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A C C E N T / T H E M A G A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S

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SUMMER 2015

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future : s 0 8 sign ’ e h de t d l o e v r b nce o f o s l nfamou vengea e Wdecade i s with a A

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OYSTER PERPETUAL ROLE X DEEPSE A

rolex

oyster perpetual and deepsea are trademarks.


LAGOS sterling silver and 18K yellow gold Caviar beaded bracelet with brilliant-cut diamonds, $3,000 LAGOS 18K yellow gold Caviar beaded bracelet, $7,400 LAGOS sterling silver and 18K yellow gold Caviar beaded bracelet with brilliant-cut diamonds, $2,750

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ll of us have heard the phrase “what goes around comes around.” This year the ’80s are back with a vengeance in all forms of fashion and pop culture—from bright/neon colors to bold gold jewelry to throwback graphic design. In this issue of our TIVOL Magazine we explore the big impact that on-trend jewelry accessories have in fashion. Because there are no longer rules for wearing jewelry, it’s quite hip and fun to mix colors, metals and styles. Layer, layer, layer—and not just bracelets, but necklaces. One of the freshest looks I’ve seen is layering two pendants together—either worn at the same length so they jumble over each other, or inches apart. I hear from customers all the time who say, “I end up wearing

the same pieces every day.” I get it. Occasionally, we all succumb to old habits. For the last couple of years I’ve taken out the night before whatever clothes, shoes and jewelry I’m wearing the next day. That way I can mix it up and think about it without the pressure of rushing and just throwing on the same earrings. As a result, I end up wearing some old treasures that I never would have thought of during a hectic morning. It’s a good habit to get into. It just makes our lives easier. (Much like setting the kitchen or dining room table two or three days before guests arrive.) The older I get, the easier I want my life to be. We’d love to show you our stores, each awash in fresh color this season. Welcome back to the future. And welcome to TIVOL 2015.

on the cover: Anita Ko 18K yellow gold arrow cuff bracelet with brilliant-cut diamonds, $4,830


800.829.1515

tivol.com

Country Club Plaza 220 Nichols Road Kansas City, MO 64112

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Chairman Emeritus CEO General Manager Director of Merchandising Director of Marketing/ Editor

Cathy Tivol Brian Butler Ryann Rinker

Adam Gebhardt

Marketing Coordinator/ Photographer

Kelly Schottler

Graphic Artist

Terry Campbell

Published by the BJI Fashion Group Publisher

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Harold Tivol

Stu Nifoussi

President and CEO

Britton Jones

Chairman and COO

Mac Brighton

FEATURES 6

IN THE LOUPE

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12

FROM THE RUNWAYS

68 TIMEPIECES:

24 30

NOTEWORTHY COLOR

Karen Alberg Grossman

Design Director

Hans Gschliesser

Managing Editor

Jillian LaRochelle

Project Manager

Lisa Montemorra

Designer Production Manager

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TRAVEL: TAKE ME AWAY

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FOOD: CURAÇAO’S CUISINE

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RECIPE: CATHY TIVOL’S MILLION DOLLAR CHICKEN

National Content Editor-in-Chief

WORRY OVER WATCHMAKERS

DESIGNER PROFILE: ANITA KO

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UP BEFORE YOU GO-GO

DIMINUTIVE DIVA: KRISTIN CHENOWETH

TIMEPIECES: WIND ME

86 HOROSCOPES 88 COMMUNITY CAUSES: CCVI

Jean-Nicole Venditti Peg Eadie

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2015. Accent is published by Business Journals, Inc, PO Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015. Fax 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212686-4412. Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Volume 13, Issue 1. Accent is a trademark of Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Printed in The U.S.A.

Above: Carelle 18K yellow gold leaf earrings with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $7,850

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FOREVERMARK

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TREND ALERT: MOONSTONE

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SOCIAL MEDIA: HASHTAG HOW-TO

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LOCAL STYLE

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in the loupe 10.10.14 Stephen Webster Personal Appearance British jewelry designer Stephen Webster visited TIVOL to showcase pieces from his new and vibrantly colored Lady Stardust and Magnipheasant collections, largely inspired by the music of David Bowie. In addition to a celebratory ’80s-themed cocktail party at the Country Club Plaza location, the new jewelry was also used to promote a November 7, 2014 Velvet Underground-themed event for the local charity SAVE Inc.

In costume as Ziggy Stardust, local entertainer Missy Koonce promotes the Velvet Underground gala in Webster’s jewelry.

Anne Killen and Stephen Webster Cathy Tivol and Stephen Webster

Andrew Tricomi-Duran and Benjamin Keeton

Laura Chalk and Jules Boasberg

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Andrew Grin and Chandler Clark

Stephen Webster and Lori Peterson

Earlier in the day, Webster appeared at a private meet-and-greet event for local media and style bloggers as well as jewelry design students from the University of Kansas, The Kansas City Art Institute, Johnson County Community College and William Jewell. The event was held above Paolini Garment on the Country Club Plaza. Front row from left: Eric Morales, Laura Rollins, Rachael Carver, Eunhwa Son, Becaa Frankel and Lopeeta Tawde. Back row: Gwendalyn Akins, Connor Dyer, Stephen Webster, Yuying Li, Phoebe Crouch, Kayla McCully, Sunyound Cheong and Selena Cochron.

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11.7.14 The Diamond Celebration Harold Tivol used to ask his clients, “Has your diamond shrunk over the years?” For those who would answer “yes” to this question, TIVOL hosted a two-day Diamond Celebration Event—a chance for customers to upgrade their existing diamonds as well as to view vast collections of engagement, wedding and anniversary rings.

Chris and Carrie Barnthouse

Jana Meister and Lauren Ellis

Abbey Henn and Chris Smreker

Nancy and Jason Wander with daughters Ava and Stella

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Carved Stone and Diamond Bangles

IF THESE JEWELS COULD TALK

FRED LEIGHTON


11.20.14 David Yurman Styling Event Travis Ngo, a renowned stylist from the David Yurman Design Studio in New York, visited TIVOL at Hawthorne Plaza to offer tips on mixing and matching jewelry—both new and old—to create nuanced looks.

Andrea Krasnow and Caitlin Fore

Christina Stratton and Barbara Mooreland

Ryan Muehlfelder, McKenzie Muehlfelder, Joe Baer and Mark Nielsen

Caitlin Fore, Kathryn Snellen, Brianna Peters, Lisa Murie, Erin Barnes and Andrea Krasnow

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from the RUNWAYS

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The detailed construction of these pieces celebrates the timelessness of fundamental geometry.

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3

5

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1. TIVOL Collection 18K rose gold necklace with triangular sugelite pendant, $750 2. Armenta Old World Collection sterling silver and 18K yellow gold diamond-shaped earrings with white diamonds, $2,900 3. TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold pyramid-shaped earrings, $595 4. Penny Preville 18K yellow gold ring consisting of different band rings, $5,290 5. Stephen Webster Lady Stardust Collection 18K white gold bracelet set with rubies, ďŹ re opals and yellow and orange garnets, $28,500 BIBHU MOHAPATRA RUNWAY IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIES DIRECTIONS

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T H E KW I AT C O BBL E S TO N E C O L L E C T I O N


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Ethereal pieces reect light as they appear to glow from within.

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6

3

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5 1. Roberto Coin Pois Mois Collection 18K yellow gold necklace with a cushion-shaped pendant set with white mother of pearl, $980 2. TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold necklace with a horizontal bar pendant of white topaz over white mother of pearl and 26 round diamonds, $1,995 3. Schoeffel Pearl strand of 37 natural Tahitian black cultured pearls, $9,950 4. TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold ring with white mother of pearl surrounded by round diamonds, $6,995 5. TIVOL Collection 18K white gold and South Sea pearl earrings with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $8,000 6. David Yurman Starburst Collection sterling silver bracelet with three starbursts set with pearls, $650 ELIE SAAB RUNWAY IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIES DIRECTIONS

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1 3

Cleanse your color palette with these delicate shades that are quintessentially feminine.

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5

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1. David Yurman Albion Collection sterling silver earrings with cushion-shaped morganite surrounded by round, brilliantcut diamonds, $1,300 2. Rahaminov Platinum and 18K rose gold ring with an oval-shaped 0.44ct pink diamond surrounded by 32 fancy pink diamonds and 84 white diamonds, $82,780 3. Penny Preville 18K rose gold earrings with oval and pearshaped blue jean aquamarines, surrounded by round diamonds, $6,085 4. Precision Set 18K rose gold band, pavĂŠ-set with four rows of round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $8,075 5. Carelle Leaf Collection 18K yellow gold ring with a cushion-shaped green quartz and open leaf design, $2,625 ZUHAIR MURAD RUNWAY IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIES DIRECTIONS

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1

Vibrant and strong, these bold beauties ask for no apologies in their celebration of summer.

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6 5

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1. TIVOL Collection 18K white gold pendant with an oval-shaped ruby surrounded by diamonds and rubies, $2,400 2. Penny Preville 18K yellow gold bracelet with rose-cut turquoise and diamond links, $6,350 3. Arman Sarkisyan 22K yellow gold and sterling silver ring with a round sapphire and round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $5,280 4. Stephen Webster Flutter Collection 18K yellow gold ring with an oval-shaped fire opal flanked by white diamond butterflies, $6,250 5. Ugo Calá Iside Collection 18K rose gold bracelet with rubies and diamonds, $2,160 6. Ugo Calá Iside Collection 18K yellow gold bracelet with blue sapphires and diamonds, $2,000 STELLA JEAN RUNWAY IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIES DIRECTIONS

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spotted

Idina Menzel wears Forevermark during a performance at Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest.

Hillary Clinton wears Marco Bicego at the Democratic Convention.

Kate Walsh wears Roberto Coin at The Hollywood Reporter’s Women In Entertainment: Power 100 Breakfast.

As Seen On...

Our favorite stars share a love for our favorite brands!

BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

Estelle wears David Yurman during a performance at the New Yorkers for Children Fall Gala.

Jennifer Lopez wears Harry Kotlar during an appearance on Ellen.

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HAUTE LOOKS ON THE RED CARPET Take a cue from these decorated digits and ring in spring! BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

ZOOEY DESCHANEL

KATY PERRY

BELLAMY YOUNG

KAROLINA KURKOVA

wore a Forevermark by

wore a Harry Kotlar fancy

wore a David Yurman Labyrinth

wore a Forevermark Cluster

Maria Canale Aster Collection

canary yellow diamond ring to

gold dome ring to the Elle Women

Shield diamond ring to an Art

diamond ring to the Emmys.

the Grammys.

in Hollywood event.

Basel party in Miami.


personalities

Right: Chenoweth’s 2014 CD release of career favorites.

