Page 1

A C C E N T/ T H E M A G A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S SPRING/SUMMER 2015

SPRING GIFTS

FOR MOMS, DADS AND GRADS WHY YOU SHOULD WORK WITH A

TRUE JEWELER CATCHING UP WITH

KRISTIN CHENOWETH


Christopher Designs Crisscut

c r i ss c u t e m er a l d by

c h r i s t o p h er

L’Amour Crisscut® is a trademark used under license from Christopher Designs. Use of L’Amour Crisscut® trademark is only allowed by authorized retailers.


WELCOME! Welcome to our spring issue of Accent magazine. We’ve used this issue to really tell our story—of what it means to be a True Jeweler in a sea of jewelry stores. It’s a subject that’s important to us, so throughout the magazine we’ve tried to help you understand why we do the things we do, and why they make us different. This issue also features a special gift-giving section for all your spring occasions. It’s just a small sample of what we offer, and of course we’d love to help you, personally, find the perfect gift for your loved one. And while you’re here, if you’d like to know more about what it means to be a True Jeweler, just ask!

SPRING GIFTS

PAGE 12

BRUCE G. WEBER

EVENTS

PAGE 6

1


CONTENTS

Spring/Summer 2015 1700 UTICA SQUARE 918-749-1700 800-749-1771 BRUCEGWEBER.COM

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI

FEATURES

28

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

1 Welcome Letter

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

4 Our Reason for Being

HANS GSCHLIESSER

6 Events

MANAGING EDITOR

8 Caring for the Community: Indian Health Care Resource Center

JILLIAN LAROCHELLE PROJECT MANAGER

10 Who We Are: Charles Whitley

LISA MONTEMORRA

12 Spring Gifts DESIGNERS

16 Gifts: From the Heart 18 How We Choose the Jewelry & Timepieces We Carry

CYNTHIA LUCERO

32

JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI

20 Why Choose a True Jeweler for Fashion?

PRODUCTION MANAGER PEG EADIE

24 Spotted: As Seen On…

PRESIDENT AND CEO

26 Why Choose a True Jeweler for a Milestone Occasion?

BRITTON JONES

28 Trends: The New Heirlooms

CHAIRMAN AND COO

30 Profile: Christopher Designs

MAC BRIGHTON

32 Diamonds: De Beers & Forevermark

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary

34 Experts: All About Bridal Rings

depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2015.

36 Scene: Haute Looks on the Red Carpet

Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550,

38 Why Choose a True Jeweler for Your Timepiece? 40 Collecting: Time to Invest 42 Why Choose a True Jeweler for Service?

48

Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212-686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No

44 Perfect Gems

part of this magazine may be reproduced without written per-

46 Spirits: Engaging the Senses

mission of the publishers. Volume 13, Issue 1. Accent® is a trade-

48 Personalities: Kristin Chenoweth

mark of Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and

50 Why Choose a True Jeweler When it’s Time to Sell Your Jewelry? 52 Culture: Fashion Facelift

Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.


OYSTER PERPETUAL DATEJUST II

rolex

oyster perpetual and datejust are trademarks.


our reason for being MICHELLE HOLDGRAFER STORE DIRECTOR BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

Why choose a

TRUE JEWELER?

We believe that to be considered a True Jeweler, you have to be a creator of jewelry and not just a reseller. A True Jeweler has expertise in all aspects of jewelry manufacturing: from the design, to choosing the materials and sourcing the goods, to the crafting of the piece through final assembly. At Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels, every part of that process is done by our own craftsmen. That experience influences everything else we do, from choosing the brands we represent to conducting appraisals and valuations. So when you’re looking for the perfect piece of jewelry, there’s nobody who can serve you better than Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.

4


1954

OVER 60 YEARS OF CONTINUOUS INSPIRATION IN THE PURSUIT OF TECHNICAL PERFECTION

Heritage Black Bay is the direct descendant of TUDOR’s technical success in Greenland on the wrists of Royal Navy sailors. Over 60 years later, the Black Bay is ready to stand as its own legend.

TUDOR HERITAGE BLACK BAY® Self-winding mechanical movement, waterproof to 200 m, 41 mm steel case. Visit tudorwatch.com and explore more. TUDOR Watch U.S.A., LLC. New York

®


bruce g. weber precious jewels events

Tulsa’s Young Professionals Next/Now Fashion Show In its eighth year, Next/Now went to a new level in 2014 with the first ever Next/Now Fashion Show, featuring some of Tulsa's top creative talent. Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels was proud to help dress some of the models at the event, which took place at The Mayo Hotel in November. The show highlighted Tulsa’s up-and-coming fashion design students. Photos are courtesy of Casey Hanson Photography.

