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VOLUME ONE . 2012 .


WELCOME TO THE FIRST 2012 CENTENNIAL EDITION OF HAMILTON JEWELERS ACCENT MAGAZINE We look forward to sharing our Centennial with you through many celebrations, special events and Centennial Edition product offerings. This milepost of our company’s journey is an accumulation of many happy memories with our clients, and we look forward to many more. As we embark on this year, we are pleased to present this issue of ACCENT Magazine; as always, we have designed our publication with content that we hope you  nd relevant to yourself, your family and your busy lives. In addition to the latest news and trend updates from the worlds of fashion, travel and gourmet food, there are a variety of articles ranging from the glamour of Newport mansions, to vintage automobiles, to innovative workout ideas and much more.

What a banner year 2012 is for our company, my family and our clients. We are exceedingly proud to celebrate 100 years as a family-owned and operated  rm, from our slight beginnings in Trenton, NJ, to our current ve-store portfolio. Adding to our bricks and mortar is our e-commerce division, a business gifts department, and an insignia and emblematic jewelry business. All in all, we have certainly grown in 100 years! We have tried to adapt our business model to best suit the needs of our clients, and we will continue to embrace new technology and ideas to always improve our service and offerings. Maybe we will even revisit a tried-and-true idea from the last 100 years… sometimes the best vision survives the test of time and a business acumen from 1912 is still part of our core values.

Having been a family-owned company for 100 years brings Wishing you and your family a relaxing many wonderful remembrances that span decades of an ever- and enjoyable spring and summer season. changing business. Since our establishment, we have thrived through many changes in technology, science, politics, culture, and of course, many transformations in fashion and style. Throughout the years, we have had the honor of being included in so many important moments in the lives of our valued clients. Many of you have reached out to us to share your stories of how a Hamilton piece of jewelry was a treasured Hank Siegel, President part of a special moment or celebration in your lives. Those are the stories that shape our own tale and make our business so rewarding and memorable. Those are the stories that remain the cornerstone of our company’s values.

Hamilton’s storefront highlighted. Trenton, NJ. 1937.

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The Ralph Lauren Stirrup Watch STAINLESS STEEL MEDIUM MODEL. SELF-WINDING MANUFACTURE MOVEMENT. 189 COMPONENTS, 40-HOUR POWER RESERVE. SWISS MADE.


Contents spring/summer 2012 H A M I LT O N J E W E L E R S 2542 BRUNSWICK PIKE LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ 08648 609-771-9400 HAMILTONJEWELERS.COM CHAIRMAN MARTIN SIEGEL PRESIDENT HANK B. SIEGEL VICE PRESIDENT DONNA J. BOUCHARD VICE PRESIDENT DAVID S. KASTER

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CONTRIBUTING WRITER KATHLEEN BROMMER GRAPHIC DESIGNER CHRISTOPHER D. NAVARRO

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R HANS GSCHLIESSER MANAGING EDITOR JILLIAN LAROCHELLE PROJECT MANAGER

1 Welcome Letter

44 Profile: John Hardy 46 Red Carpet

6 Hamilton Centennial

62 From the Runways

8 The Year in Review

65 Wellness: Haute Healthcare

LISA MONTEMORRA DESIGNERS CYNTHIA LUCERO JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI PRODUCTION MANAGER

10 Best Bets

68 Perfect Gems

16 Home Style Watch

70 Home: Al Fresco

18 Pantone Fashion Color Report

74 Food: Making Magic

20 Work it Out

76 Culture: Café Society

22 The Jewels of India

80 Travel: Eco-Immersion

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary

26 The Precious Gems of the Ancient Middle East

84 Spirits: Gin Blossoms

depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2012.

28 Vacation Adventures 32 Gilded Newport 36 The Old World Charm of Vintage Cars 38 The Hidden Surprises of Kimberly McDonald 40 Accent Advisor 42 Profile: Forevermark

PEG EADIE PRESIDENT AND CEO BRITTON JONES CHAIRMAN AND COO MAC BRIGHTON

Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550,

WATCH SECTION

Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175;

52 Watchmaking: Lititz Watch Technicum

686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publish-

54 Collecting: Time on His Side 56 Complications: Passing Time 60 Profile: Michele Watches

Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212-

ers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Volume 10, Issue 1. Accent® is a trademark of Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.

FOREVERMARK DIAMOND NECKLACE. COVER ILLUSTRATION BY DARIA JABENKO.

FEATURES


Approaching the milestone year of 2012 felt a bit daunting... how do we share the chronicle of our Centennial year with others? The mere task of gathering our documented history was unnerving; it’s hard to fathom how much can be accumulated over 100 years of a business’ life. Dozens of tattered boxes  lled with design archives, family and company stories, newspaper clippings, ads, catalogs, awards, letters… all pieces of our company’s history. After weeks of sorting

through this vast stockpile of reminiscences and memories, it became clear: this was a story that needed to be told in an important and notable way. And thus, a commemorative coffee table book about Hamilton’s history was born. Publishing later in 2012, the book will offer a rare glimpse into what formed our company’s foundation and the long history of wins and losses that we have encountered along the way. Here is a sneak peek into the making of this notable book.

Vintage Hamilton design. Platinum, diamond and 18k yellow gold brooch with frame, circa 1920s and 1960s. This brooch was sold by Hamilton in the 1920s to a client whose daughter later brought it to us in the 1960s, to create a yellow gold removable frame to wear with it. The original filigree brooch is in platinum, and set with 57 old European and transitional cut diamonds, with intricate detailing. The yellow gold frame in a foliate design has two hinged “leaves” which secure the center section in place. Sample spread in Hamilton Centennial Book.

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Hamilton Jewelers’ founder Irving Siegel at the original store in downtown Trenton. 1927.

Shoppers outside Hamilton in Trenton, NJ location. 1958.

From left: Martin and Irving Siegel, Trenton store. 1960.

From Left: Hank and Martin Siegel at Jasna Polana event. 2007.

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Guests enjoyed gourmet fare and crisp Champagne at our Patek Philippe reception.

Dressing up has never been so fun! Left: Lisette Siegel, Ricky Shechtel and Linda Grenis put on their 1920s garb and smile for their vintage photo shoot!

Above, from left: Martin Siegel, Chairman of Hamilton Jewelers, and his wife, Denise Siegel, with Suzanne Niedland De George and Lawrence F. De George.

The Princeton team with Hank Siegel, President and CEO of Hamilton Jewelers, enjoys a quick 1920s-themed photo op before the start of our Jazz and Jewels evening.

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David Kaster, Vice President, and Lauryn Cohen, baker extraordinaire, at our Worth Avenue location in celebration of our Chantecler weekend.

2011 THE YEAR IN REVIEW

There are always great reasons to celebrate. As we kicked off our important Centennial year, we did so with enthusiasm to feature the world’s top designers and global brands. We hope that our calendar gave our guests a host of reasons to stop in, say hello, and stay for the fun. Winding down 2011, we hosted several extravagant and exciting events to kick off our 100th year in style. Our Jazz and Jewels night was a VIP event  lled with the glamour of an era gone by… a 1920s themed evening where clients enjoyed a chance to wear garb from this renowned era, feast on a gourmet progressive dining menu, tap their toes to live swing time entertainment and, of course, see a preview of our  nest pieces before we introduced them to the public for our holiday season. Keeping things exciting in our Florida region, our Palm Beach Gardens location held an exclusive pre-watch fair evening with Patek Philippe on Friday, November 11th. The world-renowned brand showcased an outstanding selection of their  nest timepieces, including many limited-edition items. Most importantly during the event, we were proud to honor Lawrence F. De George and Suzanne Niedland De George for their generous donation to the Jupiter Medical Center Foundation in memory of Suzanne’s mother, Margaret Niedland. Their generous contribution enabled Jupiter Medical Center to build a state-of-the-art diagnostic facility, The Margaret Niedland Comprehensive Breast Center.

Hamilton ‘elves’ helped little ones create ornament treasures for mom and dad at our annual holiday party.

As a hallmark of our family-owned business, our annual holiday event in Princeton was a celebration of all things family. The Princeton Girlchoir provided wonderful holiday songs, while children decorated Christmas ornaments to give to mom and dad, excitement on their faces with each stroke of the paint.

Worth Avenue associates Judy, Martha and Matteo full of smiles for a weekend of Chantecler!

The Princeton Girlchoir performed a wonderful selection of Christmas songs at our annual holiday party.

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And we’ve only just begun our Centennial celebrations. Over the course of 2012, we look forward to hosting exceptional events, announcing many special promotions and continuing to raise the bar for our clients. Here’s looking ahead to an outstanding year!


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OUR EXPERT BUYERS TRAVEL THE GLOBE TO FIND TRENDS, VISITING HAMILTON WORKSHOPS AND MEETING WITH EMERGING DESIGNERS AND ESTABLISHED BRANDS TO DEVELOP A REPERTOIRE OF STUNNING JEWELRY AND FINE TIMEPIECES.

BE ST BET #1:

IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY Popular on runways, red carpets and wedding aisles, golden yellow has taken the fashion world by storm this spring. Pantone, the world-renowned authority on color, also announced yellow to be one of the key shades of the season. The sweet, feminine hue exudes happiness and a bright outlook. Inject some color into your wardrobe this spring with vibrant yellow.

RING: Handmade ring in platinum and 18k yellow gold with fancy intense yellow Asscher-cut diamond flanked by two colorless baguette side diamonds. PENDANT: Fancy yellow pear-shaped diamond pendant handcrafted in platinum and 18k yellow gold surrounded by diamonds. EARRINGS: Drop earrings with fancy yellow diamonds surrounded by colorless diamonds on a diamond hoop.

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Hamilton’s Facets Collection. 14k yellow gold station necklace featuring oval and round blue topaz, $925.

RIGHT: Hamilton’s Facets Collection. Moonstone and diamond earrings in 14k yellow gold, $2,350. BELOW: Caleo bracelet in 18k yellow gold featuring moonstones and diamonds, $14,995.

BEST BET #2:

TRUE BLUE Feeling blue has never felt so good. Designers are using every possible stone and shade to capture the icy coolness, bold tone or soft haze of blue. Using stones like moonstone, blue topaz, blue sapphire and turquoise, this season’s trend has never been so accessible.

Chandelier earrings with faceted blue topaz framed by diamonds, crafted in 18k yellow gold, $6,375. LEFT: Deco-style aquamarine, sapphire and diamond drop earrings in 18k white gold, $11,250. BELOW: Hamilton’s Rare Gemstone Collection. Handmade buckle bracelet with 66 carats of sapphires and 6 carats of diamonds set in 18k white gold, $41,000.

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THE WHITE HAUTES


HERMÈS Cape Cod, ladies size, steel, silver dial, white calf strap, quartz, Swiss made, $2,550.

G-SHOCK Classic tough white resin band digital watch with a black face, $99.

BEST BET #3:

CHANEL J12 white ceramic 38mm case and automatic watch movement with a white dial and diamond bezel, $17,700.

WHITE HOT Pure white, a natural versatile neutral that adds practicality to this season’s brights. A traditional color combination staple, pure white is best juxtaposed with this season’s bold colors to enliven both tones.

CHANEL Premiere Triple Row ceramic steel case set with 52 diamonds and a white lacquered dial.

OPPOSING PAGE: JAEGER-LECOULTRE Master Compressor Diving Chronograph Lady in a 38mm case and set with 16 full-cut diamonds on a white alligator strap. BVLGARI B.ZERO1 stainless steel and 18k pink gold case featuring a white dial with a “Mediterranean Flower” motif set with diamonds on a leather strap. PATEK PHILIPPE Aquanaut Luce “Honey Beige” model with 46 diamonds and the iconic “Pure White” strap.

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BACCARAT Handcrafted crystal dragon, $250.

JOHN HARDY Naga gold and silver round earrings, $695.

BEST BET #4:

YEAR OF THE DRAGON

Matching gold and silver small round pendant on chain necklace, $895.

Considered the most auspicious sign in the Chinese Zodiac, the dragon is quite special and much revered. A respected symbol for 2012 embodying power, luck and wisdom, designers are eager to incorporate dragon elements in their pieces this year. Embrace love and success this year through dragon-themed jewelry and home décor. ANNIE MODICA Découpage Dynasty 2 handcrafted bar tray, 21” x 8”, $279.

LALIQUE Tianlong decanter, 2012 Vintage Edition, $2,295.

JOHN HARDY Naga Head bracelets with amethyst, pink topaz and white topaz on a rectangular chain. Swiss blue topaz and black sapphire also available, $995 each.

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Hamilton’s Gemstone Collection. 18k white gold and black rhodium rose-cut pink tourmaline earrings, $16,500.

Hamilton’s Lisette Collection. Pendants in blue topaz, pink tourmaline and amethyst surrounded by diamonds set in 18k gold, from $795.

