Ace August 2016

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WALKING HOME ROBERT KIRKMAN RETURNS

TO KENTUCKY ROOTS page 6

AUGUST

CENTERFOLD

CALENDAR

“Kentucky is a beautiful, wonderful place and in no way inspired the zombie apocalypse ...

ROBERT KIRKMAN WALKING DEAD CREATOR


2 aceweekly.com August 2016


8 Calendar 12 Gigs August 2016 Volume 27, Number 8

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CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tread Editorial Assistant Atanas Golev Contributing writers (online + print) Evan O. Albert, Kenny Colston, Kevin Faris, Brian Gardner, Brian Powers, Raj Ranade, Nick Stump, Kakie Urch, Heather C. Watson, Tom Yates —— Intern Megan Friday —— Display Advertising 859.225.4889, ext. 235 ads@aceweekly.com Classified Advertising 859.225.4889, ext. 237 —— ACE is not responsible for unsolicited materials. ACE is published 24 times a year. COP Y R IGH T © 2016 We love mail! Send Letters to the Editor: editor@aceweekly.com 250 words or less. Include full name and daytime phone. To submit a calendar listing for consideration, email acelist@aceweekly.com. —— Display Ad deadlines are every Friday for the next week’s issue: Email ads@aceweekly.com. Space reservation, production art, and payment should be delivered no later than Fridays by Noon

Astrology Ace Classifieds

in this issue August, 2016

EDITRIX Rhonda Reeves

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VOLUME 27, ISSUE 8

ACEWEEKLY.COM

on the cover p6 WALKING HOME

Kirkman returns to his ole Kentucky home. Photo by Megan Mack

features P4 OUT AND ABOUT

Pics from Lexington Restaurant Week, Freedom Fest, Lexington Women Chefs Farmers Market Dinner, and Lexington Ballet Pop Up Performance

a&e p10 EAT August: Lexington Restaurant News p11 THE ART OF FOOD It’s a great time for blackberries p14 REAL ESTATE

What sold, where, and for how much?

p15 HOME AND GARDEN

Campaign benefits the Arboretum

Distribution ACE is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft. Ace racks and boxes are private property. Distribution of any other publications in an Ace rack or Ace box constitutes criminal trespass (trespass includes but is not limited to: college publications, Yard Sale flyers, tagging, and so on).

3 aceweekly.com August 2016


PHOTOS

out & about with

ace

Chef Jeremy Ashby preparing sub-zero peaches.

Lexington Restaurant Week kickoff Mayor Jim Gray and Connie Jo Miller

Bernie and Sylvia Lovely of Azur. Tom and M.J. Rogers from Clawdaddy’s

Council Member James Brown presents LFUCG employee Jackie French with the “Jackie French Day” proclamation for 38 years of service at Parks and Rec during the recent Super Sunday basketball showcase.

The Lexington Ballet pop up performance Volunteers with Freedom Fest.

Celebrity Chef Elizabeth Faulkner prepared a special six-course meal for Lexington Women Chefs Farmers Market Dinner. 4 aceweekly.com August 2016

Toyota Bluegrass Miracle League Board President Chris DeHoag and board member Tony Barrett receive a check from Rotary Club of Lexington Gerry van der Meer.


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FEATURE

Walking

Home

Walking Dead creator returns to old Kentucky home for celebration Photo courtesy Megan Mack

INTERVIEW BY EVAN O. ALBERT

A

MC juggernaught The Walking Dead isn’t set to return til October, but Kentucky fans are set to celebrate native son, and Walking Dead creator, Robert Kirkman, on Aug. 6. Who died in the Season 6 finale, ‘Last Day on Earth’? In the comic books, it’s Glenn who meets the business end of archvillain Negan’s bat. On AMC? It’s anybody’s guess. But what was it about growing up in Kentucky that inspired Kirkman to create this apocalyptic survival fiction?

Kirkman says, “I grew up in a pretty rural area in Kentucky so I was often left to my own devices, watching horror movies, reading comic books and crafting my own stories and things like that. Just because, well you know, I like to say I didn’t have a lot of friends. Being left on my own out in the wilderness allowed me to be able to think about survival and things like that. Maybe that led to it. Kentucky is a beautiful, wonderful place and in no way inspired the zombie apocalypse, but I think there must be certain aspects about the way I grew up that made me think about those things.”

Kentucky might not have inspired the zombie apocalypse, but he agrees it does inform the distinct southern culture of both the comic and the series. “You see a lot of stories set out in Los Angeles and New York,” he says. “I thought it would be a lot more interesting to tell a story about Middle Americans. People that lives their lives. I’m fighting to try not to say ‘normal people’ but just average everyday people like I am. Firefighters, lawyers or whatever it’s a lot more interesting. The cast of The Walking Dead is from places like Kentucky and Georgia and places like that. They are very much more trying to survive than solve the problem. I think that made the story that much more interesting.” With the comic more than a decade old, and the series headed into its seventh season, fans of both know that The Walking Dead is all about the long game.

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“Kentucky is a beautiful, wonderful place and in no way inspired the zombie apocalypse, but I think there must be certain aspects about the way I grew up that made me think about those things.” ROBERT KIRKMAN WALKING DEAD CREATOR Kirkman acknowledges, “It is a tremendous amount of work to keep it all straight. To know the backstories you’ve already told and bits of information about the characters that have already been revealed. Keeping track of that over the course of a story that in the comic book form has been told for nearly a decade now is somewhat of an arduous project. I will say that all the benefits to me greatly outweigh that. Being able to tell a long, involved story that unfolds over the course of many years and to be able to lay the groundwork for stories that will pay off years down the line is the most fun way of telling a story for me. I really enjoy being able to plan things out and to be able to set characters out and be able to build to huge impactful moments over the course of many years many issues and many episodes. It is so fulfilling to me that all of the work ends up being worth it.” Fans of both the show and the page also know that the paths of the two sometimes diverge, in a process not always solely controlled by the author.

He says, “I am in the writer’s room with a writing staff. We are all creative individuals and the fact that I worked on the

comic doesn’t give me any special treatment. We are adapting the comic book like any television show would adapt the source material. And when you are sitting there with a bunch of talented individuals and they are coming up with good ideas, I am wholeheartedly encouraging that kind of stuff. I am in the writer’s room essentially telling my story for the second time. Anytime there is something new that can get me excited about it, I feel like those changes are going to make the die hard fans of the comic book just as excited as it does me.” Kirkman is a tireless advocate for independent writers and creators rights.