Diminutive

Diva

Kristin Chenoweth’s big voice and bright smile have been lighting up stages and screens for decades. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

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hat Kristin Chenoweth lacks in height she makes up for in vocal power, acting ability and fashion sense. The 4'11'', 46-year-old superstar has thrilled Broadway audiences with her work in such shows as You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown (which earned her a Tony), Wicked and Promises, Promises. She’s also a frequent TV and film actress, best known for her roles as Annabeth in The West Wing, Courtney in Four Christmases, Olive Snook in Pushing Daisies (for which she won an Emmy) and April in Glee. And did we mention she regularly sells out concert halls and major arenas? Last fall, Chenoweth released her latest CD, Coming Home, a concert version of which also aired as a PBS special. She’s currently appearing on Broadway opposite Peter Gallagher as

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From top: Chenoweth in The Good Wife; with Peter Gallagher in On the Twentieth Century; in Glee; as Glinda the Good in Wicked.

tempestuous 1930s film star Lily Garland in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of the hit musical On the Twentieth Century. Accent recently caught up with Chenoweth to chat about her career, her fashion choices and her favorite pieces of jewelry. The character of Lily Garland in On the Twentieth Century has long been on your radar. How does it feel to finally get the chance to portray her on Broadway? It’s definitely been on my bucket list. The composers, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, told me before they passed away that I was the next rightful owner of that role. I’ve always kept that in the back of my mind, and it seemed like now the time was right. And here I am doing it! I’m very nervous, because it’s a difficult score to sing, and there’s some major physical comedy. When you play a character like Lily, who is a bit of a diva, which parts of your personality do you draw from? I guess there is strength in me that I can only see at times when I’m being pushed to the limit, and Lily is a push-to-thelimit type of character. And vocally she’s a soprano, so that is right in my wheelhouse. The character you’re best known for may be Glinda from Wicked. Do you ever get tired of singing songs from that show at your concerts? Sometimes I wonder if the audience really wants to hear Popular again, but they prove me wrong every time. They always do! How did you choose which songs to record for Coming Home? It’s a culmination of songs I’ve been singing my whole life, so it’s more of a career record. Gospel music is a big part of my life, so I included a song I grew up singing, Little Sparrow, which is a tribute to Dolly Parton. There’s Somewhere Over the Rainbow, which I’ve been singing since I was itty-bitty. And I Could’ve Danced All Night from My Fair Lady shows my vocal training. Everything I do is represented on that album. What are your favorite things to do off-stage? When I need to get away, I like to go to Cabo San Lucas and lie by the pool and drink margaritas and hang out and eat. I also like to just stay in bed and watch TV. Tell us about your sense of fashion, both in real life and on the red carpet. I keep it pretty simple. I think simple is better when you’re petite. And I like to mix and match. If I get a dress from Zara, then I’ll pair it with Christian Louboutin shoes. Do you have a surefire look for attracting attention? I don’t think cleavage ever hurts. How do you use jewelry to complete a look, and what are some of your favorite pieces? I don’t do a lot of big jewelry unless I’m on stage. Personally, I like smaller stacked necklaces and rings. I have a brand-new pair of broken arrow earrings that my friends gave me knowing I’m from a little town in Oklahoma called Broken Arrow, so currently those are my favorite. Have you inherited any family jewelry heirlooms that mean something particularly special to you? There is a black onyx ring that my grandma had. She gave it to my mom and my mom, not too long ago, gave it to me. That’s one of my prized possessions. So is another ring that my grandma had throughout her life; it’s an opal with diamonds around it. Those are the kind of things on which you can’t put a monetary value.

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“Sometimes I wonder if the audience really wants to hear Popular again.. . they always do!” Kristin Chenoweth will perform with the Kansas City Symphony at The Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts on Saturday, October 3. The benefit concert will support Kansas City Young Audiences.


new collections 1. 3.

2.

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hen you think of fine jewelry designer Penny Preville, the name evokes images of elegant lacework and feminine detailing. The brand’s use of diamonds, rich colored gemstones and vintage-inspired designs attracts women to its sophistication, but also its ability to be worn as everyday pieces. Now, with its brand aesthetic clearly defined, Penny Preville has begun to diversify. Over the past few seasons, the brand has been quietly playing with more modern designs while not straying too far from its signature look. TIVOL got a sneak peek at what’s new from this revered brand for 2015, and here’s what we saw: Simplified designs inspired by romantic representations of the earth, moon and stars. Clean lines have replaced lacey motifs. Gemstones have been replaced by a greater use of polished

metal, ranging from white and yellow to rose gold adorned with hints of pavé diamonds. “I find inspiration in a woman’s lifestyle,” Preville says. “I thrive on designing pieces that can be worn every day, from day to night, and as I continue to grow as a person I am always striving to excite my customers with regularly evolving collections that still stay true to my aesthetic.” Penny Preville’s new collections for 2015 include Petals, Celestial and Geometric to name a few. While the new designs are a slight departure from the signature Penny Preville look, these pieces are still feminine, classic and, as always, easy to wear. The new collections start at $1,500, and are available at TIVOL as of spring 2015. Pieces from the collections can be viewed at TIVOL.

5.

4.

1. Penny Preville 18K yellow gold long open pointed Deco earrings, $3,490 2. Penny Preville 18K white gold triangle “Y” necklace, $1,995 3. Penny Preville 18K white gold open round earrings with baguette diamonds, $8,195 4. Penny Preville 18K white gold starburst stud earrings with round diamonds, $2,590 5. Penny Preville 18K yellow gold criss-cross band with round diamonds, $3,555

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A. While yellow gold never completely disappeared from the pages of the world’s top fashion magazines, it definitely played understudy to both white gold and platinum for a lengthy period of time. Once associated with pop culture icons of the 1980s like power suits and shoulder pads, the new yellow is now modern, refined and boldly sexy. And this time it’s not alone. Today its close cousin, rose gold—an alloy with rich hues of pink undertones—has joined the mix.

B.

A. TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold curb link bracelet with round diamonds, $14,400 C. B. TIVOL Collection 18K rose gold link ring with round diamonds, $3,000

C. TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold hoop earrings, $1,500


D.

E.

F.

D. TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold curved link bracelet, $8,600

E. Arman Sarkisyan 22K yellow gold and sterling silver earrings with lacework design and round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $6,930

F. Carelle 18K yellow gold necklace with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $4,400

G. TIVOL Collection 18K rose gold cushion-shaped link drop earrings with round diamonds, $6,400

G.


designer profile

ANITA KO

An edgy new perspective gives life to classic geometric shapes.

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os Angeles-based designer Anita Ko founded her fine jewelry company in 2006 with a commitment to creating jewelry focused on quality and craftsmanship. Designing with the modern woman in mind, Anita Ko creates a variety of unique and contemporary pieces that are adaptable for a variety of occasions. Ko has been featured in some of the world’s best-known tastemaker publications such as Elle, Vogue, Harper’s

Bazaar, Marie Claire, Women’s Wear Daily, The New York Times and many more. The brand also has a large celebrity following and has been worn by Victoria Beckham, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Jennifer Lawrence, Cameron Diaz, Emma Watson, Miranda Kerr, Jessica Biel, Heidi Klum and Rihanna. TIVOL welcomed the Anita Ko collection in fall 2014 and it has quickly become a new customer favorite.

Above: Anita Ko 18K yellow gold arrow cuff bracelet with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $4,830 Far left: Anita Ko 18K yellow gold dagger earrings with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $8,400 Left: Anita Ko 18K rose gold leaf ring with baguette diamonds and round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $4,950

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C R E AT E D F O R L I F E . C R A F T E D F O R A L I F E T I M E . ™


trend alert

noteworthy T

he prevalence of colored gemstones used in designer jewelry collections has increased in recent years to reach all-time highs. A new wave of colorful designs includes both bold and pastel hues, often coordinated with yellow or rose gold metals (the hottest jewelry trends in recent memory). Of course, if strong golds aren’t for you, white gold and platinum are still popular choices as well. Ultimately, there are no rules as creating a personalized look by mixing and matching remains très chic. And with these fun colors, how can you go wrong? So, take note. Bold is in.

color

Penny Preville 18K white gold drop-style earrings with oval-shaped faceted emeralds, $10,495


David Yurman Sterling silver and 18K yellow gold Waverly Collection rings, $1,450 (green onyx), $1,450 (black onyx), $1,750 (lapis)

David Yurman Sterling silver double Wheat chain featuring an open circle design, with a sterling silver and 18K yellow gold faceted gold dome pendant with round diamonds, $3,110


Tirisi 18K yellow gold chain necklace featuring a faceted cognac quartz with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $12,910


Marco Bicego 18K yellow gold Lunaria ring featuring an oval-shaped, rose-cut dark aquamarine, $2,530

Marco Bicego 18K yellow gold Lunaria necklace featuring an oval-shaped, rose-cut dark aquamarine, $2,670

Marco Bicego 18K yellow and white gold Lunaria necklace with free-form oval shapes and round diamonds, $9,100


bridal

B. A.

C.

A. Jack KelÊge Platinum ring featuring a 1.51ct round, brilliant-cut diamond with bead-set round diamonds, $27,110 B. Precision Set Modern Collection 18K yellow gold and platinum ring with a 1.51ct round, brilliant-cut Forevermark diamond, $14,965 C. TIVOL Collection Platinum semi-mounting with a 2.02ct round, brilliant-cut Forevermark diamond anked by two round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $42,445

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A.

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A. Rahaminov Platinum ring with a 2.47ct emerald-cut diamond flanked by two trapezoid diamonds, $44,720 B. Henri Daussi 18K rose gold ring featuring a 1.58ct cushion-shaped diamond with 30 round diamonds, $16,950 C. TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold ring featuring a 1.51ct round, brilliant-cut diamond with 16 round diamonds halfway around, $14,260 D. Jack Kelége Platinum semi-mounting with 106 round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $10,900 (mounting only) E. Sébastien Barier 18K yellow gold Art Deco reproduction-style ring with a 0.70ct round diamond and milgrain detail, $6,720 F. TIVOL Collection 18K white gold semi-mounting featuring a 0.98ct marquiseshaped diamond with 32 round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $6,950

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A.

B.

C.

D.

F.

E.

A. Jack KelĂŠge 18K rose gold band with open swirl design and bead-set round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $10,450 B. Henri Daussi 18K white gold band with milgrain detail and round, brilliant-cut diamonds set inside marquise-shaped stations, $880 C. Henri Daussi 18K rose gold band with round, brilliant-cut diamonds and milgrain detail, $2,200 D. Precision Set 18K yellow gold band with 10 round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $4,720 E. TIVOL Collection 18K white gold diamond band with three rows of round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $3,435 F. Jack KelĂŠge Platinum diamond band with ďŹ ve rows of round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $16,500

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A.

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D.

E.

F.