6


Bruce G. Weber Tennis Classic In its seventh year, the Bruce G. Weber Tennis Classic again raised funds for The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis. A kick-off party at the store commenced the event, and tournament players once again enjoyed the splendid facility at the Michael D. Case Tennis Center at the University of Tulsa.

7


caring for the community

By the Light OF THE SILVERY MOON The 25th anniversary of Indian Health Care Resource Center’s Dance of the Two Moons.

A

and reconnect to their rich Indian heritage and culture. For the vast majority of the 400 campers, such experiences would not be possible without the generous donors of the Dance of the Two Moons. Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels has been a longtime supporter of Native American youth and their families through Dance of the Two Moons. The 25th anniversary year was no different. Paddles were raised and hands waved as event goers bid on the splendid freshwater pearls donated by Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. “We are pleased to support the Dance of Two Moons,” stated Bruce G. Weber store director Michele Holdgrafer. “We are honored to help Tulsa’s Native American youth grow healthy and strong.” Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa is a nonprofit organization funded through private donations, third-party reimbursement and a contract with Indian Health Service. A full range of health services, including primary care, pediatrics, optometry, dentistry, pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, behavioral health, substance abuse prevention and treatment, health education and wellness, and programs for youth, are housed in the 56,000-square-foot clinic near downtown Tulsa.

record-breaking, fun-loving crowd enjoyed the glitter of silver at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Tulsa on February 21, 2015 for the 25th anniversary of Indian Health Care Resource Center’s Dance of the Two Moons. Guests began the evening by mingling and bidding on interesting items from the silent auction. The deep rhythmic pulse of the Native Nations Youth Council Drum Group welcomed all into the grand ballroom. Guests were seated among roses and silver as the memorable night began to unfold. The air was filled with anticipation and excitement as dinner was served, hearts were opened and the auctioneer approached the stage. The night ended with a packed dance floor, rocking and rolling to the best party band in the land. Dance of the Two Moons benefits many of the programs and services offered by Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa. The event is known, however, for funding the organization’s summer health, wellness and cultural camps for Native American youths. Camps provide extraordinary opportunities for children in elementary and middle school to learn about healthy lifestyles, leadership, team building and problem solving. Campers also experience new challenges, learn about sports and daily physical activities,

8


who we are

Charles WHITLEY BY CALEB HUNT

H

is eyes narrow in concentration. His nimble fingers, moving with surgical precision, augment his thoughts. A variety of hand tools lay at his disposal. Charles Whitley is a skilled artisan who understands that gold, the most malleable metal, offers unique opportunities to the bench jeweler. In 2000, Whitley graduated from the Texas Institute of Jewelry Technology, where he learned how to work with gold, silver and other precious metals as well as gems. Talented bench jewelers are skilled in a number of techniques, and Whitley is no exception to that rule. “I took an advanced stone-setting course about 10 years ago that really opened up a lot of different techniques and gave me much more confidence in setting diamonds than when I got out of school,” he says. “I am well rounded in all aspects of jewelry repair and fabrication, [but] excel in stone setting and general repair.” Perhaps more than anything else, though, Whitley surpasses most expectations. When a customer approaches him with an item of jewelry that has been run over by a car or nearly destroyed, Whitley relishes the opportunity to bring it back to life. “The look on a customer’s face when they have written their jewelry off, only to find out it can be fixed, is priceless.” Whitley’s success should come as no surprise; he sees everything as an experience, accepting what life offers and in turn making the best out

of it. Six years ago Whitley quit smoking. To fight the nicotine cravings, he picked up coin collecting, a time-consuming but otherwise harmless hobby that kept his hands busy. He would dig through foreign coin bulk bins at the coin store, and then put the coins he found in individual coin holders. (Whitley also researches each coin’s value, mintage and year, cataloging the findings in a spreadsheet on his computer.) “Whenever I pay cash for something, I get excited about the change I'm about to get back,” he said. There seems to be no end to Whitley’s curiosity and meticulousness. Reading a book series where he can become emotionally invested in the characters is a favorite pastime for Whitley—and in his opinion the longer the book, the better. Whether Whitley is repairing or making jewelry, reading a tome, or collecting coins, his hands and eyes are forever active. Tactile sensation and reinforcement have molded Whitley for most of his life, but never more clearly than now. “I have three children, and nothing is more satisfying than holding new life in your hands.”

10


This is the box

THAT, FOR OVER FORTY YEARS,

HAS REPRESENTED THE FINEST JEWELRY AND TIMEPIECES IN THE WORLD AND THE VERY BEST VALUES AVAILABLE.

