Page 1

ACCENT

THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

LMFJ.COM

$12 00

STYLE

INTERIOR DESIGN TOP 10

TRAVEL

SIMPLY CUBA

WHAT’S

TRENDING AT LEE MICHAELS


The O riginator of Cult ure d Pe arls.

S i n c e 18 9 3 .


CON T E N TS

Spring/Summer 2017 B ATO N R O U G E 7560 CORPORATE BOULEVARD 225.926.4644 MALL OF LOUISIANA, 225.766.6000 NEW ORLEANS LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER, 504.832.0000 SHREVEPORT 6605 YOUREE DRIVE, 318.222.2929 L A F AY E T T E 4235 AMBASSADOR CAFFERY PARKWAY, 337.981.8071 JACKSON, MS RENAISSANCE AT COLONY PARK, 601.957.6100 S A N A N TO N I O, T X NORTHSTAR MALL, 210.541.9575 THE SHOPS AT LA CANTERA, 210.699.9494 CEO LEE MICHAEL BERG EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT KENNETH S. GIKAS VICE PRESIDENT GREG JOHNSON VICE PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER M A L L O F LO U I S I A N A JOHNNY TATE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER JANE HARRINGTON A DV E RT I S I N G M A N AG E R AMY GRAHAM HUGHES B OA R D O F D I R EC TO R S LEE MICHAEL BERG BRENDA BERG RYAN BERG, PRESIDENT SCOTT BERG, PRESIDENT CHAD BERG, VICE PRESIDENT ON THE COVER: GUMUCHIAN 18K GOLD AND DIAMOND OPEN L I N K N E C K L AC E , $48,000 AND E A R R I N G S, $ 9 , 0 0 0 .

C R E AT I V E D E PA R T M E N T MARIELLA BROCHARD JAMES OSBORNE P U B L I S H E D BY T H E U B M FA S H I O N G RO U P PUBLISHER STUART NIFOUSSI E D I TO R- I N - C H I E F KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN M A N AG I N G E D I TO R JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

4 Welcome Letter 6 Events: Red Box Insider 8 Interview: Konstantino Sioulas

38 Events: Patek Philippe Grand Exhibition 42 Wheels: The Need for Speed

D E S I G N D I R EC TO R HANS GSCHLIESSER P R OJ EC T M A N AG E R LISA MENGHI A S S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R MICHELLE BROWN

12 Living the Legacy of Giving

44 We Said I Do

16 What’s Trending at Lee Michaels

46 Fashion: Attainable Chic

20 Custom Design Studio

50 Spirits: Cheers and All the Best

24 Spotted: As Seen On…

52 Travel: Simply Cuba

28 Inspiration: Designer Muses

56 Food: The Big Cheesy

Jewelry has been enlarged to show detail. Due to the

30 New & Noteworthy

60 Top 10: Interior Design Trends

subject to change without notice and may vary depending

32 Culture: What’s Old is New…

61 Trends: Off the Cuff

effort to ensure the accuracy of the information in this

34 Trends: Add More Color to Your Life!0

62 Perfect Gems

Accent® Magazine is a UBM® publication. All rights

64 The Last Look

NY 10121. The publishers accept no responsibility for

36 Watch Report: Associates’ Top Picks

48 Men’s Style: Sartorial Luxury

DESIGNER JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI D I R EC TO R O F P RO DU C T I O N PEG EADIE D I R EC TO R O F P R E P R E S S JOHN FRASCONE

fluctuating prices of diamonds, gold and platinum, prices are on size, quality and availability. While we have made every magazine, we are not responsible for errors or omissions. reserved. UBM Americas, 2 Penn Plaza, Floor 15, New York, advertisers’ claims, unsolicited manuscripts or other materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Printed In The U.S.A. Volume 15, Issue 1. ©2017


THE YACHT-MASTER The emblematic nautical watch embodies a yachting heritage that stretches back to the 1950s. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL YACHT-MASTER 40

rolex

oyster perpetual and yacht-master are ® trademarks.


WE TAKE PRIDE IN OUR PEOPLE AND KNOW THAT THEY ARE OUR GREATEST ASSET.

ee Michaels, being a family jeweler, has built a reputation by endeavoring to embody excellence.

With eight stores across six cities in three states, and family members in three of the stores, it is imperative for us to have quality personnel to assist with your jewelry needs. We recognize that we are assessed by the company we keep, so we make certain our associates are of the highest caliber. In an age where information is so easily available, it is vital that our sales associates are well-informed to answer your questions. Gemological expertise of diamonds and colored gemstones, as well as brand familiarity, is a key part of our professionalism. We recognize that you must have confidence in our company and our products, but more importantly, you must have confidence that our associates are the

All Lee Michaels sales associates become

10 years or more, with almost half of those

best of the best.

Applied Jewelry Professionals through the

being over 20 years. By providing all of our

Lee Michaels has been a member of the

Gemological Institute of America (GIA)

associates with the tools to prosper and

American Gem Society (AGS) since 1979.

training program and are encouraged to

grow their jewelry knowledge, they are adept

As a member, we adhere to the highest

continue their education to become Graduate

at handling all of your jewelry needs and

standards of business practices and ethics so

Gemologists through the GIA, or Registered

providing the best shopping experience for

that you can purchase with confidence. AGS

Jewelers, Certified Gemologists and Certified

our customers.

Standards not only comply with governing

Gemologist Appraisers through the AGS.

laws, but go beyond that to ensure that

In addition to industry training, many of

We look forward to sharing our extensive knowledge with you during your next visit.

you are purchasing from a jeweler who has

our associates have cultivated their expertise

the knowledge and skills to help you make

through tenure with our company. One-third

LEE MICHAEL, RYAN, SCOTT

the most informed purchasing decisions.

of our staff has been with Lee Michaels for

AND CHAD BERG

1.800.543.4367

|

L M FJ . C O M


community and events

Inside the

RED

B X

Danielle Dowden, Cindy Brown, Burton Brown and John Hardy artisan from Bali at Shreveport event.

Lee and Ryan Berg at the Shops at La Cantera with Rolex executives Stewart Wicht-president of Rolex USA, Casey Burke-sales manager, Gabriel De Mestral-director, commercial, and Gregory Kraff– director of visual merchandising.

Mary Ellen Londrie with designer Konstantino at his personal appearance and trunk show in New Orleans.

Attendees at Ann Connelly’s art studio in Baton Rouge for an exclusive painting party with designer Ippolita.

LASM director Carol Gikas with raffle winners Kevin and Debbie Knobloch, and Mall of LA store manager Kyle Wilkinson at their annual Gala.


Jerry and Jennifer Soltis with Jessica and Ryan Berg at the Zoo Ball in San Antonio.

Lexy Freeman painting at Ann Connelly’s art studio with designer Ippolita.

Lauren Vizza wearing Lee Michaels jewels at the “Robby” awards in Shreveport benefiting The Robinson Film Center.

Dee Paille, Krissy Keating and a John Hardy representative at the Hardy Artisan event in Shreveport.

Patty Finan, Murray Valene, Gerri Valene, John Finan and Chad Berg attending an Ippolita dinner in New Orleans.


interview

Q&A

By Karen B. Gibbs

THE INCOMPARABLE JEWELRY OF

KONSTANTINO SIOULAS Q. WHAT INFLUENCED YOU

TO BECOME A JEWELRY DESIGNER?

A.

It was not an influence, it was a need. After more than 15 years selling, styling, working on the bench, making jewelry and admiring other designers, it became a need to walk my own path— a mental need, a soul need and a business need. Design is the ultimate stage of the art of jewelry.

Q.

T

he exquisitely detailed jewelry of Konstantino Sioulas has soul—soul that is deeply grounded in the antiquity, culture and landscape of his beloved homeland, Greece. Whether it’s his Black Diamond Ring or his Mother of Pearl and Black Onyx Bracelet, each Konstantino piece features his signature hand-designed engraving and embellishments. “I am obsessed with detail and perfection in my work,” says Sioulas. “When you love something you’d better love it completely, inside and out.” And he does. In a recent interview, Sioulas offered insight into the loves of his life: his work and his family. He also spoke glowingly of his business and personal relationship with Lee Michael Berg.

WHEN DID YOU KNOW THAT YOU WANTED TO DESIGN AND MAKE JEWELRY AS A CAREER?

A.

I knew from the first day, 37 years ago, that jewelry would be “my life, my wife.” It was love at first sight! This is where my hippie self and my “ancient” self meet—in the jewelry.

Q.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE TRADEMARK FEATURES OF A KONSTANTINO CREATION?

A.

Hand-etching, hand-engraving, a special antiquing procedure, complicated design and ornament, but most importantly—the soul. Soul is what characterizes my jewelry.

Q.

YOU STATED THAT IT’S THE JOURNEY, NOT THE DESTINATION THAT IS IMPORTANT IN CREATING AND MAKING BEAUTIFUL, TIMELESS PIECES. WHAT ARE THE HIGHLIGHTS OF YOUR JOURNEY AS A CRAFTSMAN?

A.

My first meeting with Lee Berg was memorable. We had a big business argument. Results? We doubled our business and tripled our friendship. Other highlights for me were when I saw my jewelry on Keith Richards, Roger Waters, Carlos Santana… that was extremely touching.

Q.