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A. Danhov Classico Collection 18K white and yellow gold band with 12 round diamonds, $3,020 B. Novell Palladium wedding band with scroll design, $1,590 C. Rahaminov 18K white gold diamond band with Carre-cut diamonds, $8,000 D. Precision Set 18K white and yellow gold band with brushed ďŹ nish, $1,995 E. Rahaminov 18K rose gold wedding band with brushed ďŹ nish and round black diamonds on each side, $7,000 F. Danhov Tubetto Collection 18K yellow gold band with double circle design, $2,640 G. Rahaminov 18K white gold diamond band with Carre-cut diamonds, $8,920

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A. Kwiat platinum diamond line Sonata Collection bracelet with alternating round, brilliant-cut and baguette diamonds, $18,700 B. Tirisi 18K rose gold beaded bracelet with a high-polish ďŹ nish, $3,660 C. Marco Bicego 18K yellow and white gold Murano Link Collection bracelet with round diamonds, $7,600

A. B.

C.

E. D.

F.

D. Rahaminov 18K yellow gold bracelet with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $21,600 E. TIVOL Collection 18K white gold bracelet with oval-shaped rubies and round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $9,795 F. Fred Leighton 18K white gold bracelet featuring hexagonal links outlined with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $13,600


trends

M

ore was better. That was the only rule of thumb in the 1980s, a time when bracelets were worn so heavily layered that Madonna could barely bend her arms. A few years later, however, the trend would reverse itself completely as jewelry wearers took a more minimalist approach to their personal styles. Fast forward to the 2010s. Influences from the ’80s are making their way back to the catwalks of New York and Paris, but this time they’re not a literal translation. Layering is again en vogue—complete with mixed metals and materials—but on this go there’s a refinement to the look: an organized chaos that was missing from the trend 30 years ago.

Marco Bicego 18K yellow gold Murano Link Collection bracelet, $3,960

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experts

All About BRIDAL RINGS

Our magazine’s trend specialist is now wedding expert to the world. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

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orraine DePasque has a passion for jewelry: she’s been writing about it for most of her career and for many years in this magazine. So her recent appointment as about.com’s first-ever wedding bands and engagement rings expert comes as no surprise. Here, we chat with her about her new position and about the basics of buying bridal rings. Congrats on the new job! We always knew you were an expert… Thank you! About.com has roughly 900 experts, but I’m the first to specialize in engagement rings and wedding bands, which became a separate category on the site this past November. What are some of your favorite topics? I recently wrote about platinum, black diamonds and eco-friendly jewelry. Social responsibility is huge with the bridal demographic: they care about ethical sourcing, reclaimed metals, recycled materials, sustainability, etc. What’s the hottest trend in engagement rings for 2015? White metal is still number one, meaning platinum of course, but also white gold (14K and 18K). Yellow gold has also been trending for the past year or so, and estate jewelry is a growing piece of the business. There’s also more interest in natural colored diamonds (thanks to celebrity preferences) and even other colored gemstones. When Prince William presented Kate with his mother’s sapphire engagement ring, it was all about blue; this year, Pantone’s Color of the Year is Marsala, so rubies— equally as durable as sapphires—should be newly popular. How about diamond cuts: what’s popular now? Round is still the top trending cut: perhaps 80 percent of the business, followed by cushion cuts, followed by squares. But some of the older cuts, especially marquises and pear shapes, are starting to come back. The other continuing trend is halos: everything from a single halo around any cut stone, a multi-halo, or even an intricate floral halo. How are the trends evolving? It’s interesting. I learn a lot about consumer preferences from Pinterest,

and when I recently posted two modern engagement rings (both platinum with round diamond center stones, one tension set), the response was overwhelming. So while the majority of women have been leaning toward classic or retro, there’s a definite trend emerging toward contemporary. Another observation: this generation wants special, even customized, wedding jewelry. I truly believe there’s a special ring for everyone, which is why I love what I do. If there’s a particular way you’d like to customize your ring, talk with your jeweler about it; this is what they do every day and they can offer suggestions on personalization. What about trends in wedding bands? I’m seeing more and more women buying a slim band that may or may not match the engagement ring, especially if they plan on wearing that on the right hand. And women are putting other slim bands of all kinds on their jewelry wish lists, so their husband knows exactly what to buy for their first anniversary, birth of their first child, or even a birthday. Then you can stack them all with your wedding band, creating a dramatic right-hand ring! The whole stackable ring fashion look has sparked this trend, and it’s not going away anytime soon. Buying jewelry online is a controversial issue: what’s your opinion? While the internet is okay for research (but don’t believe everything you read!), I’d never suggest buying wedding jewelry online. There are so many elements that go into a ring; if you don’t work with a reputable jeweler, so much could go wrong. I’ve heard horror stories about chipped stones, stones that don’t line up, stones that don’t reflect light, insecure settings. So my best advice is to form a relationship with a trustworthy jeweler, a real person (or family) who’s been around awhile and who stands behind their work. After all, it’s the most important purchase you’ll ever make, a reflection of your personal style, and something you’ll be looking at every day of your life. Don’t risk it! For more info on wedding jewelry, visit engagementrings.about.com or tivol.com/catalog/engagement-and-wedding.

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POIS MOI COLLECTION


F

orevermark diamonds are hand-selected for their beauty and rarity, and each is genuine, untreated and natural. As part of the De Beers Group of Companies, Forevermark benefits from over 125 years of diamond expertise. Experts at the Forevermark Diamond Institute carefully inspect every diamond, going beyond the technical qualities of the 4 Cs to hand-pick only those diamonds that are truly beautiful. Of all the world’s diamonds, less than one percent are eligible to become Forevermark. Each Forevermark diamond is also responsibly sourced, originating at one of a handful of

carefully selected mines that benefit the people, communities and countries where they are located. Forevermark traces each diamond along its journey, ensuring strict business, environmental and social standards are met at every step. Invisible to the naked eye, each diamond receives an inscription that includes the Forevermark icon and a unique number, making each Forevermark diamond as special as the promise made when it is given or received. The inscription also allows each Forevermark diamond to be registered in your name, confirming it as uniquely yours.

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A.

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E.


F.

A. Rahaminov 18K white gold bubble ring with five round, off-set diamonds surrounded by diamond halos, with 13 scattered diamonds, $24,830 B. Rahaminov 18K rose gold “Xâ€? ring with a 0.45ct Forevermark diamond and 20 round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $4,500 C. Rahaminov 18K white gold ring with a 1.07ct cushion-shaped Forevermark diamond, surrounded by 22 round diamonds, $13,785 D. Rahaminov 18K yellow gold ring with a 0.72ct Forevermark diamond surrounded by 18 round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $9,995 E. Rahaminov 18K white gold ring with a 1.73ct Forevermark diamond, with pavĂŠ-set round diamonds, $29,950 F. Rahaminov 18K rose gold earrings each set with one Forevermark diamond, surrounded by round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $13,645 G. Rahaminov 18K rose gold bangle bracelet with 14 Forevermark diamonds surrounded by round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $27,500 H. Rahaminov 18K white gold bangle bracelet with 12 Forevermark diamonds surrounded by round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $46,200

G.

H.


TREND ALERT

M

oonstone is a gemstone composed of two layers of feldspar called orthoclase and albite. Intermingled, light is able to fall between the layers producing a phenomenon called adularescence: a silvery sheen reminiscent of moonlight (appropriately enough). Perhaps the most captivating aspect of this adularescence is its appearance of motion. The misty light seems to roll across the gem’s surface as you change your viewing angle, giving it a lifelike quality. Moonstone has been used in jewelry for centuries. According to Hindu mythology, moonstone is made of solidified moonbeams, while the Greeks associated the gemstone with their lunar deities. In fact, legends still exist that say moonstone brings good luck. Some even believe that the future can be seen while holding a moonstone in your mouth during a full moon. In more recent history, moonstone enjoyed a resurgence during the Art Nouveau period when French goldsmith René Lalique, as well as Louis Comfort Tiffany, created jewelry using the material. During the 1960s, moonstone provided its wearers with an ethereal look, and designers of the 1990s New Age movement turned to moonstone’s natural beauty for inspiration. Today, moonstone’s popularity is again on the rise—offering proof that this unique gemstone is as relevant now as it was 3,000 years ago.

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A.

B

C.

A. TIVOL Collection 18K rose gold necklace with a 4.64ct grey moonstone and diamond bezel, $2,790

B. TIVOL Collection 18K rose gold ring with a 17.25ct grey moonstone surrounded by a scalloped edge and round diamonds, $4,795

C. TIVOL Collection 18K rose gold double row bracelet with orange, grey, white and brown moonstones with diamonds, $3,795

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social media

hashtag how-to

E

ven the social media-savvy among us might assume that the use of hashtags in user-generated posts is a relatively new phenomenon— something that’s say, two or three years old at the most. While hashtags have certainly gained popularity during this timeframe, you might be surprised to learn that their origin dates a bit further back. Like, way back. We’re talking 1990s here. Before Facebook dominated the globe, and even before the rise of MySpace (remember THAT?), hashtags were employed online by Internet Relay Chat technology as a method for categorizing items into subject groups. There they remained in relative obscurity until August 23, 2007. On that day, Google employee (and later Google+ user experience designer) Chris Messina tweeted a now-infamous question to his followers about grouping conversations within BarCamp, an online network devoted to discourse about technology as it relates to the internet. @chrismessina: “how do you feel about using # (pound) for groups. As in #barcamp [msg]?” Happy birthday to you, hashtags. That day in 2007 marked the real beginning. Tech-savvy Twitter users quickly adopted the hashtag based on Messina’s inquiry, building a momentum that spread within the social platform and then slowly transitioned to other services like Facebook. By the time Instagram, Vine, Google+ and Pinterest were created and gained their own audiences, the hashtag had been steadily earning its place in the collective consciousness. For those who aren’t as familiar with this context-providing device formerly known as the pound sign, let’s provide a quick primer. In a nutshell, to “hashtag” something means to add the pound sign in front of a word or phrase that categorizes your post by subject matter, thereby making it more searchable to a larger audience beyond your own friends and contacts. But it’s almost easier to define the hashtag by providing an example.