AND FOR GENERATION AFTER

GENERATION OF CUSTOMERS, IT’S STILL THE ONE

1700 Utica Square, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74114

I

918-749-1700

I

they look for.

800-749-1771

I

www.brucegweber.com


special occasions

Spring GIFTS Create the perfect gift-giving moment.

12


Penny Preville pavé diamond bangle $6,185 Lagos dome ring $395

From top: Ippolita turquoise and diamond ring $795 Scott Kay rose gold diamond eternity band $2,530 David Yurman diamond pavé ring $895 Penny Preville diamond ear climbers $1,270 Rahaminov rose gold pavé diamond disc earrings $2,500

Lagos link necklace $925 Baume & Mercier mother-ofpearl watch $2,900

Bruce G. Weber mother’s rings, starting at $1,000 Bruce G. Weber rondelle mother’s bracelet (bracelet only) $295 Encore slides for mother’s bracelet, starting at $395 Birthstone enhancers with diamond halos starting at $395

13


Michael Bondanza Venti cuff links $3,800 David Yurman link necklace $525 Tourbillion movement cuff links $500

David Yurman Frontier knife $1,850

Stephen Webster Highwayman band $1,095 David Yurman Petrus bracelet $950 David Yurman forged carbon ring $575

Faber-Castell perfect pencil design brown gift set $45 Faber-Castell Ondoro wood pen $140

Tudor Black Bay watch with blue rotary bezel $3,100 Baume & Mercier Classima watch with alligator leather strap $1,750

14


for the

GRAD

Ippolita blue topaz pendant $795 David Yurman initial pendant $650 Ippolita amethyst pendant $650

Baume & Mercier Clifton watch with black leather strap $3,300 Rolex 41mm Datejust watch $7,150

Mikimoto Akoya pearl necklace $1,850 Bruce G. Weber Nuvola diamond studs $3,650 Bruce G. Weber Nuvola diamond pendant $1,950

Charles Krypell "I Love You" bangles $330 each Ippolita turqouise and diamond ring $595 Scott Kay amethyst ring $781 David Yurman Wheaton morganite and diamond ring $700

15


gifts

from the HEART Notable moms on Mother’s Day, push presents and their most memorable jewelry gifts. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE & JULIANNE PEPITONE

ROSIE POPE “I had my daughter, Vivienne, on Mother’s Day a couple of years ago. I would have to say she is my most memorable Mother’s Day gift! This year I am hoping for jewelry. Being a mom of four and running a business, I don’t have too much time to get ready in the morning. But with jewelry, I can throw earrings and bracelets on and feel a little more put together. “My favorites are four bracelets my children gave me with their names written on each one. The best part about them: my oldest wrote all the names out and they stamped each into the metal, all in his handwriting. It was a special gift because it was a way of the kids welcoming our youngest, Bridget.”

HEIDI KLUM “I’m always loving to be surprised. My kids do beautiful art; we have an art teacher who comes to our house every week and guides them. They’ve done beautiful clay pots that they designed and painted. Last Mother’s Day my kids painted on canvases. I love art, so they’re always making something beautiful for me. So that’s always, for me, the best. I don’t want them to go and buy something; I’d rather they make something for me.”

IVANKA TRUMP “My first Mother’s Day was obviously memorable, but last year was my favorite. Arabella was old enough that we could really spend the day together doing our favorite ‘girl things.’ It was also my first Mother’s Day with two kids. It felt so complete. “I have a special place in my heart for handmade gifts. I have Arabella’s artwork in my office and am always excited to add to my collection. That said, I think the best gift would simply be the day spent with my family—no phones, no internet, no distractions!—making breakfast, then exploring the city together. “I didn’t get ‘push presents’ when my children were born—the children are the best gifts I could ever receive! My husband did give Arabella a necklace when she was born and I keep it for her. She knows when she is old enough it’s hers, and until then, I always ask her before I borrow it! “The best jewelry I ever received was my engagement ring. It was purchased from my collection, which was a very supportive—and smart—move on my husband’s part.”

16


bringing it home

How We Choose

THE JEWELRY &TIMEPIECES WE CARRY Choosing the jewelry and timepieces we’ll offer at Bruce G. Weber is not something we take lightly. We travel the globe, attending the largest jewelry shows in the world, searching out designers and brands that hold the same values we do. We look for a combination of exceptional design, excellent craftsmanship and solid value, and we only represent designers who exhibit these traits. We spend years developing relationships with the brands. Oftentimes that means we can introduce our clients to some of the most famous names in the business, and we can offer oneof-a-kind or unusual pieces you won’t see anywhere else.