YOUR LOVE FOR GREECE—ITS ANTIQUITY, ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND GEOGRAPHY—HAS ALWAYS INSPIRED YOUR JEWELRY CREATIONS. WHAT SPECIFICALLY PROVIDED INSPIRATION FOR YOUR LATEST COLLECTION?

A.

My last collection is a gold collection named Melissa (bee). It was inspired by the nymph Melissa who fed baby Zeus with milk and honey. Melissa (bee) is also a symbol of fertility and abundance.


Q.

YOU HAVE REMARKED THAT YOUR JEWELRY HAS SOUL BECAUSE IT IS HANDCRAFTED AND YOU NEVER USE TECHNOLOGY TO HELP DESIGN A PIECE. DOES KONSTANTINO JEWELRY EVER USE MACHINES TO TURN OUT GREATER NUMBERS OF THE SAME PIECE? Sterling silver and 18KYG with diamond cuff, $8,950

Q.

AS A DESIGNER, WHAT OTHER DESIGNERS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

A.

I admire the ones that bring me that slight feeling of jealousy and healthy, noble competition. As John Hardy told me, “Konstantino, I hated you before I met you because I love your jewelry.” So, I love the ones I hate.

Q.

His best-selling piece, sterling silver and 18KYG pearl ring, $1,020

Q.

PLEASE SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE IMPRESSIVE PARALLEL BETWEEN YOU AND LEE BERG, FOUNDER OF LEE MICHAELS FINE JEWELRY. YOU BOTH EXHIBIT PASSION, INTEGRITY AND DEDICATION TO EXCELLENCE IN BUSINESS AND FAMILY LIFE.

A.

Parallel… I feel that Greek word every minute. I meet it when working with Lee and his sons; I have two children, Julian Christo and Phaedra, working with me. You judge somebody from the relationship he has with his family, his employees, his business partners and his customers. Lee Berg is a prince in all of the above! And, yes, I am definitely parallel to all that!

WHAT IS THE MOST POPULAR PIECE OF JEWELRY YOU’VE EVER DESIGNED?

A.

It is a ring with a quote “ŦşůŰţŧū Ŵůť» that means “need to dare.”

Q.

YOUR JEWELRY IS EXQUISITELY DETAILED, EVEN IN PLACES ONLY SEEN BY THOSE WHO WEAR IT. (FOR EXAMPLE, THE BEAUTIFUL LONDON BLUE TOPAZ CARVED BANGLE HAS BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS ON BOTH THE INSIDE AND THE OUTSIDE OF THE BRACELET, AS WELL AS ON ITS EDGES.) IT IS “POLYTELEIA”—VERY PERFECT. HAVE YOU ALWAYS HAD A DEDICATION TO SUCH INTRICATE DETAIL?

A.

Polyteleia…Yes, I am obsessed with detail and perfection in my work and exactly the opposite in my personal life. When you love something you better love it completely, inside and out.

A.

I never use technology to design. I design by hand. We build up the models by hand and we handcraft them in my workshop. Yes, we use techniques to produce multiple pieces, but that doesn’t mean that the human hand does not go over every detail on every single piece.

Q.

WHAT IS A FAVORITE STORY ABOUT ONE OF YOUR CREATIONS?

A.

It was the Soul Collection. It was an attempt to bridge my world (old world) with a rock and roll electric guitar and hippie symbols. I loved it. The buyers hated it big time. And the customers adored it!

Q.

WHAT ARE YOUR ASPIRATIONS FOR YOURSELF? YOUR CHILDREN? THE BUSINESS?

A.

I know I will never retire. I see myself continuing to evolve my business together with my children.

Q.

SINCE YOUR CREATIONS WILL OUTLIVE YOU, WHAT DO YOU WANT FUTURE GENERATIONS TO SAY ABOUT YOU AND ABOUT YOUR WORK?

A.

Time is the judge for real art. If they memorize me, if they wear and admire my jewelry, if their artistry gets influenced by my work, that will be the ultimate honor for me.


feature RYAN, SCOTT AND CHAD BERG:

Living the Legacy of Giving

Lee Berg and former executive director of United Way Nona Thelan. Lee was among 25 community activists selected by United Way to carry the Olympic torch through Baton Rouge on its way to Atlanta in 1996.

By Karen B. Gibbs

T

he jewelry business is not the only

to all the Lee Michaels communities. “This

non-profits in Louisiana, Mississippi and

thing that runs in the Lee Michael

is 100% from Dad,” says Scott. “He believed

Texas. For the three brothers, it’s not about

Berg family—so does giving back to

if you can help someone, you should.”

throwing dollars at a cause and waiting for

the community. Growing up, Ryan and Scott noted their parents’ involvement in charita-

Ryan concurs. “Dad showed us there’s more to life than the business.”

applause. Sure, they give, and give generously of time, talent and treasure. But,

ble and community organizations. “Whether

equally important, they know that by part-

it was my mom with the Eye Bank, the Symphony or Congregation B’nai Israel, or

Legacy of Serving

nering with such organizations, they are

my dad with the Baton Rouge Arts Council,

Indeed, the Bergs’ dedication to service is

nities.

United Way or Cancer Services, they were

included in Lee Michaels’ mission statement.

always trying to make our community a

“We want to be ‘first choice’ for fine jew-

Baton Rouge make history in 2014 when

better place,” says Scott.

elry, employment and helping non-profits

the Gift Tree he proposed for the Hollydays

succeed,” says Chad. “We want them to

gala made the event the most successful

know we’re a great partner.”

in its 30-year history, says Kathy Victorian,

Younger brother Chad recalls his dad scheduling meetings with United Way at 7

effecting positive changes in their commu-

Scott Berg helped the Junior League of

a.m. so he could still put in a full day at the

“It’s good for us and for them,” adds

store. “Dad didn’t have the time—he made

Scott. “The stronger and more vibrant the

a Lee Michaels box from the tree, each box

the time to help. This was part of growing

community, the greater the opportunity for

containing a lovely piece of Lee Michaels

up.”

us all.”

jewelry. The record proceeds enabled

And the tradition continues to this day

This enthusiasm is a hallmark of the

with Ryan, Scott and Chad Berg giving back

relationships the Bergs have with many

president. Guests bought tickets to select

the League to pursue its many charitable activities, and live its mission of promoting


The Artisan Handcrafted Classic Chain Collection

John Hardy and Classic Chain Collection are Registered Trademarks.


Ken Gikas and Johnny Tate presenting a check for $10,000 to past Junior League president Leslie Berg, and members Kathy Victorian and Kate Seba.

volunteerism, developing the potential of women, and improving

Shannon Nisbet, former executive director of Juvenile Diabetes

the community through the effective action and leadership of

Research Foundation, is impressed with the marketing genius

trained volunteers. “The Bergs are a wonderful family and our com-

of Ryan Berg. “Ryan was always looking for ways to enhance

munity is blessed to have them,” Victorian insists.

our annual fundraiser, the Promise Ball. The first one he became

As an entrepreneur, Chad knows the importance of teaching

involved with was one of the most successful we’d ever had. In fact,

business principals to local youths. “Chad is dedicated to Junior

Ryan’s been involved in two of the three most successful Promise

Achievement, believes in its mission, and goes above and beyond

Balls—one of them raising $1.7 million.”

to assure things get done,” says Larry Washington, president of

In the past three years, Ryan’s also become involved in the Texas

JA of Greater New Orleans. “In fact, when Chad headed the 2016

Cavaliers Charitable Foundation, of which Nisbet is director. A great

City Star Soiree, which recognizes top young entrepreneurs, it

Fiesta organization, it is 100% volunteer-based and returns all funds

netted the highest profits in its 14-year history. Chad set

back to the community. Lee Michaels has donated big prizes for the

the bar. Every aspect was top notch. When I think about New

raffle that have raised thousands of dollars for children’s charities.

Orleans and its direction, I realize we need people like Chad for

“Ryan’s a generous spirit, truly committed to improving the com-

business and the community.”

munity,” says Nisbet. “He gives not only his resources but also his heart.” Marise McDermott, president and director of the Witte Museum in San Antonio, is doubly impressed with Ryan Berg and Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry. Besides generously donating items for fundraisers, Ryan used his business savvy as a member of the board of trustees to help the Witte Museum gain recognition. In a novel pairing of interests, he designed a billboard campaign for Lee Michaels that featured leaders of San Antonio’s non-profits modeling some of the store’s fine jewelry. Both Ryan and Chad have been involved with the American Red Cross of Louisiana. Ryan served on the board for nine years before moving to Texas. Chad is currently serving his second three-year

Ryan Berg with Peggy Walker and Witte Museum President and CEO, Marise McDermott.

term on the board. Joshua Joachim, regional chief executive officer of the organization, describes the Bergs as “a very generous, very supportive family.”


Scott and Leslie Berg with Diane and Johnny Tate attending a Lee Michaels-sponsored pre-party for the Baton Rouge Symphony.

He adds that Chad brings a sound business approach to his board

Atchison. Such donations raise money to help fund SRAC’s mission:

responsibilities, as well as great insights into the trends of philan-

to develop, nurture, produce and present, promote, engage and

thropic giving. “Chad has been a very big financial contributor and

educate the citizens of Northwest Louisiana about the arts, thereby

very generous with his time to help raise dollars for our events,”

maximizing access to the arts.

says Joachim. “Specifically, he has helped with ‘Power of Women’

For the Bergs, being active in organizations such as these is an

which annually celebrates the power of Southeast Louisiana’s

effective way to give back to the communities that have support-

women philanthropists.”

ed them. “And it’s greater than us,” explains Chad. “We have over

Keith Short, past chairman of the board for the Arts Council of

200 employees that we encourage to make a difference, too.”