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For instance, let’s say that Kelly, a Facebook user with more than 600 friends, posts the following line about a new restaurant along with a picture of its exterior. “I love the pasta at this noodle restaurant in Westport! Yum! #foodie” Ordinarily, Kelly’s photo and associated text would be visible to mainly the 600-plus people in her network. But with the addition of “#foodie,” virtually any member of the Facebook community can locate Kelly’s post by entering #foodie in a search (depending, of course, upon Kelly’s privacy settings). In such a search, her entry would appear along with hundreds of other posts that contain similar content, making it easier for foodies around the globe to interact with one another…and learn about Kelly’s favorite noodle joint along the way. So exactly what role have hashtags played in our world of fine jewelry and timepieces? According to top-hashtags.com, a website devoted to tracking the most-used hashtags, people’s posts about jewelry are often punctuated with #fashion, #swag, #jewelry, #diamond, #celebritystyle. A quick review of social media posts by well-known jewelry designers and retailers reveals that other tags like #aotd (accessory of the day) and #jotd (jewelry of the day) are commonly used as well. The biggest rule in the world of hashtags is that there are no rules. Clever or nonsensical, comedic or dramatic, they’re merely a way for content creators to get their posts noticed. For lovers of modernity’s increasingly scarce resource—privacy—they’re just more noise in an already too-talkative world. But for those who enjoy the chatter, hashtags are, well, #trendy. So go ahead: post a picture of the tennis bracelet you received for Christmas, or of the Rolex you just inherited. Then choose or create your own hashtag. #WeWantToSee

IMAGE BY CHRIS NAVARRO

BY ADAM GEBHARDT


local style DANNY ZASLAVSKY AN ADVOCATE FOR ENTREPRENEURS JUGGLES WORK AND FAMILY WITH STYLE. In 1986, Danny Zaslavsky’s father, John, was working as a shoe repairman in Johnson County, Kansas after immigrating with his family from Ukraine. Always a driven and industrious man, John was also focused on creating and growing a car dealership (with a business partner). By the early 1990s, that dealership—now known as Country Hill Motors—was thriving. A few years later, at age 14, Danny began working in the dealership and witnessed his dad’s impressive work ethic firsthand. Along the way, Danny learned each and every important component of the business, such as being a porter, a detailer, a sales associate and a manager. As an adult, Danny is now the managing partner. At home, Danny has a family of his own: toddler twin boys, Liam and Lleyton, and his partner, Mark. Although Danny’s hectic schedule mainly consists of working and spending time with his young family, he still manages to spend time with friends, to travel and to experience adventures of many forms—something he’s passionate about. Whether it’s caring for his two Portuguese Water Dogs, shopping at Halls, volunteering for various nonprofit organizations such as the Mid-America Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce, or listening to Adele to help him relax, Danny has found an enviable balance in life that for many is difficult to strike.

Left: As the fathers of toddler twin boys, Danny and his partner Mark must keep baby essentials nearby at all times. Not wanting to lug around a traditional overstuffed diaper tote, they elected instead to convert a favorite Burberry messenger bag.

Below: Danny wears his Panerai Luminor Marina Automatic watch nearly every day and is an aficionado of the brand. Right: While he doesn’t own one—yet—Danny says his latest obsession is the Patek Philippe Aquanaut.

On his ultimate wish list... Left: Danny volunteers his time with the Mid-America Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce. Above: The Zaslavsky family has a wonderful tradition involving jewelry that was begun by Danny’s grandmother. When he turned 18, his grandmother gifted Danny a Cartier Love bracelet that she had worn for several years. (Since then, Danny has taken it off only a few times.)

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STEPHANIE & MIKE MOUSTAKAS IN 2014 THEY GOT MARRIED AND MADE THE WORLD SERIES—NOT TOO SHABBY. In January 2014, Stephanie and Mike Moustakas said their I Do’s at a picturesque resort in Laguna Beach, California surrounded by friends and family. The setting was ideal for the young bride and groom—sunny, cheerful and warm—clearly reminiscent of their relationship together. There exists online a beautifully produced video that captures this high-profile couple’s wedding day, complete with speeches by the duo’s parents— each of whom spoke highly of Stephanie, but chided Mike with great comedic effect. But Mike took the kidding in stride. As well he should have, given the incredible season with the Kansas City Royals that was to begin in just a few short months. (The Royals would make it to their first World Series since 1985, and Mike would lead the postseason with the most homers of any player in the Major League.) As for Stephanie, for many years she had the distinction of being Mike’s first and only serious girlfriend—a role that made her the envy of many female baseball fans. Now, as Mike’s wife, she has taken on the honorable task of helping make Kansas City a better place by volunteering her time with the Royals Wives, a group that plays an important role in community outreach efforts with their commitment to many charitable causes. Other members of the Royals Wives include Jenny Cain, Mary Chen, Katelyn Davis, Jamie Gordon, Jenny Guthrie and Shelley Vargas among others. Together, these women work to organize events such as Toys Summer, which collects toys for underprivileged children, and the annual Royals Charities Broadcast Auction on FOX Sports Kansas City. During that event, the ladies answer phones and take bids from Royals fans throughout the evening, raising more than $120,000 for their charitable efforts in 2014 alone.

Far left: Mike’s favorite piece of jewelry is his Rolex timepiece. Left: Mike’s essential item is his Killspencer backpack, an American-made bag perfect for traveling and odds and ends.

Above: Mike proposed to Stephanie with a cushioncut diamond ring by Henri Daussi. Right: The couple enjoys both hip-hop and pop, including music by Beyoncé. Far right: Stephanie’s favorite local restaurant is Gram & Dun.

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ANNE HODGDON THE LACK OF PRETENSION IS ONE OF MANY REASONS SHE LOVES KANSAS CITY.

Below: Anne’s go-to perfume is Coach, which she calls her signature scent.

Left: One of Anne’s favorite artists is Kansas City’s own Tom Corbin, whose work in bronze sculpture is particularly well known. Above: Anne is reliant on her Cartier Santos Demoiselle, which she loves for its simple, classic design. Right: Her diamond Penny Preville necklace is another prized possession.

Technically speaking, Anne Hodgdon has been retired for 11 years from working as a paralegal and later a finance executive. However, in a post-career phase of life that for some is often reserved for long walks, golfing and traveling, Anne’s done anything but slow down. Philanthropy and community activism have been her priorities as she’s spent years in the political arena advocating for the rights of the mentally ill, and later went on a six-year quest to change Kansas law in order to end discrimination by insurance companies against children on the autism spectrum of disorders. In fact, since Anne’s autism bill became law in April 2014, children living with the disorder in Kansas can no longer be denied insurance coverage. These children can now receive critical early intervention therapy to help them better assimilate into society as independent citizens. In addition to this important work, Anne and her husband J.B., who owns a business that manufactures gun powder, are benefactors to the Kansas City Symphony and support many organizations devoted to inner-city youths, such as Tyrone Flowers’ Higher M-Pact, as well as a non-profit called MindDrive. She also works with other organizations like Harvesters and the Salvation Army through the Hodgdon’s charitable foundation. “I get an intense sense of gratification from having achieved success for someone or something other than myself,” Anne says. “The brass rings of success and financial compensation in the business world pale in comparison to helping others who are not in a position to help themselves.” With a perspective like that, it’s fitting that many of Anne’s favorite places and objects are loved not only for their visual appeal, but for the memories they stir.

Above: Anne and her husband love Paris, and especially enjoy staying at a small hotel on the Left Bank called the Verneuil Saint Germain. The couple discovered the hideaway in 1998, and have lodged there several times since that original trip. The hotel was recently named the Best Small Hotel in Paris by Travel & Leisure, making reservations a bit more difficult to obtain.

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DEJUAN BONDS THE HAIRSTYLIST TO SEVERAL LOCAL SPORTS CELEBRITIES HAS A WINNING SEASON. As the owner of Overland Park’s Purple Label Barber Shop since 2010, DeJuan Bonds has built a successful business by providing fashionable and classic haircuts as well as many other grooming services—straight-razor shaves, shoe shines, manicures and pedicures—to businessmen, children and young adults alike. While DeJuan isn’t a household name in Kansas City, most people within the metro are likely familiar with some of his work—albeit unknowingly—as DeJuan has served as the barber to the Kansas City Chiefs, Royals and Wizards, as well as the KU Jayhawks. Most recently, DeJuan created Royals first baseman Eric Hosmer’s signature haircut. DeJuan’s connections to these well-known teams are highlighted within the interior of Purple Label, where the walls are heavily adorned with sports memorabilia celebrating the careers of his loyal clientele. At home, DeJuan stays busy with his family of five, including his son and two daughters, but finds time to perfect his artistic abilities as well. In addition to standard haircuts, DeJuan is known for the intricate cartoons and logos he can cut into hair using a straight razor. For instance, in fall 2014—during the Royals ascent to the World Series—outfielder Jarrod Dyson became know for a lightning bolt hairdo called the “Zoombaya.” “Baseball players are superstitious,” DeJuan says. “If they get a haircut before the game, and then they hit a home run or play especially well, then they’ll probably try to use that as leverage for the next game.” It turns out fans might be superstitious as well. During the World Series in particular, Purple Label was overrun by requests for “The Hos” or the “Zoombaya” by everyday clients.

Above: Sleek, refined yet sporty, too, the Mercedes S550 is DeJuan’s ideal ride. Below left: DeJuan has an appreciation for über masculine scents, with Tom Ford colognes in Tuscan Leather and Tobacco Oud being two of his favorites. Below right: DeJuan enjoys a range of music artists within the jazz and hip-hop categories, with OutKast being a favorite.

Left: DeJuan enjoys his David Yurman dog tags. Above: American visual artists such as Norman Rockwell are his personal favorites.

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DETROIT, THE NEW WATCHMAKING CAPITAL OF AMERICA.

T H E 46 M M B R A K EM A N CH R O N O W I T H 3 E Y E CH R O N O G R A P H A N D DAT E W I N D OW I N S TA I N L ES S S T EEL C AS E . GR AY B R OW N D I A L A N D D E T R O I T- B U I LT A R GO N I T E 5030 M OV EM EN T W I T H A M ER I C A N - M A D E H E AT H ER G R E Y L E AT H ER S T R A P. B U I LT TO L AS T A L I F E T I M E O R LO N GER , U N D ER T H E T ER MS A N D CO N D I T I O NS O F T H E S H I N O L A GUA R A N T EE . E XC LU S I V E LY AVA I L A B LE AT F I N E WATC H A N D J E W E LRY R E TA I LE R S .


diamond trend

While white diamonds have enjoyed the spotlight for centuries, fancy colored diamonds are beginning to have their day as well. They can be found in almost any shade—from pale pink to dark black—and are consistently the highest-priced items at auction houses such as Sotheby’s and Christie’s. Today, yellow diamonds are among the most popular of the fancy color varieties, their extreme rarity makes them appreciated by gemstone collectors and brides alike. This includes Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood and Adele, all of whom wear yellow diamond engagement rings.

A.

B.

C.

D.

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A. Rahaminov platinum and 18K yellow gold earrings with cushion-shaped yellow diamonds and a double halo of yellow and white diamonds, $66,000 B. Rahaminov platinum and 18K yellow gold diamond pendant with a 1ct pear-shaped yellow diamond, surrounded by a double halo of yellow and white diamonds, $19,500

E.

C. Rahaminov platinum and 18K yellow gold ring with a 6.49ct radiant yellow diamond, flanked by six trapezoid diamonds, $133,340 D. TIVOL Collection 18K white and yellow gold bracelet featuring alternating white and yellow diamond links, each set with a cushion-shaped diamond with a surrounding diamond halo, $25,850

F.

E. Henri Daussi 18K white gold ring featuring a 1.12ct cushion-cut yellow diamond with 15 round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $14,270

G.

H. F. TIVOL Collection 18K white and yellow gold necklace featuring alternating white and yellow diamond links, each set with a cushion-shaped diamond with a surrounding diamond halo, $56,250 G. Rahaminov platinum and 18K yellow gold ring with a 1.03ct radiant-cut yellow diamond with a double halo of yellow and white diamonds, $19,950

I.

