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8 Calendar 12 Gigs May 2017 Volume 28, Number 5

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Astrology Ace Classifieds

in this issue MAY 2017

VOLUME 28, ISSUE 5 •

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on the cover EDITRIX Rhonda Reeves CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tread Editorial Assistant Atanas Golev Contributing writers (online + print) Evan O. Albert, Kenny Colston, Kevin Faris, Brian Gardner, Brian Powers, Raj Ranade, Nick Stump, Kakie Urch, Heather C. Watson, Tom Yates –––––––––– Display Advertising 859.225.4889, ext. 235 ads@aceweekly.com Classified Advertising 859.225.4889, ext. 237 ––––––––––– COP Y R IGH T © 2017 We love mail! Send Letters to the Editor: editor@aceweekly.com 250 words or less. Include full name and daytime phone. To submit a calendar listing for consideration, email acelist@aceweekly.com. —— Display Ad deadlines are every Friday for the next week’s issue: Email ads@aceweekly.com. Space reservation, production art, and payment should be delivered no later than Fridays by Noon

p6 And the winner is ... Kentucky author takes home James Beard awards for cookbook.

features P4 OUT AND ABOUT

Bridges brothers at Derby, Pirate Pub Crawl, Kitefest at Jacobson Park, Best Places to Work awards

a&e p10 EAT MAY: Lexington Restaurant News p11 JUMP ON THE RAMP Fresh spring produce is a once a year treat for everyone

p12 MUSIC MENU The weather heats up along with the Lexington music scene

p15 REAL ESTATE

What sold, where, and for how

much?

Distribution ACE is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft. Ace racks and boxes are private property. Distribution of any other publications in an Ace rack or Ace box constitutes criminal trespass (trespass includes but is not limited to: college publications, Yard Sale flyers, tagging, and so on).

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PHOTOS

The Fabulous Bridges Boys at 2017 Kentucky Derby

out & about with

Best Places to Work ceremony

2017 Pirate Pub Crawl

ace Kitefest at Jacobson Park

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NEWS

Art league hosting Tharsing retrospective Kentucky Join the Lexington Art League for the “Robert Tharsing, A Retrospective,” curated by Lina Tharsing.  Robert Tharsing (1943–2015) created hundreds of paintings and sculptures over his lifetime, not to mention thousands of other art objects, as small as jewelry and as large as a house in Nova Scotia. This retrospective is a survey of

Tharsing’s art career, though the legacy of Tharsing’s work extends beyond the scope of his gallery exhibitions, private collections, and catalogs. A 300-page, color catalogue has been published in partnership with Institute 193 to commemorate this exhibition with generous underwriting support in honor of Ann Tower by an anonymous friend.  “My father was a compulsive

maker. His peers said they admired his dedication, but for him, it wasn’t work ethic as much as drive—he was driven to make, almost as though he was possessed by an energy outside of himself,” Lina Tharsing said in the forward of the book. The exhibition at the Lexington Art League began in April. There will be a closing reception May 26 from 6 until 9 p.m.

Rollergirls kick off new season in Lexington The Rollergirls of Central Kentucky will celebrate their 10-year anniversary and Harry Potter-themed season opener Saturday, May 13 at 4 p.m. as they take on the “A” and “B” teams from Chemical Valley Rollergirls The action starts early at 4pm with two roller derby events for the price of one. The Rollergirls of Central Kentucky will be working alongside Lexpecto Patronum to ensure a fun-filled night

of Harry Potter fandom. Lexpecto Patronum is a local nonprofit that connects people to social justice issues through popular culture working with various local organizations. Lexpecto Patronum will be accepting donations of new comics and books that are empowering and diverse in nature. These donations will be distributed to underserved communities in Lexington. Make a

donation and receive $2 off when you purchase your ticket at the door. Come dressed in your best wizard attire and help us to show off the magic of Lexington’s roller derby community. Doors open at 4 p.m. The ROCK vs. CVRG B teams will kick things off at 5 p.m., and ROCK vs. CVRG A teams will follow at 7 p.m.

fund-raiser to feature classic film The Friends of the Kentucky Theatre invite the public to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the reopening of the Kentucky Theatre at a fund-raising party May 17 at 6 p.m. Guests can enjoy pizza, wine, live music, and door prizes. Then settle in to watch Cinema Paradiso, a heartwarming classic and winner of the 1989 Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. All proceeds from this fundraiser will go to on-going capital improvements at the historic Kentucky Theatre.

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FEATURE

AND THE WINNER IS ... Kentucky native Ronni Lundy sweeps the James Beard Awards

Kentucky native and food writer Ronni Lundy has received the top James Beard Foundation award for Book of the Year. Lundy also received a James Beard Award in the American Cooking category. In the debut issue of her online food magazine, The Zenchilada, Lundy wrote of New England food writer, John Thorne, “Some might call him a food philosopher; I would call him a true ruminant, turning over a recipe or a story until his taste, his instinct leads him to the place beyond ingredient and information, the place where the fundamental can be found.” The same could be said of Lundy. As her agent puts it, “She’s been called a ‘rockstar of a scribe’ and ‘food goddess’ but, really, Ronni Lundy is just a Kentucky girl who likes to wander with a fork in one hand and a pen in the other.” Victuals is the book she says she’s been writing since she was “probably about three.”