Greater Baton Rouge, commends Scott’s promotion of the Council

Partnering with such outstanding non-profits, members of the Lee

within the community and among arts organizations. Among Scott’s

Michaels Fine Jewelry family are philanthropic alchemists. While

stellar accomplishments was working with Short and their mutu-

they don’t turn lead into gold, together they have transformed heir-

al friend, the late Derek Gordon, to establish the River City Jazz

loom bracelets into graceful ballerinas, Rolex watches into new life

Masters concert series. Lee Michaels is a major supporter of this

for cancer victims, and clever marketing ideas into opportunities for

event, which brings national and international jazz greats to the

entrepreneurship. As “living gifts” to the world, they may not come

Baton Rouge area.

in a shiny red box, but they’re unmistakably Lee Michaels’ finest.

Brian Haymon, fellow board member with Scott Berg for United Way of Baton Rouge, says, “Scott understands how business and art, working together, can lift the economy and the overall wellbeing of all.” As chairman of the committee to find a new CEO, Scott led the board through an important leadership transition. “The professionalism he demonstrated, along with his personal qualities of kindness, generosity and dedication to excellence, were in the finest traditions of the United Way,” he adds. Pam Atchison, director of the Shreveport Regional Arts Council, works with Greg Johnson, Lee Michaels Shreveport store manager, on Council events, notably its biennial Christmas in the Sky gala. As a major sponsor, Lee Michaels donates an exquisite piece of

Chad Berg with former director of the New Orleans Red Cross, Kay

jewelry to each gala. “When we see that red box with the black bow, we know something magical is about to happen,” says

Wilkins, along with other guests.


WHAT’S TRENDING A T

L E E

M I C H A E L S

T R E N D

# 1

LINEAR SILHOUETTES From left to right: 18K white gold diamond dangle earrings, $5,750. 14K yellow gold white topaz and diamond earrings, $225. Marco Bicego 18K white and yellow gold diamond Lunaria earrings, $2,830. 18K white gold diamond chandelier earrings, $5,250. 18K white gold diamond dangle earrings, $4,500. Penny Preville 18K white gold diamond Deco earrings, $5,395.


T R E N D

# 2

LAYERING NECKLACES From left to right: Roberto Coin 18K yellow gold Symphony Princess diamond rondelle pendant necklace, $1,500. Penny Preville 18K white gold and diamond pear-shaped pendant necklace, $3,645. 14K yellow gold and diamond oval pendant necklace, $1,000. David Yurman 18K yellow gold pavÊ diamond disc pendant necklace, $1,250. 14K white gold and diamond ower necklace, $950. Marco Bicego 18K yellow and white gold diamond Circle Link necklace, $1,990. Ippolita sterling silver and diamond disc pendant necklace, $1,295. David Yurman 18K yellow gold and diamond Belmont double curb link necklace, $1,900. Lana 14K yellow gold and diamond Eclipse necklace, $1,390.


T R E N D

# 3

POP OF COLOR From top to bottom: Diamond fashion band, $3,750. Four-row pavĂŠ diamond band, $1,350. Blue sapphire and diamond fashion band, $2,925. Three-row pavĂŠ diamond band, $1,550. Yellow sapphire and diamond fashion band, $2,350. Two-row round diamond band, $11,250. Ruby and diamond fashion band, $2,925. Round diamond band, $4,490. Tsavorite and diamond fashion band, $2,350. All set in 18K white gold.


T R E N D

# 4

STACKABLE STYLE From top to bottom: 18K yellow gold Roberto Coin Symphony Princess diamond bangle, $4,600. 18K yellow gold Roberto Coin Symphony Barocco bangle, $2,600. 18K yellow gold bangle with bezel-set diamonds of various shapes, $19,500. 18K yellow gold Roberto Coin Symphony Princess diamond bangle, $4,600. 14K white gold diamond bangle, $2,150. 18K white gold bangle with bezel-set diamonds of various shapes, $19,500. 14K yellow gold diamond bangle, $2,150. 18K white and yellow gold Roberto Coin Baracco diamond braided bangle, $4,750. 18K yellow gold Roberto Coin Symphony Barocco bangle, $2,600. 18K rose gold bangle with bezel-set diamonds of various shapes, $19,500. 18K white gold Roberto Coin Symphony Princess diamond bangle, $4,600. 14K rose gold diamond bangle, $2,150.


feature

CUSTOM DESIGN STUDIO H

ere at Lee Michaels, we pride ourselves on carrying fine jewelry that expresses your personality, passions and lifestyle. We also know that sometimes, a custom-designed piece is what you want. Just as a tailor creates a custom suit,

we can create a custom piece of jewelry that reflects your vision and budget. Whether it’s a design you’ve imagined or an heirloom piece you’d like to remake,

we invite you to visit Lee Michaels and sit down with one of our experienced jewelry designers. While creating a custom-designed piece may seem overwhelming, we are experienced at simplifying the process and making even complex designs accessible. By using the most advanced technology available—Computer Aided Design (CAD)—we can render your custom-designed jewelry in a beautiful image. This will allow you to change the gemstones and precious metals, tweak the design and see how the style will actually look before it’s created. After you and the designer create the perfect piece, it will be handcrafted using only the finest materials and gemstones. To schedule an appointment, call any of our eight locations throughout the Southeast or visit lmfj.com. Together, we’ll create the jewelry of your dreams.


IF YOU CAN IMAGINE IT, LEE MICHAELS CAN HELP CREATE IT.


THE

ESTATE JEWELRY COLLECTION

At Lee Michaels M

Antique Design. Modern Perspective.


Know Your Diamond CARAT WEIGHT

COLOR GRADE

CLARITY GRADE

CUT GRADE

Look for diamonds graded by GIA, the creator of the 4Cs. Learn more at 4Cs.GIA.edu

CARLSBAD

ANTWERP

BANGKOK

DUBAI

GABORONE

HONG KONG

JOHANNESBURG

LONDON

MUMBAI

NEW YORK

RAMAT GAN

SEOUL

TAIPEI

TOKYO


spotted

AS SEEN ON ‌

Our favorite stars share a love for our favorite brands! BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

Sara Bareilles in Marco Bicego at the Oscars. Katie Ho lmes in Penny Preville at a film screening.

Janelle Monae in Forevermark at the Go lden Glo bes. 24


®ROBERTOCOIN

PRINCESS FLOWER COLLECTION


Freida Pinto in John Hardy at the Greenwich Film Festival.

Octavia Spencer in Forevermark at the Oscars. Governo rs Awards . S A P M A e th at n oi C Helen Mirren in Roberto 26


Love takes spark.

THEN IT CALLS FOR SPARKLE. That’s where we step in. We specialize in elegant pairings for you and your intended- the right ring for that finger and the proper band to match. We’ve been creating magnificent diamond rings since 1892 so we know a thing or two about combinations. Come meet with Lee Michaels to guide you through every step of the selection process.


inspiration

Valentina Bicego

Joyce Lowenstein

MARCO BICEGO

PENNY PREVILLE

“Although I like to draw inspiration for my work from my travels, architecture and the environment around me, my muse is always and forever my wife Valentina. One of my favorite styles I’ve ever created was her wedding band. Valentina is my biggest supporter, so when I asked her to marry me, I wanted to create something that would reflect how much she means to me. In honor of this sentiment, I’ve designed more non-conventional wedding bands for the bride-to-be who is unique and would want something a bit different.”

“My original inspiration was my mother. She was an artist, an interior designer and an antiques dealer. She designed gift items for small boutiques in the 1950s, then opened an antiques shop and did interior design in the 1960s. She was very passionate about her work and passed down her love of the arts and entrepreneurial spirit to me. I was surrounded by creativity, beautiful antiques and jewelry throughout my childhood. Today, my mom is 90 years young and back in college to get her degree in art history. She recently told me she wants to be an art appraiser after she gets her degree! Needless to say, she inspires me every day.”

Designer

MUSES “I always say that I have no muses, as every woman is a potential muse for my jewels. But if I have to think about those women who are icons of style in my mind, I can give you three names. There is Audrey Hepburn for her unforgettable elegance; she would be the perfect woman for my Black Jade XL version pieces, so classic and glamorous as she was. Then there is Maria Callas, an icon of passion besides talent. I would give her my New Barocco biggest pieces; they are just as spectacular as she was. The last one is Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, a symbol of chameleon femininity. She would have been the perfect woman for my Cento diamond, the only one able to represent all the different facets of her character and beauty.”

Maria Callas

28

GETTY/DE AGOSTINI PICTURE LIBRARY

ROBERTO COIN


NEW

& NOTEWORTHY

CARTIER

From such classic watch styles as the Tank and the Santos to more modern designs like the Drive de Cartier and Cle de Cartier, France’s premier jewelry maison has long been a leader in crafting elegant and innovative timepieces. And no exception to that rule is the breathtakingly beautiful Hypnose. Black and white contrasting tones almost literally make the head spin and exert a hypnotic fascination on the wearer. Its aesthetic appeal lies in the form and power of illusion inspired by its lines. Indeed, in one stylish yet disciplined stroke, Cartier has created a major new classic watch.

