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ACC ESS CO M M U N I T Y AC T I O N AG EN C Y


A letter from our Board Chair and President/CEO Dear Friends, Welcome to the Access Community Action Agency 2009 Annual Report, which provides you with an overview of our community impact and financial results over the past year. As we all know, it’s been a very tough year for many people all across Connecticut and the Nation. Locally, the economic downturn has resulted in steep increases in requests for emergency assistance – in many cases from people who’ve never before asked for help. And never before has the Access Mission been more relevant and important: To create the conditions that empower individuals and families to overcome the barriers that impair their ability to be economically stable. Fortunately, Access has been well positioned to contribute to the economic recovery of local families and communities. Our approach to strategic planning, coupled with Municipal, State and Federal governments recognizing the key role Community Action Agencies play in their local communities, and the support of many generous individuals, businesses, faith-based and civic organizations has provided both the framework and funding for Access to be there when needed. We take very seriously our responsibility to be the eyes, ears and hands of a caring community. Our Strategic Framework guides us as we work to meet that responsibility. In the pages of this report you’ll see that Strategic Framework. You’ll also find some numbers and stories that shed light on how your support has allowed us to implement that Framework and make a real difference in real lives. As your local Community Action Agency, Access is committed to carry out the nation-wide Community Action Promise: “Community Action changes people’s lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities, and makes America a better place to live. We care about the entire community, and we are dedicated to helping people help themselves and each other.” No work is more important, and we are honored and inspired by your ongoing support. It’s amazing people like you and many others that feed our hope, and fuel our action to bring about a brighter future. Please take some time to review this report so you can either reinforce what you already know, or learn some new things about Access and the results that have been achieved as we continue to partner to fight poverty. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you need more information or you want to lend a helping hand.

Sincerely,

Mary A. DeMarco Chair, Board of Directors

Peter S. DeBiasi President/CEO

Access Community Action Agency • Annual Report • July 2008 - June 2009 Strategic Framework ......................................................Page 4 Financial Statement ........................................................Page 5 2009 Annual Appeal .......................................................Page 6 Thank You to Board of Directors ...................................Page 7

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Strategic Framework Our Community Vision Windham and Tolland Counties will be a region whose residents and communities have and effectively use the resources necessary to ensure that all of its families and individuals thrive.

Our Mission To create the conditions that empower individuals and families in the communities we serve to overcome the barriers that impair their ability to be economically stable

Our Long-Term Strategic Commitments • Meet Basic Human Needs • Build Capacity to Accumulate Income and Assets • Foster Positive At-Risk-Youth Development

Our Values • • • • • •

Compassion Integrity Empowerment Accountability Synergy Excellence

Meeting Basic Human Needs means... ...providing help and hope for people going through

Fostering At-Risk-Youth Development means... ...working with youth and their families to overcome

difficult times by providing them with access to food, housing and clothes, so that they can get back on their feet and move toward economic stability.

obstacles and challenges in their lives while teaching them skills to become self-sufficient.

2,728 households worked with case managers to develop individualized plans to help move them toward economic stability. This represented an increase of 39% from 2007. 7,589 household received energy and utility assistance: an increase of 30% from 2007. 190 homes received furnace cleanings or replacements. 6,335 individuals, 2,521 of whom were 18 or younger, received emergency food services totaling 54,015 meals. 616 individuals, comprised of 115 families and 267 single adults were temporarily housed in our emergency shelter. This included 179 children. 120 families avoided being evicted from their homes. 27 individuals and 56 families were placed in permanent housing. 2,800 women, infants and children received nutrition counseling and services. 1,600 nutritious meals were provided to young children by 220 licensed home childcare providers. 35 units of affordable housing had lead based paint hazards ameliorated and were brought into compliance with building codes. 32 elderly housing units were occupied at Willington Woods, Access Senior Housing.

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ACC ESS CO M M U N I T Y AC T I O N AG EN C Y

150 parents completed the Parent Education Program to help them help their children deal with divorce. 362 children were able to maintain positive relationships with their non-custodial parent through supervised visitation. 73 children and their parents enrolled in a program to preserve and/or reunify their families, 14 reunified, 59 were preserved. 32 troubled youth were matched with mentors who acted as positive role models. 43 behaviorally challenged youth received specialized mentoring so they could continue to live with or transition back to living with their families. 26 adolescent girls lived in safe, supervised, nurturing, group homes while being supported and challenged to develop independent living skills at school, work and volunteering.

A snapshot of success: Over the past year, five of the young women living in one of our group homes graduated high school and are continuing their education.


Building Capacity for Income and Asset Accumulation means... ...working with people to prepare them for work, and helping them budget and save their hard earned money for asset purchases, so they can achieve the self-reliance and healthy inter-dependence with their communities that comes from family economic stability.

Financial Statement Meeting Basic Human Needs WIC, CACFP, LEAP, Emergency Shelter, Food Banks, Energy Assistance, Case Management, Housing Preservation, EFPP $12,346,668 REVENUE $12,232,141 EXPENSES Fostering Positive At-Risk Youth Development Residential Services, Mentoring, Town Based Services, Parenting Programs $1,916,311 REVENUE $2,034,866 EXPENSES

A snapshot of success: Luis Hernandez participated in the IDA program and used his knowledge and money saved to purchase his first home. 2,675 low income households were made more energy efficient, significantly reducing heating costs. 372 unemployed or displaced workers obtained job skill trainings and help developing job readiness skills. 725 tax returns were prepared for free with refunds totaling $1,026,160. Of this, $353,668 was returned through the Earned Income Tax Credit.

Through matched savings programs: 18 adults participated in classes on budgeting, saving and owning assets • 3 people became first-time homebuyers • 1 individual started a business

Building Capacity for Income and Asset Accumulation VITA, IDA Programs, Energy Conservation, Workforce Development $2,696,833 REVENUE $2,422,921 EXPENSES

Administration and Property Management: $249,093 REVENUE $471,299 EXPENSES Unrestricted Contributions: $16,750 REVENUE

TOTALS 30 middle school youth participated in a work, savings, budgeting and purchasing assets program • 8 youth purchased school uniforms and computers

$17,225,655 REVENUE $17,161,227 EXPENSES

Change in net assets

7 high school students participated in a similar program • 1 student purchased a car • 1 student used their money for college tuition • 1 student purchased a laptop

$64,428

Another snapshot of success:

A snapshot of success: Nico Gonzalez purchases his first car

An unemployed adult female on the verge of homelessness with no marketable skills, sought help at one of the CT Works offices. Access workforce development staff provided intensive case management services and referred her to Access for Energy Assistance and other services. Once her barriers were addressed, she received funds to pay tuition for a Certified Nursing Assistant training course. She completed the course, and attained a CNA license, passing with the highest scores in her class. She is currently employed full time.

with his IDA savings.

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2009 Annual Appeal* Special thanks to our Funding Partners. Without them our work would not be possible. Individual Donors Samantha Abbamonte Roger and Cynthia Adams Aaron Alexander Anonymous Maggie Appleton Rachel Arcand Jody Aubin Ken Avery Angela Bachand Mark and Diane Bancroft Mitch Beauregard Mike and Elaine Bernier Harry and Honore Birkenruth Judy Blakeley John and Susan Boland Joan Bourque Lindsay Bowes William Breslau Carol Briggs Donna Britland Renee Britner Rheo Brouillard William Bunnell Janelle Burke Clifford Buttermark Marlene Cady Matilde Casoni Cathy Cementina Lauren Cheslick Bradley Connors Angel Cote John and Carol Crandall Kathy Crees Luz Crespo Carmen Cruz Andrea Cygan Janice Davila Peter and Gloria Murray DeBiasi Dorothy Delvalle

Mary DeMarco Jean deSmet Mary Lou DeVivo Erin Dickerman Linda Donahue Carlyn Duncan Heidi Edwards Jordan Elliott Walter and Mary Ellen Elwell Norman and Janet Fellows Alejandro Fuentes Patricia Gaenzler Janet E. Galante David Gaudreau, O.D. Lionel Gaudreau Bruce Goldstein Atty. Ronald Goldstein Merrill Ann Gonzales James Goodwin Samuel Gordon Ann Gruenberg Anthony Guglielmo Kristen Haddad Robert J. Halloran, Jr. Zoe Hansen-DiBello KJ Haugland Cote George Hernandez Lorraine Hicks Aimee Holand Atty. John Horak Estate of Elizabeth Kemp Kareem Jolly Gail Kennedy Ann Kouatly Bettye Kramer Carol Kraus Olga Kurnyk-Ezis Claire LaBelle Jonathan Lamiotte Kimberly Lane and Peter Deary Rusty Lanzit Deborah Lax

Karen Lechene Arlene LeRoy Joan Lewis Caterina Lima Ana Lozada Egla Madera Wendy McGale Peter L. Millman Richard Minio Brenda Mitchell Kathy Mitchell Ethelinda Montfort Anne Moore Yanaira Morales Todd Morin Jodi Nafis Sarah Norman Karell Ocasio Mary Oliver Giselle Ortiz-Ruiz Elizabeth Paterson John Patton Aide Perez Melissa Phillips Leslie Poulos and William Stover Edith Prague Parrish Protheroe Sandra Provencal Alejandro Ramos Megan Riemann Shirley Riemann Janet Rivera Ronald and Christine Robinson Dahianna Rodriguez Ines Rolon Myrna Romero Damaris Ruiz Candace Rzeznikiewicz Jessica Sacilowski Aisha Salamo Christian Scannell David Shadbegian Josh Skorton Jennifer Smith Brenda Soileau Mary Jean Sznurkowski Cindy Thibodeau Bruce and Virginia Valentine Juanita Vazquez Dolly Von Husen Noreen Wallace Douglas Warner Cathy Whitehead Jennifer Witter Henry Woodbridge, Jr. Constance Woodmancy Joanna Xiong Walter J. Zoldak

Corporate/Business Donors Calvary Baptist Church Celebrations Gallery and Shoppes Charter Oak Federal Credit Union Christ Church of Pomfret Church of the Good Shepherd Dayville Volunteer Fire Co., Ladies Aux. Design Center East Federated Church of Christ Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Friendly Spirits Liquor Store Frito-Lay Gospel Light Christian Fellowship Horace Porter School Kahan, Kerensky and Capossela, LLP Greater Worcester Community Foundation Killingly Central School Killingly Glass and Aluminum Killingly Quiet Corner Lions Club Landon’s Tire Inc. Leschke-Puffer Insurance Agency MANTEC Medical Pharmacy, Willimantic New Alliance Bank PepsiCo Foundation PBR Investments Pomfret School Putnam Emblem Club Putnam Bank R&R Insulators Reid & Reige Foundation Savings Institute Bank and Trust Scott’s Cyclery Inc. Small Business Development Center St. Mark’s Chapel, Storrs St. Mary’s Church, Coventry St. Mary’s Church of the Visitation, Putnam St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Plainfield Staples Temple B’nai Israel The Wakely Foundation Town of Bolton Town of Chaplin Town of Eastford Town of Plainfield Town of Scotland Town of Somers True Value, Willimantic UConn Center for Continuing Studies United Way of Central & Northeast CT United Way of Rhode Island United Way of Southeastern CT VFW Post #10284, Moosup Weiss & Hale Financial LLC

*donations received October 1, 2008 through September 25, 2009 66

A AC CC C EE SS SS C CO OM MM MU UN N II TT Y Y A AC C TT II O ON N A AG G EE N NC CY Y


First SMILE of this years back pack program

Thank you to our Board of Directors! The Access Community Action Agency Board of Directors consists of dedicated volunteers who generously donate their time and talent in the service of the local community while representing local towns, private businesses and organizations, and constituent groups. July 2008 – June 2009 Board Members were: Rusty Lanzit, Chair ................................................Town of Chaplin Mary A. DeMarco, Vice Chair ............................Town of Windham John Patton, Treasurer ....................................Becker Construction Carol Kraus, Secretary ...................................Natchaug School PTO

Mae Flexer .............................................................Town of Killingly Veronica Gomez ....................Connecticut Light & Power Company Sam Gordon .......................................................Town of Mansfield Ann Gruenberg, Ph.D. ..........................Eastern CT State University Olga Kurnyk-Ezis ..............................Ukrainian National Home, Inc. Jose Lopez Morales .........................Ashton Towers Senior Housing Tenants Organization Melissa Phillips ............................The Savings Institute Bank & Trust David Pinney ..........................................................Town of Somers Ines Rolon ..........................................Windham Middle School PTO Patricia Royer ...........................................IDA Program Participants Jessica Sacilowski ........................Natchaug Family Resource Center Juanita Vazquez ..............Windham Community Memorial Hospital Dolly Von Husen .....................Village Heights Tenants Organization

Service Delivery Locations Main Offices 1315 Main Street Willimantic, CT • 860-450-7400 • Emergency Food Bank • Case Management • Fuel Assistance • Eviction & Foreclosure Prevention • Access and Visitation • Parent Education • CACFP (Child & Adult Care Food Program) • WIC (Women, Infants & Children) • Individual Development Accounts • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance • Weatherization (Energy Conservation) • Lead Elimination Action Program • Housing Preservation 231 Broad Street Danielson, CT • 860-774-0418 • Emergency Food Bank • Case Management • Fuel Assistance • Eviction & Foreclosure Prevention • Supportive Housing for Families • Next Step Supportive Housing • Beyond Shelter • Youth Mentoring • Access and Visitation • Parent Education

CT Works One-Stop Centers 95 Westcott Road Danielson, CT 860-412-7060 1320 Main Street Willimantic, CT 860-450-7523 Emergency Shelter 51 Reynolds Street Danielson, CT 860-774-4977 Hawkins House Group Home Danielson, CT 860-774-2876 Crossroads Transitional Group Home Norwich, CT 860-887-7800 Senior Services Beckish Senior Center 188 Route 66 Columbia, CT 860-228-0759

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1315 Main Street, Suite 2 Willimantic, Connecticut 06226 231 Broad Street Danielson, Connecticut 06239

www.accessagency.org

27 units of HUD-funded low income senior housing have been approved for development in Franklin, CT.

Annual Report 2009  

The Access Community Action Agency Annual Report 2009