T

he James Beard Awards include categories

like outstanding restaurant and best chef in 10 different regions, best new restaurants, rising star chefs, pastry chefs and bakers. The chef and restaurant awards were given out in Chicago May 1. Victuals: An Appalachian Journey, with Recipes was busy making the list of 2016’s best cookbooks before it was even released (Clarkson Potter, August 2016). In the Best Of 2016 lineup that included Ina Garten, Tasting Table wrote, “Appalachian food is about to experience its heyday, and with Lundy’s lush stories about the region’s culinary narrative, you’ll come to crave the corn, braising greens and shuck beans that come with it. The desserts are particularly alluring, like gingerbread that uses black walnuts and the ‘sorghum sea foam’ frosting on top of chocolate-blackberry jam layer cake.”

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As Jane Black pointed out in the Washington Post’s rave review of Lundy’s latest, “Today, I’ve rarely seen real green beans outside of Appalachia. It’s the last place in the country where people demand them.” She adds, “to call it a cookbook seems almost unfair.” Lundy’s books (Sorghum’s Savor; Butter Beans to Blackberries; The Festive Table; and Shuck Beans, Stack Cakes and Honest Fried Chicken) are not so much cookbooks as they are anthropology, and Victuals is no exception. Lundy says, “I would have to own that while I love to cook, recipe is not my primary interest in writing about food. I am profoundly grateful to those for whom it is and for their work, which informs mine, and I try to live up to good practice and honor great cooking when it comes to writing recipes, but I am as interested as much in why we are doing what we’re doing when we stand at the stove as the how. And that interest is personal, political, sociological and extremely historical. The great thing in writing about food (and the secret subtext hidden in many recipes) is its revelation of the voices of people who traditionally have not been consulted when history is told—even their own history. Recipe and cookbooks are where we hear what women’s lives were actually like in different eras, and what constituted daily life for the family. If you want to look at it in those terms, in food we learn the experiences of the humble, the poor and the outcast as well as those who have it made. Food is an easy door into strange cultures and stories. Plus you get to eat while you’re doing all that research.”

C

ookbook author Kendra Bailey Morris

writes, “Ronni Lundy’s Victuals is a beautiful testament to Appalachian food and culture. If you want to learn more about this region, especially from a culinary, historical, social context,

this is your read. Oh, and recipes—pepperoni rolls, chili dawgs, fried pies, pea salad, fried chicken and white gravy. Almost heaven, indeed!” Of the “chili dawgs,” Eastern Kentucky natives need not fear that their beloved chili buns have been neglected. Lundy points out that the book includes “a big full color photo of Chili Bun with upstart Slaw Dogs on p. 99 and a lovingly crafted recipe for Chili Bun Chili along with tips for picking the right bun. PLUS my version of what should be the city seal of Corbin, rendered by brilliant tattoo artist Ash Swain, on the front end pages. Three pool cues crossed representing Nevels, The Dixie, and The Fad.” Last fall’s book tour took her to Kentucky haunts like 610 Magnolia in Louisville and Morris Book Shop, before it closed. Now she’s taking a few victory laps, with multiple signings and appearances.


FEATURE

Ronni Lundy:

From corn bread to James Beard

A native of Corbin, Kentucky, Ronni Lundy grew up in Louisville, and is the author of Sorghum’s Savor; Butter Beans to Blackberries; The Festive Table; and Shuck Beans, Stack Cakes and Honest Fried Chicken. Her landmark Esquire essay, The Tao of Cornbread, began with the line, “If God had meant for cornbread to have sugar in it, he’d have called it cake.”

Lundy attended the University of Kentucky during the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, “three sophomore years,” as she puts it, one of the school’s more creatively fertile periods. Lundy wrote about both music and food for the Courier Journal after she returned to Kentucky from New Mexico, but was far from a typical restaurant critic, acknowledging, “I was a little unusual in that I actually worked in restaurants for 12 years, front and some back of the house, before I started writing. I think that gave me a knowledge of how things worked, a little more compassion when they went wrong and more genuine excitement when someone nailed it. I still take that with me to restaurants and

I’m still pretty aware of what is going on around me/under the surface. I am less interested in being entertained by food these days than a critic can be, hallelujah. I’m more interested in being nourished by something real on the plate and something genuine in the people and experience. One thing that hasn’t changed is that I have little patience with disinterested service and none with haughty - which is sadly too much the norm.” She has served as a music and food critic at Louisville’s Courier Journal; editor of Louisville Magazine; and editor of Cornbread Nation 3: Foods of the Mountain South. She has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Foodways Alliance.

High Praise for Victuals

By RL REEVES JR On January 2nd of this year we penned “2016 Cookbook Of The Year Award Goes To ‘Victuals’ By Ronni Lundy. The James Beard people took our lead and ran with it, and Ms Lundy’s ‘Victuals’ won first place in the ‘American Cooking’ book category. Congratulations to Ms. Lundy. Now go out there and eat a chili bun to help the Corbin native celebrate. Here’s what we said in January: We get dozens of cookbooks shipped to us in the mail for review here. It’s part of the job. We rifle through all of them, and if we’re lucky, we get one good recipe out of each work. But once or twice a year we get a cookbook that has dozens of good recipes, and if we’re really lucky, the tales that go along with the formulae are just as compelling. Enter Ronni Lundy. In 2016, the Kentucky native published (Clarkson Potter) ‘Victuals’ which has quickly become one of our most prized possessions. Over the course of some 300 pages, Lundy speaks eloquently on her life as a writer and adventurer with deep Appalachian roots.