He says, “This day and age is a time where creators in comics have fought for decades and decades to create a system that allows them to own their creations and profit from their creations in a way that in the ‘30s through the ‘70s just was not really possible. I think there is a tremendous amount of opportunity for creators to steer their own destiny. I think that’s what it’s really all about: being able to write your own stories freely and being able to control your own stories and have them benefit you, as opposed to have them benefit a larger corporation is something that I think is somewhat unique to comics. There is certainly not a television network owned by people who create TV shows; that kind of thing is unprecedented in the entertainment industry. I really like that more and more creators of things are taking advantage of that in comics.” Keeping pace with the demands of a hit series – and its West Coast-set spinoff, Fear the Walking Dead – is admittedly a juggling act for Kirkman, one he says is made easier by the fact that his career and his passions converge.

“I like to say that I have a job and that I have hobbies, and my hobbies are the exact same thing that I do as my job. The time normal people would spend doing work and then doing things that they enjoy and having fun, I just cram all those hours together and that’s my work. While I do work more than 40 hours a week and that does sometimes get a little taxing, I absolutely love everything that I am doing. When I


FEATURE

Photo courtesy of Jenny Eads Arnold This mural celebrating The Walking Dead was recently created by Portuguese artist Sergie Odeith in Cynthiana. Hopefully, the last season cliffhanger won’t make the mural obsolete. have free time, the thing that I most of the time want to do is work on stuff.” The Walking Dead was nearly must-see TV for the peacock network, but they passed.

Kirkman recalls how it all began. “The famous film director, Frank Darabont who did The Shawshank Redemption, discovered The Walking Dead at some point in 2005 and thought that it would be good for a television show. He got NBC interested and ended up writing a pilot script for them, which they eventually passed on. Frank and I from that point on started talking to different networks here and there from time to time over the course over a number of years trying to get the project greenlit. We were turned away by pretty much every network in existence until at some point in 2009 Gale Ann Hurd became aware of the project and wanted to turn it into a TV show. She teamed up with Frank and I and brought AMC on board… and from there it was a hop skip and a jump to being on the air.”

WALKING DEAD DAY AUGUST 6 The Walking Dead Day will be celebrated Aug. 6, 2016 in Cynthiana, honoring one of Cynthiana’s favorite native sons, Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman.

9 am

(Now that viewers have finally met Negan, it’s all starting to make sense.)

Comic signing/photos with Robert Kirkman 120 S. Walnut St. (two items per person.)

3-5 pm

Comic signings/photos with Tony Moore-123 East Pike St. (2 items per person.)

4-5 pm

Q and A with Robert Kirkman- Rohs Opera House- Pike St.

5 pm

Trivia Contest at Trindy’s Family Bistro- limited to 16 teams. Early registration will be during the day outside the restaurant. Walnut St.

5:30 pm

Last shuttle tour.

State sign dedication

10 am

Interactive shuttle tours begin. Loading will be on West Pike St. And Church St. At (Alexandria)

10 am

Special edition comic released at Chamber of Commerce. One per person.

So, how long would Kirkman last in a zombie apocalypse, and what would his weapon of choice be?

His answer might surprise fans. He’s no katana-toting Michonne. “My weapon of choice would be a high building I would jump off of, just because the thought of hanging around and fighting zombies the rest of my life is completely unappealing to me. It would be terrifying and nerve wracking and I probably wouldn’t survive long and it would end up with me being eaten. I would probably check out pretty quickly. Before I did that I would probably use a baseball bat; it’s pretty simple. A sword sounds nice but I don’t really know how to use a sword … I’ve used a baseball bat before and I think that would be pretty deadly.”

Schedule of Events

1-3 pm

NOON

Costume Contest in the parking lot in front of the Walking Dead mural on Walnut Street.

12-8 pm

Zombie jail experience opens at the old jail on Pike St.

Large backpacks/purses/bags will not be allowed inside of signings or Q and A for safety reasons. No weapons will be allowed. Foam or cardboard weapons for costumes are ok. Please plan accordingly.

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8 aceweekly.com January 2016

August August

sun

mon

Water Fest

1

tues

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE

2

Michael Cleveland, Moondance Amphitheatre

BIG BAND/ JAZZ Dave

Shelton Jazz Quintet, Ecton Park

7

8

MOVIES Star Wars: The Force DANCE Ballet Under the Stars by Kentucky Ballet Theatre. 8 pm, Woodland Park. (Thur thru Sunday)

KIDS Ratatouille 1 pm Farish Theater inside Lexington Public Library (downtown)

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE

Uptown Blue, Moondance Amphitheatre

WOODSONGS Jimmy

“Duck” Holmes; the Blues Sisters 6:45 pm Lyric Theatre

READ Mary Pearson signs

The Beauty of Darkness 7 pm, Joseph-Beth

14

9

KIDS Southland and Castlewood pools close for the season today

HG Tour the remodeled

home of Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation president, Maureen Peters. 5:30 pm, 555 N. Broadway.

BIG BAND JAZZ Dan Brock and friends, Ecton Park

HISTORY Bill Marshall will

discuss the Kentucky Gazette at McConnell Springs History to Chew On series. 6 pm (Brown Bag Dinner)

MUSIC Dolly Parton, Norton Center (Danville)

15

16

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE

Magness; Matt Andersen 6:45 pm Lyric Theatre

EVENT Diamond Rings and

Pretty Things Bridal Show 11 am, Kentucky Horse Park

COMEDY Roast of Harry

Potter 7:15 (a Comedy Central style roast), Comedy off Broadway

8ART aceweekly.com August 2016 Woodland

Water Company presents WaterFest, 4:30 pm to 7:30 pm at 2300 Richmond Rd.

COMEDY Comedian Mark

10 MOVIES Classic series, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Kentucky Theatre

MOVIES Local filmmaker

Eli Scarr will present his documentary, My Ancestral Kentucky Home, 8 pm, Lexington Public Library (downtown)

17

Jam Ecton Park

READ Jesse Donaldson signs The More They Disappear 6 pm, Morris Book Shop READ Stephanie Knipper

signs The Peculiar Miracles of Antoinette Martin, 7 pm, Joseph-Beth

4

fri

5

DANCE Ballet Under the Stars SHOP Night Market, North by Kentucky Ballet Theatre. 8 pm, Woodland Park. (Thru Sunday)

JAZZ Jazz Live at the Library,

7 pm, Lexington Public Library (downtown).

