FAIRLAWN AVE 515 WANSTEAD WAY 249 BROADVIEW DR 1860 GOODPASTER WAY 907 BRYAN AVE 146 NORTHWOOD DR 821 WARFIELD PL 708 PIONEER LN 1207 HIGHLAND PARK DR 564 PARKSIDE DR 1124 SPARKS RD 180 E LOUDON AVE 558 SANDALWOOD DR 157 ASHTON DR 541 LIN WAL RD 681 GAY PL 1039 CARNEAL RD 444 MORGAN AVE 444 MORGAN AVE

$93,300 $92,500 $84,100 $81,500 $81,400 $80,000 $80,000 $75,000 $69,000 $67,000 $66,000 $65,000 $60,000 $58,043 $54,900 $50,000 $45,250 $41,500 $31,000 $27,000

May 23 May 25

40507 409 E HIGH ST 136 DEWEESE ST

$269,000 $155,000

May 20 Jun 1 Jun 3 May 27 May 19 May 26 May 20 May 9 May 12 May 13

40508 537 LAWRENCE ST 508 E MAIN ST UNIT 402 724 FRANKLIN AVE 222 MIDLAND AVE 416 TRANSYLVANIA PARK 465 JOHNSON AVE 125 FOREST AVE 767 MAPLE AVE 423 STOLL POOLE CT 168 ALABAMA AVE

$454,000 $325,000 $285,000 $229,900 $186,000 $180,000 $87,500 $85,000 $70,000 $12,000

JULY 6 The Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation’s “DeTours” program will travel for the first time to Jessamine County to explore the Chaumiere des Prairies located at 1439 Catnip Hill Road in Nicholasville. Colonel David Meade acquired the 330 acres of land in the early 19th century, and the house was built around 1840 by the subsequent owner. Although Colonel Meade’s gardens (said to have rivaled those of Versailles) are long gone, their site, the Chaumiere des Prairies was a part of what made Lexington the “Athens of the West.”

JULY 12 Explore new and exciting sedums as part of a Fayette County Extension Service workshop Tuesday, July 12, at 3 p.m. This workshop will cover their culture and provide rooted cuttings of several types for you to try. The cost is $20. For more information, got to www.fayette.ca.uky.edu/ horticulture

JULY 13

The 2016 Lexington Arboretum Birdhouse Display opens Wednesday, July 13 and will continue through Sunday, July 31. Birdhouses may be delivered to the visitor center on Saturday, July 9, from 9 a.m. until noon and July 11-12, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Silent auction bid sheets will be in the visitor center. All birdhouses will be on display outdoors. Bid sheets available weekdays 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the visitor center.

JULY 16 The 2016 Bluegrass Fair Flower and Vegetable Show will be July 16-17. The annual show is an opportunity for gardeners of all ages in Fayette and surrounding counties to learn, compete, see what others are growing successfully in this area. Information may be seen at www.bgflowershow. com or by calling Fayette County Extension Office (859) 257-5582.

JULY 21 Find out secrets of the winter vegetable garden as part of a Fayette County Extension Service workshop Thursday, July 21, 6:30 p.m. For more information, got to www.fayette.ca.uky.edu/horticulture

JULY 22-31

The Home Builders Association of Lexington presents the 2016 scattered site Grand Tour of Homes, July 22, 23, 24, and July 29, 30, and 31. The tour will be open Friday from 5 until 8 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from noon until 6 p.m. For details, go to www.hbalexington.com. There is no charge to attend.

CONTACT US TODAY!

859.667.1720 1164 Industry Road Lexington, KY 40505

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16 aceweekly.com July 2016

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Ace July 2016  

Lifestyle and entertainment magazine for Lexington, Kentucky.

Ace July 2016  

Lifestyle and entertainment magazine for Lexington, Kentucky.

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