Hamilton’s Gemstone Collection. Handmade amethyst and pink sapphire drop earrings set in 18k rose gold with diamonds, $8,950.

BEST BET #5:

PLAYFUL PASTELS Soft tonal pastels give off a free and playful vibe, colors that designers like fashion maven Nanette Lepore love this season for their collections. Reminiscent of nature at its finest – illuminating sunsets, flowers emerging from a fresh garden – feminine pastels promise the optimism of a brighter day.

IPPOLITA Sterling silver Teardrop bangle in Paradise, $795. Sterling silver Lollipop bangle in Mandarin, $795.

IPPOLITA Sterling silver Teardrop earrings in Malibu, $495. Sterling silver 4-stone Gelato drop earrings in Mandarin, $695.

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HOME STYLE WATCH 2012

THE SECOND MOST IMPORTANT STYLE STATEMENT AFTER YOURSELF IS YOUR HOME.

Your home décor and style personality need the next big thing; why not make it a conversation starter? Emerging as leaders of the pack in 2012, these design trends are gaining notoriety as truly creative style concepts. #1: THE CUSTOMMADE CURATOR It’s more than just recycling; it’s customizing a piece of furniture or home accessory from something you have treasured all along. Children’s art can be incorporated into a coffee table, fashion items can become custom lighting fixtures, wine barrels can be crafted into a chic folding chair, and even engines from a revered classic automobile can be transformed into a side table. Spearheading the trend, CustomMade is a marketplace that allows you to commission custom projects from over 3,000 talented, independent craftsmen. You can have anything you want, custom made, to your exact project specifications for a piece that is truly unique and your own. CUSTOMMADE.COM

#2: IDEA PAINT When writing on the walls is completely acceptable. Better than a dusty chalkboard, or a clunky, institutional white board, comes IdeaPaint, a water-based paint that creates a dry-erase surface anywhere you want one. Just named to Inc. Magazine’s “30 under 30” list of America’s Coolest Young Entrepreneurs, Babson College students John Goscha, Morgan Newman and Jeff Avallon began tossing around business ideas for a class when they began to brainstorm about… brainstorming. Wouldn’t it be amazing if they could just write all over the walls when inspiration strikes? Creating a new, environmentally friendly solution, and taking a few years of chemistry work to hit the right formula, IdeaPaint is a durable coating that works as well as a porcelain whiteboard, perfect for home offices, playrooms, schools and corporate offices, even kitchen cabinets or toy boxes. Applied like chalkboard paint, without the dusty mess of chalk, IdeaPaint only takes one coat to apply, and you can choose from a myriad of colors: white, gray, mauve, orange, or light green. IDEAPAINT.COM

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#3: DOOR & CABINET FASHION Whether you want to add a little something to your bathroom or organize your entryway, switch out door hooks, hangers and knobs for instant, and creative, bursts of style. Traditional home hardware stores are featuring fun, bold doorknobs, like LA Hardware’s bright orange resin knobs. Meanwhile, some specialty shops like NiftyNob feature fun yellow duckies perfect for a kid’s room and home entertaining expert Michael Aram’s Undulating Leaf knob shows that the key to home décor is in the details. And doors are not to be left out! Add a fun hanger, like a tree branch, giraffe or crocodile, or more traditional hangers where the options are limitless. Fashion is now available for your doors and cabinets! MICHAELARAM.COM


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SOLAR POWER

GRANITA

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CABARET

HAWAIIAN OCEAN

SODALITE BLUE

TANGERINE TANGO

COCKATOO BELLFLOWER

GRASS GREEN

DAZZLING BLUE

MARGARITA

STARFISH

DRIFTWOOD

SWEET LILAC

VINTAGE KHAKI

TRADEWINDS

The Pantone Fashion Color Report is the foremost international authority on colors and trends for the upcoming fashion season. Created over 47 years ago with the purpose of simplifying decision-making and buying processes for fashion designers, industry leaders and enthusiasts, the communication showcases the latest fashion trends and predictions – all in the name of style. Dance into spring 2012! Warmer months inspire a range of diverse lifestyles, from free and playful and light and breezy, to contemporary classics. Think renewed energy, vivid brights, soft muted tones and fun-loving pastels. Lauded as the Pantone color of the year for 2012, Tangerine Tango is reminiscent of an enticing juicy orange, a provocative and vivacious refresher ready to enliven anyone’s outlook this spring. As an added dose of energy, Solar Power radiates warmth and cheer with its sunny hue. Whimsical Bellflower, a distinct ornamental purple, exudes a fresh uniqueness and creativity. Meanwhile, brilliant and bold Cabaret is a sensual and intense rosy-red sure to make a splash in summer clothing and cosmetics this summer. In contrast,

Sodalite Blue is a classic maritime hue, exuding a sense of order and calmness. This dependable shade also works with every color in the palette. Cockatoo is an exciting and unusual blue-green that is sure to make your spirits soar, adding a fanciful touch to any palette. Margarita is a piquant yellow-green, lifting spirits with its refreshing and stimulating glow. As a perfect accompaniment in a blossoming garden, Sweet Lilac evokes the fresh scents of summer in the early morning. Add this delicate pinkish purple for a touch of romance to any wardrobe. Natural versatile neutrals add practicality to this season’s bright hues. Driftwood, an adaptable blend of beige and gray with a slightly weathered feel, and Starfish, a perfect warm summer neutral, complement all the colors featured in this season’s top 10. Inspired by these colors, fashion houses are enthusiastic to experiment with new looks and color combinations. Hot neon colors and soft pastels are reminiscent of nature at its extremes: a powerful sunset, the ocean sparkling at dusk with flashes of lightning in the distance. Mix ultra-bold colors with their natural counterparts in your wardrobe for a vibrant spring look.

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Rowing machine? Been there, done that. Weights at the gym? Boring. The treadmill? Please. Tired of the same workout routine? Not your traditional workout, these exercises pack a little more punch (sometimes literally) and a lot more fun.

FENCING

En garde! If you are the competitive type, then this fast-paced workout is for you. Fencing is like a physical chess match; anticipate your opponent’s next move and react to it in an exciting mental and physical exercise. With its intense arm and footwork, fencing burns 300 calories per hour, while improving speed, flexibility and coordination. While the focus of fencing is on realism as it was used in the 19th century, all modern safety precautions are taken: weapons are blunt while students wear protective gloves, jackets and masks. Local fencing clubs, like Palm Beach Classical Fencing, provide all the necessary equipment for each fencing match or bout. Step into a bygone era when duels settled scores‌ recreationally of course. Greenacres Community Center 501 Swain Blvd. Greenacres / Lake Worth, FL www.classicalfencing.org


TAEKWONDO

The national sport of South Korea, Taekwondo combines combat techniques, self-defense, sport, exercise and in some cases, meditation and philosophy, more than other martial arts disciplines. Considered a high-intensity and high-impact exercise, an hourlong class can burn 600 calories or more, while instilling mental benefits, such as increased self-discipline and self-confidence. Increased energy and a feeling of accomplishment begin immediately. Classes are typically designed for various age groups and levels of proficiency. Regardless of age, anyone can participate, from age 4 through 70. At Taekwondo Elite in Hillsborough, New Jersey, even families can take classes together, learning and advancing collectively. Taekwondo’s benefits are like a two-for-one deal: fitness and defense all at the same time. Taekwondo Elite Martial Arts School 256 Route 206. Hillsborough, NJ 08844 www.tkdelite.com

INDOOR CYCLING

These aren’t your mom’s traditional stationary bikes. Indoor cycling studios have been cropping up in the trendiest of neighborhoods, and are dedicated to helping cyclists build strength and muscle tone, while improving general stamina and cardiovascular fitness. More entertaining during a class with an energetic trainer and fast-paced music, cycling also reduces stress while burning approximately 600 calories in an hour. Cycling offers the ultimate total body training system in a relaxed and comfortable class atmosphere. At Hammer House in Colts Neck, New Jersey, you can even pick your bike number! Hammer House’s RealRyders also burn 20% more calories than traditional spin bikes, as they tilt, lean and turn to improve upper and lower body strength, coordination, enhanced balance and a stronger core. Hammer House also offers community support activities, like creating teams for charity bike rides, 5K Mud Runs, triathlons and cycling rides. Burn fat, build muscle and most importantly, have fun!

SKATING

The activity you loved as a kid can help you stay or get in shape. Skating is a great alternative to running because it’s easier on the joints, while being a good aerobic workout that tones your lower body and builds muscle strength. Ice and inline skating can burn about 330 calories in one hour of continuous skating. While you can skate alone, there are several skating clubs around the country, each providing the opportunity for fun, great outdoor exercise, skating with old friends and meeting new ones, all while improving skating skills. The Beach Bladers in South Florida welcome experienced and novice skaters, meet several times a week and offer weekend skating trips, parties, marathons, clinics and more. As a member of the National Skate Patrol, the Beach Bladers also offer free braking clinics, tips on skating etiquette and otherwise assist new and experienced skaters. With over 27 paths the club uses in South Florida and the Palm Beach area, you’ll always take the scenic route. If you are interested, please “post a greeting” to one of the Meetup organizers on meetup.com/beachbladers www.beachbladers.com | rollerblades.org/pbsc

INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING

A great way to get over a fear of heights. Indoor rock climbing is a workout that builds strength and balance as you use your legs and arms to push and pull your way up the wall. The constant shifting of your weight helps build muscles and strengthens your core, burning up to 800 calories an hour.

Hammer House Indoor Cycling Studios Colts Neck Shopping Center 420 Rte 34. Colts Neck, NJ 07722 www.hammerhouse.com

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At indoor climbing gyms, like The Gravity Vault in Chatham, New Jersey, beginners usually start with bouldering (climbing shorter walls without a rope or harness) and top roping (climbing with an instructor or spotter using a harness or rope). Boredom from repetitive exercises is not possible; the facility includes over 13,000 square feet of rock climbing courses involving arêtes, overhangs, arches and slabs on walls 35 feet tall and higher. You’ll work muscles you didn’t know you had. The Gravity Vault 40 Watchung Avenue. Chatham, NJ 07928 www.gravityvault.com


In November 2011, Hank B. Siegel, President and CEO of Hamilton Jewelers, had the opportunity to experience the Indian gemstone and diamond industry from a new perspective, along with 15 fellow members of the Board of Governors of the Gemological Institute of America. Established in 1931, the Gemological Institute of America, a nonproďƒžt organization, is the world’s foremost authority on diamonds, colored stones and pearls. GIA exists to serve consumers and the industry by providing education, laboratory services, research and instruments needed to accurately and objectively determine gemstone quality. By upholding the highest standards of integrity, academics, science, and professionalism, and decades of ingenuity, GIA’s leadership sets extraordinary standards for the diamond and gemstone industry throughout the world. The strictest standards of corporate governance, as well as compliance with the highest levels of ethical business practices and corporate social responsibility, are also GIA priorities. Mr. Siegel has been a Governor of the Institute since 2008. Factories store rough white diamonds in bags before sorting.

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LEFT: Hank Siegel and members of the GIA Board of Governors examining rough diamonds.

ABOVE: A wax tree of 30 rings, the method by which multiple pieces of jewelry can be cast all at once.

Currently, the GIA has facilities throughout the world. In 2004, the GIA opened an educational facility in Mumbai, and thereafter a laboratory facility to meet the needs of customers in India’s fast growing marketplace.

The delegation of Governors representing the Institute chose to hold its rst board meeting outside of the United States in India, acknowledging the meteoric growth and development of the diamond and gemstone processing and trading industry which has occurred over the last 20 years. ABOVE: The finished casted trees of gold with gemstones, ready to be set and sold in the Indian markets.

Throughout the tour, the GIA delegation was treated to the incredible sights, smells and tastes of India – experiences unlike any other. All of the members commented on the tremendous advances in manufacturing, technology and software development applied to the diamond and gemstone processing industries, and were struck by the incredible work ethic and understanding of social and ethical responsibilities within the industry, which has long been a priority for leading rms in the U.S.

LEFT: Hank Siegel inspects a diamond at the polishing wheel.

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RIGHT: New computer software plots the best way to cut a diamond from the rough through 3-D scans for optimal usage. BELOW: Rough white diamonds ready for sorting.

Arriving in Mumbai from Delhi, the group expected the bustle of a large city, but not the number of motorcycles and threewheeled taxis that were on the roadways in a city of 15 million people. Following an introduction by Nirupa Bhatt, the Managing Director of GIA India, the group visited a factory with over 2,000 workers focused on cutting diamonds and crafting jewelry. Using advanced technology for looking at rough diamond crystals, the computers determined the greatest yield and least waste for cutting a rough diamond into a nished gem. The group then proceeded to the Indian Institute of Gems and Jewelry, where students are instructed in jewelry design, setting, identication, casting and other introductory skills. Afterwards, the board was welcomed to a traditional vegetarian lunch, followed by a tour of another factory where the group saw some of the upcoming promotional items for the holidays destined for the mass retailers in America.

ABOVE: Diamond cutters in Surat, the diamond capital of the world, at work on the polishing wheel.

A highlight of the trip was a visit to the GIA educational building and laboratory, with a tour of the beautiful facilities evidencing the development and growth of the organization. A reception with over 400 attendees offered a very warm and enthusiastic thank you for visiting Mumbai. The evenings were lled by receptions with industry leaders, government ofcials and the press.

RIGHT: A myriad of flowers, fruits and vegatables are always plentiful in the traditional Indian markets.

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Above: GIA India welcomes the Board of Governors.

An early morning ight to the city of Surat, with a population of over 4 million, was highlighted by visits to diamond cutting factories, each with over 3,000 workers. Surat has become the diamond cutting capital of the world, with over 500,000 skilled craftsmen employed in diamond-related industries. This experience was exceptional, especially the opportunity to meet several of the young members of senior management, each truly passionate about diamonds, their staff, technology and the importance of education. A visit to the city of Jaipur included a tour of the Indian Institute for Jewelry and Gems, an educational and training facility for the local industry. The gemstone cutting industry alone in Jaipur employs around 200,000 workers, cutting colored stones and crafting silver and stone jewelry. The group visited one of the oldest manufacturers in Jaipur, who discussed plans to expand in India, Moscow, Johannesburg and China. The trip was a thrilling experience, to see rsthand the high esteem and reverence the people of India have for the GIA, and to enjoy this culture so steeped in tradition and history.

LEFT: Written at 90 Nassau Street, Albert Einstein crafted this inspirational message about a leader, specifically M.K. Gandhi, currently on display at Gandhi’s former Mumbai home.

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the renowned museum in New York City that houses more than two million works, has now added the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia and Later South Asia. Having been renovated to dazzling success, the grand reopening of a suite of 15 galleries in October 2011 dramatically personies the Met’s collection of Islamic art, one of the most comprehensive in the world, featuring pieces collected over the museum’s 140-year history.

SHAH, EMPEROR & SULTAN

THE PRICELESS HEADDRESSES, GEMS & CROWNS OF THE ANCIENT MIDDLE EAST

The exhibits show breathtaking works of art, from the Emperor’s Carpet, an exceptional classical Persian carpet of the 16th century presented to Hapsburg Emperor Leopold I by Peter the Great of Russia, to notable early and medieval Qur’ans, to tools of the builders of the Taj Mahal and more. But it’s the breathtaking ancient jewelry that will truly induce awe. The introductory gallery, named the Patti Cadby Birch Gallery, showcases masterpieces from across the collection, displaying jeweled arts spanning distinct cultures that visitors will encounter in the successive rooms. Meanwhile, the Egypt and Syria gallery, with artifacts from the 10th to the 16th centuries, features a comprehensive display of three major periods in the medieval history of Cairo, most importantly, the Fatimid period (909 to 1171), exemplifying the rich history and culture of the time through abundant gold jewelry. Through this gallery, visitors can enter the Orientalism gallery, which houses rich holdings of the Islamic and Asian departments from the Mughal South Asia (16th to 19th centuries) and Later South Asia (16th to 20th centuries) periods. Here, jades and jewels of the Mughal period are plentiful.

Headdress in the Shape of Double Bird Central Asia or Iran, late 19th / early 20th century, silver, fire-gilded with repoussé or engraved decoration and cabochon carnelians and turquoise beads.

technical expertise of the highest level is always evident, no matter what the medium. Because the objects in our galleries are primarily secular in nature, they can easily be appreciated both for their innate utility and for their astonishing beauty, whatever the viewer’s background may be.” The Metropolitan Museum of Art proudly works to connect audiences of all ages with the collection in the galleries to enhance their understanding of the multiple perspectives and diversity that exist within the Islamic culture. Educational initiatives are available for families, students, teachers and general visitors. These include musical performances, hands-on workshops, lectures,  lms, gallery talks, K-12 teacher workshops, an international symposium, panel discussions and conversations with artists. An in-depth special online feature about the new galleries is available on the museum’s website (metmuseum.org/newgalleries2011), including videos on the conservation of select rooms and courts, images of highlighted works of art in the collection, photographs of the new galleries and a oor plan. This feature is available in several languages, including Arabic, Turkish and Persian.

“Although the galleries represent a vast territory over a long period of time, the diverse artworks shown here are nonetheless unied in several distinctive ways,” said Sheila Canby, the Patti Cadby Birch curator in charge of the Department of Islamic Art.™ “There are many examples of luxury materials, due to royal patronage. And

ABOVE: Headdress, late 19th/early 20th century Central Asia or Iran, silver, fire-gilded and engraved/punched with openwork and stamped beaded decoration and table-cut carnelians. Contemporary red cotton lining in interior. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gifts of Marshall and Marilyn R. Wolf. Images: © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

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Sipping Mai Tais on a beach at a five-star resort is relaxing and desirable. But how long can you actually sit around doing nothing, before you realize that boredom has set in? Traditional vacations are changing; exploration has replaced relaxation. These five fascinating, globe-spanning trips are thrilling adventures with a bevy of activities, where boredom is not allowed to set in. Turn your next vacation into an adventure, become an explorer, and unleash your inner Indiana Jones.

ANTARCTIC CRUISE

Departing from the tip of Argentina, Antarctic Cruises announces upon arrival, “Welcome to the end of the world. Or to the beginning.” The prime time to travel to Antarctica is the November through March spring/summer cruise season, as seasons are the reverse of the Northern Hemisphere. After harsh winters, the low season of early spring in the Southern Hemisphere is virtually untouched – so you’ll be the first to step onto many sites. Meanwhile, mid-to-late season features warmer weather, newly hatched penguin chicks and higher concentrations of whales and seals, but being peak season, the ships are also in greater abundance. Antarctic Cruises promises an authentic adventure in a comfortable environment; exploration vessels only carry around 80 passengers. The crew is more than just table service or entertainment directors; marine biologists, guides, lecturers and photographers provide for a truly otherworldly experience. While Antarctica is considered one of the least hospitable places on earth – hundreds of thousands of years of ice made for a cold, windy and dry continent – the only inhabitants are penguin colonies, migrating whales, soaring sea birds and beach-lounging seals. The animals are unafraid of humans, providing you the opportunity to wander among them. While plans depend on Antarctica’s unpredictable weather, you can enjoy crystal clear iceberg watching, snow-hiking and celebrations on ship with Champagne and dancing. A trip to the historical museum, once a former British station, a gift shop and the southernmost post office in the world – where they’ll stamp your passport – is a little spark of civilization not to be missed. After 100 years since first reaching the South Pole - Amundsen in 1911; Scott in 1912 – visitors are still few. With a trip like this, you’ll earn premiere bragging rights. www.adventure-life.com/cruises/antarctica-cruises


IBHUTAN: THE SACRED VALLEY TREK Nestled among the eastern Himalayas, the tiny kingdom of Bhutan is a culture steeped in tradition, filled with serene landscapes, sacred temples and ancient Buddhist traditions. Previously off-limits to outsiders, the “Land of the Thunder Dragon” has now embraced sharing this incredible country with travelers. The itinerary includes a trek through Bumthang, the most sacred valley of Bhutan, then through alpine forests, mountain crosses, glacier valleys and lush farmlands. Hike to dzongs, or fortress-monasteries, populated by red-robed monks. Visit charming villages long isolated from the modern world, and meet the Bhutanese people, traditional Himalayan highlanders. Explore Bhutan’s unique artistic heritage in cultural centers like Thimphu and Paro, as you discover their intriguing history through museums, monasteries and local homes.

MOROCCO CAMEL TREK Morocco is a land full of exotic adventure, where majestic minarets tower over spice-scented souks and soaring mountains give way to endless deserts. Morocco is home to traditional mountain villages, epic landscapes, ancient Roman ruins and imperial cities with fascinating architecture and enchanting medinas all at once. Experience Bhutan’s colorful pageantry during a live performance of traditional music and dance. Climb up to the 16th-century Ugyen Chholing Palace, where a museum displays the everyday tools, clothing and living quarters of an ancient household. Try your hand at archery, Bhutan’s national sport, during a festive display with local experts. Rumor has it that guests may be joined by His Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche, who is recognized as the incarnation of a great Buddhist master, at a teahouse overlooking fantastic views of the legendary Taktshang Lhakhang, or Tiger’s Nest Monastery, perched on a cliff nearly 3,000 feet above the Paro Valley. Bhutan is not just an adventure for the body; it’s also an experience for the spirit. www.nationalgeographicexpeditions.com/ expeditions/bhutan-hiking-sacred-valley/detail

After arriving in Casablanca, you can expect to visit historical mosques, some dating back as far as the 12th century, to the mausoleums of past sultans. Explore Morocco’s ancient, imperial cities, home of the legendary rose-colored casbahs. Hike the cedar forests of the Atlas Mountains, home to Barbary macaque monkeys, and descend into the lush oasis of the Ziz Valley. For a change of pace and scenery, ride a camel to a tented camp in the Sahara, sleep under a starlit sky and wake up as the sun rises over windsculpted sand dunes. Meet the local Moroccan people in traditional Berber villages as you sip mint tea and learn about their rich cultural heritage. The trip ends in Marrakech, where you can meander through medinas, lined with market stalls and craftspeople; soak up the colorful chaos of the Djemma el Fna, the lively central plaza, where snake charmers will captivate you. A mesmerizing country, and a history of mysticism, will enchant you for years to come. www.nationalgeographicexpeditions.com/expeditions/morocco-camel-trek/detail

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GREECE: ASCENT TO THE HOME OF THE GODS Luxury vacation experts Abercrombie & Kent have redefined travel with their new extreme adventures. And when the adventure involves ancient Greek gods, you can’t get any higher than that. The first day in Greece is laid back; simply shop and eat in Athens. But on the second day, the journey begins. Hike through grassy uplands to rocky ridges along picturesque gorges, traversing your way ultimately to the high peaks of Mount Olympus. The ancient Greeks thought this mountain was the pathway to reach the gods, and considered it Zeus’ throne. While the hike can be extreme, the sights on the mountain -- shady beech and fir forests, woodland birds and flowers, traditional villages and striking cliffs – are worth the effort. The entire trip is not simply hiking; stop along ancient destinations, like the cave-chapel and monastery of St. Dionysus, and swim in river pools along the way. Visit traditional stone-built villages and Europe’s deepest springs. Truly a trip the gods would envy. www.akextremeadventures.com/adventure-travel/expedition/greece/climb/Olympus/hike/packageID/5216

TREASURE HUNTING IN THE FLORIDA KEYS In 1985, Mel Fisher discovered the wreck of a 1622 Spanish Galleon, the Nuestra Señora de Atocha, off the Florida Keys. Over 400 million dollars worth of artifacts such as gold bars, coins and jewelry have been recovered, but more items remain buried at sea. Salvage operators continue to scour the wreckage of the Nuestra Señora de Atocha, as well as the wreckage of her sister ship, the Santa Margarita. Mel Fisher’s Treasures is one of the few salvage operators that has provided an opportunity to the public to join in on their own treasure hunt, while learning more about historic shipwrecks and enjoying some leisure time in Key West, Florida. You can expect accommodations at a traditional Key West home, a barbeque, reef-diving sessions, museum tours, an evening wine cruise aboard a chartered ship, and most importantly, the opportunity to treasure hunt on the Atocha trail. Previous guests can relate stories of finding solid gold bars as their party whoops and screams through their regulators. While you will not get to keep the treasure you find, Mel Fisher’s Treasures will still reward you with a previously found artifact of equal value up to $2,500. Regardless, treasure waits for you to find it. www.melfisher.com

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Inspirato Residence, St. Barts, French West Indies

ENVY BE THE

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Introducing Inspirato, the smartest way to vacation at more than 120 properties around the world – from Hawaii and Tuscany to the finest locations in Mexico, the Rocky Mountains, and the Caribbean. As a member, you’ll enjoy hassle-free vacation planning, a local concierge, daily cleaning services, and privileged access to a growing portfolio of the highest-quality resort residences. All at a fraction of the cost of other vacation options, without complicated rules or restrictions and no long-term commitment. Call 888-546-5008 or visit inspirato.com and find out why we were named by Forbes as one of America’s Most Promising Companies. EXCEPTIONAL EXPERIENCES. EXTRAORDINARY VALUE.

888-546-5008 | www.inspirato.com Photo: Pierre Carreau Inspirato is a private club that requires a nonrefundable Initiation Fee. Reservations vary in price by property and date, and are subject to availability. © 2012 Inspirato LLC. INSPIRATO is owned and operated by Best of 52, LLC (doing business in California as California Best of 52, LLC), the sponsor of this advertisement. 1637 Wazee Street, Suite 400, Denver, Colorado 80202. Fla. Seller of Travel Reg. No. ST38403. Washington Seller of Travel Registration No. UBI 603086598. CST 2107465. Registration as a seller of travel in California does not constitute approval by the State of California. Best of 52, LLC is not a participant in the California Travel Consumer Restitution Fund.


Coined the “playground for the rich” in the late 1800s, Newport, Rhode Island became the social capital of each summer season for America’s elite, illustrious families like Astor, Vanderbilt and Oelrichs. Although those families are long gone, their palatial “summer cottages” remain, a testament to the opulence that was the Gilded Age.

THE BREAKERS The grandest of Newport’s “summer cottages,” The Breakers, is a symbol of the Vanderbilt family’s social and  nancial preeminence in turn of the century America. The family’s patriarch, Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794-1877) established the family fortune in steamships and later the New York Central Railroad, playing a pivotal role in launching the industrial age. Commodore’s grandson, Cornelius Vanderbilt II, became chairman and president of the New York Central Railroad system in 1885, and purchased a wooden house called The Breakers in Newport that same year. After the original structure was destroyed in a fire in 1893, he commissioned renowned architect Richard Morris Hunt to design a villa to replace the wooden-framed home. Hunt directed an international team of craftsmen and artisans to create the 70 room Italian Renaissance-style palazzo inspired by the 16th-century palaces of Genoa and Turin. Allard and Sons of Paris assisted Hunt with furnishings and  xtures, Austro-American sculptor Karl Bitter designed relief sculpture, and Boston architect Ogden Codman decorated the family quarters.

THE DINING ROOM AT THE BREAKERS. © PATRICK O’CONNOR PHOTOGRAPHY.

Cornelius Vanderbilt II and his wife, Alice, had seven children. Their daughter, Gladys, married Count Laszlo Szechenyi of Hungary and inherited the mansion upon her mother’s death in 1934. An ardent supporter of The Preservation Society of Newport County, she opened The Breakers in 1948 to raise funds for the Society. In 1972, the Preservation Society purchased the house from her heirs, and it is now designated a National Historic Landmark.

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ROSECLIFF Modeled after the Grand Trianon, the garden retreat of French kings at Versailles, Nevada silver heiress Theresa “Tessie” Fair Oelrichs commissioned Stanford White to build the home in 1899. After its completion in 1902, at a reported cost of $2.5 million, Tessie hosted extraordinary entertainments there, including fairytale dinners and even a party featuring iconic magician Harry Houdini. Tessie’s father, James Graham Fair, was an Irish immigrant who made an enormous fortune from Nevada’s Comstock silver lode, one of the richest silver  nds in history. During a summer in Newport, Tessie met Hermann Oelrichs playing tennis at the Newport Casino, and they subsequently married in 1890. A year later, the couple purchased the property known as Rosecliff from the estate of historian and diplomat George Bancroft. Later, the Oelrichs bought additional property along Bellevue Avenue to replace the original house with the mansion that became the center for many of Newport’s most lavish parties. Rosecliff is now preserved through the generosity of its last private owners, Mr. and Mrs. J. Edgar Monroe. They gave the house, its furnishings, and an endowment to the Preservation Society in 1971. Scenes from several  lms have been shot on location at Rosecliff, particularly in the elaborate ballroom, including The Great Gatsby, True Lies, Amistad and 27 Dresses. THE ELMS The summer residence of coal industrialists Mr. and Mrs. Edward Julius Berwind of Philadelphia and New York, the couple commissioned architect Horace Trumbauer in 1898 to design a house modeled after the mid-18th century French Château d’Asnieres (c.1750) outside Paris. Reportedly costing $1.4 million, construction of The Elms was completed in 1901, with interiors and furnishings designed by Allard and Sons of Paris. The home displayed a veritable treasure trove of Renaissance work, ceramics, 18th-century French and Venetian paintings and Oriental jades. The elaborate Classical Revival gardens on the grounds were developed between 1907 and 1914, including terraces displaying marble and bronze sculptures. The rear of the park features the  nest specimens of trees, while the lavish lower garden features marble pavilions, fountains, a sunken garden and carriage house and garage. The gardens have been recently restored. When Mrs. Berwind died in 1922, Mr. Berwind invited his sister, Julia, to become his hostess at his New York and Newport houses. Although Mr. Berwind died in 1936, Miss Julia continued to summer at The Elms until her death in 1961. Later that same year, the house and most of its contents were sold at public auction. The Preser vation Society of Newport County purchased The Elms in 1962 and opened the house to the public. The Elms was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1996. CH ATE AU-SU R-M ER Chateau-sur-Mer, or “Chateau on the Sea,” is a landmark of high Victorian architecture, furniture, wallpaper, ceramics and stenciling. The most palatial residence in Newport from its completion in 1852 until the appearance of the Vanderbilt mansions in the 1890s, Chateau-sur-Mer was the scene of incredible entertainments, from an elaborate country picnic for over 2,000 guests in 1857, to the debutante ball for Miss Edith Wetmore in 1889. Built as an Italian-style villa for China trade merchant William Shepard Wetmore, Chateau-sur-Mer’s grand scale and lavish parties ushered in the Gilded Age of Newport, drawing in the social and  nancial elite of the era. Mr. Wetmore died in 1862, leaving the bulk of his fortune, and the home, to his son, George Peabody Wetmore. George married Edith Ketaltas in 1869, and during the 1870s left the home with architect Richard Morris Hunt to remodel and redecorate in the Second Empire French style, as the couple traveled on an extended trip to Europe. Chateau-sur-Mer is now a fantastic representation of the major design trends from the last half of the 19th century. After a distinguished political career as governor of Rhode Island and as a United States senator, George died in 1921, and his wife Edith in 1927. Their daughters never married, and after their deaths, the house was purchased by the Preservation Society in 1969, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 2006.

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THE GOLD ROOM, MARBLE HOUSE. © JOHN CORBETT PHOTOGRAPHY.

M A R BLE HOUSE Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 as an extensive 39th birthday present for Alva Vanderbilt from her husband, William K. Vanderbilt. Deemed a summer house, or “cottage,” as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest homes of the early 19th century, Marble House was much more. A social and architectural landmark, Marble House transformed Newport from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of palatial mansions. William Vanderbilt was the grandson of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, who established the Vanderbilt fortune in steamships and the New York Central Railroad. His older brother was Cornelius Vanderbilt II, who built The Breakers. Alva was a leading hostess in Gilded Age society, and envisioned Marble House as her “temple to the arts” in America. Designed by Alva’s favorite architect, Richard Morris Hunt, the home was inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles, costing a reported $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. The Vanderbilts had three children, and later divorced in 1895. Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, and moved down the street to another grand mansion, Belcourt. After Belmont’s death, Alva reopened Marble House, and built a Chinese Tea House overlooking the seaside cliffs. From here she hosted dozens of rallies for women’s right to vote. In 1932, she sold the house to Frederick H. Prince, after having relocated to France. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate. In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark.

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We never think about how they are signicant gas guzzlers, the difculty required to maintain them, or even the steep price tag often associated with them (a 1927 Duesenberg Model X, only one of four in the world, was bought for $2 million recently). So what is it about these vehicles that continues to keep us enthralled whenever they pass? Their auras are intoxicating, reminding us of a time when the American spirit was strong and luxury ruled the roadways.

Many of the cars were much more than just the family vehicle; the Rolls-Royce Twenty was designed with a chauffeur in mind, while the Studebaker Touring 1916 was built primarily for afternoon drives calling on friends, and the British sportscar model from Swallow Sidecar Company was primarily used as a racing vehicle before and after it was renamed Jaguar in 1935. These iconic vehicles resulted in elegant, owing lines with chromeplated  xtures, exuding a design philosophy that still makes vintage cars synonymous with beauty and luxury.

Vintage cars are classied as vehicles built between 1920 and 1930, following World War I, at a time when factories, machinery and men needed work and promises of better times encouraged pioneers in the industry. Vintage cars were often built by wouldbe inventors in barns and backyards, culminating in over 500 companies competing for supremacy by 1910. The fabled Henry Ford led the vintage car era with his assembly line, often credited with starting the industrial revolution. Eventually, entrepreneurs like Daimler, Chrysler, DeSoto, Dodge, Studebaker, Olds and Hudson followed suit.

But the mysticism during the vintage car’s reign was not to last. Most car plants were previously military plants, quickly retooled for automobile production. Government regulations were lacking in safety and environmental concerns. Car makers took risks with windshields, doors, lights, turn signals and seat belts – most vehicles were not even made with these parts! Brakes were problematic, pollution control was minimal, if not non-existent, and industrial accidents were all too common. These issues dwindled the once 500-maker strong industry to only 60 companies by the time the Great Depression arrived. Quite ttingly, only the The Roaring Twenties marked a new phase in automobile pro- strong survived. duction, cultivating a strong relationship between art and design, when owning a car was still considered a rarity. Customiza- When the Great Depression of 1929 hit, the burgeoning autotion for elite owners ruled supreme. Cadillac offered over 500 mobile industry was brought to its knees. Only 20 car makers color combinations to choose from in 1925, while stylist Harley continued to operate. However, the buildup of military plants for Earl was commissioned to design Cadillac’s 1927 LaSalle Con- World War II once again paved the way for a new generation of vertible Coup, the  rst American car designed by a stylist in- automobiles, the classic car era. stead of an engineer.

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For Kimberly McDonald, the seeds of ne jewelry design were sown early in life, underscored by a deep appreciation for Earth’s natural beauty. Childhood memories of rock collecting at her home in North Carolina sparked McDonald’s interest in nding natural gemstones and transforming them into exquisite, wearable pieces. Armed with practical advice imparted by her Southern mother, with her mantra, “Never leave home without your earrings,” McDonald’s design sensibility was cultivated through a unique composition and a perceptive eye for color and quality. She has since acquired a signicant following of ne jewelry lovers worldwide.

The Hidden Surprises of

Before embarking on her own line of jewelry, McDonald studied diamond grading at a diamond brokerage  rm in New York City, where she attended GIA courses and gained invaluable market experience. This knowledge, combined with her innate sense of design and appreciation for unique stones, enabled McDonald to begin working as a jewelry curator. With scores of loyal clients, she has helped assemble some of the country’s most remarkable, comprehensive and wearable  ne jewelry collections. McDonald set out to create a stunning collection of unique  ne jewelry that women could connect with. She began her iconic career in late 2006 by creating one-of-a-kind pieces using geodes (rock formations with crystal structures that have formed inside), agates and phantom quartz accentuated with 18k gold, precious and semi-precious stones, resulting in a stunning collection of  ne jewelry that speaks to fashion-conscious, independent women who value the singular beauty and pristine craftsmanship of McDonald’s pieces. In celebration of her achievements, in 2010, Kimberly McDonald was recognized by her peers by being inducted into the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA).

Handmade geode designs with diamonds in 18k yellow gold.

While her work with geodes and agate will always be the cornerstone of her collection, she is constantly evolving, and has expanded the breadth of her designs to include more precious stones, as well as introducing new stones like the druzy pieces in the current collection, electric in their vibrant hues of bright pink, blue and green. The collection embodies the designer’s vision through natural and luxurious style, and allows McDonald to channel her fascination with Earth’s precious gems into her unparalleled eye for design, and brilliant use of “random settings,” which has permanently changed the landscape of  ne jewelry design. The designer’s maxim for the sophisticated buyer is that diamonds are not the only precious gemstone; the true connoisseur appreciates unusual stones, those that feature color, impart energy, and trigger emotions – from whimsical to spiritual. While each piece is crafted to accentuate the beauty of the center stone, it is the unique and considered way in which they are framed that sets the line apart. Most importantly, each item in the Kimberly McDonald Collection is by nature an instant heirloom, an enduring piece that can be handed down through generations.

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ACCENT(ADVISOR) WHICH CLASSIC/TIMELESS PIECES ARE MOST LIKELY TO BECOME KEEPSAKES OR HEIRLOOMS? Those that hold their value, can be passed to the next generation, or the piece that becomes your signature. We have a client who is never (ever!) seen without a beautiful strand of pearls that her husband bought her many years ago; whether at the grocery store or at a gala, her pearls say it all. And that’s the key: finding a statement piece of jewelry (“statement” need not mean “expensive”) and letting it become your trademark. We’ve noticed that when times are tougher and discretionary spending more limited, jewelry becomes even more personal and relationship-driven. If you buy only one item this year, make it special and enduring.