H. Henri Daussi 18K white gold ring featuring five princess-cut yellow diamonds surrounded by round diamonds, $6,915 I. Henri Daussi 18K white and yellow gold band with 25 fancy yellow diamonds, $1,100

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ladies timepieces

AND RED, AND GOLD, AND BLUE.

M

ichele watches are manufactured to provide women with an elegant, luxurious and high-quality timepiece that suits their personalities as well as their fashion sensibilities. Available in a wide range of models, Michele offers the capability to interchange its watch straps, making it possible to personalize the watches to coordinate with virtually any mood or ensemble. Created in 1940 for a Belgian couple who wanted to develop a timepiece for their young daughter, Michele, the brand always focused on solid mechanics matched with playful styling. The only question is, what colors will you select?

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Opposite page: Michele Deco Day two-tone watch in stainless steel and yellow gold ďŹ nish with diamond bezel and dial on a pink leather strap, $1,995 This page: Michele Deco Day Diamond chronograph watch with stainless steel polished case and diamond bezel and dial, $1,795. Straps range from $80 to $100 each.

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new releases

ROLEX

THE NEW DESIGN Rolex presents the new Cellini collection, a contemporary celebration of the classicism and eternal elegance of traditional timepieces. This new collection combines the best of Rolex know-how and its high standards of perfection with an approach that heightens watchmaking heritage in its most timeless form. The lines are sober and refined, the materials noble, the finishings luxurious. The collection celebrates the most fascinating and exalting facets of watchmaking tradition. The 39mm cases are available exclusively in 18K white or Everose gold cast by Rolex in its own foundry. In the purest traditional style, these watches are available only with shiny black or brown alligator leather straps with stitched edges and an 18K gold buckle: a fitting reward for the sheer elegance of a gentleman. The Cellini Dual Time model is offered with a black or silver dial featuring a rayon flammé de la gloire guilloché motif. With a quick glance at the dial, wearers are simultaneously reminded of the time here and the time elsewhere. To differentiate daytime hours from night-time hours, a sun or moon symbol transits the aperture at 9 o’clock on the sub-dial. The hour hand can be set independently by successive “jumps” to adjust to a new local time zone, without disturbing the functioning of the watch or the chronometric precision of its self-winding movement.

Left: Rolex Cellini Dual Time watch with 18K white gold 39mm case, black guilloché dial and black alligator strap, $19,400 Right: Rolex Cellini Dual Time watch with 18K Everose gold 39mm case, silver guilloché dial and brown alligator strap, $19,400

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timepieces

Cartier Tank Franรงaise watch with a stainless steel case and silver diamond dial, $6,100

Cartier Tank MC watch with a 44mm stainless steel case and black alligator strap, $7,000

TAG Heuer Carrera watch with a 32mm stainless steel case, 18K rose gold bezel and white mother of pearl diamond dial, $3,850

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Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra Thin watch with a stainless steel 41mm case, silver index dial and black alligator strap, $9,350

Shinola Runwell watch featuring a stainless steel 36mm case with rose gold finish and an orchid dial, $800

C

Bell & Ross watch with a stainless steel 41mm case, black dial and stainless steel bracelet, $3,100

ertain elements of style remain constant. After all, there’s a reason why a men’s two-button suit and women’s high-heel shoes are deemed classics—they’re two items that looked just as good on Cary Grant and Lauren Bacall some 70 years ago as they do on George Clooney and Charlize Theron today. Another seemingly perpetual ingredient of personal style is the fine timepiece. During the last several years, there have been significant design tweaks made to the traditional watch, everything from oversized dials and bright colors to contrast stitching on straps. While these updates can be fanciful and playful—after all, a timepiece is a fashion accessory as well—there’s been a return to basics in the timepiece world: clean lines and classic styling. With these particular watches, it won’t matter if it’s 1985, 2015 or 2045. You’ll have it going on.

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Patek Philippe Calatrava watch with a 31mm case, diamond bezel with 54 round diamonds and pearl gray satin strap, $30,400

TAG Heuer Carrera watch with a 39mm stainless steel case, 18K yellow gold bezel and silver dial, $4,300

Baume & Mercier Clifton watch with a 41mm case, silver dial and leather strap, $2,850

Panerai 1940 3 days Radiomir watch with a 47mm case, black dial and black leather strap, $8,400

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®, T H E D I A M O N D. T H E P R O M I S E .™ A R E T R A D E M A R K S O F T H E D E B E E R S G R O U P O F CO M PA N I E S . © FOREVERMARK 2014 – 2015. FOREVERMARK®,

A TRUE PROMISE WILL NEVER BE BROKEN Less than one percent of the world’s diamonds can carry the Forevermark inscription - a promise that each is beautiful, rare and responsibly sourced.

Forevermark is part of The De Beers Group of Companies.


timepieces

worry over

The watch business is booming—and that’s got luxury brands determined to make sure watches can be produced and repaired in, well, a timely way. BY JACK FORSTER

A

watch can be many things: an heirloom, a tool, even a work of art. But what all watches have in common is that they’re machines, and like any machine, they need to be taken care of. Though most customers give little thought to maintenance when they buy their first watch, the purchase is actually the end of one story and the beginning of another—one that involves a lifetime relationship with whoever is going to keep the watch in good running order. Making sure there are enough watchmakers to go around is increasingly a challenge. Servicing even a simple watch means taking apart a tiny mechanism no bigger than a quarter, with hundreds of parts, without damaging anything. Then each part must be meticulously cleaned before the entire movement is reassembled, with the correct amount of lubricant applied to moving parts that, in some cases, are no bigger than the eye of a housefly. A properly serviced watch will also have its seals changed, to maintain the

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water resistance it had when first sold. Then its performance has to be checked and the watch adjusted to within desired specifications before it can be released back to the customer. If it’s a complicated watch, the time necessary to service increases exponentially. For a vintage watch, finding replacement parts can require hours of detective work. Educating a new generation of luxury consumers to understand exactly how much goes into servicing a watch is an important step forward. Patek Philippe has had a service center in the United States for many years, and its U.S. president Larry Pettinelli says, “There’s no question that there is a need to educate clients about using qualified Above: watchmakers and what it takes to Watchmakers maintain a fine timepiece.” working at the Patek Philippe It’s demanding work, and a hurried Institute in watchmaker is a bad watchmaker. To Shanghai. clients used to getting a car sent in for repair back within a few days, it’s mystifying that it should take so long. The problem watch owners and watch brands alike are facing is that there just aren’t enough people around who know how to service a watch properly. It’s difficult enough when you’re trying to get a fairly simple, threehanded wristwatch cleaned and oiled; if you have something more complicated—a chronograph, perhaps, or something really challenging like a perpetual calendar or tourbillon—it’s critical to entrust the timepiece to one of the increasingly few skilled watchmakers around. Nobody wants to wait weeks or months to get a favorite watch back, and luxury brands know that since every watch they sell is going to need service sooner or later, something has to be done to fill the gap in trained watchmakers. Fortunately, progress towards this goal is being made.

FAR LEFT AND NEXT PAGE COURTESY OF LITITZ WATCH TECHNICUM; OTHER IMAGES COURTESY OF PATEK PHILIPPE

watchmakers


PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Weight Carat 1.53

ColorE Grade Grade Clarity VS1

Grade CutExcellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621 Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

For over 80 years, GIA has brought clarity and global standards to gem evaluation. A GIA report means expert, independent verification from the creator of the 4Cs and the world’s most widely recognized gem authority.

Look for GIA-graded diamonds and jewelers who offer them.

CARLSBAD ANTWERP BANGKOK DUBAI GABORONE HONG KONG JOHANNESBURG LONDON MOSCOW MUMBAI NEW YORK OSAKA RAMAT GAN SEOUL TAIPEI TOKYO


One of the biggest names in watchmaking, Rolex, is also one of the front-runners in making sure watches it sells are watches it can keep running. Here in the U.S., one of the best-equipped schools for watchmakers is the Lititz Watch Technicum in Lititz, Pennsylvania, launched by Rolex in 2000. The cost of tuition is entirely underwritten by Rolex and watchmakers there work in spotless, NASA cleanroomstyle facilities, using a combination of traditional tools and state-of-the-art equipment. Though most watchmaking Watchmakers programs teach servicing a watch rather than making one at work inside the Lititz from scratch, Technicum students must actually make their Watch own timepieces before graduation. Technicum. Still, the Technicum graduates only a handful of students each year. According to a story watch historian Stacy Perman wrote for Bloomberg, there were 43 watchmaking training programs in the U.S. Germany; it also has a partnership with the British School of Watchmaking in 1976, compared to only a dozen in 2006, when the story ran. And it’s not just in Manchester. The Nicolas G. Hayek Watchmaking School in the United an American problem. In countries like China, where boom economies have States (started in Seacaucus, NJ in 2005 and located in Miami since 2009) driven an explosion of watch sales, the difficulties in getting a watch serviced provides a comprehensive, 3,000-hour curriculum that gives graduates a can present a major headache to owners, and a crisis of confidence in brands. well-rounded understanding of both the theory and practice of he principal of the Lititz Watch Technicum, German-born Herman watchmaking. It even includes courses on time and physics, and the Mayer, traces the shortage in trained watchmakers to a global event: evolution of instruments for reckoning time. the advent of inexpensive quartz watches. Says Mayer, “Reduced Beat Aebi, head of Swatch Group Customer Service, says such training demand was caused by the quartz dominance starting from the late ’70s. is essential for the future of luxury watchmaking. “Our products are made That situation led to watchmaking losing its attraction as a field of to last a lifetime,” he says. “Many people come back to us and expect high employment. The full-fledged watchmaker as a professional had levels of service [for] watches that have been passed down from generation disappeared from the awareness of the general public by the time the to generation.” And though watchmaking as a profession is still an unusual renaissance of the mechanical high-end started.” choice, Aebi says that, increasingly, “Many students seek us out. It is a Companies with the ability to do so are taking steps to make up for the passion to become a watchmaker, and they have parents or grandparents shortfall. Patek Philippe, which despite a general slowdown in luxury watch who were watchmakers and have passed down the passion and skills.’’ sales continues to be one of the most ardently desired and passionately A few independent watchmaking programs also still exist. The collected watch brands in the world, has established watchmaking schools Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology has a program that’s one in Shanghai and Beijing, intended to train watchmakers in China to handle of the oldest in the country, having been established in 1946. The program the brand’s service needs there. offers an associate’s degree and enjoys the support of Rolex, which Patek Philippe’s New York service center is one of the most highly provides material (state-of-the-art equipment) and financial assistance. regarded in the United States. “The U.S. service center has been in existence Still, relieving the shortage will be a gradual process, since for decades,” says Pettinelli. “Our watchmakers are capable and trained at watchmakers can’t be trained overnight. The Patek Philippe program, for the highest level to work on the most complex timepieces. But minute instance, requires two years of training and 3,500 hours just to reach a level repeaters and tourbillons are sent back to Geneva so they can be addressed where Patek considers the trainee qualified to service quartz and simple in the workshop they were originally created in, oftentimes with the actual mechanical movements. The OSU program, one of the most highly watchmaker who created the timepiece.” Though Patek doesn’t yet have a regarded in the USA, graduated only six students last December. And while watchmaker’s school in the United States, Pettinelli says that there are basic training programs provide a solid foundation, it’s only the beginning. serious discussions underway to establish one—a logical extension of the Learning how to handle the really big guns of horological complexity— firm’s commitment to bringing top-level expertise to its local markets. repeaters, perpetual calendars, tourbillons—takes many more years, and The Richemont Group, which owns some of the world’s most there’s no way to rush the process. prestigious brands, including Cartier, IWC and Vacheron Constantin, Pettinelli remarks, “I don’t think we are yet at a crisis, but certainly there supports the schools known as the Institutes of Swiss Watchmaking, with is a growing realization that supply is not keeping up with demand.... The training centers in Dallas, Hong Kong and Shanghai. The Institute’s U.S. major issue regarding delayed watches is the lack of qualified watchmakers. campus, the North American Institute of Swiss Watchmaking, bases its For instance [Patek Philippe’s service center in New York] does 10,000 3,000-hour program on the curriculum set by WOSTEP (Watchmakers of repairs a year with only 20 watchmakers.” Switzerland Training and Education Program), the current industry standard Help, at least, is on the way, as more and more watch brands strive to for watchmaking schools seeking to offer students a comprehensive make sure that at least basic repairs can be taken care of more quickly. For general introduction to the craft. watch customers and collectors, it helps to remember that if you buy The Swatch Group, which owns Blancpain, Breguet and Omega, among something meant to last a lifetime, it’s worth taking a little extra time to others, has a total of six watchmaking schools worldwide: in Shanghai, care for it—and worth appreciating the skill and dedication it takes to be a Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Miami, and Glashütte and Pforzheim in watchmaker.