MOVIES Cult Film Series Time

Bandits 8 pm Al’s Bar

Limestone (Bryan Avenue)

11

Fridays (free movies shown on inflatable screen Triangle Park), 9 pm, The Bad News Bears

EVENT It’s Walking Dead Day

13 OPERA Opera under the stars, 8 pm, Moondance Amphitheatre.

READ Kentucky Fried Zine Fest 2016, Lyric Theater noon to 6 p.m. COMEDY George Wallace 7:15 pm Comedy Off Broadway

JAZZ 9th Annual Smooth Jazz Fest 7:30 pm, KY Horse Park

RUN Midsummer Night’s Run (significant downtown traffic impact in the evening)

19 20

GIGS Hick Hop and Emmynominated (for Justified) Gangstagrass 10:30 pm, Cosmic Charlie’s

MOVIES Documentary, The

MUSIC Picnic with the Pops (screening Wizard of Oz, with live symphonic accompaniment)

BIZ AAF Membership mixer, 5:30 pm, West Sixth (proceeds benefit Primate Rescue Center of Kentucky)

in Cynthiana! Mural dedication, Q and A, comic book signing with Robert Kirkman/Tony

12

EAT Food Truck Friday, Noon, Herald Leader parking lot (corner of Main and Midland)

MUSIC Phoenix Fridays,

Champions, (about the pitbulls rescued from Michael Vick’s dog fighting compound) 6:30 pm, Kentucky Theatre

6

Proud Store at 2416 Palumbo Drive will host a Healthy Snack Fair 10 am to 2pm — healthy snacks for healthy kids.

FUNDRAISER

TNL Conch Republic,

Thursday Night Live, Cheapside Pavilion

EAT The Kentucky

The Black Suburbia, Payback, Moondance and White Ball, 8 pm, 903 Amphitheatre Manchester Street, benefiting Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center. MOVIES Fountain Films on

NEIGHBORHOOD Warehouse Block’s Block Party, 5 to 9 p.m.. North Ashland Avenue, from Aurora Avenue to National will be closed off. the musical attractions will include Off The TNL Prime Cut, Thursday Clock, The StarDevils, and The Night Live, Cheapside Pavilion Ben Miller Band.= MUSIC The Promised Land is MUSIC Summer Nights in an original rock musical based Suburbia, Other Brothers, on Springsteen’s music and Moondance lyrics; UK Opera Theatre’s educational workshop MOVIES Fountain Films on presentation, UK Singletary Fridays, 9 pm, The Labyrinth, Center Triangle Park

18

sat

MUSIC Summer Nights in

MOVIES Classic series, Way Out West (1937), Kentucky Theatre

BIG BAND/Jazz Jazzberry

thurs

Normand, 9 pm, Cosmic Charlie’s.

Theater inside Lexington Public Library (downtown)

WOODSONGS Janiva signs Madam Bell (now in paperback), 2 pm, Morris Book Shop

3

Classics series, Hud (1963), Kentucky Theatre

KIDS Big Hero 6 1 pm, Farish

Becky Buller, Moondance

READ Maryjean Wall

MOVIES Hollywood

KIDS Kentucky American

August 3

Awakens 1:30 Farish Theatre inside Lexington Public Library

wed

Vandaveer, Phoenix Park

MOVIES Fountain Films on Fridays, 9 pm, The Addams Family, Triangle Park

ART Woodland Art Fair, 10 am to 6 pm.

KIDS Frozen 2 pm Farish

Theater inside Lexington Public Library (downtown)

READ Maggie Green signs Tasting Kentucky, 2 pm, Morris Book Shop MUSIC Picnic with the Pops, featuring Glee’s Matthew Morrison


COMEDY Roast of Harry

Potter 7:15 (a Comedy Central style roast), Comedy off Broadway

ART Woodland

Tasting Kentucky, 2 pm, Morris Book Shop

benefit Primate Rescue Center of Kentucky)

signs The Peculiar Miracles of Antoinette Martin, 7 pm, Joseph-Beth

MUSIC Picnic with the Pops, featuring Glee’s Matthew Morrison

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Art Fair. Enjoy the final funnelcake of the season alongside 200+ artists’ booths. 10 am to 5 pm.

KIDS Chase that funnelcake

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE

MOVIES

The Princess Bride, Kentucky Theatre

Combs and Caldwell, Moondance

with an ice cream social at McConnell Springs (includes WOODSONGS The Merle scavenger hunt, fossil dig, Travis Celebration featuring face painting, a raffle, and ice Thom Bresh 6:45 p.m. Lyric cream). Theatre. Travis (“Sixteen Tons,” KIDS Need the antidote to “I am a Pilgrim”) was born in Muhlenberg County. all that sugar? Try the 12th annual Kids Triathlon, 7:30 am, Beaumont YMCA. Ages 6 to 14 are welcome; register in person at any YMCA of Central Kentucky, or online at ymcaky.org/kidstri.

LIVE MUSIC

Kurt Vile and the Violators 8 pm, Manchester Music Hall

TNL Kenny Owens and

Group Therapy, Thursday Night Live, Cheapside Pavilion

MUSIC Chamber Music Festival

COMEDY

Jon Lovitz 7:15 pm, Comedy Off Broadway

BIG BAND/ JAZZ Rick Cook Quintet, Ecton Park

FUNDRAISER Relay for

EAT Plate it Up series,

Life, American Cancer Society Hope Lodge

featuring, The Pie Seller, The Drunk, and The Lady by Terry Foody, Fayette County Extension office

28 29 30 31 Healthy YOGA YMCA of Central Kentucky presents a free sunrise yoga session at 6:30 am in Triangle Park.

Snack Fair

BIZ Lexington Young

Professionals Association LYPA at the Legends, 7 pm, Legends Ballpark

HG Eleven homes will be SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE featured during this annual Laurel River Line, Moondance Summer highlight, the Tour of Remodeled Homes presented by HBA Lexington, Noon to 5 pm. 9 aceweekly.com January 2016

EVENT KenTOKYOcon

2016 (Friday thru Sunday) Lexington Center.

EAT Lexington Jewish Food Festival 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Temple Adath Israel at 124 N Ashland Ave. (Sampling menu will include traditional dishes such as matzo ball soup, kugel, latkes, knishes, borscht and Israeli salad. Separate bake shop will offer homemade goods such as challah, rugelach, strudel and honey cake.)