But we’re mainly in it for the recipes. While we love a good tale or backstory, the reason we routinely hit flea markets, book stores, and garage sales is to add to our absurdly big recipe collection. Without good recipes, a cookbook is a naked fraud. We hit the ground running for our range when we saw that Lundy had included Colcannon in her repertoire. We know this dish as stamppot but the gist is the same: creamy, rich potatoes are enlivened with fresh, sauteed greens. We’ve crisscrossed Amsterdam for 20+ years looking for the best version of stamppot, and this recipe is a fine take. We have a big sack of ‘leather britches’ or dried, shuck beans sitting on our kitchen table right now. They were a final gift from Mom before she left this firmament last October. Lundy’s recipe is easy once the hard work of drying the beans is done. Back home in Knox County, we routinely ate our body weight in this classic mountain dish. You couldn’t hire us to eat pickled baloney when we were kids. Fried

baloney or no baloney was our cri du coeur. Anything else would have just been so much phonus balonus. But as adults our tastebuds have tempered somewhat. We haven’t tackled Lundy’s Pickled Baloney with Peppers recipe just yet but we are casting an eye toward doing so sometime this year. Perfect fried chicken is every selfrespecting Kentuckian’s birthright. More chicken is fried up each year in the state of Kentucky than all other southern states combined. Kentucky produces 1.6 billion pounds of broiler chickens each year which lands us one notch below Texas (which is nearly 7 times larger in landmass). We laud Ms Lundy for contributing her fried chicken recipe to this volume, and it’s a good one. We’ve never tried ‘lid-on’ fried chicken so we’re looking forward to learning a new technique in 2017. To be great, a cookbook has to be more than just a compendium of good recipes. It has to have stories woven into the receipts. And this is truly where Lundy shines. While her formulae are sound

it’s her narrative tales that drive the book. While reading ‘Victuals’ it’s as though Miss Ronni is sitting on the other end of the couch with a stiff drink chatting excitedly about bootleggers, corn growers, chili buns, and tattooed ruffians who have most likely taken up the cooking trade to stay out of the pen. Once we picked this book up, we weren’t able to put it down til suppertime, and starvation finally wrenched us off the sofa. We expect another avalanche of cookbooks to arrive this year, but it will take one hell of an author to knock Ronni Lundy off her perch as queen.

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NEWS

InstaCart Express will be launching delivery service for their Instacart Express membership program in Lexington through popular local stores, including Costco, Kroger, Whole Foods Market, Petco and Meijer. Instacart Express offers unlimited same day, one-hour deliveries. The delivery area will cover over 285K households. Le Petite Delicat closed its South Ashland location on Easter Saturday (recently bulldozed to make way for more Kroger parking) and is open at its new location at 722 National Avenue. Macaron classes will continue at the new location. Lexington Craft Beer Week 2017 is Friday, May 12 through Sunday, May 21. Real Hamburger has opened in the former Table 310 location on Short Street. Sam’s Hot Dog Stand has reopened in downtown Lexington, under new ownership, and after a major renovation. Shake Shack will officially open its first-ever Kentucky Shack on Thursday, May 11 in the Summit at Fritz Farm. Vinaigrette is expected to open its Hamburg location in May. EVENTS Saturday, May 6

“Growing Community - Learn to Grow Vegetables,” a special event at the Fayette County Extension Service at 1140 Harry Sykes Way, is Saturday, May 6, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more

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Food Fest featuring Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale and Kentucky Vanilla Barrel Cream Ale. Kentucky Wine & Vine Fest from 10 am to 7 p.m. in downtown Nicholasville. There will be over a dozen Kentucky Winery booths offering wine tastings, an art walk, food trucks, arts and crafts, and cooking with Kentucky wine demonstrations with locally-renowned chefs. Sunday, May 14

Tchoupitoulas, located at 1401 North Forbes Road, has new hours for dinner service. The restaurant features a continental and Cajun menu. information, go to www.fayette.ca.uky. edu Saturday, May 13

Kick @$$ Kentucky Day at 3 p.m. at Country Boy. In honor of Craft Beer Week, Country Boy teams up with Kentucky for Kentucky to offer limited edition co-branded merch at 3 pm; tapping of a Chocolate Walnut Black Gold Porter at 5 pm; Kentucky themed trivia at 7 pm. Yamaguchi’s Noodle Tent will be serving on-site during the event. Trivia and Alltech Tap Spotlight from 4 - 8 pm at Jax Lexington Green. There will be beer themed trivia and tickets to the Alltech Craft Brews and

Cheers to Mother’s Day! Blue Stallion Brewing hosts a Mother’s Day brunch special all day. There will be beer-mosas, micheladas, and nitro cold brew coffee from Archetype Coffee. Friday May 19

Ciders and Sliders at Pivot Brewing Company (Lexington Craft Beer Week) Saturday, May 20

The Alltech Craft Brews and Food Fest, noon until 8 p.m., Lexington Convention Center. There will be over 50 breweries, 175 beers, and an expanded food section with plenty of local and Kentucky Proud options.

Monday, May 22

The Bourbon Social Series: Progressive Dinner is Monday, May 22 from 5:30 until 7:30 p.m. at various locations across the city, Experience a six-course meal from some of Lexington’s favorite chefs with a unique course, each paired with a different bourbon. First course - Grillfish; second course - Crust; third course - TBA; fourth course Carson’s Food & Drink; fifth course - Sorella Gelateria; and sixth course Metropolitan Donuts. Once tickets are purchased, an email will be sent to you to select your start time/limo choice. Info, www.thebourbonsocial.com. Wednesday, May 24

“Harvest for Horses,” a farmto-table experience to benefit the Kentucky Equine Humane Center is Wednesday, May 24. Dinner will also feature live acoustic music, a wine and bourbon auction, and more.