Designer Marco Bicego

Designer Charles Krypell

Diamond Cellar CEO Andy Johnson with Steve Shonebarger, former president of Corum (left) and Rudy Chavez, president of Baume & Mercier (right).

18

Left to right: buyer Laura Schmidbauer, designer Penny Preville and store director Michelle Holdgrafer.


Š 2015 John Hardy Limited

One of a kind. One at a time. Each by hand.


fashion

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR FASHION?

When it comes to providing the right fashions, a jeweler must be able to do three things: understand the global and local trends; choose the designers who best represent those trends; and make sure their pieces are produced with quality materials to be durable and hold the integrity of the design. At Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels, we use our experience and expertise to do all that, while still providing the very best value.

20


From top: Roberto Coin diamond cuff $6,400 Elizabeth Locke aquamarine necklace $5,225 Elizabeth Locke Emperor aquamarine ring $3,225 Elizabeth Locke Man-in-Moon pink stone enhancer $3,725 Penny Preville diamond gypsy earrings $14,665 Elizabeth Locke pearl enhancer $4,885 Elizabeth Locke Eros and Lion enhancer $4,725 On model: Penny Preville diamond starburst studs $3,585 Penny Preville diamond bar pendant $2,685 Penny Preville triangular diamond bar pendant $1,715

21


fashion From top: Roberto Coin rose gold and diamond collar $14,250 Roberto Coin mother-of-pearl cocktail ring $3,200 Roberto Coin mother-of-pearl and diamond earrings $6,400 Tara & Sons Inc. pearl and diamond bracelet $6,369 Christopher Designs morganite and diamond ring $8,250

22


spotted

Idina Menzel wears Forevermark during a performance at Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest.

As Seen On... Our favorite stars share a love for our favorite brands!

Sarah Jessica Parker wears Mikimoto at the Great American Songbook Gala.

Taraji P. Henson wears Tacori at the 46th Annual NAACP Image Awards.

Estelle wears David Yurman during a performance at the New Yorkers1 for Children Fall Gala.

IDINA MENZEL COURTESY OF DOMAIN LA; SARAH JESSICA PARKER BY PATRICK MCMULLAN COURTESY OF MIKIMOTO; TARAJI P. HENSON COURTESY OF MICHELLE MARIE PR

BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


COURTESY OF D’ORAZIO & ASSOCIATES

Cara Delevingne wears John Hardy at the Serpentine Gala Summer Party. Jennifer Lopez wears Harry Kotlar during an appearance on Ellen.

Hillary Clinton wears Marco Bicego at the Democratic Convention.

Kate Walsh wears Roberto Coin at The Hollywood Reporter’s Women In Entertainment: Power 100 Breakfast. 2


gifts

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR A MILESTONE OCCASION?

When it’s time to celebrate a milestone, the piece of jewelry has to represent the occasion perfectly. As a True Jeweler, we work to develop a relationship with you, to find out what exactly the moment means to you and your loved one. Then we tailor the piece to the moment. The ultimate goal is to match the jewelry to the feeling you’re trying to convey. To do that takes deep understanding of gemstones, metals and design.When it comes to a milestone gift, we leave nothing to chance.

26


Clockwise from top: Nova platinum diamond bracelet $83,525 Christopher Designs Crisscut diamond band $31,023 Christopher Designs Crisscut diamond ring $109,409 Diamond Cellar emerald and diamond ring $95,130 Sapphire and diamond earrings $12,500 Christopher Designs Crisscut diamond earrings $36,740 Rahaminov diamond ower ring $79,200 PavÊ diamond bracelet $52,000

27


trends

the new heirlooms

Today’s jewelry merges the best of past and present.

BY BETH BERNSTEIN

When considering buying fine jewelry, a woman should ask two important questions before making a purchase: Will the styles endure or at least make a comeback? And will they retain their intrinsic value? Renowned jewelry houses and savvy independent designers ask themselves these same questions before jumping on a new trend direction. For spring/summer 2015, the hottest jewelry styles possess these qualities and are part of an evolving trend we’ll call “The New Heirlooms.” This is jewelry that recalls the past with vintage silhouettes or antique details, but has been reworked with a current sensibility to appeal to today’s modern woman.