JOHN HARDY

Launched just last year, John Hardy’s Modern Chain Collection has been embraced by both women and men. This spring sees the introduction of many new styles and the use of rose gold. Inspired by a men’s bracelet from the 1990s, the Modern Chain Collection is a contemporary evolution of the brand’s woven chain bracelets. Handmade in Bali and inspired by Balinese chain-weaving, the minimalist collection creates a new pattern designed with comfort in mind. A modern take on a classic icon, the styles in the collection are smoothed and flattened, creating a new pattern with a fresh, minimal aesthetic. Designed with the wearer’s comfort in mind, the bracelets and necklaces feature flat and slim modular chains. The redesigned chain honors its treasured technique and unique symbolism. Each and every piece is created by five or more artisans and takes upwards of 15 hours to come to life.

30


WHAT’S OLD IS NEW…

Again. Not all of today’s passions reside on your smartphone.

W

e live in an era of incredible technological advancements, with smartphones and smart houses, self-driving cars and an increasingly automated workforce. But sometimes “old ways is good ways” (to quote Stanley Kubrick), and not every innovation means tossing out the old tech for the new. Some of the classics are enjoying renewed interest among fans of quality and style.

VINYL:

With the popularity of the artisanal craft food and steampunk movements over the past decade, there’s been a resurgence in all things old-timey and handcrafted among young hipsters, from fancy facial hair to pre-Prohibition cocktails and 19th-century bicycles. But vinyl has transcended niche collecting in a big way.

Despite record stores closing left and right, vinyl sales (for both new and classic musicians) are up significantly, with LPs and 45s outselling digital and streaming music in the UK in December, according to Digital Music News. Unlikely retailers including Urban Outfitters and Barnes & Noble have jumped on the pressed album train. It’s not just audiophiles embracing the trend: At the exclusive Distillery—a new gin-themed hotel in London—three bespoke guest rooms feature minibars stocked with Portobello Road gin crafted downstairs and a vinyl playlist curated by Rough Trade Records. Chao Chao, a cool new Vietnamese restaurant in Manhattan, hosts “Vinyl Tuesdays” when you can bring your own records in for diners to enjoy. And the Goodland in Santa Barbara offers a Record Concierge to help you curate a playlist from its library to play on your inroom Crosley. Meanwhile, last summer, electronic music DJs Richard Vission and Bad Boy Bill hosted a multi-city “Back to Vinyl” tour, where they “pressed pause on all sync buttons and instead played all their music on vinyl,” both new and old. Radical! Instagram is also getting into it in a big, big way. Sonja is a young Finnish collector who goes by the handle VinylWife and boasts over 32,000 followers for her daily pics: playful, sometimes sensual poses of her with examples from her extensive collection. “I think the appeal for vinyl represents people’s longing for something real and concrete in this digital world,” she explains. Sonja launched her channel after seeing other Instagram pages dedicated to passions as obscure as wax. “I’ve always been a very visual person and I enjoy photography.” Hints for collectors new to the game (or those of us revisiting it after many decades)? “Every record has a story,” says Sonja. “Remember to handle them with love, and the stories will live forever.” We wish that was true of our latest failed iTunes update.

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Above: Hotels like the Goodland in California and the Roxy in NYC (pictured) now offer in-room turntables and curated playlists by the likes of DJ/Instagram star Alix Brown.

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ROXY NEW YORK CITY

culture


IMAGES FROM TOP: BEN FERRARI FOR KOBRICK COFFEE CO.; COURTESY OF PIPER-HEIDSIECK CHAMPAGNE; SAMWHITEOUT.COM; AGATHE POUPENEY FOR OPÉRA NATIONAL DE PARIS

OLD-FASHIONED COFFEE:

It’s easy enough to use a Nespresso or Keurig machine for your morning Joe, or drive through Starbucks and order a double-whatever-accino. But a new generation of coffee aficionados has discovered there’s a wide range of hidden flavors, aromas and experiences that you simply can’t get from a pod. While some methods approach mad scientist levels—like the painstakingly slow Japanese drip—others are surprisingly old school. Two of the latest crazes for coffee connoisseurs are “cold press” or “cold brew” and “pourover.” OXO, Yama and other stylish brands make special cold brew containers, or you can simply let 3/4 cup of coarse-ground coffee steep in 4 cups of cold water in your French Press for 12 hours. Press or strain the coffee, et voila! Pourover coffee is equally simple: Stick a coffee filter over a cup, fill it with grounds and very slowly pour hot water over it. Chemex is king here, and pourover drinkers are almost religious about their cone-and-decanter equipment. Naturally there are special filters and grinders when you start getting really serious. Pros say there are myriad advantages (especially with cold brew coffee), including lower acidity and a richer, more caffeinated cup. “Sometimes greatness is found in the simplest methods, and with the art of brewing coffee, this is the case,” says Niki Kobrick of New York’s Kobrick Coffee Co. “Sometimes when we adjust for speed and convenience, it adds detrimental layers to the process, like coffee oil residues, water temperature issues or hot plates that burn the brew. The advancements that have been made to the simplest methods—like Japanese cones that come with the perfect filter to match—offer brewers the attention to detail that creates a holistic, pure experience like no other.” Are percolators and cowboy coffee next to show up at the trendy shops?

CHAMPAGNE:

Sure, fat cats and moguls have never abandoned sparkling wine or fish eggs. But these days, the audience for both is much larger. In addition to French Champagne, prosecco from Italy and Spanish cava have witnessed spikes in popularity. This time around, it’s not simply reserved for wedding receptions and deal closures. Younger drinkers (especially) are finding any time is Champagne Time. “A couple of years ago, traditional brands started to cater to cutting-edge, modern audiences,” says Blaine Ashley, who hosts the annual New York Champagne Week. (She was honored last fall by Wine Enthusiast in its 40 Under 40 cover article.) In lieu of stuffy pairing dinners, NYCW hosts events bearing quirky names like “Let’s Get Fizzacle” and “Back That Glass Up” at trendy bars and wine shops around the city. There’s also an annual cocktail contest where some of the city’s best bartenders compete for cash and prizes with original mixed drinks featuring bubbly.

“The contest takes Champagne even further into everyday consumption, demonstrating its approachability and diversity,” says Ashley. Want further proof Champagne isn’t just for special events? Try pairing it with Indian food or Mexican fish tacos. You’ll be pleasantly surprised.

OPERA: Attending the opera, symphony and theater were once a given for the aspiring coming-of-age crowd. Today, while Broadway thrives, other public performance spectacles have experienced something of a decline. The Metropolitan Opera, however, has hosted very successful movie theater and streaming performances over the past few years, a modern update to live radio broadcasts the Met has hosted since 1910, and it continues to innovate. This, along with special attention and benefits for younger members, is proving the Fat Lady hasn’t sung yet. Nadine Sierra, 28, is an opera singer (who’s had major roles at the Met and Milan’s La Scala, and is performing this year in Paris, New York and Venice), so she’s arguably biased. But the Fort Lauderdale native also has her finger on the pulse of young America. “I’m of the generation brought up into social media,” she says. “Communication has become so important, it’s almost an obsession. Peter Gelb [GM for the Met] got it right with the HD theater broadcasts.” Arguably social media is another stepping stone for the opera company that hosted Live at the Met on radio and PBS for decades, but Sierra points out that the interaction performers can now have thanks to Twitter, Instagram and Facebook takes things even further. “To get people interested in the artistry, they first have to become interested in the artists themselves. Lady Gaga and Adele do that: communicate very personally with their fans. I have people come and greet me that I’ve only met through social media. They want to know the person behind the art.” The tactic seems to be working: At the most recent season opening and the New Year’s Eve gala (sponsored by Louis Roederer Champagne), a healthy dose of stylish under-30s brought a 21st-century vibe to the dance floor.

ANALOG WATCHES: We don’t have to tell you that mechanical watches—with their crystals and complications and detailed workmanship— are cool. You’re reading this magazine. But with the rise of the smart watch over the past two years, it looked as if digital watches might be moving to the fore again. However, demand has quickly leveled off as many people continue to relish the style and character of a classic timepiece, from fashion to luxury. “Watches are inherently cool exactly because they’ve ‘lost’ some of their functionality, with everyone having a cell phone,” says fashion influencer and Instagram sensation Sam White (260,000 followers). “It’s now a deliberate decision to wear a watch.” What’s more, as many hip-hop fans will attest, luxury watches can pair perfectly well with more casual garb. “I really like wearing a nicer watch with joggers and a hoodie, because the contrast can be unexpected, but not too flashy,” says White. “What’s also dope about watches is that there are a million-and-one different styles, bands, face sizes. With the smart watches and fitness bands, they all look very similar.” We’ll take standing out any day. —BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

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trends

Add more

COLOR TOYOUR LIFE!

T

hink about how certain colors can “take you away” to a special place. Give you a feeling, a sense of calm and serenity, or of excitement. That’s what colored gemstones do for me—and I’m not alone. For the lady who usually defers to diamonds, adding color to your collection can seem daunting. Will I have enough opportunities to wear it? Should I get my birthstone? Should I buy a stone to go with a specific outfit? Should I purchase one that represents my anniversary?  My advice: you only live once, so take the risk! Own the color that has you entranced and gives you a special feeling inside. Consider your hair shade and complexion, as well as the jewelry you already have in your collection. When a jewel is able to pair well with your existing pieces, like a fine wine paired with a cheese, you’ll know you found the perfect match. If you choose the right gemstone, it can help your personality shine through. Having one in an uncommon cut, such as a checkerboard, can add extra sparkle and shimmer to your look. Or consider the ancient (and now popular again) cabochon cut, which acts like a mirror to reflect different shades and tones of the gem being worn.