Sunday, May 21

Cupcake and Beer Pairing, five cupcakes with five flights of beer, Rock House Brewing. The Fourth Annual Beer Cheese Contest is at Country Boy from 1 to 5 p.m. There will be 50+ beer cheese recipes from local cooks and vote for your favorite to help crown a winner.

To submit a Lexington, Kentucky food, wine, or spirits news item for consideration in Ace’s Best Bites, email acelist@aceweekly.com. To submit a Lexington Food, Wine, or Spirits Event to be considered for the Ace calendar, please go to the Ace online calendar, and click “Submit” (upper right on the Menu bar). For restaurant advertising, call Ace Advertising at 859.225.4889 x229.


FOOD

By Tom Yates

Get ramped up Spring treasures won’t be around long

R

amps are the fleeting darlings of the early spring farmers’ market. With a very short three to four week growing season, they’re usually the first thing to arrive at the market and the first to go. Blink and they’re gone. Members of the allium genus, ramps are also referred to as wild onions, wild leeks, or wild garlic. With feathery leafy tops and long purplish stems, they have a pronounced garlic aroma with a strong onion flavor, making them interchangeable with both garlic and onions in most recipes. If you run across ramps at the market, catch them while you can. I got lucky. Red River Farm had buckets of gorgeous ramps at the Lexington Farmers’ Market. Even with their beautiful leafy tops fluttering in the morning breeze, most of the people in line were buying eggs and bacon. I filled my bag with ramps. I toyed with the notion of tossing the ramps over burning coals to char before serving them on newspaper like Spanish colcotes (early spring green onions) with a ruddy Romesco sauce. In the end, I went with a very simple spring soup. Chilled Ramp Soup with Blackened Sea Scallops. Typically, ramps are a bear to clean. They’re usually covered in crud and

take time to prep. Because they stored them in buckets of water to keep them fresh, the ramps from Red River Farm were almost pre-prepped and ready to go. I simply snipped the roots from the bulbs and gave them a quick rinse. After slicing the greens from the stems, I set them aside before roughly chopping the stems and bulbs. After heating a skillet over a medium high flame, I sauteed the ramp stems in a combination of olive oil and butter.

When they started to caramelize, I deglazed the pan with 1/2 white wine, let it reduce by half, and added 2 cups chicken stock. I brought the stock to a boil, reduced the heat, and added 2 peeled and chopped Elmwood Stock Farm new potatoes. While the potatoes simmered away in the ramp stock, I blanched the ramp greens along with a handful of fresh spinach (in heavily salted water) for exactly 45 seconds before plunging them into a salted icewater bath. When the potatoes were tender, I scooped them into a blender along with the cooked ramps, stock, and drained greens. After adding 1/4 cup parmigiano reggiano cheese, a splash of fresh lemon juice, salt, and white pepper, I blitzed the soup into a verdant puree before sliding it into the

refrigerator to chill. I wanted the scallops to have bite. To counter and play off of the delicate spring ramps. I slid a small cast iron skillet over a blazing hot flame. When it started to smoke, I added a whisper of oil to the pan, dredged the dried scallops in cajun seasonings, blackened them on each side for 90 seconds, scooped them out of the smoky mess, and set them aside. I ladled the chilled ramp soup into shallow bowls and nestled the blackened scallops into the center of each bowl before topping them with slivers of mango, red bell pepper, and shallots. After scattering Garey Farms micro mizzuna and arugula over the scallops, I finished with a few drops extra virgin olive oil. Simple. Bright. Light. Fabulous.

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Live Music - May 2017 MONDAY, MAY 1

Crown Larks and Doctor Girlfriend, TBA, Best Friend Bar

Jazz Live at the Library, 7 p.m., Farish Theater

FRIDAY, MAY 12

TUESDAY, MAY 2

Big Band and Jazz 2017, 7 p.m., Moondance Amphitheatre

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3

Angela Perley and The Howlin’ Moons, 8 p.m., The Burl

THURSDAY, MAY 4

Elizabeth Cook/ Maggie Lander/Darin Bradbury, 8 p.m., The Burl Shock Theatre, 9 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s Granger Smith/Dylan Schneider, 7 p.m., Manchester Music Hall

Wicked Peace, 7 p.m., Break Room Haas Kowert Tice, 8 p.m., The Burl Sandor Blue, 7 p.m., Cheapside Bar and Grill Wax Fang/Johnny Conqueroo/B R E N D A, 9 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s Sundy Best, 7 p.m., Manchester Music Hall Gershwin & Tao, 7:30 p.m., Singletary Center SATURDAY, MAY 13

FRIDAY, MAY 5

The Loaded Nuns/Vigodas/ Lovely Grandmas, 9 p.m., Best Friend Bar Tyler Childers/ Luna and The Mountain Jets/ Geno Seale, 8 p.m., The Burl Town Mountain, 9 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s Triple Run, 6:30 p.m., Mirror Twin Brewing Andrew Leahey and The Homestead, 9 p.m., Willie’s Locally Known

TUESDAY, MAY 16

North by North, TBA, Al’s Bar Jason Kutchma, 9 p.m.,The Burl The Blasters, 9 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s Red Hot Chili Peppers, 7 p.m. at the KFC Yum Center In Louisville.