GO FOR THE GOLD

BRING ON THE BLING At the same time, we’re witnessing a return to Art Deco-inspired long, linear and ultra-clean shapes, many with fluidity of movement. These appear in white gold and feature varying cuts of diamonds, reminiscent of Cartier in the ’20s and ’30s. Cabochon and sugar loaf cuts of emeralds, sapphires, spinels and rubies are also trending. The cuts are generally set in white gold or platinum and featured in flexible bracelets, large stone rings, lariat necklaces and tassel earrings, which flow and swing when a woman turns her head. Arm bracelets and hand and hair jewelry are renewing this category with the youthful spirit it needs to inspire a new generation of fine jewelry devotees.

28

FROM TOP: ROBERTO COIN, MARCO BICEGO, IVANKA TRUMP, PENNY PREVILLE

At the auction and collector level, signed pieces by storied design houses (think Boucheron, Bulgari and Van Cleef & Arpels) have been fetching record prices. Inspired by the renewed demand for bold jewelry, chunky yellow gold styles are back in all of their adorning glory. Retro looks from the ’40s and ’50s, including single bracelets with multiple charms and large, intricately designed links, are back. For a fresh look, they can be stacked with early antique serpent styles that wrap several times around the wrist, or ’70s-style buckle bracelets. Looks popularized in the ’80s by designers such as Elsa Peretti and Paloma Picasso are being rethought in modern forms: wider-than-wide cuffs, knuckle rings and pendants that dangle at 32” or longer. Large hoop earrings in various oval, marquise, round and square shapes take on an organic feel, while stud earrings, stackable rings and bib necklaces all incorporate movement. Many also sport colored gemstones, which range from more muted varieties of labradorite and moonstone to fancy colored sapphires and various hues of tourmaline. There’s also a return to figurative Art Nouveau shapes with touches of enamel and intriguing color combinations.


POIS MOI COLLECTION


profile

Love on steroids

Diamond cuts so magnificent, they’re patented! BY ERIK DEFRUSCIO

A

rtist and jewelry designer Christopher Slowinski, known for creating innovative diamond cuts and settings, modestly insists that his best creations have happened by accident. “When I started out cutting diamonds, I was actually lousy at it; it was a mistake that led me to come up with a different arrangement of facets.” Slowinski, a native of Poland with an engineering background, moved to America in 1976 and apprenticed with a diamond cutter in New York City. He started out learning how to set stones, and after two years in the industry he opened a small contracting shop with a friend, doing mostly repairs and custom work. “I didn’t start with special skills but soon learned I had the ability to make a design better than the original—creating a better flow, tweaking the design to individual tastes.” Early in Slowinski’s career, he was sent a ring with princess-cut diamonds that had a few stones missing. “They thought I was a genius and could repair anything,” he recalls. “However, it wasn’t possible for me to save this ring.” From the frustration of not being able to fix it, Slowinski ultimately created his famous invisible setting, filing his first patent in 1991. “It was absolutely perfect. Most other rings had problems with lost stones, but I never lost stones with this setting.” Ultimately opening his own small shop and gradually building a collection, his breakthrough came in 1998 when he created a 77-facet diamond (vs. the generic 48), the first-ever modified step cut, for which he filed his second patent and which fast became a top seller. Ironically, he discovered this Crisscut diamond by mistakenly placing a diamond on the cutter the wrong way. “I messed up the stone but noticed how beautifully the erroneous triangle enhanced the light,” Slowinski explains, ripping and folding a sheet of paper in an attempt to demonstrate how a generic emerald cut becomes something else entirely. “I thought I had something special but I couldn’t get a cutter to make it. Finally, I went to Israel and had it made. It’s still a top seller.” He ultimately used a similar concept on round cuts, which required three years of work and four patents. A unique cut with 109 facets, the Brilliant Crisscut appears round but actually has 12 straight walls and 12 sides, creating the illusion of a scalloped border. Then, as Slowinski recalls, “I broke all the cutting rules,” coming up with yet another new cut where “light bounces off seven times inside the stone before exiting, greatly amplifying the stone’s brilliance.” This amazing diamond design, called L’Amour Crisscut, appears 40 to 50 percent larger than a comparably sized emerald-cut diamond and, as Slowinski puts it, “is so brilliant that it sells itself.”

What’s next for Slowisnski (who works with 60 craftsmen at his two facilities in Manhattan and personally inspects every stone that is cut and every setting cast)? “I think I can finally take a break,” he says, heading off to Europe to show his collection at Baselworld, the most prestigious jewelry show in the industry. A break? We don’t, for a second, believe him….

30

“FOR ME, TECHNOLOGY IS AS IMPORTANT AS AESTHETICS.” CHRISTOPHER SLOWINSKI, CHRISTOPHER DESIGNS


Four Exceptional Jewelers and a Collection of the World’s Best Brands, All Under One Umbrella.