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Whenever I’m looking at a cut, dimension is the first thing I check for. The ability to catch the eye and make others want to look deeper into the stone is one reason gems are so unique and special. Layering and stacking new colored gem pieces with your existing look can be easier than you think. You don’t always have to be so matchy-matchy; in fact, it’s much more fashion forward not to be! Buy bangles with blue gemstones like aquamarine and blue topaz to stack with your sapphire tennis bracelet. Layer on a necklace in green (the year’s hottest shade) to bring new life to your amethyst pendant. I also find that yellow and orange gemstones can add a splash of freshness to almost any palette popular today. They will play off the light whether day or night, and they look different every time they’re worn. Sapphire, topaz, garnet, citrine, quartz, tourmaline and spinel all come in these bold warming shades. With our favorite designers turning more and more to colored gemstones, it’s easier than ever to add a pop of natural color to your jewelry wardrobe. Start standing out. —BY BENJAMIN GUTTERY

Marco Bicego Mini Jaipur necklace in hand-engraved 18K yellow gold with mixed gemstones.


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DEE PAILLE Shreveport, LA

LIZA HUIR San Antonio, TX

The Rolex Datejust is one of Rolex’s most iconic timepieces. The Datejust Lady 31mm is the perfect option for the sophisticated woman, and offers the wearer a lot of versatility. This is a must-have on my list!

Panerai watches are a natural blend of Italian design, Swiss technology and passion for the sea. The Panerai GMT in stainless steel is my go-to watch for the gentleman looking for something sporty and different.

ROLEX

PANERAI

18K yellow gold Datejust 31mm with diamond bezel, $42,050

Stainless steel GMT on leather strap, $8,600

WATCH REPORT A S S O C I A T E S ’

T O P

P I C K S

LARRY CHENOWETH San Antonio, TX

MARK HENDRICKS Baton Rouge, LA

Rolex watches are crafted and assembled in-house to the most exacting standards. I am a big fan of this brand for that exact reason. The Yacht-Master II is equipped with a calibre 4161, a self-winding mechanical regatta chronograph movement.

Patek Philippe is the pinnacle of Swiss timepieces. Since 1839 their consistency for excellence in their workmanship and quality astounds me. As they say, you never actually own a Patek, you merely look after it for the next generation.

ROLEX

PATEK PHILIPPE

Stainless steel Yacht-Master II, $18,750

18K yellow gold Calatrava on leather strap, $32,300


ED COLLINS Baton Rouge, LA

CYNTHIA WATSON Ridgeland, MS

The Baume & Mercier Classima Collection, inspired by a 1940s museum piece in the Baume & Mercier archives, is the essence of the brand’s heritage. I particularly like the sleek features of the Classima.

The TAG Heuer Link Lady is sporty yet glamorous, serious yet utterly feminine. It’s a reliable, resistant watch in one comfortable and chic package. The Link Lady is the perfect everyday watch for women on the go.

BAUME & MERCIER

TAG HEUER

Stainless steel Classima on leather strap, $990

Stainless steel Lady Link with diamond dial, $2,350

I know most people use their phones to tell time, but there's something very romantic and beautiful about a timepiece. — PADMA LAKSHMI

MARSHALL LOUPUS Lafayette, LA

MIKE CRANE Metairie, LA

Hamilton watches combine the American spirit with the unrivalled precision of the latest Swiss movements and technology. The great price points and rich American history of the brand are hard to beat as well.

Elegance at its finest. This Cartier 33mm steel and 18K yellow gold Ballon Bleu is a beautiful piece that ladies love. It is a great addition to any wardrobe and every collection.

HAMILTON

CARTIER

Stainless steel Khaki King, $595

Stainless steel and 18K yellow gold Ballon Bleu, $8,400


events

The Art of

PATEK PHILIPPE hosts the quintessential watch history exhibition.

TIMEKEEPING L

arry Pettinelli, president of Patek Philippe US, has a problem. “We’re Patek Philippe; we make an understated luxury product. We didn’t get where we are today by flaunting ostentation or conspicuous consumption. Yet we see this tremendous opportunity in America to educate: many people don’t know about the art of fine timepieces and many don’t know about Patek Philippe. But how much attention should we put out there?” It’s a fair question soon to be answered as Patek Philippe unveils its plans for an exciting world-class exhibition this July at Above and right: Patek Philippe’s open-faced, stem-winding and setting pocket watch bears the portrait of George Washington, presented in 1851. Left: Patek Philippe Grandmaster Chime Ref. 6300 with 20 complications is a double-faced wristwatch that can be worn facing either way.

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Cipriani in New York City. According to Pettinelli, it’s only the fourth time in the 30 years he’s been working at Patek Philippe that the Stern family has done this, even sharing some of Mr. Stern’s private collection museum pieces that date back to the 1500s—long before Patek’s founding in 1839. What’s more, it’s the first such exhibit in America, as the prior three Patek events were held in Dubai, Munich and London. “It makes sense in America: the number of collectors and connoisseurs here rivals anywhere in the world,” explains Pettinelli. “But a question I’m always asked is ‘how can we reach the next generation of watch collectors?’ I think this event will appeal to young people (who might not even wear a watch these days) because 2. it’s not simply about promoting or selling

1.

our product. Instead, it’s about educating people about timepieces: the history, the artistry, the lasting value and what it takes to be a watchmaker. We’re a small niche industry, but at the end of the day, how many things are left in this world that you can actually hold and treasure and pass down instead of throw away?” Pettinelli explains that these educational events are effective because they resonate with the public long after the actual exhibit. “We’ve never done anything on this scale before,” he confides. “We’re custom-building a two-story structure inside Cipriani that will be open to the public for 10 days at no charge. We’ve got 15,000 square feet in a beautiful historic bank building and we’re using every inch.” The exhibit will be divided into rooms that will include a Rare Handcrafts Gallery (where actual artisans will showcase the craft of watchmaking, demonstrating enameling, engraving, dome clock building, etc.), a US Historic Room, a Museum Room with timepieces spanning the last five centuries, a Napoleon Room with limited-edition timepieces, a Film Theatre and much more. Says Pettinelli, “We’re not selling watches at the event, but limited editions will be available at several of the fine stores that carry our product.” According to Jasmina Steele, Patek Philippe’s international communication and PR director, the aim of the Grand Exhibition is to recreate elements of the company to provide an unforgettable experience for each visitor, as close as possible to the feeling guests have when they visit the company’s workshop and museum in Geneva. “By offering visitors an immersion into the world of Patek Philippe, we want to share our passion for watchmaking so they come out of the Grand Exhibition with a greater knowledge and appreciation of the art of watches.” The show runs from July 13 to 23. Says Patek Philippe president Thierry Stern, “I am very proud that American visitors will be able to learn more about the historic and contemporary ties between our company and the American market.” —BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

3. 4.

“How many things are left in this world that you can actually hold and pass down instead of throw away?” Pettinelli asks.

5.

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1. Cipriani, NYC. 2. Cipriani interior. 3. The Sky Moon Tourbillon showcases the art of the engraver. Its complications display the nocturnal sky with the motion of the stars and phases of the moon. 4. Calibre 89 marked a milestone in watchmaking history with 33 horological complications. 5. This pendant watch was sold to Queen Victoria of Great Britain (1819-1901) at the London Exhibition on November 30, 1851.


STEFAN M.

IN DETROIT, WE DON’T NEED TO LOOK AT OUR WATCHES TO KNOW THIS IS OUR TIME.

TIARA T.

JEREMY W.


wheels

SPEED

THE NEED FOR

W

e live in extraordinary times, when the unimaginable has become almost commonplace. Man has always been fascinated with speed, and just a century ago the goal was to achieve one mile per minute in an automobile. Once that was achieved, the goal became 100 MPH. The desire to exceed record speeds continues to inspire to this day. Rolex has been associated with speed trials for over 90 years. When British race car driver Sir Malcolm Campbell broke the land speed record nine times between 1924 and 1936 in his famous “Bluebird” cars, he was always wearing his Rolex. The same was true of Chuck Yeager, who wore his Rolex Oyster as he broke the sound barrier in the experimental Bell-X on October 14, 1947. When William Knight flew the hypersonic X-15 at Mach 6.7 in 1967, he too was wearing a Rolex. Rolex will once again sponsor a British record-breaking project in the form of the Bloodhound SSC. This ultra-aerodynamic vehicle is powered by jet, rocket and internal combustion engines that produce more than 135,000 horsepower. Their goal is to achieve an inconceivable 1,000 MPH. Flight Commander Andy Green of the RAF will pilot this remarkable machine, which looks more like a fighter jet than a car. He’s no newcomer to setting records. In 1997 he drove the Thrust SSC to set the current land speed record while also breaking the sound barrier at 763 MPH—the first and only supersonic speed ever set on land. After several delays, the Bloodhound SSC land speed record attempt is currently scheduled for October 2017. It will take place at Hakskeen Pan in South Africa’s Northern Cape. Richard Noble, Bloodhound project director and a former land speed record holder (who achieved 633 MPH in 1983 piloting Thrust 2), says, “The project is achieving its primary goal even without the car running yet: we’re turning kids on to science.” The Bloodhound is an educational tool designed to inspire future generations to take up careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. More than 100,000 children took part in Bloodhound-related lessons or events in the UK last year, and universities involved with the project have reported significant increases in the number of students applying to study engineering. —BY DAVID A. ROSE

ROLEX and the

Bloodhound SSC.

