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SPRING/SUMMER 2015 A C C E N T/ T H E M A G A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S

SPRING GIFTS

FOR MOMS, DADS AND GRADS WHY YOU SHOULD WORK WITH A

TRUE JEWELER HAUTE LOOKS ON THE RED CARPET


Christopher Designs Crisscut

c r i ss c u t e m er a l d by

c h r i s t o p h er

L’Amour Crisscut® is a trademark used under license from Christopher Designs. Use of L’Amour Crisscut® trademark is only allowed by authorized retailers.


WELCOME! Welcome to our spring issue of Accent magazine. We’ve used this issue to really tell our story—of what it means to be a True Jeweler in a sea of jewelry stores. It’s a subject that’s important to us, so throughout the magazine we’ve tried to help you understand why we do the things we do, and why they make us different. This issue also features a special gift-giving section for all your spring occasions. It’s just a small sample of what we offer, and of course we’d love to help you, personally, find the perfect gift for your loved one. And while you’re here, if you’d like to know more about what it means to be a True Jeweler, just ask!

SPRING GIFTS

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DIAMOND CELLAR

EVENTS

PAGE 6

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30 6280 SAWMILL ROAD JUST SOUTH OF 161 AT THE CORNER OF MARTIN ROAD 614-336-4545 EASTON TOWN CENTER NEXT TO SMITH & WOLLENSKY

CONTENTS

614-923-6633 800-222-6642 DIAMONDCELLAR.COM

Spring/Summer 2015

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P

FEATURES

PUBLISHER

1 Welcome Letter

STU NIFOUSSI

4 Our Reason for Being

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

6 Events

KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

8 Caring for the Community: STORE 5a on POINT

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R HANS GSCHLIESSER

10 Who We Are: Daniel Gordon

MANAGING EDITOR

12 Gifts: From the Heart 14 How We Choose the Jewelry & Timepieces We Carry 16 Spring Gifts

JILLIAN LAROCHELLE PROJECT MANAGER

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20 Scene: Haute Looks on the Red Carpet

LISA MONTEMORRA DESIGNERS CYNTHIA LUCERO JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI

22 Why Choose a True Jeweler for Fashion?

PRODUCTION MANAGER

26 Spotted: As Seen On…

PEG EADIE

28 Why Choose a True Jeweler for a Milestone Occasion?

PRESIDENT AND CEO

30 Trends: The New Heirlooms

BRITTON JONES

32 Profile: Christopher Designs

CHAIRMAN AND COO MAC BRIGHTON

34 Diamonds: De Beers & Forevermark 36 Experts: All About Bridal Rings

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary

38 Why Choose a True Jeweler for Your Timepiece?

depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2015. Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175;

40 Collecting: Time to Invest

Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018,

42 Why Choose a True Jeweler for Service?

212-686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The

44 Golf: Triumph & Tragedy 46 Food: Celebrating Curaçao’s Cuisine 48 Spirits: Engaging the Senses 50 Why Choose a True Jeweler When it’s Time to Sell Your Jewelry?

publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims,

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unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Volume 13, Issue 1. Accent® is a trademark of Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.

52 Culture: Fashion Facelift


OYSTER PERPETUAL L ADY-DATEJUST PE ARLMASTER

rolex

oyster perpetual, lady-datejust and pearlmaster are trademarks.


our reason for being

Why choose a

TRUE JEWELER? We believe that to be considered a True Jeweler, you have to be a creator of jewelry and not just a reseller. A True Jeweler has expertise in all aspects of jewelry manufacturing: from the design, to choosing the materials and sourcing the goods, to the crafting of the piece through final assembly. At the Diamond Cellar, every part of that process is done in-house by a team of craftsmen with hundreds of years of combined experience in the industry. That experience influences everything else we do, from choosing the brands we represent to conducting appraisals and valuations. So when you’re looking for the perfect piece of jewelry, there’s nobody who can serve you better than the Diamond Cellar.

ANDY JOHNSON CEO AND OWNER THE DIAMOND CELLAR

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diamond cellar events

2014 Holiday Gala (top) The Diamond Cellar’s annual holiday party brought our clients together with a plethora of beautiful jewelry and timepieces, along with designers and representatives from some of the top brands. It was a great start to a festive holiday season. Watch Presidents’ Dinner (bottom) The elegance of The Columbus Club made the perfect backdrop for a collection of rare timepieces from our fine Swiss watch brands. We were proud to welcome the presidents from many of the companies, who enlightened our guests on the Swiss watch industry as well as their latest creations.

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1954

OVER 60 YEARS OF CONTINUOUS INSPIRATION IN THE PURSUIT OF TECHNICAL PERFECTION

Heritage Black Bay is the direct descendant of TUDOR’s technical success in Greenland on the wrists of Royal Navy sailors. Over 60 years later, the Black Bay is ready to stand as its own legend.

TUDOR HERITAGE BLACK BAY® Self-winding mechanical movement, waterproof to 200 m, 41 mm steel case. Visit tudorwatch.com and explore more. TUDOR Watch U.S.A., LLC. New York

®


caring for the community

PHILANTHROPY STORE 5a is on POINT with Charitable Giving. BY STACEY STATHULIS

MADISON MIKHAIL

T

Mikhail, 22, and Johnson, 24, have known each other since high school and fit squarely into the Millennial generation. “Charities are having to grow and evolve in the way they raise money and sustain themselves,” adds Johnson. “POINT is changing the way charity is done. They are creating a two-way conversation that integrates charitable giving into the lifestyles of our customers. That benefits everyone involved.”

he greatest collection of precious metals, precious gems and watches lies—sometimes dormant—in the jewelry boxes of the Baby Boomers and even the parents of that generation. Fortunately, their children and grandchildren are interested in bringing new life to those pieces in an effort to be part of a sustainable future. STORE 5a from the Diamond Cellar is responding to the call of Millennials, Generation Y and Generation X who would rather see these treasures revamped so there is less of a need to pull precious metals and gems from the earth. This comes with an ecological cost. “The truth is, my generation, the Millennial generation, is interested in vintage and antique pieces in a way that our parents and grandparents were not,” says Jesse Johnson, store director of STORE 5a. “Sustainability is important to us. There are beautiful watches and jewelry pieces out there that only need a little care and fixing in order to re-market them to customers.” At present, STORE 5a is operating as an online-based “storefront,” but Johnson is hard at work creating the STORE 5a retail experience in Columbus’ vibrant Short North arts district. Another way Johnson and STORE 5a are speaking directly to a younger demo is by partnering with POINT, an application that gives businesses a platform to help their customers give to charities. While STORE 5a already gives a portion of its sales to transparent charities, POINT gives the retailer a way to guide Millennial customers to think philanthropically. “POINT wants to build a community that is charity-focused, and STORE 5a is one of our early testers and adopters,” says Madison Mikhail, founder and President of POINT. “STORE 5a aligns perfectly with POINT’s mission and it aligns with what our age group wants. Millennials care about brands that care about charities and they will patronize those brands.”