Columbus, Ohio www.diamondcellar.com

The Woodlands, Texas www.donohos.com

Tulsa, Oklahoma www.brucegweber.com

Columbus, Ohio www.STORE5a.com

DIAMOND CELLAR HOLDINGS is a family of four of the finest jewelers in the United States. Each store has its own unique heritage, but together they represent almost 150 years of history in the jewelry business. We’ve built our reputation on excellent service, fine craftsmanship and unwavering integrity. That’s why the world’s top jewelry and watch brands trust us. And so can you. A. Jaffe Alex Woo Assael Pearls Baume & Mercier Bell & Ross Bovet Breitling Carla Amorim Cartier Charles Krypell Christian Bauer Christine Cooper Hill Christopher Designs Corum David Yurman Denise Robergé

Elizabeth Locke Forevermark Girard Perregaux Goldman Diana Graf von Faber-Castell Hermes Ippolita Ivanka Trump Jaeger-LeCoultre JB Star John Hardy Jonathan Birnbach Kwiat Lagos Lumninox

Marco Bicego Memoire Michael Bondanza Michele Mikimoto Montegrappa officine panerai Orbita Patek Philippe Penny Preville Pesavento Precision Set Raymond Weil Ritani Robert Procop

Roberto Coin Roberto Coin Cento Rolex Rustic Cuff Scott Kay Sterling & Bridal Soho Stephen Webster SUWA Swiss Army Tacori Tag Heuer Tara Pearls Tudor Tuum William Henry Studio


HowLong is FOREVER?

De Beers CEO Philippe Mellier talks challenges, long-term prospects and social responsibility. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

“THE PRODUCT WE SELL IS SCARCE AND BECOMING SCARCER.” PHILIPPE MELLIER, DE BEERS

32

What are the diamond industry’s most pressing challenges and how are you dealing with these? The growth in demand for diamonds will soon outpace supply; supply is forecast to plateau, and then decline after 2020. We are investing heavily in our production capacity: we’ve committed considerable capital to major expansion projects at our existing operations and to developing new deposits. In Botswana, we continue with our hugely important investment at Jwaneng which, we estimate, will deliver over 100 million extra carats from one of the world’s richest diamond mines. In South Africa, an underground project will extend the life of its largest diamond mine to 2044. In Canada, progress continues at one of the largest new developments in the diamond world, and we look forward to receiving the first production within a couple of years. We’ve recently opened a mine in Namibia after two years of development work. Where is this growth in demand coming from? The engine is the U.S., coupled with growing demand from the East as more Indian and Chinese middleclass consumers choose to purchase diamonds. How is the consumer landscape changing? The increasing polarization of wealth means that bridal jewelry and wealthier consumers are driving the U.S. growth today. There has also been a recent increase in consumer preferences for brands, which is why our partnership with Forevermark has been so successful. Generation Y and Millennial consumers, who will provide the oxygen for future U.S. demand for diamond jewelry, are looking for uniqueness and ethical reassurance in the products they buy. The Forevermark brand responds to their need for confidence, trust, quality and excitement. (We recently inscribed our millionth Forevermark diamond!) What responsibility do you feel toward countries whose natural resources you are developing? Our business model is built on partnerships with governments; we are extremely proud of what these partnerships have meant for the economic and social development in these nations. Diamonds represent over three quarters of total export earnings in Botswana and over a quarter of the total in Namibia. Our relationships in these nations are among the world’s most successful public-private partnerships.

FROM TOP: FOREVERMARK BY STEPHEN WEBSTER, FOREVERMARK EXCEPTIONAL DIAMOND JEWELRY BY RAHAMINOV

diamonds


© FOREVERMARK 2014 – 2015. FOREVERMARK®,

®, T H E D I A M O N D. T H E P R O M I S E .™ A R E T R A D E M A R K S O F T H E D E B E E R S G R O U P O F CO M PA N I E S .

A TRUE PROMISE WILL NEVER BE BROKEN

Forevermark is part of The De Beers Group of Companies.


experts

All About BRIDAL RINGS

Our magazine’s trend specialist is now wedding expert to the world.