SATURDAY, MAY 6

Dan Conn/ Derek Spencer/ Kevin Dalton, 8 p.m., The Burl Suny Cheeba/ Paul K and The Killer Elite, 10 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s Celtic Woman, 8 p.m. at the EKU Center for The Arts. Triple Run, 1 p.m., Keeneland

WEDNESDAY, MAY 17

GLADYS KNIGHT

SUNDAY, MAY 7

Ordinary Elephant/Sam Gleaves/Nicholas Penn, 7 p.m., The Burl MONDAY, MAY 8

Shaun Martin, 10 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s Big Band and Jazz Concert Series, 7 p.m., Ecton Park Woodsongs with Peter Rowan and John Jorgenson, 6:45 p.m., Lyric Theatre WEDNESDAY, MAY 10

Tom Boone, 12:00, The Burl

THURSDAY, MAY 11

Coralee and The Townies, 8 p.m., The Burl

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Mike The Prophet/Late Day Sons, 8 p.m., Al’s Sidecar White Reaper/Twin Peaks, TBA, The Burl Born Cross Eyed, 10 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s Morgan Alexander, 4 p.m., Talon Winery

Lara Hope and The Arktones/ Danny Dean/ NP Presley, 10 p.m., The Burl THURSDAY, MAY 18

Warren Byrom & the Fabled Canelands, 8 p.m., The Burl Holy Rivals/Shawnthony Calypso/Loaded Barrel, 9 p.m., Green Lantern Darrell Scott, 9 p.m., Willie’s Locally Known FRIDAY, MAY 19

Bendigo Fletcher/O.n.a./Short, 8 p.m., The Burl The Moonshiners Ball 2017 featuring Margaret Glaspy/ Lydia Loveless/Vandaveer/That 1 Guy/The Marcus King Band/Con Brio/Aaron Lee Tasjan/Blackfoot Gypsies (continues through Sunday. The Red Lick Valley, Irvine SATURDAY, MAY 20

Stephanie Quayle/Lucas Hoge, TBA, Big Whiskey

Joslyn, 8 p.m., The Burl Gladys Knight, 7:30 p.m., EKU Center for The Arts Rock ‘n Soul Pops, 7:30 p.m., Lexington Opera House Hadley Kennary, 4 p.m., Talon Winery

SUNDAY, MAY 21

Deception Past, TBA., Al’s Bar J Roddy Walston & the Business,/The Quaker City Night Hawks, TBA, The Burl The Legendary Shack Shakers/ Jesse Dayton, 10 p.m., Cosmic Charlie’s NEGRA-official/Room 101, TBA MONDAY, MAY 22

The Big Drops, 8 p.m., The Burl Woodsongs featuring Six-String Solders and Pentagon Winds, 6:45 p.m., Lyric Theatre TUESDAY, MAY 23

What’s Missing and Non-Compliant/Forever Strong/ Two Houses, 8 p.m., The Burl WEDNESDAY, MAY 24

Michael Barr, 8 p.m., The Burl

THURSDAY, MAY 25

Sway, 9 p.m., The Burl George Thorogood and the Destroyers, 7:30 p.m. Lexington Opera House FRIDAY, MAY 26

Vandoliers, 7 p.m., The Burl Grits and Soul, 9 p.m., The Burl The Giving Tree Band, 8 p.m., Willie’s Locally Known

SATURDAY, MAY 27

Ancient Warfare/Twin Limb, 9 p.m., The Burl Jim Lauderdale, 9 p.m., Willie’s Locally Known

SUNDAY, MAY 28

Roger Waters, 8 p.m., KFC Yum Center

MONDAY, MAY 29

Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour, 6:45 p.m., Lyric Theatre Southland Jamboree, 7 p.m., Southland Drive

TUESDAY, MAY 30

Franz Ferdinand, 8 p.m., Mercury Ballroom, Louisville


Free Will Astrology

By Rob Brezsny

ARIES (March 21–April 19): I have misgivings when I witness bears riding bicycles or tigers dancing on their hind legs or Aries people wielding diplomatic phrases and making careful compromises at committee meetings. Take advantage of opportunities to make deals and forge winwin situations. But also keep a part of your fiery heart untamed. Don’t let people think they’ve got you all figured out. TAURUS (April 20–May 20): “One of the advantages of being disorderly,” said author A.A. Milne, “is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.” I must suggest that you consider experimenting with jaunty, rambunctious behavior in the coming days, even if it generates some disorder. The potential reward? Exciting discoveries, of course. GEMINI (May 21–June 20): According to my reading of the astrological omens, it’s time for you to take a break from the magic you have been weaving since your birthday in 2016. That’s why I’m suggesting that you go on a brief sabbatical. The hard work you’ve done should be balanced by an extended regimen of relaxed playtime. CANCER (June 21–July 22): Apparently, a lot of kids in the UK don’t like to eat vegetables. In response, food researchers in that country marketed a variety of exotic variations designed to appeal to their palate. Be imaginative as you expand the range of what your colleagues and clientele have to choose from. LEO (July 23–Aug 22): Many of us never succeed in becoming ourselves. Luckily for you, Leo, in the coming weeks and months you will have an unprecedented chance to become more of who you really are. To expedite the process, work on dissolving any attraction you might have to acting like someone other than yourself. VIRGO (Aug 23–Sept 22): On numerous occasions, French acrobat Charles Blondin walked across a tightrope that spanned the gorge near Niagara Falls. His cable was three and a quarter inches in diameter, 1,100 feet long, and 160 feet above the Niagara River. Once he made the entire crossing by doing backflips and somersaults. Now would be an excellent time for you to carry out your personal equivalent of his feats, Virgo. What daring actions have you never tried before even though you’ve been sufficiently trained or educated to perform them well? LIBRA (Sept 23–Oct 22): Ready for some subterranean journeys? They may not involve literal explorations of deep caverns and ancient tunnels and underground streams. But then again, you might. At the very least, you will encounter metaphorical versions of some of the above.