Woodland Art Fair August 20-21

LIT Holler Poets Series, Al’s

Bar

MOVIES Sunset Boulevard (1963) Kentucky Theatre

August 6

EAT Burgers, Bourbon and

MEMORIAL Service will

ART Lecture by artist in

FEST Moontower Music

Beer at 903 Manchester Street. Proceeds benefit Arbor Youth Services

residence J. Daniel Graham on the opening of ‘The Less You Say,” 7 pm, Lexington Art League, Loudon House.

commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Flight 5191 crash, UK Arboretum, 10 a.m. Festival, 11 am, Masterson Station Park

DIY Learn to DIY (pair wine

with cheese? Use a French press?) 10 am to 2 pm, Sullivan Suburbia, Beatles Tribute Band, University Moondance EAT Farm to Table dinner with Chef Jeremy Ashby, celebrating Erik Reece signs Utopia 25 years of the Arboretum Drive, 6 pm, Morris Book Shop

MUSIC Summer Nights in READ

ART Louis Zoellar Bickett II: CONCERT Chris Stapleton and The Archive, UK Art Museum (thru Nov 27). Lexington artist Louis Bickett has been collecting and cataloging items from his daily life since 1972 (e.g., “Seamus Heaney used this knife and fork at a la lucie on 4 May 2006.”) Bickett retired from a la lucie when it closed in November 2015, and he was diagnosed with ALS in December 2015.

Hank Williams Jr, Riverbend (Cinci)

MOVIES Midnight Movie, Rocky Horror, Kentucky Theatre.

HG Eleven homes will be featured during this annual Summer highlight, the Tour of Remodeled Homes presented by HBA Lexington, Noon to 5 pm.

around the corner SEPTEMBER 2 SEPTEMBER 2 SEPTEMBER 3 SEPTEMBER 10 SEPTEMBER 16 OCTOBER 14 OCTOBER 16

Red White and Boom, Legends Ballpark The BASH UK vs. Southern Miss, Commonwealth Stadium Doggie Paddle, Woodland Pool RENT, Broadway Live at the Opera House Big Blue Madness (it’s never too soon to plan) Iron Horse Half Marathon (Midway) 9 aceweekly.com August 2016


Eat August: Summer means fresh vegetables NEWS Brioche Dorée has announced it will be opening on the University of Kentucky Campus on August 8, 2016.

Fresh Thyme Farmers Market is now taking employment applications for their first Lexington location. Louie’s Wine Dive is scheduled to open in Chevy Chase in the location formerly occupied by the Macho Nacho, Glenn’s Creek Brewery, and Buddy’s. This will be the chain’s first location in Kentucky. Pazzo’s is planning a Grand (re)Opening for early August with a new menu.

EVENTS The Annual Corn Boil hosted by Daughters of the Nile is Friday, Aug. 5 from 4 until 7 p.m. at the Oleika Shrine Temple, 326 Southland Dr. Corn on the cob (straight from the farm), green beans, slaw, sliced tomatoes, cornbread (handmade on site with cornmeal and flour from Weisenberger Mills). On Aug. 6, The Kentucky Proud Store at 2416 Palumbo Drive will host a Healthy Snack Fair with options from different vendors. 10 am to 2pm — healthy snacks for healthy kids. Aug, 6 is National Root Beer Float Day. (Participating A&W Restaurants will be sharing free root beer floats to celebrate. Food Truck Friday is Aug. 12 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in

the parking lot of Herald-Leader, at the corner of Main and Midland.

Maggie Green signs Tasting Kentucky: Favorite Recipes from the Bluegrass State on Aug. 20 at 2 pm, Morris Book Shop Join the Fayette County Extension Service on Aug. 23 for an evening with a Kentucky Proud author and taste Plate it Up Recipes. August features The Pie Seller, The Drunk, and The Lady: Heroes of the 1833 Cholera Epidemic in Lexington, Kentucky by Terry Foody. 6 to 8 p.m. at the Fayette County Extension Office, 1140 Red Mile Place. Preregistration is required, 859.257.5582. The Third Annual Burgers Bourbon & Beer for Arbor Youth Services is Friday Aug. 26, 7 p.m. at The Speakeasy, 903 Manchester St. benefiting Arbor Youth Services, a nonprofit that serves homeless, runaway and at risk youth in central Kentucky.

On Aug. 27, enjoy Farm to Table Dinner with Chef Jeremy Ashby, celebrating 25 years of the Lexington Arboretum. The first Lexington Jewish Food Festival is Aug. 28 from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Temple Adath Israel at 124 N Ashland Ave. The festival features a sampling menu including traditional dishes such as matzo ball soup, kugel, latkes, knishes, borscht and Israeli salad. Separate bake shop will offer homemade goods such as challah, rugelach, strudel and honey cake.

••••••

To submit a Lexington, Kentucky food, wine, or spirits news item for consideration in Ace’s Best Bites, email acelist@aceweekly.com. To submit a Lexington Food, Wine, or Spirits Event to be considered for the Ace calendar, please go to the Ace online calendar, and click “Submit” (upper right on the Menu bar). For restaurant advertising, call Ace Advertising at 859.225.4889 x229.

10 aceweekly.com August 2016

The Kentucky Proud Store / Boone Creek Creamery at 2416 Palumbo Drive will host a Healthy Snack Fair on August 6. (Pictured is proprietor Ed Puterbaugh.)


FOOD

FOOD

By Tom Yates

Goat cheese cheesecake with blackberry basil coulis

It’s the perfect time for blackberries B

lackberry picking was a noble chore on our family farm in western Kentucky. During those blistering hot midsummer days, there were blackberries to be had and someone had to pick them. It was a rough and tumble business. You see, we didn’t grow blackberries on our old Kentucky farm. They simply arrived. Our blackberries grew in places my father’s bush hog couldn’t reach or mow. The tangled prickly brambles twisted through overgrown barbed wire fence rows, corner thickets, rugged ravines, crumbling abandoned farm buildings, and camouflaged critter camps. I was the fetcher of the blackberries. Ever mindful to leave the top berries for the birds while rustling up enough noise to ward off snakes, I was the hunter and gatherer of the summer field berries. Outfitted in long sleeved flannel shirts, heavy socks, and rolled up dungarees for protection, my pretend armor was a suffocating ruse. After every expedition, without fail, I hobbled home with ankle-high cockelburs, chiggers, deep scratches, bloody hands, and blackberries. A big win for an adventurous farm boy. During the weeks of blackberry season, the fruits of my labor brought on summer cobblers, pies, muffins, pancake syrups, and macerated ice cream sauces. For those few fleeting weeks, I felt like the noble prince of summer. Nowadays, I leave the picking to our hard working farmers. See you later snakes, thorns, chiggers, and bloody heat. Hello, sweet plump summer blackberries. Ripe for the picking at our local farmers’ markets. Goat Cheese Cheesecake With Blackberry Basil Coulis Any fruit or berry would pair beautifully with goat cheese cheesecake. Right now, blackberries are having their moment in the sun.

