Page 1

2011 Annual Report

accokeek foundation


(October 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011)

Board of Trustees and Staff

leadership

Abigail Barber Catherine Krikstan Museum Theater Intern Stewardship Patricia E. Williams Anjela Barnes Coordinator, Chair Coordinator, Marketing CCC Volunteer Gabrielle Tayac and Development Marcus Manchester Vice Chair Brittany Barnes Educator Mary Boyd Marketing Intern Matt Mattingly Secretary Molly Bauman Manager, National Alan McCurry Seasonal Farm Hand Colonial Farm and Treasurer Alison Bode Historic Interpretation Wilton Corkern Educator Molly Meehan President MaryAlice Bonomo Outreach and Manager, Education and Education Coordinator Trustees Visitor Services Lindsey Mitchell Christine Bergmark Meghan Bonomo Museum Theater Intern Carl Buchheister Visitor Services Terri Nevins Kate Clancy Colette Buchholtz Seasonal Farm Hand Norton Dodge*• Candra Pennington Jean Wallace Douglas*• Assistant Manager, Ecosystem Farm Visitor Services Marietta Ethier Courtney Buchholtz Charlotte Politano Susan Gage Manager, Visitor Services Karen Hampton Ecosystem Farm Jessica Robinson John Jameson* Jose Castillo Visitor Services Mary Leigh* Farm Coordinator Scottie Swann Dorothea Leonnig Gerald Datcher Grounds Coordinator James Potts* Facilities Coordinator Ryan Walker Del. James E. Proctor, Jr. Mary Farrar Land Conservation Eugene B. Roberts, Jr. Site Interpreter Coordinator Alfred Rotondaro Christine Ferguson Colleen Walter Mark Alexander Wright Educator Site Interpreter *emeriti Mary Anne Fernandez Jeannette Wheeler • deceased Educator and Visitor Museum Theater Intern Services Josephine Withers Staff Polly Festa Educator Wilton Corkern Livestock Manager President Mariah Fry Laura Ford Museum Theater Intern Director, Development Marquia Garcia and Communications Office Assistant Lisa Hayes Tricia Hardin Director, Education and Coordinator, Public Programs Public Events and Matt Mulder Interpretation Director, Agriculture Keely Hollyfield and Environmental Seasonal Farm Hand Stewardship Dave Jackson Helen Nelson Site Maintenance Director, Finance Shanice Jones Patti Norment Museum Theater Intern Director, Operations ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... accokeek foundation 2011 annual report

Officers


a message from

the president

Stewarding a national park where agriculture is a unifying interpretive and educational theme (both 18th and 21st century), one becomes very aware of cycles. There are the growing cycles for crops, the life cycles of the heritage breed livestock, and the maintenance cycles for equipment and vehicles on which we depend. This idea of cycles lends itself to reflecting on the institution as well. In Fiscal Year 2011 the Foundation began preparing for one of the inevitable cycles of an institution, that of a change in leadership. After more than twenty years, Wilton Corkern began preparing to pass the torch of President to the successor chosen by the Board of Trustees—­me. As Director of Education and Public Programs, I had focused my time on the experiences we provided to visitors, particularly at the National Colonial Farm, and on expanding our interpretation of African American history and developing interpretation related to the history and culture of the Piscataway people, for whom Piscataway Park is a sacred landscape. Preparing to step into a new role, I widened my focus, learning more about the important work the Accokeek Foundation has done and continues to do in land conservation and sustainable agriculture. My admiration for this remarkable organization grew stronger as I immersed myself in understanding the intricately woven tapestry that is the Accokeek Foundation at Piscataway Park. Institutions with a long and venerable history can sometimes get stuck in the past, trying to preserve and recreate what the organization started out to be. Ever since its incorporation in 1957, the Accokeek Foundation has prided itself on a commitment to innovation. In the early years, the organization became a recognized leader in land preservation, not only through protection of its own land, but through its efforts to change laws and forge partnerships that made it easier to preserve more land. These efforts and a unique partnership with the National Park Service were instrumental in the creation of Piscataway Park, for which the Accokeek Foundation donated the first parcel of land. We were an early player in the field of agricultural history museums and the preservation of heirloom seeds and heritage breed livestock. Twenty years ago the organization expanded its agricultural focus by creating the Ecosystem Farm, making it an early leader in the sustainable agriculture movement with its farmer training and community supported agriculture programs. These are only a few examples of the many ways this institution has, in the words of our founder, Frances Bolton, sought to “understand clearly our function in taking initiative, pioneering, mustering knowledge and competence.”