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we said

I DO

MR. & MRS. GASTON BOX (Mary Page) March 12, 2016 | Jackson, MS


MR. & MRS. SETH WALSHIRE

MR. & MRS. JOSH MCKAY

MR. & MRS. MARK PORCHE

(Katie Wyman) October 15, 2016 | San Antonio, TX

(Leighton Thorning) November 18, 2016 | Akumal, Mexico

(Julie McCall) July 29, 2016 | Baton Rouge, LA

MR. & MRS. MATTHEW BOONE

MR. & MRS. MITCHELL ELZEY

MR. & MRS. HAMLET SPEARS

(Rye Sibley) August 20, 2016 | Baton Rouge, LA

(Brooke Borel) July 16, 2016 | Broussard, LA

(Sarah Ricks) October 22, 2016 | Brookhaven, MS


fashion

veteran of the women’s wear industry, Emily Brickel Edelson spent five years as a fashion illustrator, hanging out at trunk shows, boutique openings and backstage at fashion week sketching models. Today, she’s busy giving everyday fashionistas the illustration treatment. Brickel Edelson co-founded Chic Sketch, an app that invites users to upload a photo of their look and receive a custom sketch by a real fashion illustrator. Each drawing is personalized so no two are alike. Chic Sketch users can also watch a feed of the latest sketches as they roll in, view time-lapse videos of the illustrators at work, and check out trending fashions. The point, Brickel Edelson says, is to make a high-fashion experience more accessible. “People loved watching me draw these sketches at shows, but the average person wasn’t able to get it done unless they wanted to spend a few hundred dollars,” she says. Chic Sketch illustrations cost $10. The service is a joint effort between Brickel Edelson and her now-husband Jordan Edelson, an app developer. (“We married technology and fashion, literally,” she jokes.) The pair launched Chic Sketch at New York Fashion Week 2015, and Brickel Edelson says her team of illustrators has since delivered “tens of thousands of sketches.” “It brings the fun back to fashion,” she adds. “For me, fashion is about inspiration. I love inspiring people to feel good about themselves no matter what they look like. People will come in and say, ‘Oh, don’t sketch me—I didn’t wash my hair, I’m wearing all black.’ But everyone looks fabulous in a sketch, which is just fun.” It’s fun on the other side of the sketch, too, and Brickel Edelson fields so many questions about how to illustrate that she decided to write a book. The recently released Sketch and Go: 5Minute Fashion Illustration offers 500 templates and techniques for aspiring artists. What might her readers and illustrators-in-training be sketching throughout the rest of 2017? Brickel expects to see two hot but opposing looks on the runway: details like embellishments and lace appliques, as well as sleek, strong, utilitarian shapes. —BY JULIANNE PEPITONE

Reaching high-style heights has never been easier.

Attainable

CHIC 46


men’s style

Sartorial

LUXURY T

here are very few American clothing companies with the heritage and reputation of Hickey Freeman. Founded in Rochester, New York in 1899 and still made in Rochester today, this luxury brand (that has dressed nearly every US president) stays true to time-honored tailoring techniques and the world’s finest fabrics while evolving to modern design. For the past few years, Arnold Silverstone has been Hickey Freeman’s creative director, changing its image from conservative to cool. A third-generation clothing designer, Silverstone’s passion for tailored clothing is immediately apparent as we discuss suit trends for the current spring season. “The fastest-growing segment of the clothing business is made-to-measure,” he explains. “For not much more money, a guy can customize the fit, fabrics and details (buttons, linings, stitching) to create his own signature look. It’s like buying a car: you can buy right off the lot or you can order your own options. Made-to-measure has grown to about a third of our business and is available in most upscale menswear stores.” For guys who just want to walk out with a beautiful new suit this season, what should they buy? “The must-have color for spring ’17 is a brighter, softer blue. Most guys already own navy or gray. This new shade is fresh, contemporary and flattering. (Other good choices are silver or platinum.) As for styling, the runways are full of double-breasted jackets for fashion-forward types, but a slim-fit two-button model is most popular. Go for a slightly shorter jacket and shorter pant (the hem should brush the top of the shoe for fashion guys; traditionalists can opt for a slight break). As for pleats versus no pleats, the rules are reversing: flat-fronts are now considered classic but advanced customers are opting for pleats.” Silverstone emphasizes the importance of fit. “The suit has gradually gotten slimmer in recent years, with higher armholes, a shorter coat, a lower-rise pant with less drape through the thigh and knee. But ironically, due to our unique construction (extra room under armholes, using the best canvases and chest pieces) and performance fabrics, even slim suits are more comfortable than ever. The biggest mistake guys make is assuming that they’re too heavy, or too old, for slim-fit clothing. Our Hickey Freeman suits trace the body but move with you. Try one and be transformed.” —BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

HICKEY FREEMAN combines

artisanal craftsmanship, American production and modern styling for the perfect suit.

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C O R P O R AT E G I F T S & AWA R D S

SERVICE AWARD PROGRAMS | MILESTONE & RETIREMENT GIFTS | SALES RECOGNITION AWARDS SAFETY INCENTIVE PROGRAMS | DONOR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT GIFTS Our competitive service and commitment to excellence guarantee that everyone will enjoy the reward, recognition and representation of your business. For customer service, please contact Lindsay Chustz Guerin at 225-368-3641 or lindsayg@lmfj.com.


spirits

CHEERS! and all the best Liquor brand anniversaries are a good reason to celebrate in style.

W

hen my wife and I married, we foolishly chose a year ending in “9.” The math on anniversaries has been challenging ever since. It seems we’re not alone: rather than launch a brand in a “0” or “5” year, a number of hard spirits are celebrating milestones in these off-kilter years. The benefit to drinkers? Special releases, parties and more. Naturally some of the biggest-number anniversaries hail from Europe, where distilled spirits have been a thing for 1,000 years or so. On Scotland’s tiny island of Islay, there are eight extant distilleries, almost all boasting a legacy. Laphroaig, that smoky, peaty Scotch whisky, celebrated 200 years in 2015 (with the release of a special 15year). Lagavulin, another Islay single malt, hit its bicentennial in 2016, but you can still find the celebratory 8-year, 12-year and the unicorn 25-year, which comes in at $1,200. For 2017, look forward to possible special releases from Ardmore and Teaninich. Scotch isn’t the only old booze in Europe. Most of the major Cognac houses have also celebrated “booze-aversaries” recently. Hennessy turned 250 in 2015, celebrating with the insanely sculptural Hennessy-8 bottling: 250 bottles selling for a cool $40,000 each. While Hine Cognac celebrated its 250th in

2013 (releasing Hine 250 at $15,000), the house was given its current name 200 years ago this year; expect another special edition. Meanwhile, Brennivin will release unusual, limited oak-aged Aquavit for its 80th, and Nolet, a gin family best known these days for Ketel One vodka, turned 325 last year, offering a particularly ornate bottle. While American brands are much younger—Jack Daniel’s, billed as “America’s First Registered Distillery” turned 150 in 2016—it’s still a good time for parties. The modern craft/boutique distillery movement is finally old enough to enjoy significant markers: San Francisco’s Anchor distilling celebrates the 20th anniversary of its unusual (and delicious) Junipero Gin (celebrating by revealing the 12 “secret” botanicals in its recipe); Templeton Rye (made in Indiana, bottled in Iowa) unveils a special 10-year “Collector’s Edition” expression of its rye, and Woodford Reserve, a small-batch subsidiary of Bourbon giant Brown-Forman, kicked off its 20th celebrations last October with a very limited single-barrel release of a special 10-year expression. What does all this mean for fans and collectors? The chance to acquire one-offs, to enjoy unusual expressions and to party with the distillers. It’s worth learning when your favorite brands were founded (The Glenlivet turns 200 in 2023, Macallan in 2024) so you can be ahead of the game when the party starts. If you’ve got your own anniversary coming up, consider Taylor Fladgate’s 1967 Single Harvest 50-Year Port ($250): Rich and bold, it’s a perfect birthday or wedding anniversary gift (even if its label does insultingly claim that 50 is “very old”). —BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

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travel

S I M P LY

CUBA

ue to decades of economic embargo and tense political relations, it’s natural for Americans to feel daunted by the thought of traveling to Cuba. That’s why so many opt for the ease of guided tours, in which one price (typically $3,000 and up) covers most everything. Those options range from being herded around in massive blue, red and white coaches—which are ubiquitous at every tourist stop—to traveling with more intimate groups in minivans led by knowledgeable guides. But you needn’t go that route if you prefer to arrange your own itinerary. The reality is that the paperwork required for entry is minimal, the Cuban people are extremely welcoming of all tourists, and, with proper planning, it’s quite easy Clockwise from top left: Hotel Inglaterra and the Gran Teatro on Havana's Paseo de Martí; a mojito at La Terraza in Cojimar; street scene outside of Casayami in Havana Centro; an old American convertible on the streets of Cojimar.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATT KETTMANN

Getting there just got a whole lot easier.


to enjoy Havana and beyond with the same sort of make-your-ownschedule freedom you enjoy elsewhere. Here’s how.