I KNOW WOMEN WHO WEAR FASHION JEWELRY LIKE BANGLES OR BOLD CUFFS, BUT BUY THESE PIECES AT CLOTHING STORES AS OPPOSED TO JEWELERS (EVEN IF THEY HAVE TO REPURCHASE THE PIECES WHEN THEY TARNISH). WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THIS? I think many women balance trendy fashion jewelry that they don’t expect to last forever with items that they cherish, wear often and want to last. Since a great bangle is a classic that will be in style forever, it’s worth investing in something both fabulous and enduring.

For both ladies and gents, a good watch is an absolute must! If you can invest in only one great piece of jewelry, let it be a practical and stylish watch to enjoy for many years. It should cross over into any activity, and should dress up or down. When you have more to invest, consider buying both a “dress” and a “sports” watch. But in the interim, one great watch transcends numerous styles and ventures! Three other ideas for ladies: 1) a beautiful strand of pearls, either classic round or baroque (uneven) shaped; 2) diamond stud earrings, a true go-witheverything item to wear with denim or ball gowns; and 3) a necklace or pendant with personal meaning, like your children’s names or initials, an important date, a display of faith or spirituality. (If you’ve ever noticed women constantly touching their necklaces, it’s likely because they feel an emotional connection to the symbol.)

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WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ANTIQUE JEWELRY AND ESTATE JEWELRY? “Estate” is a popular jewelry label, but does not specify the period of manufacture. “Estate” is primarily used to describe jewelry that is previously owned. The term “antique” generally applies to jewelry items that are at least 100 years old, the benchmark used by government officials for duty-free importing of antiques. For spring 2012, everything old is new again, so consider both of these options, or try resetting one of your own family heirlooms.

HONORA PEARLS, MATTHEW CAMPBELL LAURENZA BRACELETS

WHICH ITEMS SHOULD I CONSIDER BUYING THIS SEASON?


HERMÈS SELLIER

HERMÈS HORLOGER ARCEAU CHRONO COLORS Steel case, mechanical self-winding movement, Epsom calfskin strap Crafted by Hermès watchmakers in Switzerland


PROFILE

THERE ARE DIAMONDS, AND THERE ARE FOREVERMARK DIAMONDS. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

QUINTESSENTIAL DIAMONDS F

or those who demand perfection, there are few options. Forevermark, part of the De Beers group (the foremost international diamond expert for 120-plus years), offers only the finest carefully selected, responsibly sourced diamonds, meticulously cut and inscribed by highly trained master craftsmen. Less than one percent of the world’s diamonds are eligible to bear the Forevermark inscription and only a select group of jewelers (we among them) are authorized to sell these incredible gems. Inscribed using highly advanced proprietary technology, these superlative diamonds feature the Forevermark icon and a unique identification number, both invisible to the naked eye. The actual size of the inscription is one 20th of a micron deep (one 500th the size of a human hair) and can be seen in our store using a special viewer. Although the inscription in no way affects the exceptional internal quality of the diamond, it does ensure beauty, rarity, responsible sourcing and added security. Expert gemologists at The Forevermark Diamond Institute in Antwerp assess each stone according to rigorous standards of integrity and accuracy. The result is the Forevermark Diamond Grading Report, your guarantee of excellence and authenticity. Those of us who are socially conscious should know that Forevermark diamonds are guaranteed conflict-free. But more than that, the company goes above and beyond industry standards to ensure that their sourcing actively benefits communities in their countries of origin, countries committed to the highest business, social and environmental standards. Beauty, rarity and integrity in one quintessential diamond: No wonder Forevermark is the jewel of choice for Gwyneth Paltrow, Uma Thurman, Nicole Kidman, Michelle Williams and fabulous women everywhere, on and off the red carpet.

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IT TAKES GREAT NURSES TO MAKE A GREAT HOSPITAL.

AND WE HAVE THE GREATEST OF ALL.

Jupiter Medical Center is the #1 Preferred Hospital of Choice in Palm Beach County as ranked by patients. Much of the credit goes to our nurses who provide superior patient care that distinguishes every great hospital. To them, nursing is not just a career – it’s a calling. The Nurses of Jupiter Medical Center Committed. Compassionate. Heroic.

Richard L. Cosnotti, President & CEO (561) 263-5728 • www.jmcfoundation.org


PROFILE

SCALING BACK JOHN HARDY REVISITS ITS NAGA COLLECTION WITH FIERY NEW DESIGNS TO USHER IN THE YEAR OF THE DRAGON. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

F

irst introduced in 2009, on the anniversary of John Hardy’s 20th year in business, the Naga collection tells the Balinese myth of the dragon and the pearl. As legend has it, the dragon would leave his volcano each night and dive down to the bottom of the sea to visit his love, the pearl. At sunrise, as he burst from the water and returned home to the volcano, the water dripping from his scales fertilized rice fields across the land and brought prosperity to the Balinese. Now, for the Chinese Year of the Dragon, John Hardy head designer and creative director Guy Bedarida has dramatically expanded the 2012 Naga collection with more pieces featuring this mythical symbol of good fortune, prosperity and success. Like the dragon in the myth, one of John Hardy’s missions is to help the Balinese land and people flourish. The company views itself as a collaborative effort between designers and artisans, and believes that “a business can prosper while respecting people and nature.” Their “Greener Everyday” policy signifies an ongoing commitment to environmental conservation, which includes the planting of bamboo, rice and even the black palm wood used in some of its men’s designs. The brand’s Hong Kong headquarters are completely green, and its Mambal, Bali compound is a village unto itself, composed of traditional bamboo and mud structures, rice paddies and an organic farm that provides lunch for the entire workforce there. The Naga collection, like all John Hardy collections, is handcrafted in Bali by these talented native artisans, some of whom have previously served as jewelers to Balinese kings. Some pieces feature full dragons or dragon heads, while others showcase a more abstract dragon scale motif. Crafted from sterling silver, yellow gold and an assortment of precious and semiprecious gems, the collection’s cuffs, bracelets, rings, necklaces and earrings are rich with detail, inside and out.

“I LIKE TO THINK THAT THE WEARERS OF THE NAGA COLLECTION WILL ENJOY LOVE, PROSPERITY AND LUCK.” –GUY BEDARIDA, HEAD DESIGNER 44


Brett Matthews Photography

Pink Cake Box

Williams and Sonoma

Exquisite-Bride

Prada

Neiman Marcus Short Hills

Dress The Drink

You are cordially invited to attend the Country

Club Bride

Showcasing Winter-Spring-Summer and Fall

Silvia Weinstock Cakes

Viburnum Designs

Visit our website for Country Club Featured venues in March, May, and November 2012 To receive our WEDDING INVITATION or information and event booking details Contact Deborah Lynch 609-683-8299 For a complete list of our Preferred Professionals Visit us at www.countryclubbride.com

Find great people to create your wedding wherever you are


RED CARPET

Blonde Bombshells WITH LIGHT LOCKS AND HEAD-TO-TOE STYLE, WE’D GIVE THESE STUNNING CELEBS AN AWARD ANY DAY. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

AMBER HEARD

T

ZAC EFRON & MICHELLE PFEIFFER

CLAIRE DANES

hough the Guess model-turned-actress is always striking, Amber Heard truly smoldered

at the SAG Awards. Her fitted black satin gown epitomized covered-up sexy, while sparkly

Zac Efron and Michelle Pfeiffer sure made a good looking pair at the New Years Eve premiere.

Yellow gold and pink tourmaline chandelier earrings lit up Pfeiffer’s face and helped prepetuate that youthful glow. We don’t know how she does it. For Showtime’s Emmy Nominee Reception at the Mondrian Los Angeles, Claire Danes chose pavé diamond drop earrings that popped against the silvery threads of her dress. With a confident

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HEARD AND PFEIFFER WEAR H. STERN. DANES WEARS MCL.

diamond studs and metallic smoky eyes added just the right amount of shimmer.


RED CARPET smile, flushed cheeks and dewey décolletage, the nominee for Best Actress in a TV Drama looked like a winner long before they called her name. Stacy Keibler knows how to accessorize. Adorable arm-candy aside, the former Ravens cheerleader still looks sensational in the old purple and black, topped off with teardrop earrings,

STACY KEIBLER & GEORGE CLOONEY

KATHERINE HEIGL

MARLEY SHELTON

stacked bangles and a notice-me cocktail ring. As if we wouldn’t have noticed her without it. KEIBLER WEARS MCL. HEIGL WEARS SUTRA. SHELTON WEARS AMRAPALI.

All tassel, no hassle! Katherine Heigl’s blue sapphire and black rough-cut diamond earrings lent an effortless glamour to her gown at the 39th Annual American Music Awards. Paired with a sparkly strap and matte red lips, the look recalled old Hollywood at its best. Nothing amps up a little black dress like a statement necklace. At the L.A. premiere of The Mighty Macs, Marley Shelton chose this blackened beauty to elevate her outfit from ho-hum to yum! Kelly Osbourne, Kate Mara and Kristin Cavallari have recently been spotted in identical designs; you can bet that style-savvy ladies everywhere are following suit.

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ACCENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SECTION SPRING/SUMMER 2012

COURTESY LITITZ WATCH TECHNICUM

WATCHES


FOCUS: WATCHMAKING

by Karen Alberg Grossman

LITITZ WATCH TECHNICUM: TEACHING WATCHTHINK A REMARKABLE SCHOOL THAT INSTRUCTS THE ART, SCIENCE AND SOUL OF SWISS WATCHMAKING.

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he first thing one notices upon entering the stately stone building nestled in the rolling hills of Lititz, Pennsylvania (a town with a strong watchmaking tradition) is the magnificent brass clock in the lobby. One soon learns it was crafted totally by hand by students in this Rolex-sponsored watch school, under the direction of its esteemed principal Herman Mayer. Mayer is a certified watchmaker with tremendous pride in, and respect for, the Swiss watchmaking tradition. His goal is to develop independent retail watchmakers who are technically exceptional, of course, but who are also business-savvy, service-oriented, personable, well rounded and creative, a tall order to say the least. “The watchmaker of today needs to be compatible and in sync with the spirit of the highend watch culture,” Mayer maintains. His intense two-year program, established in 2001, is fully funded by Rolex (but totally separate from the Rolex Service Center upstairs in the building). Mayer is personally responsible for creating and updating the curriculum, which is also used at watchmaking schools in Seattle and Oklahoma. It features six main areas of training: history/culture, micromechanics, mechanical movement diagnostics

and repair, electronic movement diagnostics and repair, customer service and case/bracelet diagnostics and repair. The school is small and selective, with a capacity for only 28 students (there are currently 12 first year students and 13 in their second year). It’s an intense eight-hour school day (7:30 to 4:00, with a 30 minute lunch break) and requires much outside reading and research. According to Mayer, most students are highly motivated and even talk watchmaking in their free time. “We emphasize that whatever they don’t learn in these two years, they pay for later on…” Of utmost importance to Mayer, who interviews and tests 70 to 80 applicants each year looking for various skills, from strategic reasoning to social competence, is abstract thinking. “Because often in a fine watch,” he explains, “you can’t diagnose problems just visually. You need to analyze based on input and output of the mechanism: it’s behaving a certain way so the problem must be this or that. You can’t always see the problem because many watches are built in layers, so the movements might be covered, or else just too small.” Mayer admits that among his greatest frustrations is a decline in abstract thinking

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skills among young people over the past decade. “I’m sorry to say this, but in many applicants, these skills have gone down the drain. It’s a very visual world these days; we rely on computers to do everything so young people don’t learn to think for themselves. But in a watchmaking curriculum, abstract thinking skills are essential. It’s all about deductive reasoning, which is no longer taught in school…” Why are these skills so critical? “Because even if the student has worked on hundreds of watches, the next movement that comes along might be totally different than anything he’s experienced. So it’s not a matter of simply learning to piece the puzzle together: students need to understand what the parts do and how they interact and whether or not the watch is worth repairing. Of course it’s rare when you can’t fix it at all (e.g. serious salt water damage where parts are caked together), because even if spare parts are not available, we can always make the parts. That’s what we teach them in the ‘micromechanics’ segment of the program.” According to Mayer, his ideal applicant is midto late 20s (the actual age range is 17 to 45 and mostly male; there are only one or two females per class), in a second career but with some previous exposure to watchmaking. “If they’ve had some exposure, at least they know what the profession is about: having to deal all day long with these tiny parts, the responsibility of working on such valuable pieces. Of course, there are always some who drop out because it’s too stressful…” Recent applicants have included bankers and real estate brokers, some from major cities. “People have more appreciation for job security when it’s a second career,” he explains. “And watchmaking certainly offers job security: all of our graduates who want jobs get them.” Beyond technical expertise (which Mayer believes can be taught),

the most important trait is the desire—the passion—to repair and build watches. Also necessary is the ability to communicate. Explains Mayer, “It’s essential that we teach students how to network: with peers, with mentors, with superiors, so they’re not left alone with important decisions. In fact, I’m working on making this an active component of the curriculum.” On a personal note, Mayer grew up in Würzburg, Germany; his university studies focused on philology and teaching. But at some point, his love of watches inspired him to study watchmaking, which led him to servicing jobs in the States, and ultimately to Lititz. In addition to restoring watches, Mayer is a collector: he wears a different watch every day and favors those that combine technical precision with a beautiful finish. So dedicated is Mayer to the Lititz program that he even lets his students work on his personal watches (excluding vintage handmade pieces, of course!). His first expensive watch was in fact a classic Rolex. Does he still have it? “Of course: Rolex watches are forever…” His most meaningful watch is one he inherited from his father. “When my dad returned from WWII, the economy was down so he drove a taxi on weekends. An American soldier who couldn’t afford the fare gave him his automatic Cyma. I wore it every day for years but at some point, it was difficult to get replacement parts because their factory had burned down. Observing the watchmaker adapting spare parts by hand was my first exposure to the craft and its artistry, which triggered my lifelong passion.” Mayer’s best advice to graduating students? “Remember to take the loupe off on occasion and engage in meaningful, positive dialogue with members of your professional environment. You need to actively live the exciting and ever-evolving watchmaking culture you are part of.”

“Nobody buys a fine watch just to tell time…” —Herman Mayer

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FOCUS: COLLECTING

by David A. Rose

TIME ON HIS SIDE SCOTT PRUETT IS AN UNDISPUTED CHAMPION, ON AND OFF THE TRACK.

A

As a world famous racecar driver still at the top of his game, it’s remarkable that Pruett makes time for other ventures. He and his wife Judy have joined forces to establish Pruett Vineyard, as well as Word Weaver Books, publishers of a series of children’s books they authored. Not surprisingly, the theme is racing, including titles like Twelve Little Race Cars, Rookie Racer and Racing Through the Alphabet. Based on actual aspects of Scott’s racing career, these books provide inspiration and excitement for young readers. As for his winemaking business, Pruett explains that even though racing and winemaking are spectrums apart, the feelings of accomplishment are similar. “Racing is literally minute to minute, day to day; things happen in a matter of seconds. Wine making, on the other hand, takes years: you can’t rush the process; the wine absolutely tells you when it’s ready. But it’s the blend of chemistry and artistry in winemaking that I find so rewarding. I’m not one of these athletes who puts my name on a project without involvement; in fact, I am totally hands on at my winery, involved in every aspect of the process (pressing, corking, labeling), with the help of some incredible winemakers.” Scott Pruett began his career in karting at the age of eight and has raced every year since. 2011 was his 43rd year of racing and it was another extraordinary one. With teammate Memo Rojas, Pruett won the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series Championship, earning yet another Rolex timepiece. “At 51 years old, I’m racing against drivers half my age,” says Pruett, “so being the fastest driver out there is incredible! But I never take it for granted: I’ve been blessed with this ability and feel very fortunate.” ROLEX / TOM O'NEAL

mong the many rewards of success in sports, perhaps the best is garnering the respect and admiration of fans and peers. But for those athletes competing in Rolex-sponsored events, the grand prize comes in the form of a luxury timepiece, a goal drivers set for themselves long before they’re strapped into their racecars. One man, Scott Pruett from Auburn, California, is a true champion in all forms of motor sports, with the additional honor of having won more Rolex-sponsored races than any other driver. Thus, he has become the proud owner of racing’s largest collection of Rolex timepieces. Pruett has won the Rolex 24 at Daytona four times. He’s also won the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series Championship three times and was awarded a Rolex timepiece for each of these accomplishments. In all, Scott owns 12 Rolex timepieces, of which 10 were awarded for his brilliant race wins. “My first Rolex is by far the one I love the most,” he confides. “When I won the Championship in 1986 while driving for Jack Roush and Ford Motor Company, I was invited to compete in what was known as the International Race of Champions (IROC). It was such an honor just to be invited to compete in this series, and I promised myself that if I were ever to win one of these races, I’d go out and buy myself a Rolex timepiece. At the last race ever to run at Riverside Raceway in California, and with just a few laps left in the race, I took the lead and held on to take the win. The first thing I did after that was to go out and buy my first beautiful Rolex Submariner.” (In addition to this Submariner, Pruett also bought himself a solid gold GMT-Master.)

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FOCUS: COMPLICATIONS

by Laurie Kahle

IWC Ingenieur Double Chronograph

PASSING TIME CHRONOGRAPH AND CALENDAR COMPLICATIONS LET YOU TRACK FLEETING TIME FROM SECONDS TO MONTHS.

O

nce watchmakers mastered the measurement of hours, minutes and seconds, they naturally advanced beyond mere timetelling to create ever more intricate and ingenious mechanisms. Referred to as complications, these mechanisms perform a myriad of additional functions from the simple to the sublime. The more complicated a watch is, the more difficult and expensive it is to produce. Despite technology’s advancement, complicated watches are still in demand—from Raymond

Weil’s diminutive ladies’ quartz Parsifal with a simple date window, to IWC’s made-to-order, seven-figure, astronomical Portuguese Sidérale Scafusia. While some complications are fanciful and superfluous, chronographs and calendars remain perennial favorites with practical uses for modern lifestyles. The chronograph, with a timing mechanism similar to a stopwatch, originated in France in 1821, when Nicolas Rieussec, watchmaker to King

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Montblanc Nicolas Rieussec Chronograph Automatic, Vacheron Constantin Quai de l’Ile Retrograde Annual Calendar, Omega Planet Ocean Chronograph for Ladies

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SEREIN DIAMOND


Louis XVIII, demonstrated his novel device for timing horse races. Using a clock movement, ink-filled markers and two rotating discs—a seconds disc that completed a revolution every minute and a minutes disc that made a complete rotation every hour—the contraption accurately measured the horses’ times by pushing the markers onto the discs when each horse crossed the finish line. The term chronograph translates to “time writer,” particularly endearing the complication to Montblanc, which is most famous for its pens. The brand acquired the rights to use Nicolas Rieussec’s name, and built a collection of chronographs that shows elapsed time with two fixed hands poised above two turning discs (the seconds and minutes counters), a unique system reminiscent of Rieussec’s original invention. Rather than using turning discs, sporty chronographs typically feature a mechanism that controls a central chronograph hand, which is started,

again, until the split hand is once again stopped for another time measurement. Categorized as astronomical complications, calendar functions track the passing days and months, with varying degrees of complexity. A simple calendar displays the numeric date in a window with a single disc, or with two discs to create what’s known as a big date, featured on Glashütte Original’s Seventies Panorama Date. A full calendar expands on the basic calendar display to show date, day of the week, month and moon phases. Full and partial simple calendars cannot automatically adjust for months with fewer than 31 days, so you have to adjust them five times per year. An annual calendar, however, automatically adjusts for months with 30 or 31 days, though it needs to be reset each year on February 28 of non-leap years. Vacheron Constantin recently put a contemporary twist on the annual calendar by adding a retrograde annual calendar to its Quai de l’Ile collection.

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT : Glashütte Original Seventies Panorama Date, Patek Philippe 5270,

Raymond Weil Parsifal, Frédérique Constant Vintage Racing Automatic Chrono

stopped and returned to zero by using push buttons on the side of the case. As the chronograph hand completes a full turn of the dial each minute, subdial totalizers track the number of revolutions and show the elapsed time in minutes and hours. Variations on chronographs include a flyback function that can be reset to zero and immediately start a new timing episode with a single push, instead of using three to stop, reset and restart. A split-seconds chronograph allows you to time separate events that begin but do not finish simultaneously, such as tracking cars in a race. Also called a rattrapante, or double chronograph, watches such as IWC’s Ingenieur Double Chronograph Titanium feature two central stopwatch hands that are precisely superimposed so they appear as one hand as they move, until you press a button, which stops the top chronograph hand while the bottom one progresses, allowing the measurement of two separate periods of time. After recording, another push synchronizes the hands

The most complex calendar complication is a perpetual calendar, which is mechanically programmed to account for leap years and requires no manual correction until March 1, 2100. The watch’s mechanical memory uses sequences that are repeated every 48 months, to correspond to the cycle of leap years. Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Master Eight Days Perpetual 40, for example, boasts an impressive eight-day power reserve while displaying the date, the day of the week, the month and the year in four digits, along with the power reserve, the moon phase, a day/night indicator, and even the security zone between 10 p.m. and 3 a.m. during which changes must not be made. This year, Patek Philippe offered the best of both timing and calendar complications when it combined a perpetual calendar with its new in-house chronograph movement for the Reference 5270. Sure to be on every connoisseur’s hit list, this extremely rare, highly complicated timepiece will land on only a precious few wrists with its price of $156,000.

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JE T SE T T E R

GW3000BB-1A

AT O M I C T I M E K E E P I N G

Š2011 CASIO AMERICA, INC.

SOLAR POWERED A solar panel combined with a large-capacity rechargeable battery enables these impressivesolar timepieces to run smoothly under any light with no battery replacement.

North America Japan Japan China

Multi-Band Technology receives time calibration signals automatically from up to six transmitters around the world (US, UK, Germany, Japan x 2 and China). This technology also adjusts for Leap Year and Daylight Saving Time.

United Kingdom

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GW3500B-1A


FOCUS: PROFILE

by Randi Molofsky

SO HOT THEY’RE COOL MICHELE OFFERS STYLES FOR EVERY SETTING.

A

walk through the historic district of downtown Miami encapsulates much of Michele Watches’ telltale brand appeal: both share an Art Deco design sensibility, vibrant color palette and bold sense of style. It’s no wonder Michele is favored by a fashion-forward clientele with an innate understanding of classic design. From speedboats to soirees, everything is a little bigger in Miami. The same is true for Michele, as oversized cases emphasize a bit of flash and a signature red button logo creates instant cachet. Miami’s seaside location also necessitates a certain day-to-nighttime glam. Lounging poolside? Bold chronographs with rubber straps from the Jelly Bean collection or a sporty white Tahitian Ceramic are chic standouts. When the sun goes down, diamond-studded timepieces make a big statement at affordable prices. Spring 2012 brings a refined update on Michele’s instantly

recognizable style. Serein, inspired by the Cloette, features a modern take on a timeless design. A silvery-white dial highlights a fine circular pattern and oversized Roman numerals. The Caber Sport maintains the Caber’s round case and T-bar design, now updated with a scalloped bezel and chronograph dial (available with or without diamonds). One of Michele’s most popular styles, Tahitian Jelly Beans, is also reinvented this year in new brights and beach-inspired pastels. Look-atme neons like pink, blue and green are balanced by seaside neutrals in mint, coral and steel. Want to make a unique statement any time of year? The brand’s commitment to practicality and fun led them to offer a stunning variety of straps that are easily mixed and matched. From alligator to glittery leather, cobalt blue to rainbow stripes, a sense of play makes punctuality a breeze, whether or not you can make it down to North Beach.

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©2012 Ebel -

CLASSIC SPORT

Ref 1216030 and 1216031


Gold GO FOR THE

IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIESDIRECTIONS.COM

FROM THE RUNWAYS


Bright RAINBOW


Dark

AND DANGEROUS


WELLNESS

HAUTE HEALTHCARE W

hen was the last time you went to a spinning class with your doctor? How about bike riding or grocery shopping together? Like fashion and jewelry trends, healthcare trends evolve. One “new” trend (it’s actually been around for a decade) is concierge medicine. Also referred to as boutique medicine, concierge medicine often works with insurance or Medicare, offering members 24/7 access to their primary care physicians, immediate appointments, better connections to top specialists and, in some cases, house calls. (In order to participate, patients also pay a fee independent of insurance.) This unique approach is designed not only to enhance routine exams and the treatment of illnesses, but also to educate patients and create awareness in preventive care. The theory is that a closer doctor-patient relationship encourages the patient to become savvy and proactive enough to ward off ailments that can lead to sickness. One trendsetter in concierge medicine is MDVIP, a company with over 175,000 patients and 500 physicians in its network across 34 states and the District of Columbia. Annual memberships range from $1,500 to $1,800. MDVIP was founded in 2001 by two primary care physicians who wanted to focus on personalized care and a reinvention of the primary care model. “These doctors believed there had to be a better way to put the patient first, emphasizing not just treating people after they became sick, but actually helping them stay healthy,” says Mark Murrison, MDVIP’s president of marketing and innovation. According to Murrison, the average primary care practice has about 2,400 patients, so it’s not unusual for doctors to see around 35 to 40 patients in a typical day. It’s

estimated most doctors spend approximately eight minutes or less with each patient, which Murrison believes is barely enough time to address the symptoms or underlying causes of an illness. MDVIP doctors cap their practice at 600 patients, with about 10 to 12 patient visits per day, allowing for higher levels of specialized care. Data shows MDVIP has a patient yearly renewal rate of 92%, with a patient satisfaction rate of 96%. There’s also evidence that MDVIP members are hospitalized significantly less than non-MDVIP members—Medicare beneficiaries have 75% fewer hospitalizations and insured patients 65% fewer. Other member-based companies are gaining recognition for infusing traditional medicine with specialized care. WhiteGlove Health, based in Austin, Texas, works primarily with self-insured companies, helping them with costs and enabling them to provide better healthcare to their employees and dependents. Their model involves mobile primary care, essentially house calls, where a nurse practitioner comes to a member’s home, workplace, hotel room, etc., offering dedicated care for both acute and chronic illnesses, wellness counseling, diagnostic testing and prescription medications. “It’s like Marcus Welby: the good old fashioned house call that we’ve brought back and made affordable,” says Michael Cohen, VP of marketing. Clearly, concierge medicine has the potential for significant growth. With an estimated 5,000-plus physicians now practicing it, it might just be a matter of time before you too are organizing bike rides and supermarket outings with your doctor in order to stay healthy.

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BOUTIQUE MEDICINE IS ALL THE RAGE. BY LISA MONTEMORRA MENGHI


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EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER.

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BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

A CHÂTEAU IN NORMANDY

At the end of a boulevard shaded with ancient trees, past clusters of huge roses in brilliant, almost illusory colors is the Château La Cheneviere. The grand three-story mansion, built in the 18th century, is set in the Normandy countryside, between the exquisite town of Bayeux and the historic beaches, in Port-en-Bessin. During WWII the residence was occupied by the Germans, then by the Americans after the June 1944 landing. Restored in 1988, the manor became a fully equipped hotel and restaurant, with a swimming pool, lovely terrace and beautiful views. Each guest room has a different décor, some with marble fireplaces, others with private patios. An intimate bar leads to a graceful dining room, where the brilliant chef uses local produce to present the distinctive and legendary dishes of Normandy.

SCOTT CHANEY

STEP IN STYLE

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Located in a small shop on New York City’s East Side, designer Barbara Barran’s Classic Rug Collection puts fashion underfoot with fascinating custom rugs. Her unique creations can be seen in very stylish homes all over the world, as well as the Whitney Museum, the Smithsonian, and other museum stores. Barran’s rugs, inspired by everything from Art Deco to traditional American quilts and her personal passion, Eastern art, are made of natural fibers including wool, silk, pashmina, hemp, linen, nettle and banana silk. She’s the only rug designer in the U.S. to offer hand-knotted rugs from Nepal in 300 knot silk. Go barefoot!


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HOME

AL FRESCO

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rowing up, an “outdoor kitchen” (if such a term even existed) generally meant a portable barbecue sitting atop an aqua-colored slab of cement. Basketweave plastic lounge chairs might be protected by a corrugated tin awning, and Dad spent more time swearing at non-functioning equipment than actually grilling. Today, a host of high-tech innovations, weatherproof custom appliances, and a desire to maximize the social space of even the largest houses have redefined the concept of cooking and dining al fresco. “We actually require our homeowners to include a summer kitchen in

their construction,” says Page Pierce, vice president of Walt Disney World Resort’s new Golden Oak luxury housing development. The community, which opened last September with eight homes, will eventually host as many as 800 homes, along with a top-tier restaurant and demonstration kitchen, community center and other amenities. Homeowners have VIP access to the neighboring Disney theme parks, along with available perks like door-to-park car service, concierge services for the greater Orlando region and access to special and private events.

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"Outdoor kitchens are about being social, not about formality,” says architect Doug Burdge, who designed the spaces above and left.

TOP: BURDGE & ASSOCIATES. BOTTOM LEFT: BURDGE & ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS BOTTOM RIGHT: ARCH INTERIORS

TODAY’S OUTDOOR KITCHENS ARE FOR MORE THAN JUST GRILLING BURGERS. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON


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featuring I L O V E Y O U 7 D AY S A W E E K


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ARCH INTERIORS, FLORIDA BUILDER APPLIANCES, FLORIDA BUILDER APPLIANCES, GOLDEN OAK AT WALT DISNEY RESORT, FLORIDA BUILDER APPLIANCES

“One of our thoughts in planning Golden Oak was to not create a development that was just boxes,” says Pierce. “Because this is Florida, it’s important to celebrate the indoor/outdoor living we’re able to enjoy.” At a minimum, most houses have a covered area with a great barbecue, outdoor sink, refrigerator and outdoor seating. But they can get much more elaborate. “Some have remote control retractible screens to keep the bugs out while allowing flow from the indoor kitchen, past the summer kitchen, all the way to the swim-up bar.” Flow, and the efficient use of indoor/outdoor space seem to be key ingredients in designing a successful outdoor kitchen. “When we pay taxes and insurance on a house, we’ve paid for the environment around that house,” says Julian Exclusia of Florida Builder Appliances, an upscale division of Sears Holding Corporation. “We’re not just sitting in a cubby hole.” Exclusia works with athletes, entertainers and others to design and equip custom homes, and he’s critical of some architects who “hide” a house’s kitchen in the corner. “If you’re entertaining, you’re looking at the expanse, or you should be, whether it’s the Colorado Rockies or the Caribbean.” Christopher Grubb, president of Arch Interiors in Beverly Hills, notes that “we’re trying to create a cohesive look and bring these spaces together.” His full-service design firm has created several L.A.-area outdoor spaces, featuring popular elements like warming drawers, beer taps and an outdoor pizza oven, adding utility and distinction. Doug Burdge, a Malibu architect, designed an oceanfront property with not one, but three outdoor spaces: a grill area, a semi-enclosed chef’s kitchen and a rooftop social space.

“Outdoor kitchens are now a part of almost every design we do.” Many significant outdoor improvements, however, tend to happen after completion of the house itself. This seems, in a large part, due to the economy. “In Southern California right now, 99% of all the home contracts are improvements on existing properties, not new construction,” says Grubb. Meanwhile in Florida, Exclusia notes that banks are reluctant to finance what they see as an elective (and expensive—elaborate kitchens can run $50,000 to $100,000 or more) element. Thus, even high-end custom homeowners are completing the house first, then financing the outdoor activity spaces. However, Grubb notes that a professional, welldesigned outdoor kitchen and social area could add hundreds of thousands of dollars or more in resale value to a luxury property. here are other reasons to design a space more elaborate than the average lonely Weber grill on an island of concrete. Owners who rent their homes for charity events or other gatherings effectively double or triple the number of available hosting venues (or, alternatively, keep guests and visitors outside, away from living areas and damage-prone furnishings). Simple physics may also be at play in the rising popularity of the outdoor kitchen. “We’ve kind of peaked on our maximum house size,” says Jeff Dross, corporate director of industry trends for Kichler Lighting. “So a lot of architects are building in courtyards, adding large glass walls, and creating indoor/outdoor flow. You’re essentially adding more rooms, and your yard becomes a really nice, usable space.”

T

Today's outdoor kitchens are designed to ensure that entertainment, design and service flow smoothly from inside to outside.

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FOOD

MAKING MAGIC IN THE FIRST INSTALLMENT OF OUR LEGENDARY CHEF SERIES, WE DISCOVER THAT DAVID BURKE IS MUCH MORE THAN A WHIZ IN THE KITCHEN. BY SHIRA LEVINE

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or those who dig classic conceptual cuisine outside of the traditional restaurant box setup, David Burke has become somewhat of a hero. In addition to his classic surf and turf joints, Chef Burke holds court with his fancy foods inside a Bloomingdale’s, a bowling alley and an airport. If by chance you don’t recognize the oft-showy culinologist (an expert who blends culinary arts and food technology) with a penchant for whimsically sculpting his dishes to dazzle diners by name, there’s still a decent chance you’ve eaten in one of his 10 restaurants, or purchased his gourmet products. (“Burke in the Box” takeout meal at Las Vegas’ McCarran Airport, anyone?) Or perhaps you’ll recall his very near win against Bobby Flay on Iron Chef, or his too-early kissoff from Top Chef Masters. Chef Burke has been a longtime pioneer in the biz of celebrity chefery, cooking up a career that “blurs the lines between chef, artist, entrepreneur and

inventor.” His factory of fabulous foodspots tantalizes taste buds through a slew of dramatically different spaces, with entertaining concoctions appearing on plates throughout New York, and in New Jersey, Chicago, Connecticut and Las Vegas. Then there’s David Burke Townhouse, David Burke’s Primehouse, Fromagerie, David Burke Prime, Fishtail by David Burke and David Burke Kitchen. Burke is also the mastermind behind Pastrami Salmon, GourmetPops, flavor-transfer spice sheets and various flavor sprays and oils. He’s got two cookbooks and even DAVID BURKE Magazine. We managed to catch this Renaissance man at his local greenmarket, shopping for fresh, in-season finds.

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You have so many titles! Chef, entrepreneur, artist, inventor.... Which do you feel describes you best? I’ve always felt at home in the kitchen. I was a dish washer in high school. I’d work on the weekends, and that’s when I fell in love with the idea of working in a kitchen. I get real excitement from the energy and creative teamwork that happens in there. So all of the other things I am today came out of me working in the kitchen. I get a real satisfaction out of putting together a good product for someone else to enjoy. Above: The lively dining room at Fishtail by David Burke. Left: David Burke, longtime pioneer of celebrity chefery.


Many of today’s entrepreneurial celebrity chefs don’t actually do the cooking anymore, but shift their focus to the business side of things. I still do cook in my kitchens, but it’s been a natural progression for me to be in and out of the kitchen when need be. I made an early decision that I was going to conquer one level of this business at a time. After I reached the level of what I truly felt was “me as a good chef,” then it was time to be partner in a company. Then the next course was to start my own company. I was one of the first chefs to do that. That road had not been paved yet. It was the late ’70s and the beginning of modern American food and of chefs as businessmen. A lot of the David Burke dining experience is about setting the scene, and your restaurants each have very specific, thoughtout designs. Would you describe yourself as fashion forward? When you work in the kitchen it’s nearly impossible to be fashion forward! But we do take a lot of pride in the ambiance and décor of the restaurants, especially Townhouse and Kitchen. I was very involved in helping decorate them, but I’m not a designer. Kitchen is supposed to feel dark and woodsy, comfy—like a home. Bloomingdale’s has an intimate neighborhood feel. Our steakhouses are more masculine.

there. In those cases we make exceptions—it’s what the customers want! But when it comes to fruit and people wanting raspberries or blueberries year round, we suggest maybe trying a dish with mango or pineapple. Your menus run the deliciously garish gamut, from Bowlmor Lanes’ badass burger replete with applewood-smoked bacon, spicy tempura shrimp, cheddar cheese and blue cheese slaw, to David Burke Kitchen’s pretzel crabcake with tomato, orange and green peppercorn. What do you love to order when you eat out, and what do you like to cook at home? I love ordering Peking duck! For myself, I love to prepare pasta. I’ll make gemelli with sweet sausage, tomatoes, olive oil and butter. When I cook for friends and family, I love to prepare a whole roasted fish, chicken, squab or turkey. My favorite is roasted squab foie gras, cabbage with corn bread and pickled onions. Is there anything you wish your guests would be a little more adventurous about trying? Game birds, sweet potatoes and kidneys!

What are some other ideas you’re currently excited about? We have a moveable garden in a parking lot at the Rumsfield, New Jersey restaurant. This summer we’re going to put each of the gardens in little red wagons so they can move around easily. When guests walk into the restaurant, they will be greeted with a bushel of tomatoes and basil plants that they can cut themselves and bring to the hostess. Then we’ll prepare it at the table as part of their appetizer. I just love the idea of that. What’s your overall food philosophy? I’m always looking to cut out the middleman as much as possible. It’s what is most economically sound for us. I am always in a local produce market myself. We’ve done it with our bread, our dairy and our produce. Fish and seafood are next. We’re also currently building a dry beef company with my patented salt treatment. Our beef comes from right here in New Jersey. I bought a bull five years ago in Kentucky so I would know exactly where my beef comes from and can ensure the quality of what we’re serving. We have the product down to the genetics, for the perfect marbleization and grading. It was superior planning on our part. We always want to know where our stuff is coming from. Do you think all the recent hype around “local” and “seasonal” is silly? Haven’t good chefs been doing this all along? The seasonal and local thing has been done forever, but it hasn’t been touted. It’s being emphasized now because of the the state of the economy, and high fuel prices. All the recent PR is good, especially since it helps support American farmers, but it’s always been what we try to do. However, you have to understand, it’s hard to do local in Chicago in the winter. It’s absolutely what the mom and pop shops should be aiming for, but it’s hard for big [national] chains to do it. It’s tough to be 100 percent local; you might simply not have a good local person for something you need. How do you please loyal customers who request something that isn’t in season? In New Jersey we have a lot of clientele who want calamari, but it’s not local

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Maple Bacon Dates Yields 20 stuffed dates

INGREDIENTS:

1 ⁄4 pound peanuts 2 1⁄2 ounces honey 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper or 1⁄2 minced jalapeño 20 Medjool dates, cut in half 10 strips of par-baked smoked bacon 20 seedless grapes 1 egg Flour Breadcrumbs

METHOD: 1. Heat peanuts, honey and cayenne pepper until caramelized. Cool and puree. 2. Stuff puree into Medjool date half, then wrap with a half piece of par-baked smoked bacon. 3. Lightly beat egg. Dredge grapes in flour, dip in egg wash, then breadcrumbs. Place into a deep fryer filled with hot oil and fry until crispy. 4. Place grapes, and then bacon wrapped dates, on bamboo skewers and serve.


CULTURE

CAFÉ SOCIETY

AT BUDAPEST’S FAMOUS CAFÉS, OLD WORLD CHARM IS NEW AGAIN. BY JACQUELIN CARNEGIE

L

ong before “café culture” flourished in Paris and Vienna, it thrived in Budapest. The joy of coffee drinking was introduced by the invading Ottoman Turks in the 1500s, and by Budapest’s Golden Age, between 1870 and 1910, there were some 500 coffee houses in the city. In their heyday, Budapest’s cafés were cherished rendezvous spots for aspiring writers, poets, artists and intelligentsia of all stripes. People spent hours in their favorite café, sharing ideas and reading the many newspapers and periodicals available to patrons. Before the age of television and the Internet, for up-to-the-minute news and the most interesting gossip, you’d head to one of these cafés. During this period, the cafés were so central to daily life that when the first early film reels appeared, they were projected on walls in the cafés. (Two eventual film industry giants, director and producer Sir Alexander Korda and Oscar-winning director Michael Curtiz, were first introduced to movies this way. Later on, in Casablanca, Curtiz would recreate Budapest’s café atmosphere on the set of Rick’s Café.)

Most of the classic Budapest coffee houses had sumptuous interiors, plush furnishings, gleaming chandeliers, and high, frescoed ceilings to rival the Sistine Chapel. But, after two World Wars and the Communist era in Hungary, the old famous cafés had been destroyed or closed. In recent years, many of these once-grand cafés have been restored to their original splendor. NEW YORK CAFÉ Opened in 1894 on the ground floor of a stylish office complex, designed by architect Alajos Hauszmann and financed by a New York life insurance company, the café was a favorite haunt of the writers and editors who worked in the building (now a five-star Boscolo hotel). For struggling writers, the New York provided free ink and paper and offered a low-cost “writer’s menu” (bread, cheese and cold cuts). During Budapest’s Golden Age, much of the city’s creative business took place here or at the Café Central. CAFÉ CENTRÁL Opened in 1887, the Central was a popular meeting place for writers, poets, editors and artists. In the 1890s, writers sitting Above: New York Café; during Budapest’s Golden Age, it was a hotbed of creative activity.

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around the café began an influential literary periodical, A Hét (Week). A few years later, another group of regulars, who divided their time between the Central and the New York, launched Nyugat (West), which became one of the most influential Hungarian literary journals of the early 20th century. CAFÉ GERBEAUD Founded by confectioner Henrik Kugler in 1858, this is regarded as one of the most elegant and refined cafés. In 1884, its Swiss pastry chef, Emile Gerbeaud, took over the establishment, making it as famous for its cakes as its coffee. BOOKCAFÉ PÁRIZSI ÁRUHÁZ This stunning café is located on the third floor of what is now the Alexandra bookstore. The Art Nouveau building, designed by Zsigmond Sziklai, was opened in 1911 as Párizsi Nagy Árúház, Budapest’s first modern department store. The café, in Lotz hall, is resplendent with restored frescos (done by painter Károly Lotz), large mirrors and magnificent chandeliers.

Clockwise from top: Centrál Kávéház, a popular meeting place for writers, poets and artists. The elegant Café Gerbeaud. BookCafé Párizsi Áruház in Lotz hall in the Alexandra Bookstore.

Budapest’s Famous Cafés The best time to visit Budapest is between March and October; Delta and American Airlines offer direct flights. Visit www.gotohungary.com to learn more. New York Café New York Palace Hotel at Erzsébet körút 9-11; www.newyorkcafe.hu MÛVÉSZ KÁVÉHÁZ Around since 1898, its name mûvész means artist. Since the café is located opposite the Budapest State Opera House, it has attracted its fair share of artists and performers over the years. CAFÉ GERLÓCZY On a leafy square, in a pretty 1892 building, the Gerlóczy has the feel of a Parisian café with its wonderful croissants and freshly-baked pastries—some consider it the best breakfast in town. At night, a harpist adds to the atmosphere. Another unique Gerlóczy offering: 15 stylish rooms in its upstairs boutique hotel, so you never have to leave!

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Café Centrál Károlyi Mihály utca 9 www.centralkavehaz.hu Café Gerbeaud Vörösmarty tér 7; www.gerbeaud.hu BookCafé Párizsi Áruház, Alexandra bookstore, Andrássy út 39 Mûvész Kávéház Andrássy út 29; www.muveszkavehaz.hu Café Gerlóczy Gerloczy u. 1; www.gerloczy.hu For an interesting read, try The Great Escape. This wonderful book by Kati Marton, about influential Hungarians, describes life in the Budapest cafés at the turn of the 20th century.


TRAVEL

The view from the lounge attached to one of the suites at Amangiri makes the desert seem like a private space. Coffee is always available for early risers on the Ecoventura yachts in the Galapagos Islands.

ECO-IMMERSION

A

t its best, eco-friendly travel makes every day feel like the world is new. Full immersion in an exotic natural environment makes every sound clearer, every smell sweeter, every sight sharper, every taste more delicious. At the destinations below, getting away becomes a journey of coming home to the senses.

EDEN IN THE OCEAN: Cruise the Galapagos with Ecoventura The arc of the sun and rise and fall of the tides measure the days as Ecoventura’s luxury motor yachts cruise the Galápagos Islands. The volcanic

archipelago straddling the equator 400 miles west of Ecuador stands outside human time. Under the tutelage of two naturalists per 10-cabin vessel, a one-week voyage is an intimate engagement with the planet’s least-spoiled corner. When you see the lay of the islands from atop a volcanic cinder cone, you immediately grasp the archipelago’s violent birth. Other hikes across black lava moonscapes to sandy coves reveal the resilience of bird and animal life. Protected since 1959 as a national park, every ecological niche of the islands is inhabited by creatures that view human intruders as a curiosity rather than a threat. You stare roosting seabirds in the eye, and watch blue-

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AMANGIRI IMAGES COURTESY OF AMANGIRI RESORT. GALAPAGOS IMAGES BY PATRICIA HARRIS & DAVID LYON.

GETTING IN TOUCH WITH THE WORLD CAN BRING YOU TO YOUR SENSES. BY PATRICIA HARRIS AND DAVID LYON


In Galapagos, unconcerned sea lions let photographers snap their portraits with abandon.

Sunsets (and sunrises) are spectacular in the Galapagos Islands.

The step pool at the spa at Amangiri glows in the falling light of dusk. The giant tortoises of the Galapagos Islands are one of the region’s endangered species.

All the bungalows at Lapa Rios in Costa Rica are constructed of thatch.

The foot hue of blue-footed boobies varies by individual.

STRANGE CREATURES INHABIT THEIR OWN GARDEN OF EDEN

footed boobies in their comic courtship dance. Male frigate birds nearly roll over backwards on their nests, incapacitated by the red chest pouches they have inflated to lure a mate. The strange creatures inhabit their own Garden of Eden. Sea lions bask on the beach nursing their pups, flightless cormorants literally “neck” as they court, giant tortoises lumber through highland meadows, and bright red Sally Lightfoot crabs skitter across black rocks in the surf. Park rules forbid touching the wildlife, but no one has told the sea lions not to waddle over to sniff a human’s toes. (Their whiskers tickle.) ecoventura.com

RAINFOREST RHYTHMS: Costa Rica Escape at Lapa Rios Lapa Rios Ecolodge crouches where Central America’s last lowland rainforest meets the beach in Costa Rica. A model of ecologically sensitive tourism since 1993, the main lodge and 16 thatched bungalows nestle in the forest overlooking the ocean. Scarlet macaws chatter from branches and tree frogs sing all night, reminding you that Lapa Rios is the human exception in a 930-acre private nature reserve. More than 300 species of birds have been logged at Lapa Rios and

birders seek the glint of feathers, the flurry of flight, and burble of song to add to their life lists. Guided hikes in the rainforest uncover exotic flora and fauna—from more than 200 species of orchids to nectar-licking kinkajous, distant relatives of the raccoon. For a complete immersion in the rainforest experience, join an off-site excursion into the wild river canyon of El Remanso to spend an afternoon rappeling down a series of four waterfalls. laparios.com

MANTRAS OF THE CANYONS: The Purifying Desert at Amangiri For thousands of years, people have sought enlightenment and rejuvenation in the purifying spareness of the desert. Amangiri, which means “peaceful mountain,” hunkers down in a southern Utah desert valley looking south at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Blending into the raw landscape of bluffs and mesas with an architecture as minimal as a whispered mantra, the resort is constructed around a swimming pool oasis. After a day of hiking amid hoodoos and step-rocks, retreat to the 25,000 square foot spa where hot stone massage and full-body treatments aim to restore the Navajo concept of Hozho, which translates as “beauty, harmony, balance, and health.” To encourage meditation, daily group yoga classes are offered in the light-flooded yoga pavilion. But nothing so brightens the spirit as escaping the resort’s circle of illumination at night to commune with a dark desert sky awash with stars. amanresorts.com

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SPIRITS

GIN

BLOSSOMS

“EIGHT YEARS AGO, every bar in the U.S. had perhaps four gins on the back row, and perhaps four million vodkas on the front,” says Simon Ford, international brand ambassador for Plymouth and Beefeater gins. Today, the scene is, thankfully, far more complex, with gin cocktails dominating many a bar menu. Gin got its start when 17th-century British mercenaries discovered Dutch genever (a malted spirit with juniper) during the Thirty Years’ War. It traditionally consists of an amalgam of botanical “flavors” (seeds, roots, berries) infused into a high-proof neutral base spirit and re-distilled. What spirit and flavorings are used, and how they’re processed, creates different gins. Hendrick’s “steams” a basket of botanicals with the vaporized alcohol, then adds cucumber and floral notes. Beefeater steeps its botanical brew, distills it and blends it with (essentially) vodka, cutting the distillate at just the right moment to capture citrus notes. Citadelle Reserve is barrel-aged for six months. Lest you shy away from gin for all that juniper, know that only London Dry styles (think Tanqueray or Bulldog) are expected to have juniper-driven flavor profiles. New Western Dry styles, like Aviation and G’Vine (made with grape alcohol), might emphasize orange, rose or saffron. If you seek something truly over-the-top, Nolet’s Reserve ($700) is a limited-edition Dutch sipping gin with notes of saffron and verbana. Want to try your hand at blending the perfect gin? For about $65, Plymouth Gin master distiller Sean Harrison will guide you through his historic distillery in southwest England, lead a comparative tasting, then turn you loose to create your own mini-bottle. You’ll have your choice of 20 different botanicals, and cook it all up in a miniature still.

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NOLET’S GIN

GIN HASN’T BEEN THIS POPULAR IN 300 YEARS. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON


Hamilton Jewelers Business Gifts Division offers a full range of products to help companies and organizations commemorate important moments. In a competitive business environment, we understand the importance of communicating the right message to your clients, employees, peers and community. Hamilton is here to assist.

The Liberty Bowl, made exclusively for Hamilton. This custom-made porcelain bowl was handcrafted by artisans to represent important moments and places in American history, including the Signing of the Declaration of Independence ,The Liberty Bell, The First US Bank, Christ Church, Merchants Exchange, Carpenters Hall, University of Pennsylvania, Congress Hall and Betsy Ross House. This bowl or similar items can be made for a wide range of groups, organizations, and companies.

Donna Latham: Telephone: 609.771.6010 ext. 137 Email: dlatham@hamiltonjewelers.com

VISIT US ONLINE AT HAMILTONJEWELERS.COM

Maureen Barna: Telephone: 609.454.4588 Email: mbarna@hamiltonjewelers.com


HAMILTON JEWELERS ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2012

HAMILTON  

VOLUME ONE. 2012. Wishing you and your family a relaxing and enjoyable spring and summer season. Hank Siegel, President Hamilton’s storefron...

HAMILTON  

VOLUME ONE. 2012. Wishing you and your family a relaxing and enjoyable spring and summer season. Hank Siegel, President Hamilton’s storefron...