What mysteries would you love to solve? What secrets would be fun to uncover? What shadows would you be excited to illuminate?

SCORPIO (Oct 23–Nov 21): Why would you guzzle mind-clouding moonshine when you will eventually get a chance to sip a heart-reviving tonic? Why spoil your appetite by loading up on non-nutritious hors d’oeuvres when a healthy feast will be available sooner than you imagine? I advise you to suppress your compulsion for immediate gratification. It may seem impossible for you to summon such heroic patience, but I know you can. And in the long run, you’ll be happy if you do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22–Dec 21): “You’ll always be my favorite what-if.” Many years ago, I heard that phrase whispered in my ear. It came from the mouth of a wonderful-but-impossible woman. It allowed us to move on with our lives and pursue other dreams that were more realistic and productive. I invite you to consider triggering a liberation like that sometime soon.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22–Jan 19): I’d love to see you increase the number of people, places, and experiences you love, as well as the wise intensity with which you love them. From an astrological perspective, now is an excellent time to upgrade your appreciation and adoration for the whole world and everything in it. To get you in the mood, I’ll call your attention to some unfamiliar forms of ardor you may want to pursue: eraunophilia, an attraction to thunder and lightning; cymophilia, a fascination with waves and waviness; chorophilia, a passion for dancing; asymmetrophilia, a zeal for asymmetrical things; sapiophilia, an erotic enchantment with intelligence.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20–Feb 18): You could build a sacred crazy altar in your bedroom where you will conduct rituals of playful liberation. Or how about this? Acquire a kit that enables you to create spontaneous poetry on your refrigerator door using tiny magnets with evocative words written on them. Can you think of other ideas to revitalize your home environment? It’s high time you did so. PISCES (Feb 19–March 20): Texas has the third-highest rate of teenage pregnancies. Uncoincidentally, sex education in Texas is steeped in ignorance. In the coming weeks, Pisces, you can’t afford to be as deprived of the truth as those kids. Even more than usual, you need accurate information that’s tailored to your precise needs, not fake news or ideological delusions or selfserving propaganda. Make sure you gather insight and wisdom from the very best sources. That’s how you’ll avoid behavior that’s irrelevant to your life goals. That’s how you’ll attract experiences that serve your highest good. recommended

mail resume to: Cypress Semiconductor Corp., Attn: AMMO, 198 Champion Court, M.S. 6.1, San Jose, CA 95134.

HELP WANTED AUTOMATION MANAGER for Consultant Solutions, Inc. (Lexington, KY) - Create, debug & install electrical designs for manufacturing equipment. Extensive travel (up to 50%), national & international, & extended work days & week-end work. Reqs. incl. BS deg. in Electrical Eng’g, Electronics Eng’g, or rel.; & 5 yrs exp. as an Automation Mgrr, or rel. electrical design, engineering & manufacturing occupation; which must incl. some exp. w/ Hardwire electrical design & debug; Toyopuc PLC design & debug; Safety PLC design & debug; HMI design & debug; IO Draw; Unidraf & robotic programming; & knowledge of the localized complexity of global Toyota Customer Specifications & Requirements. In lieu of a BS deg. & 5 yrs. exp., employer will accept 7 yrs of exp. Mail resumes to: CSI Group, Attn: Maryanne Inman, 700 Allenridge Pt, Lexington KY 40510.

Engineering/ Technology Cypress Semiconductor Corporation, leading provider of high-performance, mixedsignal, programmable solutions, has an opening in Lexington, KY for a CAD Engineer Senior (CDE01): Assist the CAD team in developing and maintaining software tools that assist the integrated circuit design process and product data management. Reference job code and

Tempur-Pedic Management LLC seeks Sr Business Intelligence Analyst in Lexington, KY, to lead & participate in all IT solutions life cycle phases. Req MS + 4 yrs or BS + 6 yrs. Add’l specific exp req’d. Mail resumes to Kelly Carter at Tempur-Pedic Management LLC, 1000 Tempur Way, Lexington, KY  40511 w/job title in subject line. Senior Engineering Specialist (Lexington, KY) Dsgn & monitoring performance of storm water infrastructures such as detention basins, permeable pavements, & underground detention basins. Work w/ HEC-RAS & HEC-HMS comp s/ware. Observe & supv construction phase & monitor effectiveness of these infrastructures upon completion. Perform site investigations & supv drilling operations & collect & analyze samples from soil to prepare Geo-technical soil reports & recommendations. Work w/ Geotechnical s/ware such as GSTABL, GSLOPE, & gINT. Reqmts: Master’s deg in Civil Engg or Geotechnical Engg or closely related. 30% of travel to clients sites w/in state of KY reqd. Mail resume to: Vision Engineering, Attn: J. Hallany, Engineering Specialist, 128 E. Reynolds Rd, Ste 150, Lexington, KY 40517

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Real Estate

REAL ESTATE: Properties recently sold in Fayette Co. 40502 Mar 20 Mar 06 Mar 13 Mar 17 Mar 16 Mar 20 Mar 21 Mar 16