Coulis I tumbled 1 pint Pulaski County blackberries into a saucepan, added 1/3 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice, a pinch ground white pepper, and 3 whole fresh basil leaves. After cranking the heat to medium high to melt the sugar, I reduced the heat to a simmer and let it rip until the berries collapsed from the heat. When the blackberries released their juices and disintegrated into the sauce, I pulled the coulis from the heat, strained it through a fine mesh strainer, discarded the basil-flecked pulp, and set the coulis aside to cool. Crust. To add a subtle savory bent, I crushed 3 tablespoons shelled pistachios in a food processor before tossing them with 1/2 cup graham cracker crumbs and 3 tablespoons melted butter. After buttering 8 individual 4 ounce ramekins, I spooned the crumb mixture into each ramekin, tamped the buttered crumbs firmly into the edges, slid the ramekins into a 325 degree oven for 8 minutes, and pulled them from the oven to cool. Filling. A fun little ride on the wild side. After bringing 11 ounces cream cheese and 4 ounces goat cheese to room temperature, I tossed both into a stand mixer. Using the paddle attachment, I beat the cheeses together for 2 to 3 minutes before adding 2 Elmwood Stock Farm eggs (one at a time until incorporated), 1 tablespoon fresh lemon zest, 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract, 2 tablespoons sour cream, and a pinch of salt. To ensure maximum creaminess, I beat the filling on medium speed for 10 full minutes before carefully filling each buttered cup. After placing the ramekins into a hot water bath, I carefully slid them into a preheated 300 degree oven for 24 minutes, pulled them from the oven, let the cheesecakes rest in the water bath for 10 minutes, and transferred them to a wire rack to cool completely before sliding them into the refrigerator to chill overnight.

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GIGS/CONCERTS

August 2016

MONDAY AUGUST 1

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE Michael Cleveland, Moondance Amphitheatre

TUESDAY AUGUST 2

BIG BAND/ JAZZ Dave Shelton Jazz Quintet, Ecton Park

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 3

Susto | Gaslight Street | Kelley Swindall 9 pm Willie’s

THURSDAY AUG 4

TNL Bobby Perry Band Thursday Night Live, Cheapside Pavilion

Don Henley will perform. at Riverbend Music Center in Cincinnati Aug. 23

FRIDAY AUG 5

Johnny Conqueroo/ The Swells Best Friend Bar

Don Henley 8 pm, Riverbend, Cinci

Broncho | Billy Changer 10 pm, Cosmic Charlie’s

Ben Lacy & Alan McKenzie Lakeside Live (Lex Green) Summer Nights in Moondance Amphitheatre

Suburbia,

WED AUG 24

Kurt Vile and the Violators with the Sadies 8 pm, Manchester Music Hall

Payback,

Chris Stapleton will open for Hank Williams Jr. at Riverbend Music Center in Cincinnati.

SATURDAY AUG 6

Modern Marilyn Lakeside Live (Lex Green) Billy Joe Shaver 9 pm Willie’s

THURSDAY AUG 18

SUNDAY AUG 7

Korn and Rob Zombie Riverbend (Cinci)

Restless Leg String Band 10 p.m Cosmic Charlie’s

MONDAY AUG 8

Legendary Dolly Parton will perform at the Norton Center for the Arts Aug. 9, starting at 7:30 p.m.

Rhyton |Three Legged Race | Lost Action 9 pm Green Lantern

Josh Groban, Riverbend in Cincinnati

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE Moondance Amphitheatre

Katie Mullen & Vince Thompson| Shane & Kathryn Mullen Lakeside Live (Lex Green)

Uptown

Blue,

TUE AUG 9

Deerhoof 10 pm, Cosmic Charlie’s

BIG BAND JAZZ Dan Brock and friends, Ecton Park Dolly Parton, Norton Center (Danville)

WED AUG 10

Derek Spencer | The Landers Willie’s

THURSDAY AUG 11

TNL Prime Cut, Thursday Night Live, Cheapside Pavilion Joslyn and the Sweet Compression 9 pm, Willie’s

FRIDAY AUG 12

The Spiritual Bat 9 pm Al’s Bar Summer Nights in Suburbia, Other Brothers, Moondance Off The Clock, The StarDevils, and The Ben Miller Band, Warehouse Block’s Block Party

12 aceweekly.com August 2016

Will Kimbrough Willie’s

SATURDAY AUG 13

Warren Byrom and the Fabled Canelands CD Release, with Idiot Glee Al’s Bar Luke Bryan 7:30 pm Riverbend (Cinci) Appalatin | Zoe Speaks Willie’s

SUNDAY AUG 14

Grey Watson and the Warm Jets Al’s Bar

MONDAY AUG 15

Conch Republic, Thursday Night Live, Cheapside Pavilion

FRI AUG 19

Easy Roscoe 9 pm, Green Lantern

The Kentucky Hoss Cats, Willie’s

Summer Nights in Suburbia, Beatles Tribute Band, Moondance

SATURDAY AUG 20

Lexington Lexington Block Party Al’s Bar

Jordan English Lakeside Live (Lex Green)

SATURDAY AUG 27

Picnic with the Pops, Keeneland

Moontower Music Festival (Drive-By Truckers, Trombone Shorty, Manchester Orchestra, The Floozies, Chrome Pony) Masterson Station Park

Dream the Electric Sleep, Jandergan, The Wild Jays, 10 pm, Cosmic Charlie’s

The Lacs Manchester Music Hall

Dream the Electric Sheep 10 pm Cosmic Charlie’s Ben Lacy & Alan McKenzie Lakeside Live (Lex Green)

Chris Stapleton and Hank Williams Jr, Riverbend (Cinci)

SUNDAY AUG 21

SUNDAY AUG 28

MONDAY AUG 22

Jazz Brunch with Lee Carroll’s Soul Jazz Quartet, Willie’s

Kelsey Waldon | The Wooks 9 pm Willie’s

TUE AUG 16

The Tillers 9 pm, Willie’s

Chamber Music Festival of Lexington, various locations. For more information, go to http:// chambermusiclex.org/schedule/

Phoenix Fridays, Vandaveer, Phoenix Park

Boogie G and the Titanics Lakeside Live (Lex Green)

The Merle Travis Celebration featuring Thom Bresh 6:45 p.m. Woodsongs at Lyric Theatre

Gangstagrass 10:30 pm, Cosmic Charlie’s

TNL Kenny Owens and Group Therapy, Thursday Night Live, Cheapside Pavilion

FRIDAY AUG 26

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE Combs and Caldwell, Moondance