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collecting

time to

invest

Rolex Oyster Perpetual GMTMaster II, 40mm in stainless steel with rotatable black and blue ceramic bezel and Oysterlock bracelet.

Watchmaking history appeals to a new generation. BY WILLIAM BUCKLEY

P

hilatelists collect stamps and numismatists collect coins, but watch collectors, in the grand scheme of things, are a relatively new breed. Seismic shifts—from pocket watch to mechanical wristwatch to quartz and atomic movements—indicated the fading of each previous technology into obscurity. But by the end of the 1980s, manufacturers realized that there was a market for mechanical wristwatches both as timepiece and work of art. A new generation of consumers was excited by the craftsmanship of traditional horology, and the watch collector was born. Edward Faber, one of the leading experts on vintage watches and founder of the Aaron Faber Gallery in New York, explains, “Before 1930 watches were essentially pocket watches retrofitted to the wrist. With the advent of World War I, huge advances in technology were made in all areas, from automobiles to aviation, and watches soon followed suit. The nuances of jeweling and modern technology enabled watchmakers to integrate features like chronographs and moonphase calendars, and mechanical wristwatches entered their element.” But with the “quartz revolution” came a level of timekeeping accuracy that changed daily life. What began in 1929 with the quartz clock took 40 years to miniaturize, but in a few swift years mechanical watches began to look like they would become obsolete. “We’ve learned in this industry to fear new technologies, and for good reason,” explains Michael Friedman, historian for Audemars Piguet. “What we could accurately call the quartz revolution was known to many as the quartz crisis because it essentially wiped out the industry as we knew it; it took many years to evolve past that. But interestingly, what the quartz era in the 1970s really did was to liberate the watch industry. We’re now in an era of experimentation and expressionism largely because the accuracy problem was solved when the quartz watch debuted.” With smart watch production numbers in the tens of millions, manufacturers like Apple and Samsung are investing in the future of timekeeping. And whether or not smart watches become as ubiquitous as the quartz and mechanical movements before them, increased interest in traditional craftsmanship has secured the future of mechanical watches. “To connect with a timepiece, which may have plus or minus a few seconds per week but is part of horological history, is a strong statement,” insists Faber. “People in their 20s and 30s are looking at vintage Rolexes and IWCs and they’re excited to collect them, they’re excited to buy them. When they buy vintage watches, they’re also buying the stories behind them.”

Patek Philippe Ref. 5170G Men’s Chronograph with pulsometric scale. White gold with silvery white dial. Featuring Caliber CH 29-535 PS Mechanical manually wound movement.

WHAT COLLECTORS LOOK FOR Brand: This is the number-one consideration. Currently Patek Philippe and Rolex are most coveted. Papers and Presentation: Watches with their original papers and boxes in good condition are worth more. Metal: With only a few exceptions, platinum is number one, followed by rose gold, then yellow gold, then steel. Complications: Chronographs, moonphases, tourbillions etc. can increase a watch’s collectability. Rarity: The more mass-produced a watch is, the less desirable it is to a collector.

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Longtime customers Tiffany and Lance Snyder with sons Lucas, Gabe, Eli and Sutton

“Living the life... now!”

Accessible and enduring furnishings for the way Tiffany and Lance live today…. and for their many tomorrows.

Locally-owned and a Country Club Plaza icon for over 30 years ‹ Corner of 501 Nichols Rd. & Pennsylvania 816.753.4144 ‹ (toll free) 800.875.4144 ‹ www.terrasi.com


wheels

return of the

Muscle Car

Auto aficionados turn their interest back to these American icons.

I

f you were a teenager in 1960s America, you likely dreamed of getting your driver’s license, impressing the girls by peeling out of the highschool parking lot and blasting down the road. European cars of the time were fun to drive, but a bit docile. Muscle cars (smaller-size, two-door American vehicles with huge, high-compression V8 engines that accelerate at blisteringly fast speeds in a straight line) were Detroit’s way of making a statement to potential customers that horsepower was the American way. Unlike European sports cars, which relied on well-balanced chassis with suspension setups to provide excellent cornering speeds, the brute power of muscle cars was primarily used for drag racing; cornering at speed was a very risky pursuit. Some say it was the Oldsmobile Rocket 88 that initiated the muscle car era, but Ford’s 1962 introduction of its 406-cubic-inch V8 Galaxy 500—to compete with Chevrolet’s Impala SS 409—is likely what began the horsepower wars. It didn’t take long before Chrysler, Plymouth, Dodge and Pontiac joined the fray. These cars were so much more than transportation. A culture sprang up around them and pop music expanded this chapter of history as a way of life. The Beach Boys, Jan and Dean, Ronny and the Daytonas, and the Rip Chords set the mood with songs like Little Deuce Coupe, 409, GTO and Hey Little Cobra. The lyrics synced with the language used by gearheads, as exemplified in the Beach Boys tune Shut Down, which passionately tells the

BY DAVID A. ROSE

story of a drag race between a Dodge 413 and a Corvette Stingray. This remarkable era in automobile history began to wind down in the early 1970s when the government placed limitations on emissions, forcing automobile manufacturers to detune their mighty engines in order to run on low-lead and unleaded fuel. In 1973 OPEC cut oil exports to the U.S., causing a gasoline shortage that led to long lines and short tempers at gas stations across the country. People began to gravitate toward compact cars with smaller, fuel-efficient engines, and for decades the automobile industry produced mostly lackluster, utilitarian machines with no character. Now for the good news: Performance cars with both quality and style are again what people want to buy, and what car makers again seem eager to produce. Muscle car mania may never again rise to the same heights, but its spirit can be seen on dealership sales floors across the country. In 2005, the redesigned Ford Mustang channeled the iconic fastback from 1965, which set off a wave of retro-modern American muscle. Three years later, Dodge dusted off the Challenger nameplate with a style that looked a lot like its 1969 predecessor. Chevy followed suit with the new Camaro, referencing the original 1967-69 model. Even Cadillac, which never produced a muscle car in the style’s heyday, now offers a 556-horsepower engine in its CTS-V model. These cars are remarkably exciting to drive, and technology has made them far more forgiving in terms of handling than their earlier incarnations.

HOT MUSCLE CARS IN HISTORY 1965 Pontiac GTO 1967 Shelby Mustang GT500 1967 Plymouth Road Runner 1968 Pontiac Firebird 1968 Oldsmobile 442 1969 Dodge Charger 1969 Chevy Camaro Z28 1970 Chevy Chevelle 454 SS 1970 Plymouth Hemi ’Cuda 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302

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golf

triumph & tragedy

Gary Player won the 1965 U.S. Open Championship, but Phil Mickelson missed his chance in 2006.

The U.S. Open Championship is golf’s toughest tournament. BY EDWARD KIERSH

Gary Player celebrated at Bellerive in 1965.

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GARY PLAYER COURTESY OF BLACK KNIGHT ARCHIVES; PHIL MICKELSON COURTESY OF ROLEX

I

t’s one of the most demanding athletic showcases in the world, where unshakable endurance and remarkable precision are all-important. The U.S. Open Championship, which will be held in June, this year at Chambers Bay near Tacoma, Washington, has long been a proving ground for the world’s best golfers. Every year since the first Open, in 1895 at the Newport Country Club in Rhode Island, legends have been inspired by brave men battling anklehigh rough, dramatically contoured fairways and unnervingly fast greens. “The Open was my most coveted title because it’s such a grueling test, and it consistently offers special moments in the game’s history,” says 1965 Open champion Gary Player. “Open courses are so physically and mentally demanding that handling the terrific pressure is essential to winning—and that requires a combination of patience and precision.” Although the Open is especially merciless (maybe because of it), many of the game’s most inspirational moments have taken place during this United States Golf Association-staged event. Only last year at Pinehurst, Martin Kaymer ran away from the field by shooting a nineunder par 271, the third lowest score ever. It was a triumph reminiscent of three-time champion Tiger Woods’ stunning 12-under par performance at Pebble Beach in 2000, and Rory McIlroy’s blistering 16-under 2011 conquest of Congressional. Staging his own heroics in 1990, Hale Irwin, at age 45, became the oldest man ever to claim the title. His uplifting win belied the great Walter Hagen’s remark about a typical U.S. Open course: “It makes duffers of us all.” Few golf aficionados can forget how “The People’s Champion” Phil Mickelson turned victory into defeat at New York’s Winged Foot Golf Club in 2006. Trying to carve a three-iron around a tree to buttress his onestroke lead, Mickelson hit a branch, only managing to advance his ball a mere 25 yards. Obviously dismayed, he subsequently plopped the ball into a bunker, and later rued, “What an idiot I am!” As Rolex, one of the tournament’s chief sponsors, suggests, Open golfers who do achieve a win become “witnesses to history,” masters of “impossible physics on the most hallowed grounds.” They display the same boldness and passion that make Rolex an iconic watch brand, so it’s no wonder that Rolex is irrevocably linked with greatness.


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travel

Take Me Away

Escape your everyday routine and experience self-discovery during a yoga retreat. BY ELISE DIAMANTINI

Left: Open-air meditation session in Nicaragua during a Yoga for Bad People retreat. Right: Scenes from the juice cleanse retreat in Montauk, NY.