“POINT wants to build a community that is charity-focused and STORE 5a is one of our early adopters.” MADISON MIKHAIL FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT OF POINT

STORE 5a customers will receive information about POINT to get a feel for what charities the business supports. Soon, customers will be able to log in to the POINT app to make a donation or find out what other charities are available to support. “POINT makes philanthropy simple,” concludes Mikhail. “STORE 5a is a perfect partner for POINT as it rolls out its early stages. The customer base that STORE 5a appeals to is into vintage things, things that are collected or recycled. They want to minimize their carbon footprint and buy jewelry that is conflict-free and ethical.” Learn more about STORE 5a at STORE5a.com and about POINT at pointapp.org. And look for the STORE 5a opening in spring 2015.

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Š 2015 John Hardy Limited

One of a kind. One at a time. Each by hand.


who we are

Daniel GORDON Sales Manager and Social Media Planner BY KATE LIEBERS

D

aniel Gordon has more than 1,100 followers on Facebook, more than 2,500 on Instagram, and more than 13,400 on Twitter. His perspectives are even sought out by The New York Times (Going from Smart to Smarter, Dec. 4, 2014). The traction he’s gained in the social community seems to be a matter of fate; he was raised in his family’s 111-year-old jewelry business, after all. But his secret to this success is something unrelated to diamonds: It is people. “I’ve never had any formal sales training,” Gordon says. “I’ve just always been a people person. I never cared how big or small the sale was.” Still, it didn’t hurt that his first sale—at the age of 23—was $32,000. The serendipitous moment was the first in a series of opportunities that would launch Gordon into the next level of his profession. He was working his first year at the family’s business, starting (as all new employees did) in the repair shop. “I had built a rapport with a customer who said he didn’t want a salesperson,” Gordon says. The man asked for Gordon’s assistance instead. Three days later, Gordon found himself closing the deal on a giant sale. “The funny part was that I was shaking when I was doing the hand-written ticket. He was like, ‘Was this your first sale or something?’ and I told him the truth,” Gordon says. “Immediately, the next day, my dad put me on the sales floor.” Gordon proved to be not just a natural salesman, but to have an innate sense for jewelry. A diamond style he recommended the store seek out turned out to be a bigger success than he could have expected. “It sold 11 times in one year,” Gordon says. “The average turn for an engagement ring could be one to three times a year, so it was a very dramatic turn for a product in our industry.” That’s when he transitioned into buying jewelry professionally. At this point, it seemed like Gordon had completed the trifecta of the jewelry industry: sales, service and buying. But the aspect that really set Gordon apart from other jewelry aficionados happened in a place Gordon’s long line of jeweling ancestors had never tackled: cyberspace. “Our industry, it’s very guarded. You have security issues. A lot are family businesses and don’t want to adapt to change,” Gordon says. “But I saw that [social media] was going to be a part of the business. It’s going to change how we sell and how we learn.” His online presence, as a jeweler, was so unique that major news

outlets began asking for interviews. “I wasn’t the person who wanted to be in the limelight, but I landed there because there wasn’t any other dealer doing that,” Gordon says. “I had accidentally stumbled into something no one else had at the time.” Now that he’s at the Diamond Cellar, Gordon’s experience seems to be coming full circle. While Gordon is getting recognition for celebrating jewelry using technology, technology now seems to be embracing the idea of jewelry. For example, the Apple Watch. “It’s going to be so fascinating to see how a super-traditional industry, jewelry, and something used to adapting to change, technology, will combine. You’ve got these two industries so far from each other and they’re going to find a way to co-exist,” he says. In the meantime, the philosophy he follows for success in anything from sales to social media has always been the same: Be genuine.

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gifts

from the HEART Notable moms on Mother’s Day, push presents and their most memorable jewelry gifts. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE & JULIANNE PEPITONE

ROSIE POPE “I had my daughter, Vivienne, on Mother’s Day a couple of years ago. I would have to say she is my most memorable Mother’s Day gift! This year I am hoping for jewelry. Being a mom of four and running a business, I don’t have too much time to get ready in the morning. But with jewelry, I can throw earrings and bracelets on and feel a little more put together. “My favorites are four bracelets my children gave me with their names written on each one. The best part about them: my oldest wrote all the names out and they stamped each into the metal, all in his handwriting. It was a special gift because it was a way of the kids welcoming our youngest, Bridget.”

HEIDI KLUM “I’m always loving to be surprised. My kids do beautiful art; we have an art teacher who comes to our house every week and guides them. They’ve done beautiful clay pots that they designed and painted. Last Mother’s Day my kids painted on canvases. I love art, so they’re always making something beautiful for me. So that’s always, for me, the best. I don’t want them to go and buy something; I’d rather they make something for me.”

IVANKA TRUMP “My first Mother’s Day was obviously memorable, but last year was my favorite. Arabella was old enough that we could really spend the day together doing our favorite ‘girl things.’ It was also my first Mother’s Day with two kids. It felt so complete. “I have a special place in my heart for handmade gifts. I have Arabella’s artwork in my office and am always excited to add to my collection. That said, I think the best gift would simply be the day spent with my family—no phones, no internet, no distractions!—making breakfast, then exploring the city together. “I didn’t get ‘push presents’ when my children were born—the children are the best gifts I could ever receive! My husband did give Arabella a necklace when she was born and I keep it for her. She knows when she is old enough it’s hers, and until then, I always ask her before I borrow it! “The best jewelry I ever received was my engagement ring. It was purchased from my collection, which was a very supportive—and smart—move on my husband’s part.”