HOW TO GET THERE Many US airlines fly straight to Cuba now, and the ticket price usually includes the additional medical insurance required by the communist country (though no one ever asks about such insurance once there). For instance, the hour-long American Airlines flight from Miami to Havana is just $120, and AA also flies straight from Los Angeles for about $500. There are also plenty of flights into other Cuban cities as well. Most people are concerned about the visa process, but it’s ridiculously easy. Just buy one for $85 from Cuba Visa Services (cubavisaservices.com). Make sure to fill it out carefully, otherwise you may have to buy a new one at the airport, usually for about double the price. Also, make sure to get it stamped before hopping on your flight to Cuba; the airlines will usually remind you. Much ado is made about the official reasons that Americans are allowed to visit Cuba, which range from religious and family reasons to business research and “support of the Cuban people,” also known as the people-to-people visa. The only time anyone asks about your reasons for travel is in the American airport as you check in for your flight. No one seems to care which one you pick, though people-to-people is the most broad and therefore popular category.

WHERE TO EAT For decades, most of the restaurants in Havana were government-owned, and many remain that way. But changes in the law a few years ago allowed private citizens to start serving food in their homes, and there’s been a culinary revolution exploding ever since. The leader of the pack is La Guarida (laguarida.com), whose rooftop bars and historic dining rooms were made famous in the film Strawberry and Chocolate. There’s also creative farm-to-table cuisine at Ivan Chef Justo (no website, but his Al Carbon is around the corner if you can’t get a reservation); the Swedishmeets-Latin American style of Casa Miglis (casamiglis.com), which has a sweet bar; and 304 O’Reilly (whose name is also its address in the heart of old town). Make reservations before you leave for Cuba: they’re required at most spots, and since a working internet or phone connection is hard to come by for tourists, you’ll need to get your dining ducks in a row before landing in Havana.

WHERE TO STAY

EASY ESCAPES Once you’ve seen a show at the Cabaret Tropicana, sipped on daiquiris with Ernest Hemingway’s statue at El Floridita, and ridden around town in a convertible 1950s Chevy, escape Havana to explore the countryside. An easy half-day is to Cojimar, the fishing village east of Havana where Hemingway used to dock his boat, Pilar. There’s a quaint fort there, numerous shops with cheaper prices than Havana, and the famous author’s favorite table at La Terraza, where a trio will sing your favorite songs as you sip on mojitos and eat escabeche. If you’re hungry, try Café Ajiaco (ajiacocafe.com), one of the country’s best restaurants, home to an amazing taro soup. For a full-day experience, hire a car and guide from taxivinalescuba.com and head west to the UNESCO-protected tobaccogrowing region of Vinales, a quaint town of pastel-colored stucco where amazing limestone mogotes rise steeply from the dark red soil. Explore caves, dine on farmfresh food at Ecologica, get a cigar rolled for you, and grab a Cristal Cerveza while taking in the view from Hotel Los Jazmines. Feel free to doze off on the three-hour ride back to the constant hum of Havana.

There are a number of luxury hotels in Havana with most of the accoutrements — and $500 price tags—you expect at similar properties around the world. Located along the Prado that separates the old town (Habana Vieja) from downtown (Centro), and quite near many of the city’s cultural attractions, are the Hotel Plaza Havana (hotelplazacuba.com) the Hotel Inglaterra (hotelinglaterra-cuba.com), and the Hotel Saratoga, which was rebuilt in 2005 with a rooftop pool overlooking the Capitol Building. Located a bit further away but closer to the waves-splattered Malecón are the famous Hotel Nacional (hotelnacionaldecuba.com)—worth a visit for drinks and music whether you stay From top: Farm-to-table fare at Ecologica in Vinales; there or not—and the Melia Cohiba AND IF YOU DO A Rainier hand-rolls a cigar at his tobacco estate in Vinales. (melia.com), a full resort experience. GUIDED TOUR…. For travelers who are more adventurous, or frugal, or simply want a Don’t hop on one of those huge coaches. Instead, opt for a smaller, more more up-close taste of what Havana has to offer, search out casa focused tour, like the ones offered by Access Trips (accesstrips.com). Its particulares, which are rooms or entire homes that owners are allowed to seven-day experience encompasses the culinary scene of Havana and rent out to guests. The easiest way to book one is through Havana’s massive beyond. And among the cocktail lessons and sustainable farm tours, Airbnb community. A recent four-night stay at the two-bedroom Casayami, you’ll learn all you need to know about Cuba’s economy, how the African for instance, was just $83 a night, and came with homemade breakfast each religion of Santeria is intertwined with Catholicism, and why most Cubans morning (though it didn’t come with tons of privacy). have much hope for a more prosperous future. —BY MATT KETTMANN

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food

1.

1. A well-balanced cheese board that offers hard and soft varieties. 2. New Orleans’ famed St. James Cheese Company. 3. Cheesemonger James Gentry, ACS CCP.

2.

C

The Big

Cheesy JAMES GENTRY provides a glimpse into the world of fine fromage.

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heesemongers across the US are transforming the way we approach cheese. They not only stock, monitor, cut, wrap and sell it, these connoisseurs share the stories, history and science behind each artisan and farmhouse cheese in their cases. They know which are in season based on the grasses or hays the animals eat; they know the subtleties that distinguish the many cheeses in the blue family; they assist with pairings. With each sample they share, cheesemongers guide us to expand our knowledge and palates, giving us a glimpse into their passion. One of the most passionate is James Gentry, an American Cheese Society Certified Cheese Professional (ACS CCP) who is head cheesemonger at New Orleans’ St. James Cheese Company, recognized as a Top Cheese Shop in America and a Top Ten Sandwich Shop by Travel + Leisure and Bon Appétit respectively. Gentry 3. took a circuitous road to becoming a cheesemonger, his journey representing many in the industry. “I came from a working-class family. My only experience with cheese was that it either came from a can or from a deli,” he says with a smile. Graduating with a degree in philosophy from UC San Diego, Gentry planned to attend either graduate or law school, but wanted to first take a few years off. After working in the food industry at several different restaurants, he secured a position in the Cheese, Beer and Wine division of Whole Foods in Seattle. He instantly became enthralled with cheese. Gentry threw himself into his cheese studies. He read about it voraciously, tasted everything that came in, attended seminars and visited as many cheese shops as he could while taking notes in a journal. He still remembers walking into his first cheese shop (where all the cheese looked the same to him) and feeling overwhelmed. It is a memory he holds on to when working with customers new to cheese. “I want to welcome people to cheese without making any judgments.


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I want you to buy something you will like so you’ll want to come back again. It doesn’t matter what kind of cheese I like. I will ask a few questions to help you to figure out what you like, and then I’ll make suggestions based on your answers. Even [when I’m with] a customer with a very discerning palate and knowledge of cheese, I listen and make suggestions for them to try. It’s best to come in with an open mind and a willingness to try new things,” he emphasizes. On his quest, Gentry traveled throughout the US and parts of Europe visiting cheese shops and farms, sampling cheeses and talking to other professionals. He realized that the cheesemonger’s role differs depending on where he or she lives. “In France, because cheese is a way of life—really part of the fabric of customers’ lives—cheesemongers are more like caretakers of the cheese. In the US, it depends on what city you are in as to whether cheese is ingrained in the culture. In cases where it isn’t, cheesemongers are educators, sharing cheese knowledge from around the world,” he explains. In 2012, Whole Foods sent Gentry to Colorado to take the inaugural cheese exam given by the American Cheese Society (ACS), which he passed with just over 100 other people from across the country. Each candidate must “demonstrate a mastery of cheese knowledge and best practices” by working 4,000 hours within six years in a cheese-related field and passing the certification exam. Only about 740 people in the US hold the title of ACS CCP. Gentry believes the certification is important to standardize basic knowledge and believes that, down the road, there will be multiple levels of ACS certification. “It’s significant because [cheesemongers] are the last step before cheese goes to market. It’s my job to protect the integrity of that cheese as the cheesemaker or cheese ager intended it. If I don’t, it is a disservice to the effort, the passion of the person making the cheeses.” Gentry later moved to New Orleans to work at St. James Cheese Company,

JAMES GENTRY’S PAIRINGS

ILLUSTRATION BY MUTE MOON

FOR LATE SPRING AND EARLY SUMMER

“Spring through early summer is goat milk season. The cheeses I am usually most stoked on are the goat cheeses from the Loire Valley in France, one of the most historically important goat milk cheese producing regions in the world. I am rather fond of the cheeses from the region, specifically ash rind cheese such as Valancay, St. Maure and Selles sur Cher. All three of those cheeses, along with others from the region, pair exquisitely well with the famous wines of the same region: Sancerre, Vouvray, Chinon, Pouilly-Fume and rosé. But don’t ignore American goat cheeses like River’s Edge Chevre in Oregon, Goat Lady and Prodigal Farms in North Carolina, Vermont Butter and Cheese, and Capriole in Indiana, among many others making fabulous goat cheese on par with the French.”