Lisa Hayes President

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... www.accokeekfoundation.org | 1


A Rich History, A Vibrant Future

piscataway park

For more than 10,000 years humans have been interacting with a treasured landscape now known as Piscataway Park. From the Piscataway people, who remain connected to their cherished homeland, and the colonists, whose interaction with the land shaped it in many ways, to the present-day members of the surrounding community; each person has had a special connection to this place. According to its 1957 charter, the Accokeek Foundation’s mission is “to preserve, protect and foster, for scientific, educational or charitable use and study for the benefit of the people of the nation, the historical sites and relics, trees, plants, and wildlife rapidly disappearing from an area of great natural beauty along the Maryland shore of the historic Potomac River.”

“to preserve, protect and foster... this area of great natural beauty... .”

For over 50 years, the Foundation has been providing unique outdoor-learning experiences for park visitors. Whether it is a school group visiting the colonial farm museum for the first time and learning how a child in the 18th century lived, played, and worked; a local family on their weekly visit to the barnyard to see the heritage breed cattle, sheep, poultry, and other livestock; or a budding new farmer seeking training and inspiration on how to run a sustainable farm operation—each has had a profound and lasting experience because of this place and land. With a commitment to creating these types of meaningful interactions for years to come, while enhancing the general visitor experience, the Accokeek Foundation has three strategic priorities: expanding farmer training and stewardship outreach, increasing public access to the park’s natural and interpretive assets, and expanding interpretation of American Indian and African American culture and history. The highlights in the following pages illustrate how these priorities helped us to reach diverse audiences during the past fiscal year, connecting both new and returning visitors to the park and its resources.

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 | accokeek foundation 2011 annual report


Expanding Farmer Training and Stewardship Outreach Agricultural practices have a profound impact on the health of natural systems and human communities. To fulfill its mission, the Accokeek Foundation demonstrates the dynamic and complex connections between people, crops, land, water, and livestock. The goal of the Foundation’s sustainable agricultural and environmental stewardship program is to promote practices that are environmentally sound, socially just, and economically viable to help people to live in balance with nature. Common Ground: Growing Agriculture, Restoring the Bay To find common ground between those who work the earth and those who work to save the Chesapeake Bay, members of the agricultural and environmental fields were invited to a conference titled Common Ground: Growing Agriculture, Restoring the Bay. Funded by the Chesapeake Bay Trust and held at the National Wildlife Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, the conference produced a lively discussion about environmental protection, land preservation, and farm viability. In addressing the almost 80 guests in attendance, conference speakers found common ground in discussing the land itself—sustainable agriculture and land preservation were presented as integral steps on the path toward restoring the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Food Justice Series A new program was created to examine and spotlight the issues that affect food justice on a local and global scale in a series of four events that began on Cesar Chavez Day in March 2011. From the challenges to building local and just food systems to the threat that genetically-modified foods can pose to our environment and our health, the series brought together farmers, policy makers, community members, and advocates to cultivate insight and conversation about these pressing matters of food justice that each of them witnesses firsthand.

Throughout the series, panel presenters included: Denzel Mitchell, urban farmer, chef, ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... www.accokeekfoundation.org | 3


Robert Ware Straus Ecosystem Farm

sustainable agriculture

and food educator from Baltimore; Michele Levy, Co-Director of Crossroads Farmers Market; Don Bustos, Chair of the National Immigrant Farming Initiative and veganic farmer from New Mexico; Mapy Alvarez of the National Immigrant Farming Initiative; Holly Freishtat, Food Policy Director for the Baltimore City Department of Planning; Jeremiah Lowery of Common Good City Farm; Margaret Morgan-Hubbard and Christian Melendez of ECO City Farms in Edmonston, Maryland; Kathy Ozer, Executive Director of the National Family Farm Coalition; Angela Adrar, Field and Outreach Coordinator at the Rural Coalition/Coalición Rural; and Tirso Moreno, Founder and Executive Director of the Farmworker Association of Florida. The series furthered community engagement and outreach, through partnerships with Capital City Public Charter School, whose sixth-grade class created several pieces of agriculture-inspired artwork as part of a lesson on the industrialization of food; Rural Coalition; National Immigrant Farming Initiative; and Busboys and Poets, a community gathering place with locations throughout the metro Washington D.C. area. NIFI/Rural Coalition Partnership Through strategic partnerships, two projects were initiated and completed with funds received through a grant from the USDA 2501 program. With these projects, the Accokeek Foundation expanded its networking with diverse audiences, created an environment conducive to developing cross-cultural relationships, and developed many Spanish language translations of the Foundation’s outreach materials. National Immigrant Farming Initiative: This project, funded by the USDA 2501 program, was designed to reach underserved, socially disadvantaged, and limited resource communities with training and resources. José Castillo, an agronomist who grew up farming in Guatemala, was selected to receive one year’s training and assistance to help him begin his own farming operation. He worked full time for the season at the Ecosystem Farm, attended training programs, and began his own private agricultural production, which includes honey and produce in Prince George’s County.

Rural Coalition: Together with the Rural Coalition, the Accokeek Foundation examined ways to address the root causes of the USDA’s struggle to effectively connect with the diverse ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 | accokeek foundation 2011 annual report


producers they serve. The Foundation’s work with the project included assisting with research through farmer focus groups and the development of strategies to enhance services for farmers.

Agricultural and farmer-focused trainings were expanded to provide the necessary knowledge and skills for beginning farmers. Many programs were offered free to participants to make them accessible to all.

60 total

CSA shares filled with produce went out to 86 homes.

500

beginning farmers reached through new farmerfocused training programs.

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... www.accokeekfoundation.org | 5


An Outdoor Classroom Like No Other

education

Enhanced Public Access to Interpretive Assets Visitor Services Improvements In early 2011, work began on giving a fresh look to the visitor services center. The interior received a new coat of paint and a redesigned store layout, making more space to accommodate future interpretive exhibits. One new feature, popular among the more than 2,500 school-aged youth visiting last year, is a children’s Discovery Corner that includes a rescued box turtle named Edgar and a hands-on learning center where kids can use all of their senses to learn about nature. Postcards were designed and made available for sale so that visitors could take Edgar along on their travels, sending back photos in a “Flat Stanley” fashion to highlight the places Edgar went. These photos are on display in the visitor services center. Historic Buildings and Site Maintenance Jeff Thompson of Colonial Woodwrights, an award winning company that specializes in historic tobacco barns, was contracted for repairs in the roofs over the pents (closets) of Laurel Branch, the nationally registered historic farmhouse preserved by the National Colonial Farm interpretive program.

Further inspection of the house uncovered the need for more repairs, such as replacing the mortar in the chimney and a few exterior clapboards. Restoration work will continue and includes an application of a “witch’s brew” to the exterior to seal and preserve the wooden clapboards. This important preservation work is made possible by individual and corporate donations, as well as government and foundation grants. ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 | accokeek foundation 2011 annual report


14,310

Education and Interpretation More educational offerings and tours were added during 2011 to connect the area’s youth to nature and the outdoors throughout the year. These programs included specialty summer tours and Sprouts, a nature-themed program for preschoolers. As another way to enhance the visitor experience through interpretation, the museum theater program returned, delighting visitors to the National Colonial Farm with stories of “Crime and Punishment”... from the Pillory.