WEDNESDAY AUG 17

THURSDAY AUG 25

Picnic with the Pops, Keeneland

SOUTHLAND JAMBOREE Becky Buller, Moondance

Harmed Brothers 9 pm, Willie’s

Grizzly Goat, Willie’s

TUE AUG 23

BIG BAND/ JAZZ Rick Cook Quintet, Ecton Park Drywall Road, Willie’s

Andy McKee Cosmic Charlie’s

MONDAY AUG 29 SOUTHLAND Moondance

SEP 2

JAMBOREE

Laurel River Line,

Red, White and Boom (Florida Georgia Line, Jason Aldean, Eric Church, Kacey Musgraves, Thomas Rhett, and Cole Swindell) Lexington Legends’ ballpark


Free Will Astrology

By Rob Brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I apologize in advance for the seemingly excessive abundance of good news I’m about to report. If you find it hard to believe, I won’t hold your skepticism against you. But I do want you to know that every prediction is warranted by the astrological omens. Ready for the onslaught? 1. In the coming weeks, you could fall forever out of love with a wasteful obsession. 2. You might also start falling in love with a healthy obsession. 3. You can half-accidentally snag a blessing you have been half-afraid to want. 4. You could recall a catalytic truth whose absence has been causing you a problem ever since you forgot it. 5. You could reclaim the mojo that you squandered when you pushed yourself too hard a few months ago. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): August is Adopta-Taurus month. It’s for all of your tribe, not just the orphans and exiles and disowned rebels. Even if you have exemplary parents, the current astrological omens suggest that you require additional support and guidance from wise elders. So I urge you to be audacious in rounding up trustworthy guardians and benefactors. Go in search of mentors and fairy godmothers. Ask for advice from heroes who are further along the path that you’d like to follow. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When a parasite or other irritant slips inside an oyster’s shell, the mollusk’s immune system besieges the intruder with successive layers of calcium carbonate. Eventually, a pearl may form. I suspect that this is a useful metaphor for you to contemplate in the coming days as you deal with the salt in your wound or the splinter in your skin. Before you jump to any conclusions, though, let me clarify. This is not a case of the platitude, “Whatever doesn’t kill you will make you stronger.” Keep in mind that the pearl is a symbol of beauty and value, not strength. CANCER (June 21-July 22): It’s your lucky day! Spiritual counsel comparable to what you’re reading here usually sells for $99.95. But because you’re showing signs that you’re primed to outwit bad habits, I’m offering it at no cost. I want to encourage you! Below are my ideas for what you should focus on. (But keep in mind that I don’t expect you to achieve absolute perfection.) 1. Wean yourself from indulging in self-pity and romanticized pessimism. 2. Withdraw from connections with people who harbor negative images of you. 3. Transcend low expectations wherever you see them in play. 4. Don’t give your precious life energy to demoralizing ideas and sour opinions. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’re not doing a baby chick a favor by helping it hatch. For the sake of its well-being, the bird needs to peck its way out of the egg. It’s got to exert all of its vigor and willpower in starting its new life. That’s a good metaphor for you to meditate on. As you escape from your comfortable womb-jail and launch yourself toward inspiration, it’s best to rely as much as possible on your own instincts. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hear you’re growing weary of wrestling with ghosts. Is that true? I hope so. The moment you give up the fruitless struggle, you’ll become eligible for a unique kind of freedom that you have not previously imagined. Here’s another rumor I’ve caught wind of: You’re getting bored with an old source of sadness that you’ve used to motivate yourself for a long time. I hope that’s true, too. As soon as you shed your allegiance to the sadness, you will awaken to a sparkling font of comfort you’ve been blind to. Here’s one more story I’ve picked up through the grapevine: You’re close to realizing that your attention to a mediocre

treasure has diverted you from a more pleasurable treasure. Hallelujah! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Could it be true that the way out is the same as the way in? And that the socalled “wrong” answer is almost indistinguishable from the right answer? And that success, at least the kind of success that really matters, can only happen if you adopt an upside-down, inside-out perspective? In my opinion, the righteous answer to all these questions is “YESSS???!!!” — at least for now. I suspect that the most helpful approach will never be as simple or as hard as you might be inclined to believe. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your strength seems to make some people uncomfortable. I don’t want that to become a problem for you. Maybe you could get away with toning down your potency at other times, but not now. It would be sinful to act as if you’re not as competent and committed to excellence as you are. But having said that, I also urge you to monitor your behavior for excess pride. Some of the resistance you face when you express your true glory may be due to the shadows cast by your true glory. You could be tempted to believe that your honorable intentions excuse secretive manipulations. So please work on wielding your clout with maximum compassion and responsibility. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Did you honestly imagine that there would eventually come a future when you’d have your loved ones fully “trained”? Did you fantasize that sooner or later you could get them under control, purged of their imperfections and telepathically responsive to your every mood? If so, now is a good time to face the fact that those longings will never be fulfilled. You finally have the equanimity to accept your loved ones exactly as they are. Uncoincidentally, this adjustment will make you smarter about how to stir up soulful joy in your intimate relationships. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may experience a divine visitation as you clean a toilet in the coming weeks. You might get a glimpse of a solution to a nagging problem while you’re petting a donkey or paying your bills or waiting in a long line at the bank. Catch my drift, Capricorn? I may or may not be speaking metaphorically here. You could meditate up a perfect storm as you devour a doughnut. While flying high over the earth in a dream, you might spy a treasure hidden in a pile of trash down below. If I were going to give your immediate future a mythic title, it might be “Finding the Sacred in the Midst of the Profane.”

HELP WANTED Sensor Circuit and System Engineer (Lexington, KY) Designing embedded circuit systems for moisture sensors for dew point measurement. Software development for sensor data collection, data modeling, and sensor calibration. Developing and improving dew point sensor calibration system. Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering required. Must be proficient in C and C+, embedded system design, dew point sensor calibration system. Mail resume to Advanced Semiconductor Processing Technology, LLC, 3124 Hemingway Ln, Lexington, KY 40513

Sr. Business Analyst in Lexington, KY: Responsible for defining and documenting requirements, specifications and test plans, in addition to having an in-depth knowledge of the SDLC process. Responsible for identifying and analyzing user requirements. Requires: (1) Masters + 1 yr exp. OR (2) Bachelors + 5 yrs exp. Mail resume to: TempurPedic Management, LLC, 1000 Tempur Way, Lexington, KY 40511, Attn: HR.