L

orraine DePasque has a passion for jewelry: she’s been writing about it for most of her career and for many years in this magazine. So her recent appointment as about.com’s first-ever wedding bands and engagement rings expert comes as no surprise. Here, we chat with her about her new position and about the basics of buying bridal rings. Congrats on the new job! We always knew you were an expert… Thank you! About.com has roughly 900 experts, but I’m the first to specialize in engagement rings and wedding bands, which became a separate category on the site this past November. What are some of your favorite topics? I recently wrote about platinum, black diamonds and eco-friendly jewelry. Social responsibility is huge with the bridal demographic: they care about ethical sourcing, reclaimed metals, recycled materials, sustainability, etc. What’s the hottest trend in engagement rings for 2015? White metal is still number one, meaning platinum of course, but also white gold (14K and 18K). Yellow gold has also been trending for the past year or so, and estate jewelry is a growing piece of the business. There’s also more interest in natural colored diamonds (thanks to celebrity preferences) and even other colored gemstones. When Prince William presented Kate with his mother’s sapphire engagement ring, it was all about blue; this year, Pantone’s Color of the Year is Marsala, so rubies— equally as durable as sapphires—should be newly popular. How about diamond cuts: what’s popular now? Round is still the top trending cut: perhaps 80 percent of the business, followed by cushion cuts, followed by squares. But some of the older cuts, especially marquises and pear shapes, are starting to come back. The other continuing trend is halos: everything from a single halo around any cut stone, a multi-halo, or even an intricate floral halo. How are the trends evolving? It’s interesting. I learn a lot about consumer preferences from Pinterest, and when I recently posted two modern engagement rings (both platinum

with round diamond center stones, one tension set), the response was overwhelming. So while the majority of women have been leaning toward classic or retro, there’s a definite trend emerging toward contemporary. Another observation: this generation wants special, even customized, wedding jewelry. I truly believe there’s a special ring for everyone, which is why I love what I do. If there’s a particular way you’d like to customize your ring, talk with your jeweler about it; this is what they do every day and they can offer suggestions on personalization. What about trends in wedding bands? Personally, I like wraps if you plan to wear your band on the same finger as your engagement ring. But I’m seeing more and more women buying a slim band that may or may not match the engagement ring, especially if they plan on wearing that on the right hand. And women are putting other slim bands of all kinds on their jewelry wish lists, so their husband knows exactly what to buy for their first anniversary, birth of their first child, or even a birthday. Then you can stack them all with your wedding band, creating a dramatic right-hand ring! The whole stackable ring fashion look has sparked this trend, and it’s not going away anytime soon. Buying jewelry online is a controversial issue: what’s your opinion? While the internet is okay for research (but don’t believe everything you read!), I’d never suggest buying wedding jewelry online. There are so many elements that go into a ring; if you don’t work with a reputable jeweler, so much could go wrong. I’ve heard horror stories about chipped stones, stones that don’t line up, stones that don’t reflect light, insecure settings. So my best advice is to form a relationship with a trustworthy jeweler, a real person (or family) who’s been around awhile and who stands behind their work. After all, it’s the most important purchase you’ll ever make, a reflection of your personal style, and something you’ll be looking at every day of your life. Don’t risk it! For more information on wedding jewelry, check out engagementrings.about.com or brucegweber.com/collections/bridal.

34

FROM LEFT: STEPHEN WEBSTER, FOREVERMARK, STEPHEN WEBSTER, HARRY KOTLAR, TACORI

BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN


BIG

When it comes to important purchases, we know savvy shoppers appreciate financing options. We are pleased to provide the Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels Credit Card, one more way we can help make your dreams come true.

CREDIT CARD BENEFITS INCLUDE: • No annual fee • Special event offers • Instant credit available • Exclusive cardholder promotions

Call today and find out how Bruce G. Weber can provide you with enhanced purchasing power and flexible financing options. A card dedicated exclusively to your fine watch and jewelry purchases – all with the integrity and value that have been the cornerstone of Bruce G. Weber for over 40 years. • See store for details


scene

KATY PERRY

JULIANNE HOUGH

BELLAMY YOUNG

wore a Harry Kotlar fancy canary yellow diamond ring to the Grammys.

wore a David Yurman Petite PavĂŠ pinky ring to the Elle Women in Hollywood event.

wore a David Yurman Labyrinth gold dome ring to the Elle Women in Hollywood event.

HAUTE LOOKS ON 1


KAROLINA KURKOVA

TAYLOR SCHILLING

ZOOEY DESCHANEL

wore a Forevermark Cluster Shield diamond ring to an Art Basel party in Miami.

wore a Forevermark Exceptional Diamond Jewelry by Premier Gem ring to the Emmys.

wore a Forevermark by Maria Canale Aster Collection diamond ring to the Emmys.

THE RED CARPET Take a cue from these decorated digits and ring in spring! BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


timepieces

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR YOUR TIMEPIECE?