“[Our educator] was very informative and led a great tour. The living history interpreters were outstanding! What a great immersion experience for all of us.” —Patricia Sowers, D.A.R. Colonial Camp

The Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.) Colonial Camp visited the National Colonial Farm, while a group of fourthgraders from the National Children’s Museum’s summer camp chose to visit the farm as a means to explore issues of childhood obesity, healthy living, and being active outdoors. Touring the Pumpkin Ash Trail to the Ecosystem Farm, the youth group learned about where their food comes from and how it can be grown sustainably with little impact to the environment. Afterward, the students used natural watercolors to paint postcards.

park visitors including public event attendees.

2,354

youth reached through K-12 programs and tours.

Sprouts introduced approximately 100 preschoolers to the wonders of the natural world by pairing time spent outdoors with stories, songs, crafts, and games based on central themes—butterflies, birds, autumn leaves, colors, and rain. “Crime and Punishment” in the 18th Century

The Museum Theater Internship program takes shape around the particular talents and chemistry of selected interns who work at the National Colonial Farm each summer and learn about 18th century life on a small tobacco farm in Maryland’s Tidewater region while developing scripts based ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... www.accokeekfoundation.org | 7


National Colonial Farm

history and culture

on a predetermined theme. The 2011 theme of “Crime and Punishment” provided abundant material for the six young women who, through an unique method of interpretation, entertained weekend visitors with “Songs and Tales from the Pillory” and a vignette on how bastardy was dealt with in colonial Maryland. The culminating event on July 30 featured a performance of “Goody Two Shoes” (a children’s play created in collaboration with the National Children’s Museum) and “Murder on the Potomac,” with Mistress Nancy Fletcher Marple Drew solving a crime. The visitor experience is best summed up by a comment from manager of the National Colonial Farm, Matt Mattingly: “If there was one thing that struck me the most about this year it was the number of visitors who actually thanked us for what we did at the colonial farm. Not a thank you for the tour or talking to us, but thank you for doing what we do. In 18 years I’ve never heard it more than this year.”

Expanded Interpretation of American Indian and African American Culture and History Historic interpretation staff explored ways to expand upon the interpretation of the diverse cultures of the region through Maryland food traditions. The monthly Foodways program gave visitors a look at not only what colonists ate or how their meals were prepared, but also at why they ate what they did. Through the unifying subject of food, participants discovered the region’s historical roots and cultural traditions and how those eating habits have changed the ecology and landscape of the Potomac Tidewater region.

In May 2011, through a partnership with the National Museum of the American Indian’s Cultural Resource Center, the colonial farm welcomed special guests from the Zea Pueblo in New Mexico who prepared traditional American Indian cuisine. Visitors watched as staff and volunteers helped prepare rabbit and venison stews, brined beef, muskrat, tortillas, and fry bread over an outdoor, open fire. ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 | accokeek foundation 2011 annual report


With the 11th annual African American Heritage Day held in the fall, the Accokeek Foundation celebrated the region’s African American history and culture. This popular cultural program, curated for the first time by a public history fellow, invited museum professionals, speakers, and performers who entertained and educated the public about the “Enduring Traditions: Rich Connections to Our Past.”

20

Over recipes prepared during Foodways.

7 fleeces

of heritage breed sheep’s wool and

23

skeins of yard were processed.

Volunteering at the Accokeek Foundation Throughout the year, the Foundation is truly fortunate to have a commmited corps of volunteers who dedicate their time, energy, and expertise to the programs of Piscataway Park, including bluebird monitoring, maintaining the colonial kitchen and museum gardens, Stitch ’n Time textile club, Colonial Foodways, livestock and pasture care, the Ecosystem Farm, and the public events held at the National Colonial Farm. From everyone on the staff and the board of trustees of the Accokeek Foundation, thank you to all of our volunteers—past, present, and future.