1800 BON AIR DR 744 COTTAGE GROVE LN 650 MONTCLAIR DR 303 DUKE RD 253 LEAWOOD DR 370 LINCOLN AVE 519 CENTRAL AVE 3075 WINDERMERE RD

Jan 12 Mar 14 Mar 24 Mar 23 Mar 15 Mar 17 Mar 24 Mar 13 Mar 24 Mar 17 Mar 21

40503 3072 BLENHEIM WAY $200,000 2872 MIDDLESEX WAY $183,000 3415 WINTHROP DR $181,500 491 OSPREY CIR $168,800 324 BROADLEAF LN $163,000 2411 MAPLEWOOD DR $150,700 600 VINCENT WAY UNIT 1101 $140,000 600 VINCENT WAY UNIT 2202 $138,000 327 SHERIDAN DR $120,000 143 REGENCY POINT PATH $99,900 2121 NICHOLASVILLE RD $71,000

Mar 16 Jan 27

40504 1143 ATHENIA DR 2048 FALLON RD

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$800,000 $623,500 $335,000 $315,000 $175,000 $93,155 $0 $0

$284,500 $270,000

Mar 17 Mar 15 Mar 21 Mar 15 Mar 23

739 DELLA DR 872 LAUREL HILL RD 1150 HORSEMANS LN 1621 BRITTANY LN 755 TERRACE VIEW DR

$155,000 $130,000 $90,000 $80,050 $70,000

Mar 30 Mar 26 Mar 27 Mar 17 Apr 06 Mar 21 Mar 17 Mar 24 Mar 24 Mar 28 Mar 10 Mar 30 Mar 31 Mar 10 Mar 30 Mar 20 Jan 06 Mar 27 Mar 15

40505 645 BELLCASTLE RD 533 BRYANWOOD PKWY 231 BEVERLY AVE 1509 FT SUMTER CT 1701 KNOXVILLE CT 1853 GAYLE DR 2371 PIERSON DR 1704 NEW ORLEANS CT 504 ANNISTON DR 955 DAYTON AVE 653 DARTMOOR DR 128 WITHERS AVE 1709 KNOXVILLE CT 1718 RALEIGH RD 562 SANDALWOOD DR 1904 MARIETTA DR 575 FREEMAN DR 810 MARCELLUS DR 231 E LOUDON AVE

$186,900 $185,000 $170.000 $135,000 $135,000 $125,000 $117,500 $112,000 $101,500 $99,000 $95,000 $96,500 $94,000 $88,900 $80,000 $75,000 $61,000 $53,334 $50,000

Apr 07 Mar 20 Mar 23 Apr 03 Mar 24 Apr 06 Mar 15

1418 EDGELAWN AVE 1017 BRYAN AVE 107 GLASS AVE 544 CRICKLEWOOD DR 918 DELAWARE AVE 417 E LOUDON AVE 510 SANDALWOOD DR

$45,100 $40,000 $15,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

Mar 24 Mar 17

40507 247 N MILL ST 350 E SHORT ST UNIT 304

Mar 24 Mar 20 Mar 02

40508 250 S MARTIN LUTHER KING $125,000 439 OHIO ST $19,000 1104 LIGGETT ST $0

Mar 08 Mar 06 Mar 24 Apr 03 Mar 31 Apr 03 Mar 30 Mar 30

40509 3033 BOBWHITE TRL $1,297,000 1128 CHETFORD DR $543,500 2449 CORONEO LN $504,000 2581 PASCOLI PL $455,000 552 WINTER HILL LN $350,000 1035 HADDRELL PT $347,900 801 LOCHMERE PL $342,000 3025 FALLING LEAVES LN $319,000

$875,000 $340,000


Home and Garden

Tuesday, May 2

Sunday, May 7

The Fayette County Extension Service will host the “Growing Great Tomatoes - Mini Food for Thought Tasting” workshop Tuesday, May 2 at 6:30 p.m. Scheduled to coincide with Gardener’s Toolbox classes taught by Jamie Dockery, Fayette County Extension Agent for Horticulture.

The Springtime Native Plant Garden Tour is Sunday, May 7 from noon until 5 p.m. at various locations across Lexington. Features on this year’s tour include spring flowering native plants, shade gardens, a ‘wabi sabi’ garden and the Michler’s Cafe garden. The tour can start at any of the gardens, where tickets with a brochure and map are available. Info, lexington.wildones.org

Thursday, May 4 The Wild Ones Plant Exchange and Fundraiser is May 4 at St Michael’s Church from 7 until 9 p.m. Everything from seeds, perennials, and grasses to shrubs, trees, and vines can be exchanged at this event. The only stipulation is that the plants must be native to the Eastern United States, but cultivars of a native plant are also acceptable.

Thursday, May 11

Saturday, May 6

Saturday, May 13

“Growing Community - Learn to Grow Vegetables,” a special event at the Fayette County Extension Service will be held Saturday, May 6, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be hourly drawings for garden tool door prizes. There will be a free garden kit available on a first come, first served basis with one kit per family. For more information, go to www. fayette.ca.uky.edu

The Down to Earth Garden Club Plant Sale is May 13 from 9 a.m. until noon at the Woodland Christian Church. Money raised will be donated to local projects that promote gardening, education, preservation, conservation and environmental stewardship.

The Fayette County Extension Service will be hosting a Lunch and Learn session “Saving Water at Home,” Thursday, May 11, starting at noon. Guests are asked to bring their own lunch. Drinks will be provided. Call 859.257.5582 to register.