Farm to Table Coordinator - Community Farm Alliance is hiring an Eastern Kentucky Farm to Table Coordinator (EKY F2TC) responsible for coordinating and implementing CFA’s Eastern Kentucky market development work-plan that builds regional and community food systems, with a special focus on Farm to Institution. The EKY F2TC will work directly with farmers, farmers markets in CFA’s Farmer’s Market Support Program, public schools and other institutions, private enterprises, and other organizations to build a local food supply chain network for institutional markets in Eastern Kentucky. The position is also responsible for coordinating and integrating CFA’s Program of Work in Eastern Kentucky that specifically a) builds CFA’s EKY membership, b) identifies and develops EKY CFA Leadership, and c) helps to build regional collaboration in a 21-county region in Southeast Kentucky supported with funding by the Economic Development Administration and the Appalachian Regional Commission. To apply: send resume, cover letter, along with 2 writing samples, 3 professional references and 2 personal references to Martin Richards Executive Director P.O. Box 130 Berea, KY 40403.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’ve worked hard for many years to dismantle my prejudices. To my credit, I have even managed to cultivate compassion for people I previously demonized, like evangelical Christians, drunken jocks, arrogant gurus, and career politicians. But I must confess that there’s still one group toward which I’m bigoted: super-rich bankers. I wish I could extend to them at least a modicum of amiable impartiality. How about you, Aquarius? Do you harbor any hidebound biases that shrink your ability to see life as it truly is? Have you so thoroughly rationalized certain narrow-minded perspectives and judgmental preconceptions that your mind is permanently closed? If so, now is a favorable time to dissolve the barriers and stretch your imagination way beyond its previous limits. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you lingering at the crux of the crossroads, restless to move on but unsure of which direction will lead you to your sweet destiny? Are there too many theories swimming around in your brain, clogging up your intuition? Have you absorbed the opinions of so many “experts” that you’ve lost contact with your own core values? It’s time to change all that. You’re ready to quietly explode in a calm burst of practical lucidity. First steps: Tune out all the noise. Shed all the rationalizations. Purge all the worries. Ask yourself, “What is the path with heart?”

13 aceweekly.com August 2016


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REAL ESTATE: Properties recently sold in Fayette Co. May 24 May 24 May 27 May 26 May 24 June 2 May 27 May 31 May 25 June 3 May 25 June 6 May 31 June 7 June 3 June 6 June 6 June 8 June 10 May 31 June 3 April 1 May 31 June 8 May 27 June 8 June 13 June 15 June 9 June 14 June 8 June 13 May 27 June 7 June 15 June 17

40505 513 ANNISTON DRIVE 907 Bryan Ave. 1039 CARNEAL RD 2109 CORIANDER LN 1848 Eddon Drive 681 Gay Place 839 Henry Clay Blvd 1977 LACLEDE CT 2113 Patchen Lake Lane 558 Sandalwood Drive 1623 Strader Drive 1745 COURTNEY AVE 2173 CURTISWOOD DR 226 DEVONIA AVE 706 DUNES CIR 1860 GOODPASTER WAY 1407 HILL ST 433 LIN WAL RD 1531 LINDY LN 604 LISA CT 2030 NEW ORLEANS DR 411 SHAWNEE AVE 338 WICKLAND CT 171 WINSTON AVE 1748 WYATT PKWY 568 BELLCASTLE RD 303 BLUE GRASS AVE 237 BROADVIEW DR 558 EMERSON DR 481 GLENDORA CT 557 GRANTCHESTER ST 604 JUDY LN 931 MARCELLUS DR 558 RADCLIFFE RD 670 WARRINGTON DR 521 ANNISTON DR

14 aceweekly.com August 2016

$93,300 $80,000 $41,500 $142,920 $105,000 $45,259 $137,000 $215,000 $450,462 $58,043 $98,000 $165,000 $112,000 $22,000 $115,000 $0 $95,000 $85,500 $109,000 $101,900 $106,000 $0 $99,000 $122,000 $128,000 $175,500 $62,500 $82,500 $67,500 $142,900 $80,000 $88,000 $30,000 $103,500 $130,000 $84,000

May 6 June 20 June 17 June 23 June 20 June 21 June 10 June 20 June 17 June 16 June 20 June 17

156 BEVERLY AVE 865 DARLEY DR 2301 EASTLAND PKWY 523 EMERSON DR 590 GLENBROOK ST 1107 HIGHLAND PARK DR 1652 LIBERTY RD 561 LISA DR 852 MARCELLUS DR 998 MARCELLUS DR 568 SHAFTSBURY RD 1609 WYATT PKWY

$150,000 $55,000 $165,950 $48,500 $99,900 $56,600 $80,000 $102,000 $105,000 $83,300 $158,000 $117,500

MAY 27 May 31 May 27 March 3 April 29 June 1 May 27 May 26 May 26 May 27 May 27 May 16 May 16 May 27 May 31 May 20 May 31 May 27 June 2 June 2 June 3 May 27 June 1

40509 180 ACORN FALLS $178,000 2346 ARISTOCRACY CIR $168,000 3012 BLACKMOOR PARK $202,000 3046 BONANZA DR $70,300 1212 BRICK HOUSE LN $260,000 3201 BRIGHTON PLACE $635,000 1116 Canyon Court $145,000 464 CHELSEA WOODS DR $90,000 481 CHELSEA WOODS DR $92,500 1300 Colorado Road $167,000 2232 CORNERSTONE DR $159,900 550 DARBY CREEK RD $82,900 550 DARBY CREEK RD $82,900 3600 FLOWER MOUND $360,000 2105 FORTUNE HILL LN $99,500 650 GINGERMILL LN $359,500 3093 GLENWOOD DR $171,500 665 GRAFTONS MILL $126,000 1132 GRIMBALL TRCE $316,000 1097 HADDRELL PT $300,605 3750 HARDWOOD $182,700 183 HEDGEWOOD CT $0 4660 LARKHILL LN $269,414

May 20 May 26 May 25 May 26 May 31 May 27 May 31 April 29 May 26 May 9 April 28 May 9 June 2 May 24 May 27 May 31 May 27 May 16 May 27 May 27 May 25 June 3 May 31 May 27 May 31 June 1 May 25 May 26 May 27 May 31 May 31 May 31 May 26 June 9 June 1 June 3 June 10

3345 LAWSON LN 2956 MAHALA LN 2984 MAHALA LN 1053 MARCO LN 697 MORGAN HILLS DR 4133 NEEDLERUSH DR 4164 NEEDLERUSH DR 704 NICKWOOD TRL 3016 OLD HOUSE RD 2496 PASCOLI PL 2960 POLO CLUB BLVD 2960 POLO CLUB BLVD 1830 RACHELS RUN 929 RIDGEBROOK RD 3037 ROUNDWAY DOWN 3173 ROUNDWAY DOWN 3217 ROYAL TROON RD 1795 SANDHURST CV 4188 SPERLING DR 798 SPYGLASS LN 4237 STARRUSH PL 3692 STOLEN HORSE 2178 STONEWOOD LN 4464 STUART HALL 3724 SUNFLOWER ST 3376 SWEET CLOVER 3225 TOLL GATE RD 3237 TOLL GATE RD 3076 WAVECREST WAY 4509 WILLMAN WAY 4737 WILLMAN WAY 649 WINTER HILL LN 744 WINTER HILL LN 3637 AMICK WAY 3104 AYLESBURY CIR 3333 BAY SPRINGS PARK 3389 BAY SPRINGS PARK

$269,000 $194,900 $197,000 $59,900 $124,000 $349,000 $278,608 $137,500 $148,000 $580,000 $176,000 $176,000 $284,722 $154,900 $159,000 $152,500 $210,000 $220,000 $289,000 $249,900 $397,825 $65,250 $180,000 $173,000 $255,000 $196,000 $258,900 $173,500 $118,000 $217,500 $240,000 $328,500 $284,000 $170,000 $439,000 $200,000 $234,900

June 10 May 21 June 6 May 27 June 3 June 3 May 27 May 31 June 8 May 31 June 9 June 10 June 3 June 6 June 6 June 3 June 6 June 9 June 1 June 3 June 7 June 7 June 9 May 20 June 1 June 7 May 31 June 3 June 1 May 31 May 27 June 6 May 26 June 10 June 6 June 7 June 10

628 BLANDVILLE RD $265,000 3105 BOBWHITE TRL $246,000 3412 BRIERCROFT WAY $80,000 3781 BROADMOOR DR $275,000 2637 CALGARY $140,000 2541 CHECKERBERRY DR $95,500 3404 CHESTNUT HILL LN $320,000 1068 CHETFORD DR $ 385,000 2328 CROSS CREEK $325,000 3028 FALLING LEAVES $224,500 2585 FLYING EBONY DR $247,500 1092 GRIMBALL TRCE $304,450 1120 GRIMBALL TRCE $366,790 1121 HADDRELL PT $314,026 3732 HORSEMINT TRL $435,000 529 LANARKSHIRE PL $226,000 2018 LAWTON FLT $310,000 814 LOCHMERE PL $466,000 757 MAIDENCANE DR $269,900 935 MCCLANAHAN LN $112,500 937 MCCLANAHAN LN $114,900 951 MCCLANAHAN LN $114,900 637 MULDOON DR $247,500 2442 OGDEN WAY $155,000 3325 ORCHARD GRASS $167,000 3256 POLO CLUB BLVD $225,000 2673 RED LEAF DR $307,500 4449 RIVARD LN $149,900 1791 SANDHURST CV $250,000 2168 SHAKER RUN RD $189,900 3688 STOLEN HORSE $454,135 2111 STONEWOOD LN $169,900 2293 SUNNINGDALE DR $280,000 2460 TREELINE WAY $171,000 2492 TREELINE WAY $167,000 2100 WALSH CT $154,000 409 WELSH PARK $238,000


Home and Garden

AUG 2 A class focusing on attracting pollinators and beneficial insects will be held Tuesday, Aug. 2 at 6:30 p.m. at the Fayette County Extension Service, 1140 Red Mile Place. As honeybees have struggled, the importance of pollinators and beneficial insects in our home gardens has become more prominent. Visitors will take home several small transplants. The cost is $15. Call the Fayette County Extension Service at 859.257.5582 to inquire about the status of classes before registering.

AUG 3, 17

Lexington Arboretum Horticulturist Jesse Dahl will lead walks through the gardens highlighting plants of particular interest at the time of each tour. On Aug. 3 and 17, the tours will focus on shade trees and water features. Tours start at the visitor center. The cost is $3.

AUG 11 The Fayette County Extension Service will discuss many landscape worthy grasses with an emphasis on selections of native species Thursday, Aug. 11 at 6:30 p.m. Attendees will also receive three different plants to take home. The program will showcase photos of grasses in garden settings for planting ideas. The cost is $20 and will be limited to 40. The program will be the Fayette County Extension Service office.

AUG 22 The Kentucky Krafters is a special interest homemakers group that meets the fourth Monday of each month at the Fayette Cooperative Extension Office from 6 to 8 p.m. The next meeting will be held Monday, Aug. 22. The theme for this meeting will be “Make your own burlap door wreath,” led by Liz Kingsland. To attend a monthly meeting, call the extension office, at 859-257-5582 so enough materials can be provided. Official club members are provided a supply list for the month’s project by email/snail mail. Members can always contact the office with any questions about listed supplies.

AUG 27 Kentucky American Water will sponsor a rain barrel workshop Saturday, Aug. 27 at 10 a.m. The event will be held at the UK EREC Building, 1737 Russell Cave Road, Lexington.

AUG 27-28 The Home Builders Association of Lexington will host the Tour of Remodeled Homes Saturday, Aug. 27 from noon until 5 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 28, from noon to 5 p.m. The tour is by invitation only and will be held at several sites throughout the

Chef Jeremy Ashby, executive chef of AZUR Food Group, will create a farm to table meal on the grounds of The Arboretum State Botanical Garden of Kentucky as part of the Legacy Campaign, celebrating 25 years of The Arboretum. The event will be Saturday, Aug. 27 from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. For more information, call 859.257.6955 or email Molly Davis at molly.davis1@uky.edu. Seating limited, RSVP by Aug. 15 to secure a seat at the table. Lexington area.

AUG 27 A Legacy Campaign event celebrating 25 years of The Arboretum will be Saturday, Aug. 27 from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Enjoy a farm to table dinner prepared by Chef Jeremy Ashby, executive chef of AZUR Food Group, on the grounds of The Arboretum State Botanical Garden of Kentucky. The evening will begin with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres in the Kentucky Children’s Garden, followed by a unique dinner in the gardens using the freshest local ingredients. The Friends of The Arboretum will present a live and a silent auction to benefit the Legacy Campaign. The highlight of the evening is the unveiling of the Legacy Campaign Dorotha Smith Oatts Visitor Center expansion plans by campaign chairs Bill and Vange Lear along with Roberto de Leon of De Leon and Primmer Architecture Workshop. Tickets are $150 per person. For more information, call 859.257.6955 or email Molly Davis at molly.davis1@uky. edu. Seating limited, RSVP by Aug. 15 to secure a seat at the table.

15 aceweekly.com August 2016


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REGISTER TODAY! ideafestival.com 16 aceweekly.com August 2016