365

volunteers contributed more than 1400 hours from Oct 1, 2010 to Sept 30, 2011.

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... www.accokeekfoundation.org | 9


contributors

Accokeek Foundation thanks all who supported our work over the fiscal year from October 1, 2010 to September 30, 2011. $50,000+ Estate of Bill and Clara Moran National Park Service Wallace Genetic Foundation $10,000 – 49,999 Corina Higginson Trust Marietta Ethier and John McGarry Marpat Foundation Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union National Immigrant Farming Initiative PEPCO Rural Coalition

Lisa Hayes and Ted Manekin John Jameson and B.J. Shorak Mary and Elizabeth Leigh William and Stephanie Saylor Washington Post Patricia Eileen Williams $250 - 499 Will Baker Carl and Babs Buchheister Neal Sigmon and Mary Ann Lawler Byron and Becky Williams

Myra McGovern and Stephen Lorenz Richard and Judy Meade Daniel and Rosemarie Nielsen, Friends of Old Time Banjo Chas Offutt Norman and Marilyn Randall Mary T. Rice Margaret Schmid James and Jean Thompson William and Grace Thrift Skip and Johanna Vaughan Edward and Sylvia Wilk

$100 - 249 Joseph and Erica Barry Christine Bergmark and Brett Grohsgal Robert Berlin and Jim Newman John Berry Joseph and Rebecca Briggs Marney Bruce $5,000 – 9,999 Dan and Julia Calhoun Eugene and Lynn Roberts William Cole State of Maryland and Virginia Rice Morton Richard Douglas Collin $99 and Under $2,500 – 4,999 Elizabeth Dame Aaron and Bonnie Ackley Christ Church Georgetown Thomas Ellwanger Janet Alger Alan and Gail McCurry and Ellen Hancock Marion Alley Clara Moran Fleming Douglas Capital Othelia Ernestine Ashley Management, Inc. Mary Babiarz $1,000 – 2,499 John and Laura Ford Raymond and Gypsy Banks Norton and Nancy Dodge Cliff and Mary George Erika Bauer Homegrown Coffeehouse Bonnie Henke Sandra Bauer Tom and Susan Gage Thomas and Debbie Hewson Roger and Lisa Bazzarre Dorothy Leonnig John Hindle Jack and Liz Beardsley Walter M. Meinhardt Karen Hoagberg Robert Boone James and Barbara Potts Phil and Sue Jones Don Briggs Richard Riddell Steve and Rose Kim Marjie Brown and Anne Fortney Marianne Klink Ken Bryson University of Maryland, Burton Kummerow and Nancy Sulfridge Western Maryland Research Don and Carolyn LeCrone and Education Center Norman and Susan Lindeblad Joe and Michelle Buckingham Tim and Annmarie Buckley Eric and Sylvia Livingston Carol Burbank $500 – 999 Alexander and Larry and Caroline Carbaugh Chesapeake Bay Foundation Leigh Mackay-Smith Walter and Holly Carr John and Linda Derrick Michael McCarthy Alberta Lee Carson Jane H. Gilbert Marie Helen McGlone ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 | accokeek foundation 2011 annual report