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bringing it home

How We Choose

THE JEWELRY &TIMEPIECES WE CARRY Choosing the jewelry and timepieces we’ll offer at the Diamond Cellar is not something we take lightly. We travel the globe, attending the largest jewelry shows in the world, searching out designers and brands that hold the same values we do. We look for a combination of exceptional design, excellent craftsmanship and solid value, and we only represent designers who exhibit these traits. We spend years developing relationships with the brands. Oftentimes that means we can introduce our clients to some of the most famous names in the business, and we can offer oneof-a-kind or unusual pieces you won’t see anywhere else.

Designer Marco Bicego

Diamond Cellar CEO Andy Johnson with Roberto Coin (left) and Peter Webster (right), co-founders of Roberto Coin.

Designer Charles Krypell

Diamond Cellar buyers with designer Stephen Webster (second from right) at Couture in Las Vegas.

Andy Johnson with Steve Shonebarger, former president of Corum (left) and Rudy Chavez, president of Baume & Mercier (right).

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special occasions

Spring GIFTS

Create the perfect gift-giving moment.

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Penny Preville pavé diamond bangle $6,185 Lagos dome ring $395

From top: Ippolita turquoise and diamond ring $795 Scott Kay rose gold diamond eternity band $2,530 David Yurman diamond pavé ring $895 Rahaminov rose gold pavé diamond disc earrings $2,500 Penny Preville diamond ear climbers $1,270

Lagos link necklace $925 Michele diamond and motherof-pearl watch $1,975

Diamond Cellar mother’s rings, starting at $1,000 Diamond Cellar rondelle mother’s bracelet (bracelet only) $295 Encore slides for mother’s bracelet, starting at $395 Birthstone enhancers with diamond halos starting at $395

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Michael Bondanza Venti cuff links $3,800 David Yurman link necklace $525 Tourbillion movement cuff links $500

David Yurman Frontier knife $1,850

Stephen Webster Highwayman band $1,095 David Yurman Petrus bracelet $950 David Yurman forged carbon ring $575

Faber-Castell perfect pencil design brown gift set $45 Faber-Castell Ondoro wood pen $140

Tag Heuer Aquaracer stainless steel watch $2,150 Luminox Atacama Field Chrono watch $925

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for the

GRAD

Ippolita blue topaz pendant $795 David Yurman initial pendant $650 Ippolita amethyst pendant $650

Tudor 42mm Heritage Chrono blue watch $4,425 Hermès Cape Cod watch with double-wrap leather strap $2,850

Mikimoto Akoya pearl necklace $1,850 Diamond Cellar Nuvola diamond studs $3,650 Diamond Cellar Nuvola diamond pendant $1,950

Charles Krypell "I Love You" bangles $330 each Ippolita turqouise and diamond ring $595 Scott Kay amethyst ring $781 David Yurman Wheaton morganite and diamond ring $700

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scene

KATY PERRY

JULIANNE HOUGH

BELLAMY YOUNG

wore a Harry Kotlar fancy canary yellow diamond ring to the Grammys.

wore a David Yurman Petite PavĂŠ pinky ring to the Elle Women in Hollywood event.

wore a David Yurman Labyrinth gold dome ring to the Elle Women in Hollywood event.

HAUTE LOOKS ON 1


KAROLINA KURKOVA

TAYLOR SCHILLING

ZOOEY DESCHANEL

wore a Forevermark Cluster Shield diamond ring to an Art Basel party in Miami.

wore a Forevermark Exceptional Diamond Jewelry by Premier Gem ring to the Emmys.

wore a Forevermark by Maria Canale Aster Collection diamond ring to the Emmys.

THE RED CARPET Take a cue from these decorated digits and ring in spring! BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


fashion

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR FASHION?

When it comes to providing the right fashions, a jeweler must be able to do three things: understand the global and local trends; choose the designers who best represent those trends; and make sure their pieces are produced with quality materials to be durable and hold the integrity of the design. At the Diamond Cellar, we use our experience and expertise to do all that, while still providing the very best value.

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From top: Stephen Webster Lady Stardust bracelet $26,000 Stephen Webster Lady Stardust Opalescent Ring $9,000 Stephen Webster Magnipheasant diamond bracelet $25,000 Stephen Webster Lady Stardust multistone earrings $12,000 Stephen Webster Magnipheasant earclimbers $9,500 On model: Penny Preville diamond starburst studs $3,585 Penny Preville diamond bar pendant $2,685 Penny Preville triangular diamond bar pendant $1,715

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fashion From top: Roberto Coin rose gold and diamond collar $14,250 Roberto Coin mother-of-pearl cocktail ring $3,200 Roberto Coin mother-of-pearl and diamond earrings $6,400 Tara & Sons Inc. pearl and diamond bracelet $6,369 Christopher Designs morganite and diamond ring $8,250

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spotted

Idina Menzel wears Forevermark during a performance at Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest.

As Seen On... Our favorite stars share a love for our favorite brands!

Sarah Jessica Parker wears Mikimoto at the Great American Songbook Gala.

Taraji P. Henson wears Tacori at the 46th Annual NAACP Image Awards.

Estelle wears David Yurman during a performance at the New Yorkers 20 for Children Fall Gala.

IDINA MENZEL COURTESY OF DOMAIN LA; SARAH JESSICA PARKER BY PATRICK MCMULLAN COURTESY OF MIKIMOTO; TARAJI P. HENSON COURTESY OF MICHELLE MARIE PR

BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


gifts

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR A MILESTONE OCCASION?

When it’s time to celebrate a milestone, the piece of jewelry has to represent the occasion perfectly. As a True Jeweler, we work to develop a relationship with you, to find out what exactly the moment means to you and your loved one. Then we tailor the piece to the moment. The ultimate goal is to match the jewelry to the feeling you’re trying to convey. To do that takes deep understanding of gemstones, metals and design.When it comes to a milestone gift, we leave nothing to chance.

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Clockwise from top: Nova platinum diamond bracelet $83,525 Christopher Designs Crisscut diamond band $31,023 Christopher Designs Crisscut diamond ring $109,409 Diamond Cellar emerald and diamond ring $95,130 Sapphire and diamond earrings $12,500 Christopher Designs Crisscut diamond earrings $36,740 Rahaminov diamond ower ring $79,200 PavÊ diamond bracelet $52,000

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trends

the new heirlooms

Today’s jewelry merges the best of past and present.

BY BETH BERNSTEIN

When considering buying fine jewelry, a woman should ask two important questions before making a purchase: Will the styles endure or at least make a comeback? And will they retain their intrinsic value? Renowned jewelry houses and savvy independent designers ask themselves these same questions before jumping on a new trend direction. For spring/summer 2015, the hottest jewelry styles possess these qualities and are part of an evolving trend we’ll call “The New Heirlooms.” This is jewelry that recalls the past with vintage silhouettes or antique details, but has been reworked with a current sensibility to appeal to today’s modern woman.

GO FOR THE GOLD

BRING ON THE BLING At the same time, we’re witnessing a return to Art Deco-inspired long, linear and ultra-clean shapes, many with fluidity of movement. These appear in white gold and feature varying cuts of diamonds, reminiscent of Cartier in the ’20s and ’30s. Cabochon and sugar loaf cuts of emeralds, sapphires, spinels and rubies are also trending. The cuts are generally set in white gold or platinum and featured in flexible bracelets, large stone rings, lariat necklaces and tassel earrings, which flow and swing when a woman turns her head. Arm bracelets and hand and hair jewelry are renewing this category with the youthful spirit it needs to inspire a new generation of fine jewelry devotees.

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FROM TOP: ROBERTO COIN, MARCO BICEGO, IVANKA TRUMP, PENNY PREVILLE

At the auction and collector level, signed pieces by storied design houses (think Boucheron, Bulgari and Van Cleef & Arpels) have been fetching record prices. Inspired by the renewed demand for bold jewelry, chunky yellow gold styles are back in all of their adorning glory. Retro looks from the ’40s and ’50s, including single bracelets with multiple charms and large, intricately designed links, are back. For a fresh look, they can be stacked with early antique serpent styles that wrap several times around the wrist, or ’70s-style buckle bracelets. Looks popularized in the ’80s by designers such as Elsa Peretti and Paloma Picasso are being rethought in modern forms: wider-than-wide cuffs, knuckle rings and pendants that dangle at 32” or longer. Large hoop earrings in various oval, marquise, round and square shapes take on an organic feel, while stud earrings, stackable rings and bib necklaces all incorporate movement. Many also sport colored gemstones, which range from more muted varieties of labradorite and moonstone to fancy colored sapphires and various hues of tourmaline. There’s also a return to figurative Art Nouveau shapes with touches of enamel and intriguing color combinations.


POIS MOI COLLECTION


profile

Love on steroids

Diamond cuts so magnificent, they’re patented! BY ERIK DEFRUSCIO

A

rtist and jewelry designer Christopher Slowinski, known for creating innovative diamond cuts and settings, modestly insists that his best creations have happened by accident. “When I started out cutting diamonds, I was actually lousy at it; it was a mistake that led me to come up with a different arrangement of facets.” Slowinski, a native of Poland with an engineering background, moved to America in 1976 and apprenticed with a diamond cutter in New York City. He started out learning how to set stones, and after two years in the industry he opened a small contracting shop with a friend, doing mostly repairs and custom work. “I didn’t start with special skills but soon learned I had the ability to make a design better than the original—creating a better flow, tweaking the design to individual tastes.” Early in Slowinski’s career, he was sent a ring with princess-cut diamonds that had a few stones missing. “They thought I was a genius and could repair anything,” he recalls. “However, it wasn’t possible for me to save this ring.” From the frustration of not being able to fix it, Slowinski ultimately created his famous invisible setting, filing his first patent in 1991. “It was absolutely perfect. Most other rings had problems with lost stones, but I never lost stones with this setting.” Ultimately opening his own small shop and gradually building a collection, his breakthrough came in 1998 when he created a 77-facet diamond (vs. the generic 48), the first-ever modified step cut, for which he filed his second patent and which fast became a top seller. Ironically, he discovered this Crisscut diamond by mistakenly placing a diamond on the cutter the wrong way. “I messed up the stone but noticed how beautifully the erroneous triangle enhanced the light,” Slowinski explains, ripping and folding a sheet of paper in an attempt to demonstrate how a generic emerald cut becomes something else entirely. “I thought I had something special but I couldn’t get a cutter to make it. Finally, I went to Israel and had it made. It’s still a top seller.” He ultimately used a similar concept on round cuts, which required three years of work and four patents. A unique cut with 109 facets, the Brilliant Crisscut appears round but actually has 12 straight walls and 12 sides, creating the illusion of a scalloped border. Then, as Slowinski recalls, “I broke all the cutting rules,” coming up with yet another new cut where “light bounces off seven times inside the stone before exiting, greatly amplifying the stone’s brilliance.” This amazing diamond design, called L’Amour Crisscut, appears 40 to 50 percent larger than a comparably sized emerald-cut diamond and, as Slowinski puts it, “is so brilliant that it sells itself.”

What’s next for Slowisnski (who works with 60 craftsmen at his two facilities in Manhattan and personally inspects every stone that is cut and every setting cast)? “I think I can finally take a break,” he says, heading off to Europe to show his collection at Baselworld, the most prestigious jewelry show in the industry. A break? We don’t, for a second, believe him….

“FOR ME, TECHNOLOGY IS AS IMPORTANT AS AESTHETICS.” CHRISTOPHER SLOWINSKI, CHRISTOPHER DESIGNS

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This is the box

THAT, FOR OVER SIXTY-FIVE YEARS,

HAS REPRESENTED THE FINEST JEWELRY AND TIMEPIECES IN THE WORLD AND THE VERY BEST VALUES AVAILABLE.

AND FOR GENERATION AFTER

GENERATION OF CUSTOMERS, IT’S STILL THE ONE

6280 Sawmill Road, Dublin

I

they look for.

3960 New Bond Street, Easton Town Center

I

www.diamondcellar.com


HowLong is FOREVER?

De Beers CEO Philippe Mellier talks challenges, long-term prospects and social responsibility. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

“THE PRODUCT WE SELL IS SCARCE AND BECOMING SCARCER.” PHILIPPE MELLIER, DE BEERS

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What are the diamond industry’s most pressing challenges and how are you dealing with these? The growth in demand for diamonds will soon outpace supply; supply is forecast to plateau, and then decline after 2020. We are investing heavily in our production capacity: we’ve committed considerable capital to major expansion projects at our existing operations and to developing new deposits. In Botswana, we continue with our hugely important investment at Jwaneng which, we estimate, will deliver over 100 million extra carats from one of the world’s richest diamond mines. In South Africa, an underground project will extend the life of its largest diamond mine to 2044. In Canada, progress continues at one of the largest new developments in the diamond world, and we look forward to receiving the first production within a couple of years. We’ve recently opened a mine in Namibia after two years of development work. Where is this growth in demand coming from? The engine is the U.S., coupled with growing demand from the East as more Indian and Chinese middleclass consumers choose to purchase diamonds. How is the consumer landscape changing? The increasing polarization of wealth means that bridal jewelry and wealthier consumers are driving the U.S. growth today. There has also been a recent increase in consumer preferences for brands, which is why our partnership with Forevermark has been so successful. Generation Y and Millennial consumers, who will provide the oxygen for future U.S. demand for diamond jewelry, are looking for uniqueness and ethical reassurance in the products they buy. The Forevermark brand responds to their need for confidence, trust, quality and excitement. (We recently inscribed our millionth Forevermark diamond!) What responsibility do you feel toward countries whose natural resources you are developing? Our business model is built on partnerships with governments; we are extremely proud of what these partnerships have meant for the economic and social development in these nations. Diamonds represent over three quarters of total export earnings in Botswana and over a quarter of the total in Namibia. Our relationships in these nations are among the world’s most successful public-private partnerships.

FROM TOP: FOREVERMARK BY STEPHEN WEBSTER, FOREVERMARK EXCEPTIONAL DIAMOND JEWELRY BY RAHAMINOV

diamonds


© FOREVERMARK 2014 – 2015. FOREVERMARK®,

®, T H E D I A M O N D. T H E P R O M I S E .™ A R E T R A D E M A R K S O F T H E D E B E E R S G R O U P O F CO M PA N I E S .

A TRUE PROMISE WILL NEVER BE BROKEN

Forevermark is part of The De Beers Group of Companies.


experts

All About BRIDAL RINGS

Our magazine’s trend specialist is now wedding expert to the world.

L

orraine DePasque has a passion for jewelry: she’s been writing about it for most of her career and for many years in this magazine. So her recent appointment as about.com’s first-ever wedding bands and engagement rings expert comes as no surprise. Here, we chat with her about her new position and about the basics of buying bridal rings. Congrats on the new job! We always knew you were an expert… Thank you! About.com has roughly 900 experts, but I’m the first to specialize in engagement rings and wedding bands, which became a separate category on the site this past November. What are some of your favorite topics? I recently wrote about platinum, black diamonds and eco-friendly jewelry. Social responsibility is huge with the bridal demographic: they care about ethical sourcing, reclaimed metals, recycled materials, sustainability, etc. What’s the hottest trend in engagement rings for 2015? White metal is still number one, meaning platinum of course, but also white gold (14K and 18K). Yellow gold has also been trending for the past year or so, and estate jewelry is a growing piece of the business. There’s also more interest in natural colored diamonds (thanks to celebrity preferences) and even other colored gemstones. When Prince William presented Kate with his mother’s sapphire engagement ring, it was all about blue; this year, Pantone’s Color of the Year is Marsala, so rubies— equally as durable as sapphires—should be newly popular. How about diamond cuts: what’s popular now? Round is still the top trending cut: perhaps 80 percent of the business, followed by cushion cuts, followed by squares. But some of the older cuts, especially marquises and pear shapes, are starting to come back. The other continuing trend is halos: everything from a single halo around any cut stone, a multi-halo, or even an intricate floral halo. How are the trends evolving? It’s interesting. I learn a lot about consumer preferences from Pinterest, and when I recently posted two modern engagement rings (both platinum

with round diamond center stones, one tension set), the response was overwhelming. So while the majority of women have been leaning toward classic or retro, there’s a definite trend emerging toward contemporary. Another observation: this generation wants special, even customized, wedding jewelry. I truly believe there’s a special ring for everyone, which is why I love what I do. If there’s a particular way you’d like to customize your ring, talk with your jeweler about it; this is what they do every day and they can offer suggestions on personalization. What about trends in wedding bands? Personally, I like wraps if you plan to wear your band on the same finger as your engagement ring. But I’m seeing more and more women buying a slim band that may or may not match the engagement ring, especially if they plan on wearing that on the right hand. And women are putting other slim bands of all kinds on their jewelry wish lists, so their husband knows exactly what to buy for their first anniversary, birth of their first child, or even a birthday. Then you can stack them all with your wedding band, creating a dramatic right-hand ring! The whole stackable ring fashion look has sparked this trend, and it’s not going away anytime soon. Buying jewelry online is a controversial issue: what’s your opinion? While the internet is okay for research (but don’t believe everything you read!), I’d never suggest buying wedding jewelry online. There are so many elements that go into a ring; if you don’t work with a reputable jeweler, so much could go wrong. I’ve heard horror stories about chipped stones, stones that don’t line up, stones that don’t reflect light, insecure settings. So my best advice is to form a relationship with a trustworthy jeweler, a real person (or family) who’s been around awhile and who stands behind their work. After all, it’s the most important purchase you’ll ever make, a reflection of your personal style, and something you’ll be looking at every day of your life. Don’t risk it! For more information on wedding jewelry, check out engagementrings.about.com or diamondcellar.com/collections/bridal.

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FROM LEFT: STEPHEN WEBSTER, FOREVERMARK, STEPHEN WEBSTER, HARRY KOTLAR, TACORI

BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN


Socially Speaking Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Or, share your experience with us on Wedding Wire or Yelp to JOIN THE CONVERSATION TODAY!


timepieces

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR YOUR TIMEPIECE?

In the past, a timepiece was all about function. The more accurate, the better. Today, form and function are equal partners. Craftsmanship and engineering have elevated the watch movement into the realm of art. A True Jeweler can explain the different watch complications like the tourbillion, moon phase, or 40-hour power reserve. Our understanding of the engineering and various functions as well as metals, gemstones and design helps match the right watch to you, the wearer.

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Clockwise from top: Rolex 39mm Cellini Date watch on black alligator strap $17,700 Panerai Luminor steel watch on black leather strap $7,100 Tudor 41mm Ranger watch with black dial on brown leather strap $2,825 Bell & Ross 41mm Auto Chrono watch with rubber strap $4,500 Raymond Weil Maestro watch with sunburst circle center $1,495 Patek Philippe white gold Calatrava watch on black alligator strap $34,400

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collecting

time to

invest

Rolex Oyster Perpetual GMTMaster II, 40mm in stainless steel with rotatable black and blue ceramic bezel and Oysterlock bracelet.

Watchmaking history appeals to a new generation. BY WILLIAM BUCKLEY

P

hilatelists collect stamps and numismatists collect coins, but watch collectors, in the grand scheme of things, are a relatively new breed. Seismic shifts—from pocket watch to mechanical wristwatch to quartz and atomic movements—indicated the fading of each previous technology into obscurity. But by the end of the 1980s, manufacturers realized that there was a market for mechanical wristwatches both as timepiece and work of art. A new generation of consumers was excited by the craftsmanship of traditional horology, and the watch collector was born. Edward Faber, one of the leading experts on vintage watches and founder of the Aaron Faber Gallery in New York, explains, “Before 1930 watches were essentially pocket watches retrofitted to the wrist. With the advent of World War I, huge advances in technology were made in all areas, from automobiles to aviation, and watches soon followed suit. The nuances of jeweling and modern technology enabled watchmakers to integrate features like chronographs and moonphase calendars, and mechanical wristwatches entered their element.” But with the “quartz revolution” came a level of timekeeping accuracy that changed daily life. What began in 1929 with the quartz clock took 40 years to miniaturize, but in a few swift years mechanical watches began to look like they would become obsolete. “We’ve learned in this industry to fear new technologies, and for good reason,” explains Michael Friedman, historian for Audemars Piguet. “What we could accurately call the quartz revolution was known to many as the quartz crisis because it essentially wiped out the industry as we knew it; it took many years to evolve past that. But interestingly, what the quartz era in the 1970s really did was to liberate the watch industry. We’re now in an era of experimentation and expressionism largely because the accuracy problem was solved when the quartz watch debuted.” With smart watch production numbers in the tens of millions, manufacturers like Apple and Samsung are investing in the future of timekeeping. And whether or not smart watches become as ubiquitous as the quartz and mechanical movements before them, increased interest in traditional craftsmanship has secured the future of mechanical watches. “To connect with a timepiece, which may have plus or minus a few seconds per week but is part of horological history, is a strong statement,” insists Faber. “People in their 20s and 30s are looking at vintage Rolexes and IWCs and they’re excited to collect them, they’re excited to buy them. When they buy vintage watches, they’re also buying the stories behind them.”

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Patek Philippe Ref. 5170G Men’s Chronograph with pulsometric scale. White gold with silvery white dial. Featuring Caliber CH 29-535 PS Mechanical manually wound movement.

WHAT COLLECTORS LOOK FOR Brand: This is the number-one consideration. Currently Patek Philippe and Rolex are most coveted. Papers and Presentation: Watches with their original papers and boxes in good condition are worth more. Metal: With only a few exceptions, platinum is number one, followed by rose gold, then yellow gold, then steel. Complications: Chronographs, moonphases, tourbillions etc. can increase a watch’s collectability. Rarity: The more mass-produced a watch is, the less desirable it is to a collector.


Four Exceptional Jewelers and a Collection of the World’s Best Brands, All Under One Umbrella.

Columbus, Ohio www.diamondcellar.com

The Woodlands, Texas www.donohos.com

Tulsa, Oklahoma www.brucegweber.com

Columbus, Ohio www.STORE5a.com

DIAMOND CELLAR HOLDINGS is a family of four of the finest jewelers in the United States. Each store has its own unique heritage, but together they represent almost 150 years of history in the jewelry business. We’ve built our reputation on excellent service, fine craftsmanship and unwavering integrity. That’s why the world’s top jewelry and watch brands trust us. And so can you. A. Jaffe Alex Woo Assael Pearls Baume & Mercier Bell & Ross Bovet Breitling Carla Amorim Cartier Charles Krypell Christian Bauer Christine Cooper Hill Christopher Designs Corum David Yurman Denise Robergé

Elizabeth Locke Forevermark Girard Perregaux Goldman Diana Graf von Faber-Castell Hermes Ippolita Ivanka Trump Jaeger-LeCoultre JB Star John Hardy Jonathan Birnbach Kwiat Lagos Lumninox

Marco Bicego Memoire Michael Bondanza Michele Mikimoto Montegrappa officine panerai Orbita Patek Philippe Penny Preville Pesavento Precision Set Raymond Weil Ritani Robert Procop

Roberto Coin Roberto Coin Cento Rolex Rustic Cuff Scott Kay Sterling & Bridal Soho Stephen Webster SUWA Swiss Army Tacori Tag Heuer Tara Pearls Tudor Tuum William Henry Studio


service

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR SERVICE?

You can’t think about a True Jeweler without imagining goldsmiths at their benches repairing and creating jewelry. At the Diamond Cellar, we have some of the best in the country. It’s in our DNA. But we also understand that your jewelry is an old friend, a constant companion, the voice of someone from your past. That’s why we do all our service in-house, at our own benches. We won’t ship your friend off to a stranger when it needs service.

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SCOTT HEPNER 28 YEARS OF SERVICE WITH THE DIAMOND CELLAR


PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Weight Carat 1.53

ColorE Grade Grade Clarity VS1

Grade CutExcellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621 Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

For over 80 years, GIA has brought clarity and global standards to gem evaluation. A GIA report means expert, independent verification from the creator of the 4Cs and the world’s most widely recognized gem authority.

Look for GIA-graded diamonds and jewelers who offer them.

CARLSBAD ANTWERP BANGKOK DUBAI GABORONE HONG KONG JOHANNESBURG LONDON MOSCOW MUMBAI NEW YORK OSAKA RAMAT GAN SEOUL TAIPEI TOKYO


golf

triumph & tragedy

Gary Player won the 1965 U.S. Open Championship, but Phil Mickelson missed his chance in 2006.

The U.S. Open Championship is golf’s toughest tournament. BY EDWARD KIERSH

Gary Player celebrated at Bellerive in 1965.

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GARY PLAYER COURTESY OF BLACK KNIGHT ARCHIVES; PHIL MICKELSON COURTESY OF ROLEX

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t’s one of the most demanding athletic showcases in the world, where unshakable endurance and remarkable precision are all-important. The U.S. Open Championship, which will be held in June, this year at Chambers Bay near Tacoma, Washington, has long been a proving ground for the world’s best golfers. Every year since the first Open, in 1895 at the Newport Country Club in Rhode Island, legends have been inspired by brave men battling ankle-high rough, dramatically contoured fairways and unnervingly fast greens. “The Open was my most coveted title because it’s such a grueling test, and it consistently offers special moments in the game’s history,” says 1965 Open champion Gary Player. “Open courses are so physically and mentally demanding that handling the terrific pressure is essential to winning—and that requires a combination of patience and precision.” Although the Open is especially merciless (maybe because of it), many of the game’s most inspirational moments have taken place during this United States Golf Association-staged event. Only last year at Pinehurst, Martin Kaymer ran away from the field by shooting a nine-under par 271, the third lowest score ever. It was a triumph reminiscent of three-time champion Tiger Woods’ stunning 12-under par performance at Pebble Beach in 2000, and Rory McIlroy’s blistering 16-under 2011 conquest of Congressional. Staging his own heroics in 1990, Hale Irwin, at age 45, became the oldest man ever to claim the title. His uplifting win belied the great Walter Hagen’s remark about a typical U.S. Open course: “It makes duffers of us all.” Few golf aficionados can forget how “The People’s Champion” Phil Mickelson turned victory into defeat at New York’s Winged Foot Golf Club in 2006. Trying to carve a three-iron around a tree to buttress his one-stroke lead, Mickelson hit a branch, only managing to advance his ball a mere 25 yards. Obviously dismayed, he subsequently plopped the ball into a bunker, and later rued, “What an idiot I am!” As Rolex, one of the tournament’s chief sponsors, suggests, Open golfers who do achieve a win become “witnesses to history,” masters of “impossible physics on the most hallowed grounds.” They display the same boldness and passion that make Rolex an iconic watch brand, so it’s no wonder that Rolex is irrevocably linked with greatness. Emphasizing Rolex’s preeminence in watches as well as the integrity of the brand, John Green, president and CEO of Lux Bond & Green, says, “Our clients see Rolex wearers like Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus and Roger Federer striving for excellence, and they too want to own a Rolex. These are the world’s greatest athletes, so buyers want what they want: the absolute best.”


food

Shore restaurant at the Santa Barbara Resort in Nieuwpoort, Curaçao. Below, Chef Heinrich Hortencia.

LIONFISH WITH CARIBBEAN RATATOUILLE AND CHIMICHURRI OIL

Celebrating Curaçao’s Cuisine

Ingredients: 4 whole lionfish, fileted 4 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into thick slices 1 ripe plantain, diced 1 red tomato, diced 1 eggplant, diced 1 green zucchini, diced 1 yellow zucchini, diced 1 onion, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 1 handful curly parsley 2 cups olive oil ¾ cup unsalted butter Sea salt White pepper

Chef Heinrich Hortencia is a Shore winner.

BY SHIRA LEVINE

H

aute cuisine is not the main reason people travel to the Caribbean. Swimming in the azure waters, snorkeling beside coral reefs and exploring the jungle are the real temptations that lure us to these exotic locales. Except, perhaps, in cosmopolitan Curaçao, where Chef Heinrich Hortencia of the Shore restaurant at the Santa Barbara Resort in Nieuwpoort uses A-list local and imported delicacies in his quest to put the “C” of the ABC Islands on the foodie map. “Everyone recognizes Shore for interesting presentations of ingredients at the fine dining level,” he notes. “I want to change the taste of Curaçao to represent our diversity.” As Hortencia’s recent win on the Food Network show Chopped has proved, he knows how to deliver more than such white tablecloth menu staples as Lobster Thermidor, despite having spent 13 years cooking in Europe. While he initially returned to this colonial island of narrow winding streets and pastel building facades in order to spend time with his mother following his father’s passing, an edible agenda soon emerged: to elevate Curaçaoan cuisine from simple conch fritters to something worth traveling for. Hortencia admits that Curaçao’s steady warm weather and smaller production of crops than he was used to in Europe provide a bit of a challenge. Nonetheless, part of his plan involves using the finest local ingredients from such purveyors as The Curaçao Ostrich Farm, which provides the bird’s lean meat and giant eggs. Currently, Hortenica is on a lionfish kick. “There are too many lionfish around the island, so I am experimenting with preparations. That’s something I can’t do in Europe. We catch lionfish on this beautiful island and prepare it right here.”

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For lionfish: Ask your local fishmonger to clean and filet the lionfish for you. Safe handling is a priority because lionfish spines are very sharp and venomous. Season filets with sea salt, then pan-fry in hot olive oil on the skin side until crispy. Flip filet onto other side and fry for 30 seconds. Remove from heat and set aside. For Caribbean ratatouille: Heat pan with a small amount of olive oil. Fry half of the onion and half of the garlic. Add the plantain, then the remaining vegetables. Season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat and set aside. For sweet potato: Boil potato until soft. Take out and dry on paper towels. Pan fry in unsalted butter. Season with sea salt and set aside. For chimichurri oil: Blend parsley, remaining garlic, remaining onion, olive oil, salt and pepper in blender. On each plate, form a circle of Caribbean ratatouille, then top with a lionfish filet. Plate sweet potato beside the ratatouille, then drizzle chimichurri oil over plate.


CENTO COLLECTION


spirits

Engaging the Senses

Drinking well isn’t just about great taste. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

enhances wine or cocktails, but there’s no doubt a heavy-cut crystal whisky glass or big red wine glass enhances our perception of the drink. Texture also plays a significant role: granular sugar is a plus on the rim of a Sidecar, but a minus in the drink (where liquid simple syrup is often used instead). Sound: People underestimate how much sound influences experience. To play with this sense, British bartender Tony Conigliaro experimented by serving the same drink against two different soundtracks (classical and techno), resulting in completely different tasting notes from attendees. Sense of Place: Terroir is a French word which suggests that wine, in particular, is influenced by soil, microclimates and even the personality of the winemaker. But we also experience a sense of context; visiting a winery or distillery can actually make the product taste “better,” because you now have a connection to the producer. A specific cocktail can induce memories of a perfect date or a great travel experience. Sense of Balance: Equilibrioception, regulated by the inner ear, is severely hampered by consuming too much alcohol. But there’s another sense of balance: one of balance in your cocktail, where all the elements— sweet and sour, alcohol and sugar, fruit and savory—come together perfectly. Learning to identify a balanced drink (or what a drink is lacking) goes a long way toward creating ideal food pairings. It even turns out that senses can do double duty. Synesthesia crosses wires, and allows those with that neurological condition to “hear” colors and “see” sounds. To some degree, we all do it: Green means “go” and fast food restaurants decorate in bright colors to make people hungrier and eat faster. Get to know your senses and how they work, and you’ll enjoy your drinking and dining experience in a whole new way.

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GETTY1

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f someone asks what senses are involved when you’re sipping a glass of wine or a cocktail, the correct answer is “all of them.” Taste, smell and sight are all pretty obvious. But touch (mouth feel, a chilled glass), sound (the bubbles in the glass, the crack and tumble of ice) and more come into play to truly round out your drinking experience. It turns out we rely on far more than five senses (maybe as many as 21) to make sense of the world. Thermoception, for example—our sense of hot and cold—turns out to be a completely different thing than our sense of touch. When it comes to enjoying a glass of wine or a cocktail, understanding how our senses interact goes a long way to understanding why we like or don’t like a particular food or drink. “Dimmer lighting in a bar can mask colors and aesthetics, causing the imbiber to rely on aromas, texture and flavors to engage with the drink,” says Pamela Wiznitzer, president of the New York branch of the U.S. Bartenders Guild and an M.S. candidate in food science at NYU. “Similarly, the sounds of cracking ice and shaking and straining a cocktail can cause a Pavlovian sensation. Bars that elevate the background music may drown out that component, leaving the guest with visual stimulation as the only option. It’s one reason why drinks at brightly lit rooftop and pool bars tend to rely on vivid colors and wild garnishes, while cocktail lounges emphasize complex, savory ingredients.” Sight: “Blind” tastings can be taken to an extreme at restaurants that offer “dining in the dark” options. A few years ago, Wiznitzer crafted a deconstructed Pisco Sour cocktail featuring reduced lime syrup and gelled pisco “pearls.” Guests put the drink together on their palate in total darkness for a new experience. Smell: An old trick has you pinch your nose shut to learn that an onion and an apple taste the same. Somewhere between 70 and 90 percent of what we “taste” actually happens with our olfactory nerves. Opus One winemaker Michael Salacci hires a parfumist to lead sensory training sessions and provide an outside opinion while blending the brand’s iconic Cabernet Sauvignon-based wine. Taste: The old “tongue map” (sweet at the tip of the tongue, salty on the sides, etc.) has been largely debunked by science. But it does turn out that different chemical reactions are responsible for differing tastes. Wired magazine’s August 2014 What’s Inside column noted that for the popular hot sauce sriracha, capsaicinoids in spicy peppers bind to TRPV1 receptors in nerve endings conveying touch, temperature and pain, while salt is probably interacting with ion channels in your taste buds. Touch: There’s a lot of debate on whether the “right” glassware actually


service

Why choose a True Jeweler

WHEN IT’STIMETO SELLYOUR JEWELRY? You can easily sell your unwanted jewelry to someone who will dismantle it and use the metal and gemstones for other projects. We do that too sometimes, when appropriate. But since we understand fashion, we’re always looking for older designs that are still beautiful. Our craftsmen can refurbish an old piece, repair it when needed and bring it back to life. In the end, you get more money for your unwanted jewelry, and we find it a new home with somebody who will truly appreciate it. We get to make two people happy. Items shown available at STORE5a.com

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culture

Italy’s designers step up to preserve cultural landmarks. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

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ast spring, in the wake of crippling recessions, Matteo Renzi, Italy’s newest (and youngest) prime minister, called on the private sector to help fund emergency restoration of collapsing structures in the ancient wonder that is the buried city of Pompeii. Heavy rains and flooding had caused severe damage, and the government was unable to cover the whole bill. Now the program is expanding to the country’s museums, fountains and other icons, particularly in Rome. And its fashion giants—including Fendi, Bulgari and Tod’s—are stepping up to the plate. While corporate sponsorship of public projects is nothing new in the U.S., it’s fairly unprecedented in Italy, where there’s a resistance to mixing private and government programs. “The ideological refusal to permit the private sector to intervene—as if only the public sector could guarantee the guardianship of heritage—must end,” Renzi announced last March. Soon after, luxury jeweler Bulgari said it would put $2 million toward an extensive refurbishment of the storied Spanish Steps in the Piazza di Spagna, where decades of heavy traffic have taken a toll on the 290-year-old structure. Scheduled to begin this year, it will help celebrate Bulgari’s 130th anniversary as a “special gift from

Roberto Cavalli held a runway show beneath Milan’s Arch of Peace and donated $120,000 towards its restoration.

GETTY 1; RUNWAY IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIES DIRECTIONS

Fashion Facelift

Bulgari to its city,” CEO Jean-Christophe Babin said in a statement. These gestures are not completely without precedent: In 2010, Roberto Cavalli presented his collection beneath Milan’s Arch of Peace in exchange for a $120,000 donation toward its restoration. What’s changed is the scale—and the ability to do some branding during construction. Tod’s, the shoe company famous for its elegant driving moccasins, announced it is helping to finance a series of projects at Rome’s 2,000-yearold Colosseum. Plans for the $30 million comprehensive restoration have been in the works since 2012. (They met with some controversy, since part of the agreement involves promotional opportunties for Tod’s in exchange for the funding.) A series of restorations of the site’s arches, facades and entrances will keep the famous amphitheater partially shrouded in scaffolding for over two years. In the end, though, the city should be able to enjoy its massive monument for another few millennia. And last summer, Fendi announced it would dedicate almost $3 million to a restoration of the Trevi Fountain, the Neptune-and-chariot adorned destination built in the 18th century and made famous in the films La Dolce Vita and Three Coins in the Fountain. While tourists might lament visiting the site while it’s drained and under scaffolding, it’s also possible they’ll catch Fendi’s creative genius Karl Lagerfeld, who loves photographing Rome’s fountains. For Fendi, restoring the city’s fountains (more projects are planned) makes sense. Insists Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director of accessories and thirdgeneration designer, “It’s our duty to pay tribute to the city of Rome which has given us so much.”

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The Gold Collection FEATURED IN WHITE, YELLOW AND ROSE GOLD WITH DIAMONDS.


© D.YURMAN 2015


DIAMOND CELLAR ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2015

Diamond Cellar  

The Magazine of Life's Celebrations