YOGA FOR BAD PEOPLE Don’t be alarmed by the name: Yoga for Bad People is bad in a really good way. This traveling retreat company is the brainchild of NYC-based yoga instructors Heather Lilleston and Katelin Sisson, who provide guests with the perfect combination of yoga asana, meditation and fun-filled activities in beautiful settings all over the world. Lilleston describes the retreats as “not too much granola, not too much discipline, but just enough structure to give you an outline within which your own personal flavor of R & R can flourish. We like to think we have mastered the art of having a good time, rather than mastered the handstand or shoving our feet behind our heads. That can be fun too, but mainly we want the experience to feel inclusive.” Yoga for Bad People travels the globe to find gorgeous locations in countries like Nicaragua, Brazil, even Cuba. Yogis on retreat can expect a led meditation in the morning followed by a vinyasa yoga class, brunch, midday activities (like tanning, surfing, hiking, shopping, relaxing, etc.), an evening yoga class (generally more restorative), dinner and then time to chill out or explore the city’s nightlife. Yoga classes are focused on alignment and therapy, and as Lilleston says, “The practice reflects and balances out the

group dynamic, personal needs and the local environment, as well as offers a physical challenge. We make sure to give plenty of hands-on assists throughout a class. Led meditations are always optional, but those who have committed to them for the duration of the retreat have often been able to continue the practice at home.” Another thing that makes Yoga for Bad People unique is the music. Lilleston and Sisson say you’ll hear anything from Outkast to Cat Power to Led Zeppelin to Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. “It’s not uncommon for the vibe of the class to feel like you have one foot on the mat and one foot on the dance floor,” she explains. “Bottom line: we like to have a good time.”

LUXYOGA Imagine this: an all-inclusive retreat at a private villa in the South of France with two daily yoga classes taught by master instructors, a personal chef who cooks delicious food using healthy local ingredients, and luxurious personalized service. When you book a LuxYoga retreat, this scenario becomes your reality. Benjamin Sears, who is trained in Bikram, Forrest and Dharma Mittra yoga, as well as meditation and pranayama, created LuxYoga as a high-quality yoga immersion and luxury vacation. “We offer a yoga

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program where teachers get to know the students in a space where they will reflect and grow,” explains Sears. “Plus, it’s really nice to do some challenging yoga and know that after the class our concierge will be waiting with fresh-pressed juice and a beautiful lunch. This is a deep yoga retreat for real people. We want to create not only a vacation, but a transformative experience. We try to get people to dig a deep well and really enjoy themselves.” Each retreat, specializing in either Bikram or vinyasa yoga, has no more than 15 people and two expert teachers. In addition to daily classes, students can attend in-depth workshops—photo analysis, lectures and clinics—that provide a deeper understanding of the practice. All levels are welcome, from beginners who want to learn more to certified teachers who want to refine their knowledge. “We want to make people feel safe and

EXOTIC YOGA RETREATS

E

xotic Yoga Retreats is exactly what its name implies: vacations with an emphasis on yoga in non-touristy locations, where students can experience “luxury travel, blending yoga and inner discovery with sensory experiences of visual beauty, healthy sumptuous cuisine, cultural enrichment and outdoor adventure.” Founder Gayle Olson, author of The Yoga and Fitness Guide for Women, is also a 20-year veteran teacher of vinyasa, Iyengar and Hatha yoga styles. She personally scouts locations in order to provide guests with “a deeply relaxing and inspiring setting [in which] to unwind, enjoy a little healthy indulgence, connect with themselves, with nature and with other interesting people from around the world: to enjoy simple pleasures in life, wrapped in a little luxury!” Upcoming 2015 retreats include trips to Croatia, Bali, Bhutan and Provence. Practicing handstands in Cambodia on an Exotic Yoga Retreat.

Yogis sharing a locally sourced meal during a LuxYoga retreat in the South of France.

“We want to create not only a vacation, but a transformative experience.” comfortable, and offer them a way of life that they can re-create at home. We do journaling exercises and meditation to promote self-reflection. And while I care about the asana and I want people to improve, I’m more concerned with people than poses. The poses are just tools to help people.” Sears says that while each activity at LuxYoga is optional, guests are typically inspired to take part in every aspect of the retreat. “And it’s not a Kumbaya situation, it’s a really special experience: yoga facilitates the bonds people make, but the bonds are not forced. It just happens that people form lasting friendships.” In addition to the quality of yoga and small classes, Sears says something that sets LuxYoga apart is the convivial atmosphere of the villa. “For example, our concierge will remember if someone likes mint tea and pick fresh mint flowers for them. “And the villa itself is something you have to see to believe. We have this incredible unobstructed view of the French Riviera. I wanted to create my ideal vacation: practice yoga in a beautiful place and share wonderful meals with soulful people.”

Accommodations are luxurious, whether guests lodge in a boutique hotel, a lavish sailboat or an extravagant villa; food and wine is always local and organic. Yoga classes are intimate (eight to 12 students) with lots of hands-on adjustments by Olson and her experienced instructors. She describes a typical day: “Mornings begin with fresh juice, a cappuccino or a healing Ayurvedic tea, depending on where we are in the world. A morning serenity walk on a tropical beach, in lavender fields, or through the rolling hills of Tuscany invites you to savor the tranquility and rejuvenating power of nature. We meet for yoga around 8 a.m., followed by a well-earned farm-to-table brunch on a beautiful terrace. Afternoons are for beach lounging, cultural excursions or other adventures. On touring retreats, there may be only one yoga class each day, with stretches along the way. But on most, we have sunset restorative, pranayama and meditation practices. Evenings are pure magic, as we savor the simple luxury of a healthy gourmet meal with fine wine and wonderful company!” Pure magic indeed.

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PERFECTGEMS

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER. BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

SAY CHEESE

HUILE D’OLIVE—TRÈS CHIC!

Spain produces more than 100 different types of must-try cheeses including Quesos de Valdeon, a maple-leaf wrapped blue cheese made deep in the Picos de Europa, and the very sophisticated Sant Gil d’Albio, an artisanal goat’s milk cheese with luscious depth, great acidic balance, and hints of nuts and herbs. There’s even a perfect cheese for summer alfresco dining. Max McCalman, author of Mastering Cheese, says, "Manchego is my go-to cheese for a picnic. Simply irresistible, everyone loves Manchegos. They hold up well outdoors on a picnic and they are extremely nutritious. I prefer them between five and nine months of age, in particular Carpuela, a nine-month-old raw milk Manchego. It is versatile with a broad range of wines; for example, it pairs nicely with a Spanish Tempranillo."

On the southern slopes of the Alpilles Mountains near Provence is a wonderfully restored and very elegant 18th-century castle and estate, Château d’Estoublon. Traveling gourmands stop here for lunches paired with the château’s olive oil, which is not only delicious, but so stylish it’s offered in a couture spray flacon. Five olive varietals planted over 212 acres are hand selected, gathered in nets and processed within 24 hours of picking. (The green production method—processing olives harvested before they darken—brings out the full, fresh flavors.) Later this year, visitors won’t have to eat and run. The château will open to guests, offering the opportunity to spend a few days drinking wine, eating, touring the vineyards and olive groves (even picking olives for individual bottles of oil) and reveling in the beauty of Provence.

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SPARKLING STRINGS

At his atelier in the little town of Deidesheim, Germany near the Rhine River, master craftsman Jens Ritter creates handmade guitars that are also works of contemporary art. His Eye of Horus bass, custom-designed for Phil Lesh of The Grateful Dead with black piano finish, silver Egyptian inlay and blue LED lights, is on display at the Smithsonian Institution, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired the Cremona bass guitar for their permanent collection. Ritter’s creations aren’t just for viewing. Prince, George Benson, Mary J. Blige, and the musicians behind Madonna, Christina Aguilera and Van Halen own (and play) Ritter’s guitars. For the reflective rock star, the Princess Isabella is made of German alder, mahogany and ebony with platinum inlays and is covered in over 7,000 Swarovski aquamarine crystals.

TOP HATS

No spring ’15 fashion show was complete without hats. From city streets to the beach, they’re everywhere. Be heads above the crowd with a hat by Angiolo Frasconi. Founded in Campi Bisenzio (one of the major centers of famed centuries-old Florentine straw hat production) just after World War II, Angiolo Frasconi has been a family-owned company for three generations, creating collections of handmade hats that are molto elegante. The designs combine handcrafted tradition, innovation and fine natural fibers— straw first and foremost—but also classical raw materials of the tradition: linens, cottons, felt, wool and cashmere expertly crafted and trimmed by hand. The new collection focuses on creativity and the best of Italian craftsmanship.

Donald Sultan, one of the world’s leading avant-garde artists, achieved fame in the late 1970s as part of the New Image movement. Known for elevating the still-life tradition through the deconstruction of his subjects and the use of industrial materials, he pushes the restrictions of his medium through gouging, sanding and buffing to create depth and texture. Sultan’s philosophy emphasizes “the impermanence of structure and the malleability of form...the whole oeuvre is a celebration of substances before they disappear.” Many of his pieces are on display, including those at the Art Institute of Chicago, The British Museum, the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This summer, Sultan will present his latest work, a sixfoot square creation utilizing black buttons on a modernistic surface, at New York’s prestigious Ryan Lee Gallery.

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DONALD SULTAN, TILE AND AQUA LANTERNS, FEBRUARY 15, 2014

PUSHING THE RIGHT BUTTONS


food

Shore restaurant at the Santa Barbara Resort in Nieuwpoort, Curaçao. Below, Chef Heinrich Hortencia.

LIONFISH WITH CARIBBEAN RATATOUILLE AND CHIMICHURRI OIL

Celebrating Curaçao’s Cuisine

Ingredients: 4 whole lionfish, fileted 4 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into thick slices 1 ripe plantain, diced 1 red tomato, diced 1 eggplant, diced 1 green zucchini, diced 1 yellow zucchini, diced 1 onion, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 1 handful curly parsley 2 cups olive oil ¾ cup unsalted butter Sea salt White pepper

Chef Heinrich Hortencia is a Shore winner.

BY SHIRA LEVINE

H

aute cuisine is not the main reason people travel to the Caribbean. Swimming in the azure waters, snorkeling beside coral reefs and exploring the jungle are the real temptations that lure us to these exotic locales. Except, perhaps, in cosmopolitan Curaçao, where Chef Heinrich Hortencia of the Shore restaurant at the Santa Barbara Resort in Nieuwpoort uses A-list local and imported delicacies in his quest to put the “C” of the ABC Islands on the foodie map. “Everyone recognizes Shore for interesting presentations of ingredients at the fine dining level,” he notes. “I want to change the taste of Curaçao to represent our diversity.” As Hortencia’s recent win on the Food Network show Chopped has proved, he knows how to deliver more than such white tablecloth menu staples as Lobster Thermidor, despite having spent 13 years cooking in Europe. While he initially returned to this colonial island of narrow winding streets and pastel building facades in order to spend time with his mother following his father’s passing, an edible agenda soon emerged: to elevate Curaçaoan cuisine from simple conch fritters to something worth traveling for. Hortencia admits that Curaçao’s steady warm weather and smaller production of crops than he was used to in Europe provide a bit of a challenge. Nonetheless, part of his plan involves using the finest local ingredients from such purveyors as The Curaçao Ostrich Farm, which provides the bird’s lean meat and giant eggs. Currently, Hortenica is on a lionfish kick. “There are too many lionfish around the island, so I am experimenting with preparations. That’s something I can’t do in Europe. We catch lionfish on this beautiful island and prepare it right here.”