Grace Griffith Shelu Patel Susan Gustafson Verena Peters Gail Halt Harold and Mary Lee Phelps Raymond Hanson Dennis and Charlotte Politano Michael Hardy Ronald and Rebecca Pollack Michael Harris Rizwan Ramakdawala Karen Heys and Rosemin Duga Ingrid Hower Anne-Marie Ramsey Jim and Jane Hudnall David and Margaret Reichard Perry and Diane Ives Gayle Madeline Rietmulder Jacquelyn E. Jay Robert and Joan Schreck Dion and Jenny Johnson Matthew Schwaller Patrick and Paula Jones and Sheryl Romeo Andrew and Kendra Carter Joanna Kamerer Steven and Josie Schwalm Martin Carts Frank and Ann Kane Tom and Adrien Seaton and Paola Addamiano-Carts Saeid and Mary Ann Karimi Debbie Sharek Linda Cappellano-Sarver Daniel Katz Danielle Shillam Bob Christensen Misty Koper Margaret Siegel Alta Clayton Tracy Labrie Jack and Joan Smuck Catherine Cloud George and Beverly Linde James Snow and Magdi Badawy Paul and Barbara Livingston John Stempin Cindy Cobleigh Arthur and Deanna Lutz and Cara Fogarty Russ and Meg Cole Sheryl Maddux Roger and Sandra Stephon Erika Colon Jakir Manela Scott and Suzanne Steward Wilton Corkern Ruth Kappy O. Majekodunmi James and Elizabeth Stewart and Mary Bruce Batte Linda Marks Eric and Susan Straus Wilson and Nancy Coudon Bobby Martin Bill Suworoff and Betsy Reid Anthony Crenshaw Donald R. Massey Gabrielle Tayac James Crist Jenna Williams Mathers Eric Tillman Elizabeth Davison Michael and Amy McGraw James and Wendy Tinsley Rosemin Daya Francis McMullen Yvette Troyan Franz de Leon Paul and Elaine McVinney Charles Trozzo Adam Dempsey Mary C. Means and Gail Rothrock Nitin Doshi Martha Midgette Barbara Uhler James Downey Mount Vernon Estate Jeanette Vaughan Mary Elder Moyaone Association Jack and Stephanie Victory Robert E. Robert and Marion Mulholland Virginia Wadsley and Olivia Farncomb Terrance Murphy Louise Webb Cory and Erica Fecko and Essence Campbell Rosemary Weller, Randall and Carol Fiertz Robert and Maureen Murray Tanta-Cove Garden Club Patsy Fletcher Majeehad Neale Fred and Lois Anne Williams Stephen and Page Fox and Farooq I Al-Farooq Josephine Withers Nanette Fremont Donald and Phyllis Nelson Leigh and Janie Worthing and Rita Bergman Jane Norman and Paul Jett Mark Alexander Wright Charles and Ruth Gaumond Claire O’Brien Sara L. Young Robert and Charlotte Gillespie John and Caroline O’Connell Zaid Zaid Gaby Gollub Lynn Parent Cathie Zimmerman Frank and Isabel Gottron Linda Parker Nancy Zydell Joyce Gray and Michael Hartford ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... www.accokeekfoundation.org | 11


Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2011

Financial Highlights

FY 2011 REVENUES Contributions 29%

Program Income 4% Government Grants 57%

FY 2011 EXPENSES

Foundation Grants 10%

Fundraising 5% Management & General 13%

Education 45%

Natural Resources 17%

Agriculture 20%

revenues

Contributions..........................................$435,435 Government Grants................................855,455 Foundation Grants...................................146,500 Program Income........................................ 60,124 Total Revenues.............................$1,497,504

program expenses

Education................................................$559,417 Agriculture................................................243,933 Natural Resources....................................211,349

support expenses

Management & General..........................158,446 Fundraising.................................................. 69,534 Total Expenses.............................$1,242,679

A copy of the audited financial statement and IRS Form 990 is available by calling 301-283-2113 or emailing hnelson@accokeek.org.

Change in Net Assets.................... $254,825

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 | accokeek foundation 2011 annual report


Photographs taken by and copyrighted by the Accokeek Foundation. More photo hightlights can be found on Flickr at www.flickr.com/photos/accokeek ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... www.accokeekfoundation.org | 13


3400 Bryan Point Road Accokeek, MD 20607 301.283.2113 www.accokeekfoundation.org

Accokeek Foundation Annual Report 2011  

annual report for the fiscal year October 1, 2010 to September 30, 2011.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you