Gentry took a circuitous road to becoming a cheesemonger, his journey representing many in the industry. opened by Danielle and Richard Sutton (who honed their knowledge of cheese by working at the 200-year-old cheese shop Paxton & Whitfield in England) a year after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans. St. James makes its own charcuterie and celebrates about 400 unique artisan and farmhouse cheeses from around the US and the world. “In places like the San Francisco Bay Area or New York City, there may be three or four cheese shops each with several locations. We are sort of an outpost here in New Orleans, the only cheese shop of significance from Austin to Atlanta. The owners took a risk and it has paid off.” Like most other cheesemongers, Gentry believes there is always more to learn, so he pushes himself to expand his knowledge and experiences. Enter Adam Mosowich and Paul Kindstedt, two men revered by cheese enthusiasts because both have bolstered the industry in different ways. A scholar and University of Vermont professor, Kindstedt wrote the heralded book Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its Place in Western Civilization. Mosowich, president and owner of Larkin Cold Storage and Columbia Cheese, founded, organizes and hosts the Cheesemonger Invitational (CMI) and The Barnyard Collective. Both programs provide forums for cheese professionals to gather, discuss, collaborate, compete and learn about their craft. Gentry regularly participates in the events. “The education and networking parts are arguably more important than the competition. It’s where friendships are made and contacts are created. I have made life-long friends from participating in the CMI.” On competition day, challengers prove their prowess by taking on tasks such as completing a written test and doing a blind tasting of five cheeses. They must name the milk type, country of origin, what cheese it is most like, what cheese it is most unlike, and finally, identify the cheese. Mongers then typically face challenges such as cutting for exact weight and wrapping cheese while timed. Another task requires them to perfectly plate an assigned cheese, perfectly pair it with a beverage, and then create a perfect bite. Gentry has competed the last three years and placed in the top 10 each time. “It is important for us to all gather. We share our passion and commiserate. It’s good to know that our struggles are not unique, that we all go through trying times and amazing experiences. “I love this industry,” he continues. “It’s a small industry, but it’s filled with passionate, funny, kind-hearted people who care about the environment, about food, about the way to live and posterity. “Plus, they all give good hugs.” —BY LESLEY RUBENSTEIN

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BECAUSE A STAR DESERVES FOUR MORE.At the four-star Renaissance

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Think green!

3. ECLECTIC AND BOLDER EXPRESSION A selective but rich mix of references is flourishing. Classically traditional meets simply modern. New mingles with vintage. Eye-catching cultures, decades and ethnicities all come together. The attitude should be relaxed and “collected,” not overdone. 4. ROUNDED EDGES Comfort will overrule edginess. Soft will outweigh hard. The Milan Furniture Fair saw an influence of Mid-century curved furniture. People are gravitating to spaces of comfortable expression that can serve as an oasis in a time of chaos. 5. MUTED COLOR

1. PANTONE COLOR OF THE YEAR GREENERY “A life-affirming shade,” Greenery provides the refreshment and revitalization today’s world needs. In fact, all shades of green are trending. Vogue suggests accents, so try emerald green glassware with your white dinner set.

By Laurie Schechter

INTERIOR DESIGN

trends

2. PROFESSIONAL HELP Where DIY was once in favor, the current direction is toward higher skill-level executions. Think glass blown by hand or specialized woodwork. Especially in furniture, this expert craftsmanship results in well-made investment pieces.

Splendo r in theglas s.

Plants (faux o r real) are mus t-haves fo r 2017.

New neutrals, warming and calming, can complement other neutrals as well as strong color. Chalk and bone, organic looking with imperfections, replace sterile white. Beige, pale gray and camel, as well as terra-cotta, rust and ochre, are on trend. And navy is the new black; its versatility works with almost any décor from modern to traditional.

6. TEXTURE Inviting connection and touch, texture comes in pleats, folds, yarn stitches and velvet finishes. Continuing trends mohair, faux fur and other luxuriously soft materials suit this look. Terrazzo flooring puts texture underfoot.

7. MIXED AND MUTED METALS Polished brass has reigned for some time, but change is in the air. Subtlety is in fashion. Antique finishes like bronze and copper, oxidized details and glazed finishes are coming to the fore. Mixing metals and metal accents is now the look. 8. FAUX Faux in all manner of speaking is in for 2017. Faux wood finishes are wrapped around ceiling beams. Engineered quartz and even faux leather are replacing marble on countertops. Faux wood or tile stands in for the real thing on floors. 9. MIXED PATTERNS Taking inspiration from the fashion runways, mismatched patterns—tropicals, geometrics and ethnic prints among them—are in vogue. Adding throws and pillows to a solid piece of furniture you already own is a quick and easy update. 10. QUIRKY LIGHTING Bare hanging bulbs were once interesting enough, but it’s time to step up your game. Look for mismatched or retro-inspired fixtures to bring character to your dining room and bedside tables.

PERHAPS IT’S A REACTION TO THE WORLD’S UPHEAVAL OF LATE: 2017’S INTERIORS ARE SOFTENING, TRENDING TO MORE WORLDLY SPACES THAT NOURISH US. A COMPLETE MAKEOVER IS NOT REQUIRED. LIKE A NEW PAIR OF EARRINGS ENHANCES AN OUTFIT, A NEW DESIGN ELEMENT CAN IMMEDIATELY UPDATE A ROOM. 60

INTERIOR PHOTOGRAPHS BY WILLIAM WALDRON. VERO BEACH HOUSE BY DECORATOR AND ARCHITECT ROBERT COUTURIER, NYC, ROBERTCOUTURIER.COM. GREENERY COURTESY OF PANTONE®. HANDBLOWN GLASS PETAL VASE BY ROSETREE BLOWN GLASS, NEW ORLEANS, ROSETREEGALLERY.COM.

top 10


trends

>@

> W

e can’t wait to wear these cool

resin cuffs this Spring! Part of

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Perfect GEMS

Explore the little luxuries the world has to offer.

about FACE

It’s no secret that staying active helps you reach your fitness goals faster than diet alone. So if toners, masks and serums are nutrition for your face, think of the NuFace Trinity as its corresponding workout. No matter how rigorous your skincare regimen, facial muscles still need stimulation to get lifted and toned, explains Tera Peterson, whose mother Carol Cole helped bring microcurrent technology to the US in the early ’80s. Originally developed for her Hollywood clients to use between professional treatments, the third-generation device couldn’t be easier or more comfortable to use. Apply a cooling gel primer (to transmit the microcurrent into the muscles), then gently roll the Trinity over your face to target fine lines, droopy eyelids and loss of definition. While results will vary, our testers reported firmed, brightened skin within days, and more dramatic improvements over a 60-day period. The device has been FDA-tested for effectiveness as well as safety, but like any workout, you only get out of it what you put in. In this case, it’s all gain with zero pain. —JL

Cinema does more than provide escape and entertainment; it’s often a perfect snapshot of the time in which a movie was filmed, from which cars we drove to which clothes we wore. And independent films are often among the most accurate chroniclers of a period, just one more reason to consider staying in the ultra-luxe Autograph Collection hotels this year. This high-end assemblage of more than 100 properties is partnering with Film Buff to provide a dedicated guest entertainment channel that broadcasts a wide range of award-winning films and documentaries for you to enjoy from the comfort of your well-appointed suite. The offerings focus primarily on art, design, food and music. Some locations will also host Premieres by Film Buff, much-anticipated screenings preceded by fabulous cocktail receptions and followed by film-festival-style Q&As with the films’ directors. —BSL

62

SHUTTERSTOCK

in the BUFF


BEE mine

“Every honeybee fills with jealousy,” wrote legendary songsmith Fats Waller. But your friends will be the envious ones if they learn you’re escaping to the swanky Ritz-Carlton Buckhead. Not just because of the five-star amenities that can be found at Atlanta’s most haute hotel, but because you’ll have the rare chance to see its honeybees in action at a special apiary constructed last year. It’s one of five RitzCarlton Hotel Company locations that now houses honeybees as part of the Community Footprints program and its commitment to environmental sustainability. If you want to see what all the buzz is about, don’t worry about being stung—you’ll be watching from a very safe observation deck. Better still, you can taste these bees’ superb honey in the hotel café. It’s used by chef Michelle Wick and pastry chef Troman Felizmenoin in such delectable creations as seasonal honey yogurt, pear salad with a honeylavender gelée and a spiced orange-honey bar. You can even drink to the bees’ health in the Lobby Lounge, sipping a signature cocktail called “The Legend,” which features house-infused bourbon limoncello and local honey syrup. How sweet it is! —BSL

REI of light (and dark)

If you’ve ever seen a garment by Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo (of fashion house Comme des Garçons), the memory of its inventiveness and audacity has probably stayed with you. Her work is not about being pretty in any conventional sense, but about challenging accepted notions of beauty, good taste, and ultimately, even fashion. Beginning on May 4th, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute will pay tribute to this iconoclastic woman with Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between, a thematic retrospective of her work featuring approximately 120 pieces of women’s wear that will engage both the eye and the mind. Equally fascinating will be to witness how some of the world’s biggest celebrities pay tribute to Kawakubo with their outfits for the Met’s legendary Costume Institute Benefit (aka the Met Gala). The designer herself will serve as the evening’s honorary chair. —BSL

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ONE OF A KIND

the last look

STATEMENT BRACELETS are trending this spring, and this turquoise, diamond, moonstone and sapphire bracelet is sure to make an impact. The unique and beautiful combination of these gems makes this beauty truly one of a kind! Set in 18kwg, $45,000.


LEE MICHAELS FINE JEWELRY ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry  
Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry