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RETURN

DREAM TRAVEL HINTS

AMERICAN MUSCLE CAR

SOCIAL MEDIA FLAIR

of the

FROM THE

SPRING FROM THE RUNWAYS RUNWAYS


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H A M I LT O N J E W E L E R S PRINCETON, NJ 609-771-6010 HAMILTONJEWELERS.COM CHAIRMAN MARTIN SIEGEL PRESIDENT HANK B. SIEGEL VICE PRESIDENT DONNA J. BOUCHARD

34

VICE PRESIDENT DAVID S. KASTER

CONTENTS

GRAPHIC DESIGNER CHRISTOPHER D. NAVARRO

Spring/Summer 2015

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI

FEATURES

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

4 Welcome Letter

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

6 Trending at Hamilton

HANS GSCHLIESSER

10 The Legacy of Luxe

MANAGING EDITOR JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

12 Pantone Fashion Color Report

PROJECT MANAGER

14 The Year in Review

LISA MONTEMORRA

18 A Tale of Two Sisters

DESIGNERS CYNTHIA LUCERO

20 Power of the # in Luxury

JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI

22 From the Runways

PRODUCTION MANAGER

28 Collecting: Time to Invest

PEG EADIE PRESIDENT AND CEO

30 Gifts: From the Heart

BRITTON JONES

32 Scene: Haute Looks on the Red Carpet

CHAIRMAN AND COO

34 Timepieces: Worry Over Watchmakers

MAC BRIGHTON

38 Spotted: As Seen On… 40 Perfect Gems 42 Golf: Triumph & Tragedy

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary

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depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2015. Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018,

44 Travel: Take Me Away 48 Personalities: Kristin Chenoweth

212-686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No

52 Spirits: Engaging the Senses 54 Wheels: Return of the Muscle Car

part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Volume 13, Issue 1. Accent® is a trademark of Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and

56 Culture: Fashion Facelift

Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.


OYSTER PERPETUAL DATEJUST

rolex

oyster perpetual and datejust are trademarks.


( ) % 6  * 6 - ) 2 ( 7  As I write this, our New Jersey region is still in the midst of a very challenging winter, as are many areas of the country. This is the time when traveling to our Palm Beach stores is even more appealing, both for the beautiful weather and to greet so many of our ‘season’ friends and clients. I imagine that many readers will be as grateful as I am to welcome spring of 2015.

In late 2014, we underwent a rigorous renewal and audit process, and I am pleased to report that we were successful in meeting XLI6.'¸WWXVMRKIRXVIUYMVIQIRXWJSVVIGIVXMÁGEXMSRSRGIEKEMR being the only independently owned retailer in the world to RS[LEZIFIIRGIVXMÁIHX[MGI8LMWMWEZMXEPTEVXSJSYVFYWMRIWW capabilities, and we are proud to share the accomplishment with our readers.

We ended 2014 with a tremendous accomplishment for our company, and it is with great pride that I write about it. A core value of our company is responsibility. Hamilton is FIWXMRGPEWWMRXLIÁRINI[IPV][SVPHMRIXLMGEPERHVIWTSR sible business practices, and this practice is something that we take very seriously. We believe that there is both a business imperative and a moral obligation to support responsible FILEZMSVXLVSYKLSYXXLIIRXMVINI[IPV]WYTTP]GLEMRERH[I also care about our carbon footprint and work to be environmentally responsible citizens. Our executive team members are leaders in the industry and have helped us maintain this support for over 100 years.

We are pleased to present this issue of ACCENT Magazine, with GSRXIRXXLEX[ILSTI]SY[MPPÁRHIRXIVXEMRMRKERHVIPIZERX-R addition to the latest news and trend updates from the world of fashion, there are a wide variety of articles on topics ranging from the arts and culture to travel. 4PIEWIIRNS]XLMWMWWYISJACCENT with our compliments. We wish you and yours a wonderful spring and summer season, and look forward to seeing you soon.

-R  ,EQMPXSR [EW XLI ÁVWX JEQMP]S[RIH MRHITIRHIRX NI[IPIV XS FI GIVXMÁIH F] XLI 6IWTSRWMFPI .I[IPPIV] 'SYRGMP ERMRXIVREXMSREPRSXJSVTVSÁXWXERHEVHWERHGIVXMÁGEXMSRSVKE nization. It has more than 500 member companies that span XLINI[IPV]WYTTP]GLEMRJVSQQMRMRKXSGSRWYQIVJEGMRKFYWM RIWWIW6.'QIQFIVWGSQQMXXSERHEVIMRHITIRHIRXP]EYHMXIH EKEMRWX XLI 6.' 'SHI SJ 4VEGXMGIW ER MRXIVREXMSREP WXERHEVH JSV VIWTSRWMFPI FYWMRIWW TVEGXMGIW 8LI 'SHI SJ 4VEGXMGIW addresses human rights, labor rights, environmental impact, mining practices, product disclosure and many more important XSTMGWMRXLINI[IPV]WYTTP]GLEMR

Hank B. Siegel, President

PRINCETON PALM BEACH PALM BEACH GARDENS 1.800.5.HAMILTON HAMILTONJEWELERS.COM

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N 65° 19’ 6.7” - W 137° 20’ 14”

SEVERAL DAYS’ WALK FROM ANY TRACE OF MANKIND Suffused with the pioneering spirit of the far North and the epic journeys of sled dogs across the frozen expanse of the Arctic, the TUDOR Heritage Ranger is the reinterpretation of a classic, a fusion of sophistication with the demands of an untamed environment. The epitome of functionality, its bund strap, satin-smooth finish and understated dial are just some of the features through which the modern city dweller can glimpse a mythical bygone world. And hear the call of the wild. TUDOR HERITAGE RANGER® Self-winding mechanical movement, waterproof to 150 m, 41 mm steel case. Visit tudorwatch.com and explore more. TUDOR Watch U.S.A., LLC. New York

®


1 What’s new, what’s hot, what’s now.

Trending at Hamilton Here is a curated list of the season’s QYWXLEZIWMR]SYVÁRINI[IPV][EVHVSFI

THE STATEMENT CUFF Nothing quite makes the same declaration of purpose meets passionPMOIERI\XVESVHMREV]GYJJFVEGIPIX 8LIVMKLXTMIGIGERTIVJIGXERIRXMVISYXÁXERHI\TVIWW EWSTLMWXMGEXIHERHXMQIPIWWWX]PI3YVHIWMKRIVWLEZI FIIR[SVOMRK[MXLHMZIVWIQIXEPWERHWLETIW XSTVIWIRXXLIFSPHIWXWXEXIQIRXWSJXLIWIEWSR

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1. Paul Morelli Art Nouveau cuff bracelet in 18K white gold with black diamonds, 15.39 carats, price upon request. 2. Hamilton 18K rose gold cuff, made in Italy. Set with 3.50 carats of diamonds, $10,650. 3. Hamilton 18K white gold flower design,

open-work diamond cuff showcasing over 8 carats of rose-cut and brilliant-cut diamonds, $22,500.

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1 2 PURPLE REIGN 3JXIRORS[REWXLIGSPSVSJVS]EPX]TYVTPIMWW]QFSPMGSJTS[IV WTMVMXYEPKSHWTEWWMSREXIFIPMIJERHZMWMSREV]PIEHIVWLMT %PPWLEHIWSJTYVTPIJVSQPEZIRHIVXSHIITZMSPIXEVIIQTPS]IH I\XIRWMZIP]MRJEWLMSRERHHIWMKR[MXLÁRINI[IPV]PIEHMRKXLI[E] *VSQMRXIRWIWLEHIWSJEQIXL]WXXSTYVTPIWETTLMVIXLIWINI[IPWEVI WXYRRMRK[LIRQM\IH[MXLFVMPPMERXHMEQSRHWSVSXLIVZMFVERXKIQWXSRIW

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1. 18K white gold pavé purple sapphire and amethyst pendants with diamonds, from $4,950. 2. 18K white gold with rhodium 90-carat rose quartz slice and pink sapphire earrings with diamonds, $15,900. 3. 18K rose gold with black rhodium pink sapphire and amethyst drop earrings, $3,150. 4. 18K rose gold amethyst and pink sapphire earrings with diamonds, $8,950. 5. 18K rose gold and rhodium rose-cut pavé amethyst cuff bracelet with pink tourmaline and diamonds, $21,000.

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Hamilton Jewelers presents The Bejeweled Journey

THE LEGACY OF LUXE An evening to support Eden Autism Services

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Hamilton Jewelers offers “Bejeweled Journey” at charitable event to support Eden Autism Services. RUBY: THE KING OF GEMSTONES

elebrating its 40th anniversary, Eden Autism Services was looking for a way to gain awareness and support for its annual gala, “A Ruby in Winter”, held Saturday, January 17, 2015 at the Hyatt Regency in Princeton. With the ruby gemstone being well known as the symbol of a 40th wedding anniversary celebration, it provided a REXYVEPÁXJSV,EQMPXSR.I[IPIVWXSTVIWIRXSYVI\GPYWMZIµNI[IPV] XV]SR¶I\TIVMIRGIEXXLIIZIRX

-WMXER][SRHIV[L](SVSXL]¸WWPMTTIVW[IVIGVEJXIHMRVYFMIWXS take her from Oz back home? Ruby is many things to many people, and has traditional associations as the birthstone for July and the gift for 40th wedding anniversaries. In addition, ruby is said to represent devotion, desire and passion, likely because of its red color: the hue of intense emotion. 6YF] MW SRI SJ XLI QSWX LMWXSVMGEPP] WMKRMÁGERX GSPSVIH WXSRIW Rubies are mentioned four times in the Bible, in association with attributes like beauty and wisdom. It is believed that when rubbed on the skin, a ruby can restore youth and vitality, making it one of the most important gemstones in the world. Early cultures treasured rubies for their similarity to the redness of the blood that flowed through their veins, and believed that rubies held the power of life. In the ancient language of Sanskrit, ruby is called ratnaraj, or “king of precious stones.”

Two stunning ruby and diamond suites were presented, each valued at over $1M, and guests were treated to a special opportunity to try on the amazing jewels and then pose for a professional portrait. They were then provided with a printed, framed photo to take home after the event as a keepsake. “This was a fun and unique opportunity for guests to indulge in XLIÁRIWXMJSRP]SREXVMEPVYR¶WE]W(SRRE&SYGLEVHZMGITVIWMHIRX of Hamilton. “We presented one-of-a-kind pieces that people may RSX SVHMREVMP] WII SV [IEV ERH MX [EW ER I\GMXMRK GSVRIV SJ XLI IZIRX8LII\TIVMIRGISJJIVWIZIRXWEHMWXMRGXMZIEGXMZMX]JSVKYIWXW to enjoy, and provides a wonderful keepsake of the special evening.”

People in India believed that rubies enabled their owners to live in peace with their enemies. In Burma (a ruby source since at least 600 %(´RS[ GEPPIH 1]ERQEV  [EVVMSVW TSWWIWWIH VYFMIW XS QEOI them invincible in battle. The glowing red of ruby suggests an IXIVREPÂEQIFYVRMRKMRXLIWXSRIERHXLIKIQLEWFIIRGEPPIH the most precious of the 12 stones created by God.

Hamilton also contributed a stunning diamond necklace to the event’s silent auction, as well as donated eco-friendly cloth tote bags for all guests. Attended by nearly 400 people, the gala event [EWERI\XVESVHMREV]HMWTPE]SJXLIIZIRMRK¸WXLIQIµVIÂIGXMSRW of a rich life.” The festivities included several lifestyle partners SJJIVMRKÁRIWTMVMXWGMKEVWJYVWGSWQIXMGWERHQSVI

Ruby has remained one of most sought-after gems in the world. Artisans have employed this stunning gem in important pieces of I\GITXMSREPNI[IPV]JSVLYRHVIHWSJ]IEVWERHMXMWWXMPPZIV]QYGL YWIHMRHIWMKRWXSHE]-XMWEXMQIPIWWERHIZIVPEWXMRKI\TVIWWMSR of love, passion and intensity. Hamilton craftsmen employ the ZMZMHLYIXSGVIEXIQEKRMÁGIRXTMIGIWSJNI[IPV]XSFIIRNS]IH for a lifetime.

SUITE #1: $1.145M Platinum necklace and earrings with oval rubies from Burma SUITE #2: $1.020M Platinum suite with necklace, bracelet, and ring, deco-inspired design

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FA SHI ON

CO LO RR

EP OR T

INE AR AM UE U L • AQUBA B REEN C G S • CITE BLUE • LUASSIC • CL STARDNE E • CUNGERIERRY ICND • TARAWB ALMO • ST ASTEDA • TOARSAL GRAY • MLACIERUE • GUSK BL • D EETOPNE • TROODBI NE • W NDSTO B • SATANIUMR HERID E I H • T VEND ORC • LA DIANT • RA

In contrast to the busy world around us, designers from New York Fashion Week have taken a minimal approach to choose their spring collections, which in turn has inspired PANTONE’S SPRING 2015 COLORS. An ethereal mix of understated brights, pale pastels and neutrals steal the spotlight as designers take inspiration from simpler times. These softer yet eclectic hues come together to create a palette of soothing elegance meant to provide an escape from the everyday, and they make us dream of tropical landscapes to restore a sense of well-being as we enter into the warmer months. The airy blue of the lead color, Aquamarine, has a cool, light feel that makes us dream of floating in the clouds, which is enhanced by other blues and greens in the collection. The bright turquoise of Scuba Blue conveys a sense of carefree playfulness and reminds us of the gentle waves of a tropical ocean, adding an exhilarating touch to the collection, while Lucite Green, a soft serene green, offers a fresh sense of clarity.

Reminiscent of the warmth on our skin in spring and summer, Toasted Almond pairs well with both Strawberry Ice, a light coral tone, and Tangerine, an energizing yet pleasant take on orange that adds a pop of color. Combine all three hues for an almost retro-inspired look. Exuding warmth and happiness, Custard serves as a base yellow for the spring palette, which works well with Classic Blue to create a maritime look. From the lush, satisfying wine that gives Marsala its name, the grounding red-brown roots point to a sophisticated, natural earthiness that works well with the timeless color Glacier Gray. An unobtrusive gray that adds a sense of graceful relaxation, Glacier Gray works as a great practical neutral that pairs with brighter colors such as Aquamarine, providing an exciting look that is perfect for spring.

Pair Lucite Green with bold Classic Blue for a rounded and refreshed look. Classic Blue provides a strong base, and with its water-like qualities is perceived as thoughtful and introspective. Bringing balance to generally cool tones of the spring collection, Toasted Almond, a sun-tanned neutral, offers a comforting warmth.

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THE YEAR IN REVIEW 2014

We concluded 2014 with a couple of noteworthy events that brought some guests a Paris boutique and brought others the chance to help those in need in their own backyard. Both events presented the best in jewelry and timepieces from Hamilton’s selection of world-renowned designers. Paris came to Palm Beach on a night of high fashion and French cuisine. Our exclusive event hosted in partnership with luxury fashion icon Chanel showcased some of the world’s most QEKRMĂ GIRX ERH GSZIXIH LMKLNI[IPIH XMQITMIGIW JVSQ XLI ,SYWISJ'LERIPĂ‚S[RMRJVSQ4EVMWWTIGMĂ GEPP]JSVXLIIZIRX Guests celebrated “la vie en Franceâ€? as they tried on stunning pieces from the Chanel collection and enjoyed French wine and gourmet fare. We were honored to be one of only a few merchants in the United States to showcase the collection and pleased to bring such an exquisite experience to our clients.

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While the feeling was hot in Palm Beach, the temperature was dropping outside in Princeton, which made giving to those in need more important than ever. We have always been dedicated to giving back to our community, and in 2014 we hosted an incredible event in partnership with international designer David Yurman to raise funding and awareness for HomeFront, a Central New Jersey-based organization dedicated to ending homelessness in the area. Guests shopped from a large display of beautiful new and classic pieces by David Yurman and tried their luck in our VEJĂ‚IXS[MRE(EZMH=YVQERXMQITMIGIZEPYIHEX A percentage of all proceeds from the night went to HomeFront. The night was successful not just because of the good time had by all, but also because of the overwhelming support from those who attended the event. Hamilton was able to present HomeFront [MXL E  HSREXMSR NYWX MR XMQI JSV XLI LSPMHE] WIEWSR providing a great end to a great year.


A display of Chanel Mademoiselle PrivĂŠ timepieces in Palm Beach Gardens.

Tamra Fitzgerald and Jay Cashmere enjoying the exhibition.

Above: Guests at HomeFront’s reception enjoyed an exciting live drawing for a beautiful David Yurman timepiece. Left Page: Hank Siegel, Connie Mercer, Lisette Siegel.

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T H E

A N I M A

C O L L E C T I O N

Welcome to the joyful atmosphere of Chantecler, jewels in the pure spirit of Capri since 1947. Exclusively in the United States at Hamilton Jewelers and online at hamiltonjewelers.com


POIS MOI COLLECTION


Most rewarding part of my job: KAREN: Saving hundreds of dogs and cats per year, seeing the gratefulness of homeless and abused animals who get loving homes, and seeing new adopters happy to have saved a life are what speaks to me. I am so fortunate to be surrounded by an ALL volunteerbased group, and to work with devoted, strong-willed and highly motivated people. Teaching children about animals, animal abuse and homelessness to empower the next generation of animal rights advocates puts a smile on my face every day. LYNNE: There are transformational moments in the Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum when a child realizes s/he is a bully, feels the pain they cause, and then decide they don’t want to hurt others anymore. It also warms my heart when children understand that one person can actually make a big difference in bullying prevention by being an UPstander back at school and in their communities. Re-energizing educators to advocate for safer, more caring environments when back in their classrooms is also a big reward. We teach bullying prevention, diversity appreciation, empathy and empowerment in the Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum using evidence-based programs for more than 2,500 kids and educators each year.

Most challenging part of my job: KAREN: Not being able to save more homeless animals, not being able to tell the dogs in the shelter they are safe and not being able to enlighten more people fast enough about their plight are some of my frustrations. There will always be more animals we could save if we had more adopters. LYNNE: The biggest challenge is funding the museum and its programs. The next biggest challenge is raising our visibility beyond a regional focus. We are results driven, evidence based and capable of reaching so many more kids, families and educators than we do now. We also wish our own communities understood the importance of teaching bullying prevention, diversity and character education earlier and more consistently. And while these challenges are WMKRMÁGERXXLI]EVIRSXLMRKGSQTEVIHXSFIMRKEGLMPHPMZMRK[MXL fear and anxiety every day, and feeling powerless to escape namecalling, discrimination and exclusion.

One empowers youth to build more peaceful communities, and the other helps animals XSWXE]WEJIERHÁRHPSZMRKRI[LSQIW

A TALE OF TWO SISTERS

The one thing I want people to know about us: KAREN: That we are 100 percent dedicated to these animals. That we are no-kill. That we are all volunteers: volunteers with full-time jobs come during the day, on the weeknights and weekends to help save these cats and dogs. That we collaborate with other local rescues XSQEOIXLMWIJJSVXXLIQSWXIJÁGMIRXMXGERFI;IEVIPSSOMRKJSV PERHXSFYMPHXLIÁVWXVIKMSREPRSOMPPWLIPXIVMR1IVGIV'SYRX]XS save dogs, cats and horses. We need more volunteers, donors and TYFPMGMX]WSIZIV]SRIORS[WSJ)%7)0MR1IVGIV'SYRX]ERHGER contribute time or money to help more homeless animals.

Together, they make a difference in Mercer County.

Lynne Azarchi, Executive Director, Kidsbridge

LYNNE: As the only youth-dedicated tolerance museum in the world, Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum helps some of New Jersey’s most vulnerable citizens—the bullied, tormented, and emotionally fractured children who are alone and without hope. This special, transformative place does help them—and it should be cloned and be available to children all over the United States and around the world.

Karen Azarchi, President, Easel Animal Rescue League

For more information about these important organizations, please visit easelnj.org or kidsbridgemuseum.org

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POWER OF THE

IN LUXURY

UPON FIRST GLANCE, THERE APPEARS TO BE A GREAT DIVIDE BETWEEN SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE LUXURY WORLD. THE FIRST IS BASED ON FREE-FLOWING COMMUNICATION FOR THE MASSES AND THE OTHER ON EXCLUSIVITY AND LIMITATION. BUT WHEN YOU DIG DEEPER INTO THIS SEEMINGLY ROCKY RELATIONSHIP, YOU FIND THAT THE LUXURY WORLD FITS COMFORTABLY WITHIN THE SOCIAL MEDIA LANDSCAPE. BECAUSE WHEN YOU GET DOWN TO IT, THEY BOTH SHARE THE SAME CORE VALUE: PASSION.

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“WITH SO MUCH HISTORY AND HERITAGE SURROUNDING MUCH OF THE LUXURY WORLD, SOCIAL MEDIA PROVIDES A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY FOR BRANDS TO CREATE ENTERTAINING AND INFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES THAT REINVIGORATE LUXE CULTURE.”

encourages owners to take and share beautiful images of their cars and posts them on their branded page with hashtags such as #MBFamily and #MBFanPhoto. Encouraging fans to share their stories has resulted in a complete and beautiful representation of the brand in every aspect. From longtime owners to people getting their first car, Mercedes has used social media to capture and promote the true spirit of what it means to be a Mercedes-Benz owner.

Creating a passionate story that resonates with an audience has become a key aspect of successfully communicating through social channels. With so much history and heritage surrounding much of the luxury world, social media provides a unique opportunity for brands to create entertaining and informative experiences that reinvigorate luxe culture. With this in mind, it is no wonder luxury fashion leader Chanel continues to be a top social media contender. Chanel uses the two largest social sites, Facebook and Twitter, to open its doors and show the world what it means to be part of the House of Chanel. Behind-the-scenes footage of fashion shows and videos of designers making couture runway styles gives everyone a front-row seat to watch the hard work and dedication that goes into making something so beautiful, thus driving the message of inspirational fashion that has been so synonymous with the Chanel name. While brands like Chanel bring fans into their worlds, others use fans to create theirs.

Although not common in the luxury industry, Swiss watchmaker IWC has been known to host social contests to increase engagement and learn about their most loyal customers. Currently, they are hosting a social media contest that asks people to share an image on Instagram of what represents their national culture using the hashtag #MyNationalIcon. Notice that the contest has nothing directly to do with their watches, but has everything to do with the culture that surrounds them and representing the cultures of people who love their watches. Collaboration between the luxury world and social media creates a truly unique experience that has never really been available before. Brands are now able to connect with their fans on a personal level by creating stories that express their culture and passion, and in return, fans have been able to express the passion they have for their favorite brands.

These days, anyone with an internet connection can become a brand’s biggest fan or biggest critic. Mercedes-Benz takes advantage of people’s propensity to share and has created a network of passionate Mercedes-Benz owners across their social media channels. These fans share their personal stories, and in turn, tell the overall story of the brand. On Instagram, Mercedes

You can follow Hamilton Jewelers and contribute your story on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Google+ @hamiltonjeweler

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Paul Morelli 18K yellow gold sprial mesh double leaf earrings, $5,200. Etho Maria 18K rose gold and amethyst pyramid designs. Earrings, $8,500. Ring, $5,995. Roberto Coin 18K yellow gold Pois Moi Collection, from $2,500. Hamilton’s Mercer Collection 18K gold square-edged diamond rings, from $1,950.

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Photo Credit: Bibhu Mohapatra Runway Images Courtesy of Accessories Directions

ARCHITECTURAL ATTITUDE


Mikimoto 18K yellow gold golden South Sea cultured pearl gradient necklace, price upon request. Mikimoto 18K yellow gold diamond earrings featuring golden South Sea pearls, $10,500. Chantecler Bon Bon Collection pearl and diamond drop earrings, price upon request. Hamilton 18K white gold Baroque 10mm South Sea pearl and diamond earrings, $4,650. Hamilton 18K white gold gray Tahitian pearl and diamond earrings, $6,500.

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Photo Credit: Elie Saab Runway Images Courtesy of Accessories Directions

PUMPED-UP PEARLS




     


Chantecler Bon Bon Collection 18K white and rose gold pink coral necklace with diamonds, $18,815. Ippolita Rock Candy Collection 18K yellow gold tennis bracelet with faceted blue topaz, $7,495. Chantecler Paillettes Collection 18K rose gold with pale pink enamel earring clusters, $5,550. Chanel Limited-edition Première Rock Pastel with mother-of-pearl dial. Triple-row steel with leather strap, price upon request. Pomellato Luna Collection 18K rose gold rings set with lemon quartz, chalcedony and pink quartz, from $2,350.

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Photo Credit: Zuhair Murad Runway Images Courtesy of Accessories Directions

SORBET SHADES


DETROIT, THE NEW WATCHMAKING CAPITAL OF AMERICA.

T H E 46 M M B R A K EM A N CH R O N O W I T H 3 E Y E CH R O N O G R A P H A N D DAT E W I N D OW I N S TA I N L ES S S T EEL C AS E . GR AY B R OW N D I A L A N D D E T R O I T- B U I LT A R GO N I T E 5030 M OV EM EN T W I T H A M ER I C A N - M A D E H E AT H ER G R E Y L E AT H ER S T R A P. B U I LT TO L AS T A L I F E T I M E O R LO N GER , U N D ER T H E T ER MS A N D CO N D I T I O NS O F T H E S H I N O L A GUA R A N T EE . E XC LU S I V E LY AVA I L A B LE AT F I N E WATC H A N D J E W E LRY R E TA I LE R S .


collecting

time to

invest

Watchmaking history appeals to a new generation.

Rolex Oyster Perpetual GMTMaster II, 40mm in stainless steel with rotatable black and blue ceramic bezel and Oysterlock bracelet.

BY WILLIAM BUCKLEY

P

hilatelists collect stamps and numismatists collect coins, but watch collectors, in the grand scheme of things, are a relatively new breed. Seismic shifts—from pocket watch to mechanical wristwatch to quartz and atomic movements—indicated the fading of each previous technology into obscurity. But by the end of the 1980s, manufacturers realized that there was a market for mechanical wristwatches both as timepiece and work of art. A new generation of consumers was excited by the craftsmanship of traditional horology, and the watch collector was born. Edward Faber, one of the leading experts on vintage watches and founder of the Aaron Faber Gallery in New York, explains, “Before 1930 watches were essentially pocket watches retrofitted to the wrist. With the advent of World War I, huge advances in technology were made in all areas, from automobiles to aviation, and watches soon followed suit. The nuances of jeweling and modern technology enabled watchmakers to integrate features like chronographs and moonphase calendars, and mechanical wristwatches entered their element.” But with the “quartz revolution” came a level of timekeeping accuracy that changed daily life. What began in 1929 with the quartz clock took 40 years to miniaturize, but in a few swift years mechanical watches began to look like they would become obsolete. “We’ve learned in this industry to fear new technologies, and for good reason,” explains Michael Friedman, historian for Audemars Piguet. “What we could accurately call the quartz revolution was known to many as the quartz crisis because it essentially wiped out the industry as we knew it; it took many years to evolve past that. But interestingly, what the quartz era in the 1970s really did was to liberate the watch industry. We’re now in an era of experimentation and expressionism largely because the accuracy problem was solved when the quartz watch debuted.” With smart watch production numbers in the tens of millions, manufacturers like Apple and Samsung are investing in the future of timekeeping. And whether or not smart watches become as ubiquitous as the quartz and mechanical movements before them, increased interest in traditional craftsmanship has secured the future of mechanical watches. “To connect with a timepiece, which may have plus or minus a few seconds per week but is part of horological history, is a strong statement,” insists Faber. “People in their 20s and 30s are looking at vintage Rolexes and IWCs and they’re excited to collect them, they’re excited to buy them. When they buy vintage watches, they’re also buying the stories behind them.”

Patek Philippe Ref. 5170G Men’s Chronograph with pulsometric scale. White gold with silvery white dial. Featuring Caliber CH 29-535 PS Mechanical manually wound movement.

WHAT COLLECTORS LOOK FOR Brand: This is the number-one consideration. Currently Patek Philippe and Rolex are most coveted. Papers and Presentation: Watches with their original papers and boxes in good condition are worth more. Metal: With only a few exceptions, platinum is number one, followed by rose gold, then yellow gold, then steel. Complications: Chronographs, moonphases, tourbillions etc. can increase a watch’s collectability. Rarity: The more mass-produced a watch is, the less desirable it is to a collector.

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gifts

from the HEART Notable moms on Mother’s Day, push presents and their most memorable jewelry gifts. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE & JULIANNE PEPITONE

ROSIE POPE “I had my daughter, Vivienne, on Mother’s Day a couple of years ago. I would have to say she is my most memorable Mother’s Day gift! This year I am hoping for jewelry. Being a mom of four and running a business, I don’t have too much time to get ready in the morning. But with jewelry, I can throw earrings and bracelets on and feel a little more put together. “My favorites are four bracelets my children gave me with their names written on each one. The best part about them: my oldest wrote all the names out and they stamped each into the metal, all in his handwriting. It was a special gift because it was a way of the kids welcoming our youngest, Bridget.”

HEIDI KLUM “I’m always loving to be surprised. My kids do beautiful art; we have an art teacher who comes to our house every week and guides them. They’ve done beautiful clay pots that they designed and painted. Last Mother’s Day my kids painted on canvases. I love art, so they’re always making something beautiful for me. So that’s always, for me, the best. I don’t want them to go and buy something; I’d rather they make something for me.”

IVANKA TRUMP “My first Mother’s Day was obviously memorable, but last year was my favorite. Arabella was old enough that we could really spend the day together doing our favorite ‘girl things.’ It was also my first Mother’s Day with two kids. It felt so complete. “I have a special place in my heart for handmade gifts. I have Arabella’s artwork in my office and am always excited to add to my collection. That said, I think the best gift would simply be the day spent with my family—no phones, no internet, no distractions!—making breakfast, then exploring the city together. “I didn’t get ‘push presents’ when my children were born—the children are the best gifts I could ever receive! My husband did give Arabella a necklace when she was born and I keep it for her. She knows when she is old enough it’s hers, and until then, I always ask her before I borrow it! “The best jewelry I ever received was my engagement ring. It was purchased from my collection, which was a very supportive—and smart—move on my husband’s part.”

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scene

KATY PERRY

JULIANNE HOUGH

BELLAMY YOUNG

wore a Harry Kotlar fancy canary yellow diamond ring to the Grammys.

wore a David Yurman Petite PavĂŠ pinky ring to the Elle Women in Hollywood event.

wore a David Yurman Labyrinth gold dome ring to the Elle Women in Hollywood event.

HAUTE LOOKS ON 32


KAROLINA KURKOVA

TAYLOR SCHILLING

ZOOEY DESCHANEL

wore a Forevermark Cluster Shield diamond ring to an Art Basel party in Miami.

wore a Forevermark Exceptional Diamond Jewelry by Premier Gem ring to the Emmys.

wore a Forevermark by Maria Canale Aster Collection diamond ring to the Emmys.

THE RED CARPET Take a cue from these decorated digits and ring in spring! BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


timepieces

worry over

The watch business is booming—and that’s got luxury brands determined to make sure watches can be produced and repaired in, well, a timely way. BY JACK FORSTER

A

watch can be many things: an heirloom, a tool, even a work of art. But what all watches have in common is that they’re machines, and like any machine, they need to be taken care of. Though most customers give little thought to maintenance when they buy their first watch, the purchase is actually the end of one story and the beginning of another—one that involves a lifetime relationship with whoever is going to keep the watch in good running order. Making sure there are enough watchmakers to go around is increasingly a challenge. Servicing even a simple watch means taking apart a tiny mechanism no bigger than a quarter, with hundreds of parts, without damaging anything. Then each part must be meticulously cleaned before the entire movement is reassembled, with the correct amount of lubricant applied to moving parts that, in some cases, are no bigger than the eye of a housefly. A properly serviced watch will also have its seals changed, to maintain the

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water resistance it had when first sold. Then its performance has to be checked and the watch adjusted to within desired specifications before it can be released back to the customer. If it’s a complicated watch, the time necessary to service increases exponentially. For a vintage watch, finding replacement parts can require hours of detective work. Educating a new generation of luxury consumers to understand exactly how much goes into servicing a watch is an important step forward. Patek Philippe has had a service center in the United States for many years, and its U.S. president Larry Pettinelli says, “There’s no question that there is a need to educate clients about using qualified Above: watchmakers and what it takes to Watchmakers maintain a fine timepiece.” working at the Patek Philippe It’s demanding work, and a hurried Institute in watchmaker is a bad watchmaker. To Shanghai. clients used to getting a car sent in for repair back within a few days, it’s mystifying that it should take so long. The problem watch owners and watch brands alike are facing is that there just aren’t enough people around who know how to service a watch properly. It’s difficult enough when you’re trying to get a fairly simple, threehanded wristwatch cleaned and oiled; if you have something more complicated—a chronograph, perhaps, or something really challenging like a perpetual calendar or tourbillon—it’s critical to entrust the timepiece to one of the increasingly few skilled watchmakers around. Nobody wants to wait weeks or months to get a favorite watch back, and luxury brands know that since every watch they sell is going to need service sooner or later, something has to be done to fill the gap in trained watchmakers. Fortunately, progress towards this goal is being made.

FAR LEFT AND NEXT PAGE COURTESY OF LITITZ WATCH TECHNICUM; OTHER IMAGES COURTESY OF PATEK PHILIPPE

watchmakers


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One of the biggest names in watchmaking, Rolex, is also one of the front-runners in making sure watches it sells are watches it can keep running. Here in the U.S., one of the best-equipped schools for watchmakers is the Lititz Watch Technicum in Lititz, Pennsylvania, launched by Rolex in 2000. The cost of tuition is entirely underwritten by Rolex and watchmakers there work in spotless, NASA cleanroomstyle facilities, using a combination of traditional tools and state-of-the-art equipment. Though most watchmaking Watchmakers programs teach servicing a watch rather than making one at work inside the Lititz from scratch, Technicum students must actually make their Watch own timepieces before graduation. Technicum. Still, the Technicum graduates only a handful of students each year. According to a story watch historian Stacy Perman wrote for Bloomberg, there were 43 watchmaking training programs in the U.S. Germany; it also has a partnership with the British School of Watchmaking in 1976, compared to only a dozen in 2006, when the story ran. And it’s not just in Manchester. The Nicolas G. Hayek Watchmaking School in the United an American problem. In countries like China, where boom economies have States (started in Seacaucus, NJ in 2005 and located in Miami since 2009) driven an explosion of watch sales, the difficulties in getting a watch serviced provides a comprehensive, 3,000-hour curriculum that gives graduates a can present a major headache to owners, and a crisis of confidence in brands. well-rounded understanding of both the theory and practice of he principal of the Lititz Watch Technicum, German-born Herman watchmaking. It even includes courses on time and physics, and the Mayer, traces the shortage in trained watchmakers to a global event: evolution of instruments for reckoning time. the advent of inexpensive quartz watches. Says Mayer, “Reduced Beat Aebi, head of Swatch Group Customer Service, says such training demand was caused by the quartz dominance starting from the late ’70s. is essential for the future of luxury watchmaking. “Our products are made That situation led to watchmaking losing its attraction as a field of to last a lifetime,” he says. “Many people come back to us and expect high employment. The full-fledged watchmaker as a professional had levels of service [for] watches that have been passed down from generation disappeared from the awareness of the general public by the time the to generation.” And though watchmaking as a profession is still an unusual renaissance of the mechanical high-end started.” choice, Aebi says that, increasingly, “Many students seek us out. It is a Companies with the ability to do so are taking steps to make up for the passion to become a watchmaker, and they have parents or grandparents shortfall. Patek Philippe, which despite a general slowdown in luxury watch who were watchmakers and have passed down the passion and skills.’’ sales continues to be one of the most ardently desired and passionately A few independent watchmaking programs also still exist. The collected watch brands in the world, has established watchmaking schools Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology has a program that’s one in Shanghai and Beijing, intended to train watchmakers in China to handle of the oldest in the country, having been established in 1946. The program the brand’s service needs there. offers an associate’s degree and enjoys the support of Rolex, which Patek Philippe’s New York service center is one of the most highly provides material (state-of-the-art equipment) and financial assistance. regarded in the United States. “The U.S. service center has been in existence Still, relieving the shortage will be a gradual process, since for decades,” says Pettinelli. “Our watchmakers are capable and trained at watchmakers can’t be trained overnight. The Patek Philippe program, for the highest level to work on the most complex timepieces. But minute instance, requires two years of training and 3,500 hours just to reach a level repeaters and tourbillons are sent back to Geneva so they can be addressed where Patek considers the trainee qualified to service quartz and simple in the workshop they were originally created in, oftentimes with the actual mechanical movements. The OSU program, one of the most highly watchmaker who created the timepiece.” Though Patek doesn’t yet have a regarded in the USA, graduated only six students last December. And while watchmaker’s school in the United States, Pettinelli says that there are basic training programs provide a solid foundation, it’s only the beginning. serious discussions underway to establish one—a logical extension of the Learning how to handle the really big guns of horological complexity— firm’s commitment to bringing top-level expertise to its local markets. repeaters, perpetual calendars, tourbillons—takes many more years, and The Richemont Group, which owns some of the world’s most there’s no way to rush the process. prestigious brands, including Cartier, IWC and Vacheron Constantin, Pettinelli remarks, “I don’t think we are yet at a crisis, but certainly there supports the schools known as the Institutes of Swiss Watchmaking, with is a growing realization that supply is not keeping up with demand.... The training centers in Dallas, Hong Kong and Shanghai. The Institute’s U.S. major issue regarding delayed watches is the lack of qualified watchmakers. campus, the North American Institute of Swiss Watchmaking, bases its For instance [Patek Philippe’s service center in New York] does 10,000 3,000-hour program on the curriculum set by WOSTEP (Watchmakers of repairs a year with only 20 watchmakers.” Switzerland Training and Education Program), the current industry standard Help, at least, is on the way, as more and more watch brands strive to for watchmaking schools seeking to offer students a comprehensive make sure that at least basic repairs can be taken care of more quickly. For general introduction to the craft. watch customers and collectors, it helps to remember that if you buy The Swatch Group, which owns Blancpain, Breguet and Omega, among something meant to last a lifetime, it’s worth taking a little extra time to others, has a total of six watchmaking schools worldwide: in Shanghai, care for it—and worth appreciating the skill and dedication it takes to be a Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Miami, and Glashütte and Pforzheim in watchmaker.

T

36


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spotted

Idina Menzel wears Forevermark during a performance at Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest.

As Seen On... Our favorite stars share a love for our favorite brands!

Sarah Jessica Parker wears Mikimoto at the Great American Songbook Gala.

Taraji P. Henson wears Tacori at the 46th Annual NAACP Image Awards.

Estelle wears David Yurman during a performance at the New Yorkers1 for Children Fall Gala.

IDINA MENZEL COURTESY OF DOMAIN LA; SARAH JESSICA PARKER BY PATRICK MCMULLAN COURTESY OF MIKIMOTO; TARAJI P. HENSON COURTESY OF MICHELLE MARIE PR

BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


COURTESY OF D’ORAZIO & ASSOCIATES

Cara Delevingne wears John Hardy at the Serpentine Gala Summer Party. Jennifer Lopez wears Harry Kotlar during an appearance on Ellen.

Hillary Clinton wears Marco Bicego at the Democratic Convention.

Kate Walsh wears Roberto Coin at The Hollywood Reporter’s Women In Entertainment: Power 100 Breakfast. 2


PERFECTGEMS

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER. BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

SAY CHEESE

HUILE D’OLIVE—TRÈS CHIC!

Spain produces more than 100 different types of must-try cheeses including Quesos de Valdeon, a maple-leaf wrapped blue cheese made deep in the Picos de Europa, and the very sophisticated Sant Gil d’Albio, an artisanal goat’s milk cheese with luscious depth, great acidic balance, and hints of nuts and herbs. There’s even a perfect cheese for summer alfresco dining. Max McCalman, author of Mastering Cheese, says, "Manchego is my go-to cheese for a picnic. Simply irresistible, everyone loves Manchegos. They hold up well outdoors on a picnic and they are extremely nutritious. I prefer them between five and nine months of age, in particular Carpuela, a nine-month-old raw milk Manchego. It is versatile with a broad range of wines; for example, it pairs nicely with a Spanish Tempranillo."

On the southern slopes of the Alpilles Mountains near Provence is a wonderfully restored and very elegant 18th-century castle and estate, Château d’Estoublon. Traveling gourmands stop here for lunches paired with the château’s olive oil, which is not only delicious, but so stylish it’s offered in a couture spray flacon. Five olive varietals planted over 212 acres are hand selected, gathered in nets and processed within 24 hours of picking. (The green production method—processing olives harvested before they darken—brings out the full, fresh flavors.) Later this year, visitors won’t have to eat and run. The château will open to guests, offering the opportunity to spend a few days drinking wine, eating, touring the vineyards and olive groves (even picking olives for individual bottles of oil) and reveling in the beauty of Provence.

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SPARKLING STRINGS

At his atelier in the little town of Deidesheim, Germany near the Rhine River, master craftsman Jens Ritter creates handmade guitars that are also works of contemporary art. His Eye of Horus bass, custom-designed for Phil Lesh of The Grateful Dead with black piano finish, silver Egyptian inlay and blue LED lights, is on display at the Smithsonian Institution, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired the Cremona bass guitar for their permanent collection. Ritter’s creations aren’t just for viewing. Prince, George Benson, Mary J. Blige, and the musicians behind Madonna, Christina Aguilera and Van Halen own (and play) Ritter’s guitars. For the reflective rock star, the Princess Isabella is made of German alder, mahogany and ebony with platinum inlays and is covered in over 7,000 Swarovski aquamarine crystals.

TOP HATS

No spring ’15 fashion show was complete without hats. From city streets to the beach, they’re everywhere. Be heads above the crowd with a hat by Angiolo Frasconi. Founded in Campi Bisenzio (one of the major centers of famed centuries-old Florentine straw hat production) just after World War II, Angiolo Frasconi has been a family-owned company for three generations, creating collections of handmade hats that are molto elegante. The designs combine handcrafted tradition, innovation and fine natural fibers— straw first and foremost—but also classical raw materials of the tradition: linens, cottons, felt, wool and cashmere expertly crafted and trimmed by hand. The new collection focuses on creativity and the best of Italian craftsmanship.

Donald Sultan, one of the world’s leading avant-garde artists, achieved fame in the late 1970s as part of the New Image movement. Known for elevating the still-life tradition through the deconstruction of his subjects and the use of industrial materials, he pushes the restrictions of his medium through gouging, sanding and buffing to create depth and texture. Sultan’s philosophy emphasizes “the impermanence of structure and the malleability of form...the whole oeuvre is a celebration of substances before they disappear.” Many of his pieces are on display, including those at the Art Institute of Chicago, The British Museum, the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This summer, Sultan will present his latest work, a sixfoot square creation utilizing black buttons on a modernistic surface, at New York’s prestigious Ryan Lee Gallery.

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DONALD SULTAN, TILE AND AQUA LANTERNS, FEBRUARY 15, 2014

PUSHING THE RIGHT BUTTONS


golf

triumph & tragedy

Gary Player won the 1965 U.S. Open Championship, but Phil Mickelson missed his chance in 2006.

The U.S. Open Championship is golf’s toughest tournament. BY EDWARD KIERSH

Gary Player celebrated at Bellerive in 1965.

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GARY PLAYER COURTESY OF BLACK KNIGHT ARCHIVES; PHIL MICKELSON COURTESY OF ROLEX

I

t’s one of the most demanding athletic showcases in the world, where unshakable endurance and remarkable precision are all-important. The U.S. Open Championship, which will be held in June, this year at Chambers Bay near Tacoma, Washington, has long been a proving ground for the world’s best golfers. Every year since the first Open, in 1895 at the Newport Country Club in Rhode Island, legends have been inspired by brave men battling ankle-high rough, dramatically contoured fairways and unnervingly fast greens. “The Open was my most coveted title because it’s such a grueling test, and it consistently offers special moments in the game’s history,” says 1965 Open champion Gary Player. “Open courses are so physically and mentally demanding that handling the terrific pressure is essential to winning—and that requires a combination of patience and precision.” Although the Open is especially merciless (maybe because of it), many of the game’s most inspirational moments have taken place during this United States Golf Association-staged event. Only last year at Pinehurst, Martin Kaymer ran away from the field by shooting a nine-under par 271, the third lowest score ever. It was a triumph reminiscent of three-time champion Tiger Woods’ stunning 12-under par performance at Pebble Beach in 2000, and Rory McIlroy’s blistering 16-under 2011 conquest of Congressional. Staging his own heroics in 1990, Hale Irwin, at age 45, became the oldest man ever to claim the title. His uplifting win belied the great Walter Hagen’s remark about a typical U.S. Open course: “It makes duffers of us all.” Few golf aficionados can forget how “The People’s Champion” Phil Mickelson turned victory into defeat at New York’s Winged Foot Golf Club in 2006. Trying to carve a three-iron around a tree to buttress his one-stroke lead, Mickelson hit a branch, only managing to advance his ball a mere 25 yards. Obviously dismayed, he subsequently plopped the ball into a bunker, and later rued, “What an idiot I am!” As Rolex, one of the tournament’s chief sponsors, suggests, Open golfers who do achieve a win become “witnesses to history,” masters of “impossible physics on the most hallowed grounds.” They display the same boldness and passion that make Rolex an iconic watch brand, so it’s no wonder that Rolex is irrevocably linked with greatness. Emphasizing Rolex’s preeminence in watches as well as the integrity of the brand, John Green, president and CEO of Lux Bond & Green, says, “Our clients see Rolex wearers like Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus and Roger Federer striving for excellence, and they too want to own a Rolex. These are the world’s greatest athletes, so buyers want what they want: the absolute best.”


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travel

Take Me Away

Escape your everyday routine and experience self-discovery during a yoga retreat. BY ELISE DIAMANTINI

Left: Open-air meditation session in Nicaragua during a Yoga for Bad People retreat. Right: Scenes from the juice cleanse retreat in Montauk, NY.

YOGA FOR BAD PEOPLE Don’t be alarmed by the name: Yoga for Bad People is bad in a really good way. This traveling retreat company is the brainchild of NYC-based yoga instructors Heather Lilleston and Katelin Sisson, who provide guests with the perfect combination of yoga asana, meditation and fun-filled activities in beautiful settings all over the world. Lilleston describes the retreats as “not too much granola, not too much discipline, but just enough structure to give you an outline within which your own personal flavor of R & R can flourish. We like to think we have mastered the art of having a good time, rather than mastered the handstand or shoving our feet behind our heads. That can be fun too, but mainly we want the experience to feel inclusive.” Yoga for Bad People travels the globe to find gorgeous locations in countries like Nicaragua, Brazil, even Cuba. Yogis on retreat can expect a led meditation in the morning followed by a vinyasa yoga class, brunch, midday activities (like tanning, surfing, hiking, shopping, relaxing, etc.), an evening yoga class (generally more restorative), dinner and then time to chill out or explore the city’s nightlife. Yoga classes are focused on alignment and therapy, and as Lilleston says, “The practice reflects and balances out the

group dynamic, personal needs and the local environment, as well as offers a physical challenge. We make sure to give plenty of hands-on assists throughout a class. Led meditations are always optional, but those who have committed to them for the duration of the retreat have often been able to continue the practice at home.” Another thing that makes Yoga for Bad People unique is the music. Lilleston and Sisson say you’ll hear anything from Outkast to Cat Power to Led Zeppelin to Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. “It’s not uncommon for the vibe of the class to feel like you have one foot on the mat and one foot on the dance floor,” she explains. “Bottom line: we like to have a good time.”

LUXYOGA Imagine this: an all-inclusive retreat at a private villa in the South of France with two daily yoga classes taught by master instructors, a personal chef who cooks delicious food using healthy local ingredients, and luxurious personalized service. When you book a LuxYoga retreat, this scenario becomes your reality. Benjamin Sears, who is trained in Bikram, Forrest and Dharma Mittra yoga, as well as meditation and pranayama, created LuxYoga as a high-quality yoga immersion and luxury vacation. “We offer a yoga

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program where teachers get to know the students in a space where they will reflect and grow,” explains Sears. “Plus, it’s really nice to do some challenging yoga and know that after the class our concierge will be waiting with fresh-pressed juice and a beautiful lunch. This is a deep yoga retreat for real people. We want to create not only a vacation, but a transformative experience. We try to get people to dig a deep well and really enjoy themselves.” Each retreat, specializing in either Bikram or vinyasa yoga, has no more than 15 people and two expert teachers. In addition to daily classes, students can attend in-depth workshops—photo analysis, lectures and clinics—that provide a deeper understanding of the practice. All levels are welcome, from beginners who want to learn more to certified teachers who want to refine their knowledge. “We want to make people feel safe and

EXOTIC YOGA RETREATS

E

xotic Yoga Retreats is exactly what its name implies: vacations with an emphasis on yoga in non-touristy locations, where students can experience “luxury travel, blending yoga and inner discovery with sensory experiences of visual beauty, healthy sumptuous cuisine, cultural enrichment and outdoor adventure.” Founder Gayle Olson, author of The Yoga and Fitness Guide for Women, is also a 20-year veteran teacher of vinyasa, Iyengar and Hatha yoga styles. She personally scouts locations in order to provide guests with “a deeply relaxing and inspiring setting [in which] to unwind, enjoy a little healthy indulgence, connect with themselves, with nature and with other interesting people from around the world: to enjoy simple pleasures in life, wrapped in a little luxury!” Upcoming 2015 retreats include trips to Croatia, Bali, Bhutan and Provence. Practicing handstands in Cambodia on an Exotic Yoga Retreat.

Yogis sharing a locally sourced meal during a LuxYoga retreat in the South of France.

“We want to create not only a vacation, but a transformative experience.” comfortable, and offer them a way of life that they can re-create at home. We do journaling exercises and meditation to promote self-reflection. And while I care about the asana and I want people to improve, I’m more concerned with people than poses. The poses are just tools to help people.” Sears says that while each activity at LuxYoga is optional, guests are typically inspired to take part in every aspect of the retreat. “And it’s not a Kumbaya situation, it’s a really special experience: yoga facilitates the bonds people make, but the bonds are not forced. It just happens that people form lasting friendships.” In addition to the quality of yoga and small classes, Sears says something that sets LuxYoga apart is the convivial atmosphere of the villa. “For example, our concierge will remember if someone likes mint tea and pick fresh mint flowers for them. “And the villa itself is something you have to see to believe. We have this incredible unobstructed view of the French Riviera. I wanted to create my ideal vacation: practice yoga in a beautiful place and share wonderful meals with soulful people.”

Accommodations are luxurious, whether guests lodge in a boutique hotel, a lavish sailboat or an extravagant villa; food and wine is always local and organic. Yoga classes are intimate (eight to 12 students) with lots of hands-on adjustments by Olson and her experienced instructors. She describes a typical day: “Mornings begin with fresh juice, a cappuccino or a healing Ayurvedic tea, depending on where we are in the world. A morning serenity walk on a tropical beach, in lavender fields, or through the rolling hills of Tuscany invites you to savor the tranquility and rejuvenating power of nature. We meet for yoga around 8 a.m., followed by a well-earned farm-to-table brunch on a beautiful terrace. Afternoons are for beach lounging, cultural excursions or other adventures. On touring retreats, there may be only one yoga class each day, with stretches along the way. But on most, we have sunset restorative, pranayama and meditation practices. Evenings are pure magic, as we savor the simple luxury of a healthy gourmet meal with fine wine and wonderful company!” Pure magic indeed.

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personalities

Right: Chenoweth’s 2014 CD release of career favorites.

Diminutive

Diva

Kristin Chenoweth’s big voice and bright smile have been lighting up stages and screens for decades. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

W

hat Kristin Chenoweth lacks in height she makes up for in vocal power, acting ability and fashion sense. The 4'11'', 46-year-old superstar has thrilled Broadway audiences with her work in such shows as You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown (which earned her a Tony), Wicked and Promises, Promises. She’s also a frequent TV and film actress, best known for her roles as Annabeth in The West Wing, Courtney in Four Christmases, Olive Snook in Pushing Daisies (for which she won an Emmy) and April in Glee. And did we mention she regularly sells out concert halls and major arenas? Last fall, Chenoweth released her latest CD, Coming Home, a concert version of which also aired as a PBS special. She’s currently appearing on Broadway opposite Peter Gallagher as

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From top: Chenoweth in The Good Wife; with Peter Gallagher in On the Twentieth Century; in Glee; as Glinda the Good in Wicked.

tempestuous 1930s film star Lily Garland in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of the hit musical On the Twentieth Century. Accent recently caught up with Chenoweth to chat about her career, her fashion choices and her favorite pieces of jewelry. The character of Lily Garland in On the Twentieth Century has long been on your radar. How does it feel to finally get the chance to portray her on Broadway? It’s definitely been on my bucket list. The composers, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, told me before they passed away that I was the next rightful owner of that role. I’ve always kept that in the back of my mind, and it seemed like now the time was right. And here I am doing it! I’m very nervous, because it’s a difficult score to sing, and there’s some major physical comedy. When you play a character like Lily, who is a bit of a diva, which parts of your personality do you draw from? I guess there is strength in me that I can only see at times when I’m being pushed to the limit, and Lily is a push-to-thelimit type of character. And vocally she’s a soprano, so that is right in my wheelhouse. The character you’re best known for may be Glinda from Wicked. Do you ever get tired of singing songs from that show at your concerts? Sometimes I wonder if the audience really wants to hear Popular again, but they prove me wrong every time. They always do! How did you choose which songs to record for Coming Home? It’s a culmination of songs I’ve been singing my whole life, so it’s more of a career record. Gospel music is a big part of my life, so I included a song I grew up singing, Little Sparrow, which is a tribute to Dolly Parton. There’s Somewhere Over the Rainbow, which I’ve been singing since I was itty-bitty. And I Could’ve Danced All Night from My Fair Lady shows my vocal training. Everything I do is represented on that album. What are your favorite things to do off-stage? When I need to get away, I like to go to Cabo San Lucas and lie by the pool and drink margaritas and hang out and eat. I also like to just stay in bed and watch TV. Tell us about your sense of fashion, both in real life and on the red carpet. I keep it pretty simple. I think simple is better when you’re petite. And I like to mix and match. If I get a dress from Zara, then I’ll pair it with Christian Louboutin shoes. Do you have a surefire look for attracting attention? I don’t think cleavage ever hurts. How do you use jewelry to complete a look, and what are some of your favorite pieces? I don’t do a lot of big jewelry unless I’m on stage. Personally, I like smaller stacked necklaces and rings. I have a brand-new pair of broken arrow earrings that my friends gave me knowing I’m from a little town in Oklahoma called Broken Arrow, so currently those are my favorite. Have you inherited any family jewelry heirlooms that mean something particularly special to you? There is a black onyx ring that my grandma had. She gave it to my mom and my mom, not too long ago, gave it to me. That’s one of my prized possessions. So is another ring that my grandma had throughout her life; it’s an opal with diamonds around it. Those are the kind of things on which you can’t put a monetary value.

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“Sometimes I wonder if the audience really wants to hear Popular again.. . they always do!”


BUSI N ESS GI FTS DI V ISION

For assistance, please contact Donna Latham at 609.524.6497, or email dlatham@hamiltonjewelers.com


spirits

Engaging the Senses

Drinking well isn’t just about great taste. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

enhances wine or cocktails, but there’s no doubt a heavy-cut crystal whisky glass or big red wine glass enhances our perception of the drink. Texture also plays a significant role: granular sugar is a plus on the rim of a Sidecar, but a minus in the drink (where liquid simple syrup is often used instead). Sound: People underestimate how much sound influences experience. To play with this sense, British bartender Tony Conigliaro experimented by serving the same drink against two different soundtracks (classical and techno), resulting in completely different tasting notes from attendees. Sense of Place: Terroir is a French word which suggests that wine, in particular, is influenced by soil, microclimates and even the personality of the winemaker. But we also experience a sense of context; visiting a winery or distillery can actually make the product taste “better,” because you now have a connection to the producer. A specific cocktail can induce memories of a perfect date or a great travel experience. Sense of Balance: Equilibrioception, regulated by the inner ear, is severely hampered by consuming too much alcohol. But there’s another sense of balance: one of balance in your cocktail, where all the elements— sweet and sour, alcohol and sugar, fruit and savory—come together perfectly. Learning to identify a balanced drink (or what a drink is lacking) goes a long way toward creating ideal food pairings. It even turns out that senses can do double duty. Synesthesia crosses wires, and allows those with that neurological condition to “hear” colors and “see” sounds. To some degree, we all do it: Green means “go” and fast food restaurants decorate in bright colors to make people hungrier and eat faster. Get to know your senses and how they work, and you’ll enjoy your drinking and dining experience in a whole new way.

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f someone asks what senses are involved when you’re sipping a glass of wine or a cocktail, the correct answer is “all of them.” Taste, smell and sight are all pretty obvious. But touch (mouth feel, a chilled glass), sound (the bubbles in the glass, the crack and tumble of ice) and more come into play to truly round out your drinking experience. It turns out we rely on far more than five senses (maybe as many as 21) to make sense of the world. Thermoception, for example—our sense of hot and cold—turns out to be a completely different thing than our sense of touch. When it comes to enjoying a glass of wine or a cocktail, understanding how our senses interact goes a long way to understanding why we like or don’t like a particular food or drink. “Dimmer lighting in a bar can mask colors and aesthetics, causing the imbiber to rely on aromas, texture and flavors to engage with the drink,” says Pamela Wiznitzer, president of the New York branch of the U.S. Bartenders Guild and an M.S. candidate in food science at NYU. “Similarly, the sounds of cracking ice and shaking and straining a cocktail can cause a Pavlovian sensation. Bars that elevate the background music may drown out that component, leaving the guest with visual stimulation as the only option. It’s one reason why drinks at brightly lit rooftop and pool bars tend to rely on vivid colors and wild garnishes, while cocktail lounges emphasize complex, savory ingredients.” Sight: “Blind” tastings can be taken to an extreme at restaurants that offer “dining in the dark” options. A few years ago, Wiznitzer crafted a deconstructed Pisco Sour cocktail featuring reduced lime syrup and gelled pisco “pearls.” Guests put the drink together on their palate in total darkness for a new experience. Smell: An old trick has you pinch your nose shut to learn that an onion and an apple taste the same. Somewhere between 70 and 90 percent of what we “taste” actually happens with our olfactory nerves. Opus One winemaker Michael Salacci hires a parfumist to lead sensory training sessions and provide an outside opinion while blending the brand’s iconic Cabernet Sauvignon-based wine. Taste: The old “tongue map” (sweet at the tip of the tongue, salty on the sides, etc.) has been largely debunked by science. But it does turn out that different chemical reactions are responsible for differing tastes. Wired magazine’s August 2014 What’s Inside column noted that for the popular hot sauce sriracha, capsaicinoids in spicy peppers bind to TRPV1 receptors in nerve endings conveying touch, temperature and pain, while salt is probably interacting with ion channels in your taste buds. Touch: There’s a lot of debate on whether the “right” glassware actually


wheels

return of the

Muscle Car

Auto aficionados turn their interest back to these American icons.

I

f you were a teenager in 1960s America, you likely dreamed of getting your driver’s license, impressing the girls by peeling out of the highschool parking lot and blasting down the road. European cars of the time were fun to drive, but a bit docile. Muscle cars (smaller-size, two-door American vehicles with huge, high-compression V8 engines that accelerate at blisteringly fast speeds in a straight line) were Detroit’s way of making a statement to potential customers that horsepower was the American way. Unlike European sports cars, which relied on well-balanced chassis with suspension setups to provide excellent cornering speeds, the brute power of muscle cars was primarily used for drag racing; cornering at speed was a very risky pursuit. Some say it was the Oldsmobile Rocket 88 that initiated the muscle car era, but Ford’s 1962 introduction of its 406-cubic-inch V8 Galaxy 500—to compete with Chevrolet’s Impala SS 409—is likely what began the horsepower wars. It didn’t take long before Chrysler, Plymouth, Dodge and Pontiac joined the fray. These cars were so much more than transportation. A culture sprang up around them and pop music expanded this chapter of history as a way of life. The Beach Boys, Jan and Dean, Ronny and the Daytonas, and the Rip Chords set the mood with songs like Little Deuce Coupe, 409, GTO and Hey Little Cobra. The lyrics synced with the language used by gearheads, as exemplified in the Beach Boys tune Shut Down, which passionately tells the

BY DAVID A. ROSE

story of a drag race between a Dodge 413 and a Corvette Stingray. This remarkable era in automobile history began to wind down in the early 1970s when the government placed limitations on emissions, forcing automobile manufacturers to detune their mighty engines in order to run on low-lead and unleaded fuel. In 1973 OPEC cut oil exports to the U.S., causing a gasoline shortage that led to long lines and short tempers at gas stations across the country. People began to gravitate toward compact cars with smaller, fuel-efficient engines, and for decades the automobile industry produced mostly lackluster, utilitarian machines with no character. Now for the good news: Performance cars with both quality and style are again what people want to buy, and what car makers again seem eager to produce. Muscle car mania may never again rise to the same heights, but its spirit can be seen on dealership sales floors across the country. In 2005, the redesigned Ford Mustang channeled the iconic fastback from 1965, which set off a wave of retro-modern American muscle. Three years later, Dodge dusted off the Challenger nameplate with a style that looked a lot like its 1969 predecessor. Chevy followed suit with the new Camaro, referencing the original 1967-69 model. Even Cadillac, which never produced a muscle car in the style’s heyday, now offers a 556-horsepower engine in its CTS-V model. These cars are remarkably exciting to drive, and technology has made them far more forgiving in terms of handling than their earlier incarnations.

HOT MUSCLE CARS IN HISTORY 1965 Pontiac GTO 1967 Shelby Mustang GT500 1967 Plymouth Road Runner 1968 Pontiac Firebird 1968 Oldsmobile 442 1969 Dodge Charger 1969 Chevy Camaro Z28 1970 Chevy Chevelle 454 SS 1970 Plymouth Hemi ’Cuda 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302

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Photography by Haring

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culture

Italy’s designers step up to preserve cultural landmarks. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

L

ast spring, in the wake of crippling recessions, Matteo Renzi, Italy’s newest (and youngest) prime minister, called on the private sector to help fund emergency restoration of collapsing structures in the ancient wonder that is the buried city of Pompeii. Heavy rains and flooding had caused severe damage, and the government was unable to cover the whole bill. Now the program is expanding to the country’s museums, fountains and other icons, particularly in Rome. And its fashion giants—including Fendi, Bulgari and Tod’s—are stepping up to the plate. While corporate sponsorship of public projects is nothing new in the U.S., it’s fairly unprecedented in Italy, where there’s a resistance to mixing private and government programs. “The ideological refusal to permit the private sector to intervene—as if only the public sector could guarantee the guardianship of heritage—must end,” Renzi announced last March. Soon after, luxury jeweler Bulgari said it would put $2 million toward an extensive refurbishment of the storied Spanish Steps in the Piazza di Spagna, where decades of heavy traffic have taken a toll on the 290-year-old structure. Scheduled to begin this year, it will help celebrate Bulgari’s 130th anniversary as a “special gift from

Roberto Cavalli held a runway show beneath Milan’s Arch of Peace and donated $120,000 towards its restoration.

GETTY 1; RUNWAY IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIES DIRECTIONS

Fashion Facelift

Bulgari to its city,” CEO Jean-Christophe Babin said in a statement. These gestures are not completely without precedent: In 2010, Roberto Cavalli presented his collection beneath Milan’s Arch of Peace in exchange for a $120,000 donation toward its restoration. What’s changed is the scale—and the ability to do some branding during construction. Tod’s, the shoe company famous for its elegant driving moccasins, announced it is helping to finance a series of projects at Rome’s 2,000-yearold Colosseum. Plans for the $30 million comprehensive restoration have been in the works since 2012. (They met with some controversy, since part of the agreement involves promotional opportunties for Tod’s in exchange for the funding.) A series of restorations of the site’s arches, facades and entrances will keep the famous amphitheater partially shrouded in scaffolding for over two years. In the end, though, the city should be able to enjoy its massive monument for another few millennia. And last summer, Fendi announced it would dedicate almost $3 million to a restoration of the Trevi Fountain, the Neptune-and-chariot adorned destination built in the 18th century and made famous in the films La Dolce Vita and Three Coins in the Fountain. While tourists might lament visiting the site while it’s drained and under scaffolding, it’s also possible they’ll catch Fendi’s creative genius Karl Lagerfeld, who loves photographing Rome’s fountains. For Fendi, restoring the city’s fountains (more projects are planned) makes sense. Insists Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director of accessories and thirdgeneration designer, “It’s our duty to pay tribute to the city of Rome which has given us so much.”

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Y O U R

M O S T

I M P O R T A N T S T A R T S

D A Y

H E R E

PHOTO CREDIT: MARIE L ABBANCZ

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© D.YURMAN 2015


HAMILTON JEWELERS ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2015

Hamilton Jewelers  

The Magazine of Life's Celebrations