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For lionfish: Ask your local fishmonger to clean and filet the lionfish for you. Safe handling is a priority because lionfish spines are very sharp and venomous. Season filets with sea salt, then pan-fry in hot olive oil on the skin side until crispy. Flip filet onto other side and fry for 30 seconds. Remove from heat and set aside. For Caribbean ratatouille: Heat pan with a small amount of olive oil. Fry half of the onion and half of the garlic. Add the plantain, then the remaining vegetables. Season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat and set aside. For sweet potato: Boil potato until soft. Take out and dry on paper towels. Pan fry in unsalted butter. Season with sea salt and set aside. For chimichurri oil: Blend parsley, remaining garlic, remaining onion, olive oil, salt and pepper in blender. On each plate, form a circle of Caribbean ratatouille, then top with a lionfish filet. Plate sweet potato beside the ratatouille, then drizzle chimichurri oil over plate.


The best place to adopt, foster, volunteer, and donate!

7ZHOYHPRQWKVVSHFLDOĂ€QDQFLQJ* Apply in-store or at TIVOLFRP

Three Locations to Adopt!

Kaye Ness Photography

Largest No Kill shelter in Kansas City! kcpetproject.org

Final approval granted in-store only.


recipe FROM CATHY TIVOL’S KITCHEN

One of my favorite things to eat at home or in a restaurant is roast chicken (another is a great Bolognese sauce). The Standard Grill in New York’s meatpacking district has my favorite roast chicken out—I love the way they serve it in a cast iron skillet, which is how I do it at home (feeds two generously, or up to four). This recipe comes close to The Standard Grill’s. 1 1 3 1 1 4 1

4.5-pound whole chicken lemon, halved peeled cloves garlic bunch fresh thyme (must be fresh) bay leaf tbsp good olive oil, divided cup crème fraîche

3 thick slices day-old sourdough French bread 1 tsp lemon zest 1 tbsp finely chopped shallots Kosher salt and black pepper lemon juice to taste chopped flat-leaf parsley or chives to garnish, optional

1. Preheat oven to 450°. 2. Season inside and outside of chicken generously with salt and black pepper. Squeeze lemon halves into cavity, then add garlic cloves, fresh thyme and bay leaf. 3. Drizzle 1 tbsp olive oil into cast iron skillet or roasting pan. Place sourdough slices into pan and press slices into olive oil. Drizzle one more tbsp olive oil on top of bread. Place chicken on top of slices and tie legs together with kitchen twine. Brush outside of chicken with 1 tbsp olive oil and a little additional salt. 4. Bake one hour. 5. Mix crème fraîche, shallots and one tsp pepper in small bowl. Stir two tbsp lemon juice and zest into sauce. Refrigerate. 6. Lift chicken off slices after one hour and flip bread over—they will be quite brown. Place chicken back onto bread. Brush the outside of chicken with crème fraîche sauce, putting enough on to drip onto slices. 7. Bake chicken another 10-15 minutes to brown the glaze. Remove pan and generously brush on additional sauce, then bake 10 more minutes. (There will be leftover sauce.) Remove chicken and let stand 10 minutes before cutting. I usually divide this into three portions, with each person getting a crunchy piece of bread. YUM. Note: You can make your own crème fraîche the day before or early the same day by adding 2 tbsp buttermilk to 1 cup heavy cream. Put in a glass container, cover and let sit at room temperature for 8 to 24 hours until very thick. Stir before using.

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life style home food


GEMINI

HOROSCOPES

MAY 22 - JUNE 21 If you are exploring a style that is beyond your normal identification, you’ll connect with a new part of yourself. It’s mischievous, and it’s fun. Explore new looks with jewelry as well. Try layering necklaces and mixing metals. Men, try changing the strap color of your timepiece. Big changes may occur from small steps taken.

YOUR FASHION OUTLOOK FOR SUMMER.

CANCER

Lately, you’re very aware of what’s going on with the people around you, but remember that fashion is about how you want to express yourself. You’re larger than life in 2015 and you should dress to make it known. Bring an edge to your jewelry with a designer such as Stephen Webster or Anita Ko, and don’t be afraid to rock your look.

VIRGO

AUGUST 24 - SEPTEMBER 23 Virgos will undergo a bit of a metamorphosis this year, and it could be a welcome change. You are gaining confidence and growing more comfortable in your own skin. In fashion, you should push beyond your regular boundaries, but only wear what makes you feel beautiful. The jewelry world is your oyster this year. You be you—the NEW you.

Go out into the world and do it in your own unique Aquarian way. Don’t follow the trends this year. Get weird. It’s not about rejecting the mainstream, but all about creating your own style. Some will follow, others won’t. But all will envy your moxie. Men, consider wearing customized bracelets or dog tags. Ladies, consider a second ear piercing.

SCORPIO

OCTOBER 24 - NOVEMBER 22 This is your year of collared shirts, ties and oxfords. You’ve been through a real phase of personal discovery recently, so let your style reflect your intensity and focus (just don’t get too serious about the whole thing). Mix classic jewelry pieces with a pop of the unexpected to reflect this enlightened direction.

SAGITTARIUS

NOVEMBER 23 - DECEMBER 21 This year is about simplifying your style. Let others see your serious side, even though you may not realize you have one. Long cuts and dark fabrics will add intensity and authority to your presence. Statement earrings and complicated watches emphasize the look.

LIBRA

SEPTEMBER 24 - OCTOBER 23 This is your year to be playful with your style. Explore light and vibrant fabrics and then trade to neutral tones the next day to keep them guessing. Accessories are the name of the game with hats, handbags, pocket squares and jewelry. You don’t follow the crowd and it will exude through your undeniable fashion sense. Go on and lead the pack, Libra. It’s your thing.

Capricorns, like everyone else, need to be practical from time to time. Find a style this year that allows you to express your mysterious nature. Mix old fashion favorites with new finds. In terms of jewelry, think geometric and celestial designs. They represent the beauty found in the unknown and uncharted, a place where Capricorns often thrive.

JANUARY 21 - FEBRUARY 19

You can still feel good and look sharp with clothing that serves a purpose beyond going for coffee. This is a time of hard work for you, and since you are so good at adapting, you can adapt an element of seriousness to your style. Think pearl strands and diamond stud earrings. Guys, wear a timeless pair of cuff links. Find power in the classics.

JULY 23 - AUGUST 23

DECEMBER 22 - JANUARY 20

AQUARIUS

JUNE 22 - JULY 22

LEO

CAPRICORN

PISCES

FEBRUARY 20 - MARCH 20 Your style can change its mind as often as you do. You might try layering 10 necklaces over a houndstooth shirt one week, then wear nothing but a plain black Tshirt with a stainless Swiss timepiece the next. Just make sure to keep your own flow going, and mix vintage pieces with new favorites as well. No matter what, you’ll make the look fabulous.

ARIES

MARCH 21 - APRIL 20

Your style for 2015 is all about creative expression. If it doesn’t feel like art, don’t wear it. Choose lines and fabrics that will boost your air of authority, but choose accessories that add a softness to your aura and add to your mystery. Consider fun and style-forward timepieces such as Shinola, Michele, Panerai or TAG Heuer.

TAURUS

APRIL 21 - MAY 21

Above: TIVOL Collection 18K yellow gold sunburst necklace with green tourmaline and round diamonds, $9,995 Below: Ritani platinum semi mounting with round, brilliant-cut diamonds, $3,280 (mounting only)

Don’t be afraid to be noticed with more dramatic pieces, a new hair color or the shoes that you bought because they’re amazing (but you’ve never actually worn). Be bold, and choose strong colors in jewelry—think ruby, orange sapphire, yellow diamonds or sugilite. Stand out.


LOOK BETTER

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community causes

CHANGING YOUNG LIVES CHILDREN’S CENTER FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED

Students at the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired in midtown Kansas City are taught life skills, such as cooking and how to use technology, in an environment that is supportive and specifically developed to assist with their unique challenges.

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ach time TIVOL brings in a jewelry designer like Penny Preville or Marco Bicego for a personal appearance, we try to partner with a charity in order to help raise money for a worthy cause. In October 2014, TIVOL partnered with the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired during Stephen Webster’s visit to Kansas City. The mission of CCVI is to prepare children with visual impairments, including those with multiple disabilities, to reach their highest potential in the sighted world. Currently assisting 224 children from both Kansas and Missouri, the center’s doors are open for any infant to schoolaged child whose visual impairment is significant enough to adversely affect his or her educational performance. Children and their parents go to the center to discover a truly unique, positive environment with innovative and stimulating programs customized for each student. More than 85 percent of what a child learns is derived through vision and incidental learning before age 5. Vision provides the motivation to explore one’s environment and to understand one’s position in space, and it is an important modality for the acquisition of speech and language. To help compensate for these challenges,

the center provides early intervention to help develop the other senses that will maximize the child’s residual vision and integrate visual and compensatory strategies into daily routines, play activities and all other learning opportunities. CCVI offers a comprehensive program, including individualized therapy, consulting services and supportive family education. Services are provided beginning in infancy through the center's home-based infant program, and continue with their preschool and kindergarten classes, preparing children for entry into the public or private school systems. Specialized services include braille instruction, orientation and mobility, deaf/blind services, assistive technology, low vision training, speech, occupational, physical and aquatic therapies and family support. CCVI also provides itinerant and consulting services to area school districts. CCVI staff includes professionals in occupational, speech/language and physical therapies, as well as in the specialized instruction areas of braille and orientation and mobility. CCVI teachers are certified in Early Childhood Special Education and Blind/Partially Sighted.

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N 65° 19’ 6.7” - W 137° 20’ 14”

SEVERAL DAYS’ WALK FROM ANY TRACE OF MANKIND Suffused with the pioneering spirit of the far North and the epic journeys of sled dogs across the frozen expanse of the Arctic, the TUDOR Heritage Ranger is the reinterpretation of a classic, a fusion of sophistication with the demands of an untamed environment. The epitome of functionality, its bund strap, satin-smooth finish and understated dial are just some of the features through which the modern city dweller can glimpse a mythical bygone world. And hear the call of the wild. TUDOR HERITAGE RANGER® Self-winding mechanical movement, waterproof to 150 m, 41 mm steel case. Visit tudorwatch.com and explore more. TUDOR Watch U.S.A., LLC. New York

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© D.YURMAN 2015


TIVOL ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SUMMER 2015

Tivol  

The Magazine of Life's Celebrations