The Bluegrass Iris Society Show is Saturday, May 13 at Lexington Green Mall, starting at 10 a.m. This

year marks 50 years of Bluegrass Iris Society and in celebration, the organization is hosting a special show. For more information, go to www.bluegrassiris.org. Residents of Fayette County my collect up to one truckload of free mulch Saturday, May 13 from 8 a.m. to noon at the 1631 Old Frankfort Pike. The mulch is distributed on a first come, first served basis while supplies last.

Tuesday, May 16 The name of this workshop - Hens and Chicks refers to succulent sempervivums and not poultry this time. The event will be held Tuesday, May 16, at 6:30 p.m. at the Fayette County Extension Service. Many gardeners are familiar with these little evergreen rosettes and how incredibly durable they are. They work great in succulent planters and areas with poor, dry soil. For more information or to register, call 859.257.5582.

Saturday, May 20 The Kitchens of The Bluegrass Tour is Saturday, May 20 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, April 21 from 1 until 5 p.m at various sites across Lexington. The 16th annual Kitchens of the Bluegrass Tour will feature unique designs, appliances, gadgets, and creative solutions to inspire kitchen projects.

REAL ESTATE: Properties recently sold in Fayette Co. Mar 31 Mar 24 Mar 31 Mar 22 Mar 31 Mar 02 Mar 24 Mar 31 Mar 31 Mar 30 Apr 03 Mar 10 Mar 28 Mar 24 Mar 24 Mar 17 Mar 23 Mar 31 Mar 15 Apr 04 Mar 23 Mar 22 Mar 22 Mar 28 Mar 31 Mar 21

4484 LOGANS FORT LN 953 JOUETT CREEK DR 3500 JACOB CT 989 STAR SHOOT PKWY 213 HANNAH TODD PL 3296 SWEET CLOVER LN 4752 LARKHILL LN 4460 STUART HALL BLVD 3349 MATHERN TRL 500 VONBRYAN TRCE 3664 IRON LACE DR 3140 TIMBERNECK CV 781 GRAFTONS MILL LN 3144 ROUNDWAY DOWN LN 3393 TYLER CT 2280 MARKET GARDEN LN 556 WILDERNESS RD 1100 MORNING SIDE DR 1224 IRON LACE CT 788 RIDGEBROOK CIR 815 MICKEY LN 2488 PASCOLI PL 321 PEACHTREE RD 419 DABNEY DR 2408 WINDWOOD CT 349 SHADOW GLEN CT

$310,000 $299,900 $287,525 $280,000 $245,000 $244,900 $240,000 $222,500 $219,900 $188,000 $175,000 $170,000 $160,000 $160,000 $156,000 $149,000 $145,000 $140,000 $129,900 $128,000 $115,000 $105,900 $102,500 $78,000 $65,000 $56,000

Apr 06 Mar 22 Apr 06 Mar 02 Mar 16

288 HEDGEWOOD CT 285 HEDGEWOOD CT 3109 GLENWOOD DR 262 OSAGE CT 316 WOODCROSS PL

Mar 20 Mar 20 Mar 20 Mar 27 Mar 20 Mar 24 Mar 24 Mar 24 Mar 06 Mar 24 Mar 06 Mar 23

40511 2931 EMINENT DR 3020 OUR TIBBS TRL 2624 KEARNEY CREEK LN 253 LONG BRANCH LN 3028 SANDERSVILLE RD 2704 ELLA RAE CT 181 ANGEL FALLS DR 3097 PRICHARD DR 236 STALLION RUN 228 SPRINTERS TRL 225 BLACK WATER LN 2312 REMINGTON WAY

$301,500 $247,508 $216,200 $187,500 $180,000 $175,000 $155,000 $150,900 $150,000 $140,000 $139,000 $111,500

Mar 17 Mar 20 Mar 17

40513 2136 CAROLINA LN 3012 OLD FIELD WAY 3262 BEAUMONT CENTRE

$513,500 $460,000 $305,000

40514

$39,900 $30,000 $0 $0 $0

Mar 07 Mar 21 Mar 24

2017 PLANTERS CT 3877 ARIA LN 316 TWIN SPIRES TRL

$240,000 $165,000 $98,000

Mar 14 Mar 17 Mar 24 Mar 17 Mar 24 Mar 22 Mar 17 Mar 13 Jan 26

40515 193 SOMERSLY PL 573 ALDERBROOK WAY 945 WOODGLEN CT 1708 FARMVIEW DR 517 SOUTHPOINT DR 1572 SPRINGFIELD DR 3481 COLONNADE DR 4015 WINNEPEG WAY 199 S EAGLE CREEK DR

$455,000 $349,900 $206,000 $201,000 $187,000 $126,500 $117,000 $92,000 $74,000

Mar 24 Mar 17 Mar 17 Mar 17 Mar 17 Mar 21 Mar 20 Mar 21 Mar 03 Mar 24

40517 1104 CLOVELLY CT 3453 DIXIANA DR 3341 DOWNING PL 3654 LEISURE CREEK CT 3577 GALAHAD DR 1145 APPIAN CROSSING 3593 OLYMPIA RD 3617 OLYMPIA CIR 1217 OCTAVIAN CIR 3556 KING ARTHUR DR

$204,900 $145,000 $145,000 $117,500 $107,500 $104,000 $100,500 $70,000 $52,500 $0

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16 aceweekly.com May 2017

Ace May 2017  

Lifestyle and entertainment magazine for Lexington, Kentucky.

Ace May 2017  

Lifestyle and entertainment magazine for Lexington, Kentucky.

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