In the past, a timepiece was all about function. The more accurate, the better. Today, form and function are equal partners. Craftsmanship and engineering have elevated the watch movement into the realm of art. A True Jeweler can explain the different watch complications like the tourbillion, moon phase, or 40-hour power reserve. Our understanding of the engineering and various functions as well as metals, gemstones and design helps match the right watch to you, the wearer.

38


Counterclockwise from top: Tudor 42mm Heritage Advisor steel and titanium watch $5,850 Tudor 41mm Ranger watch with black dial on brown leather strap $2,825 David Yurman Revolution watch with three subdials on black rubber strap $5,800 Rolex 41mm Datejust watch with uted bezel and steel Oyster bracelet $9,100 Baume & Mercier Classima watch with steel bezel and black dial on black leather strap $1,750 Rolex 39mm Cellini Date watch on black alligator strap $17,700

39


collecting

time to

invest

Rolex Oyster Perpetual GMTMaster II, 40mm in stainless steel with rotatable black and blue ceramic bezel and Oysterlock bracelet.

Watchmaking history appeals to a new generation. BY WILLIAM BUCKLEY

P

hilatelists collect stamps and numismatists collect coins, but watch collectors, in the grand scheme of things, are a relatively new breed. Seismic shifts—from pocket watch to mechanical wristwatch to quartz and atomic movements—indicated the fading of each previous technology into obscurity. But by the end of the 1980s, manufacturers realized that there was a market for mechanical wristwatches both as timepiece and work of art. A new generation of consumers was excited by the craftsmanship of traditional horology, and the watch collector was born. Edward Faber, one of the leading experts on vintage watches and founder of the Aaron Faber Gallery in New York, explains, “Before 1930 watches were essentially pocket watches retrofitted to the wrist. With the advent of World War I, huge advances in technology were made in all areas, from automobiles to aviation, and watches soon followed suit. The nuances of jeweling and modern technology enabled watchmakers to integrate features like chronographs and moonphase calendars, and mechanical wristwatches entered their element.” But with the “quartz revolution” came a level of timekeeping accuracy that changed daily life. What began in 1929 with the quartz clock took 40 years to miniaturize, but in a few swift years mechanical watches began to look like they would become obsolete. “We’ve learned in this industry to fear new technologies, and for good reason,” explains Michael Friedman, historian for Audemars Piguet. “What we could accurately call the quartz revolution was known to many as the quartz crisis because it essentially wiped out the industry as we knew it; it took many years to evolve past that. But interestingly, what the quartz era in the 1970s really did was to liberate the watch industry. We’re now in an era of experimentation and expressionism largely because the accuracy problem was solved when the quartz watch debuted.” With smart watch production numbers in the tens of millions, manufacturers like Apple and Samsung are investing in the future of timekeeping. And whether or not smart watches become as ubiquitous as the quartz and mechanical movements before them, increased interest in traditional craftsmanship has secured the future of mechanical watches. “To connect with a timepiece, which may have plus or minus a few seconds per week but is part of horological history, is a strong statement,” insists Faber. “People in their 20s and 30s are looking at vintage Rolexes and IWCs and they’re excited to collect them, they’re excited to buy them. When they buy vintage watches, they’re also buying the stories behind them.”

40

Patek Philippe Ref. 5170G Men’s Chronograph with pulsometric scale. White gold with silvery white dial. Featuring Caliber CH 29-535 PS Mechanical manually wound movement.

WHAT COLLECTORS LOOK FOR Brand: This is the number-one consideration. Currently Patek Philippe and Rolex are most coveted. Papers and Presentation: Watches with their original papers and boxes in good condition are worth more. Metal: With only a few exceptions, platinum is number one, followed by rose gold, then yellow gold, then steel. Complications: Chronographs, moonphases, tourbillions etc. can increase a watch’s collectability. Rarity: The more mass-produced a watch is, the less desirable it is to a collector.


Plucked from nature. Choose your color. The colored stone jewelry jewelry collection, collection, exclusively exclusively the Diamond at Bruce G.at Weber Precious Cellar. Jewels


service

Why choose a True Jeweler

FOR SERVICE?

You can’t think about a True Jeweler without imagining a goldsmith at his bench repairing and creating jewelry. At Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels, we have one of the best in the country. We also understand that your jewelry is an old friend, a constant companion, the voice of someone from your past. That’s why we do all our service in-house, at our own bench. We won’t ship your friend off to a stranger when it needs service. 42

CHARLES WHITLEY GOLDSMITH BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS


PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Weight Carat 1.53

ColorE Grade Grade Clarity VS1

Grade CutExcellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621 Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

For over 80 years, GIA has brought clarity and global standards to gem evaluation. A GIA report means expert, independent verification from the creator of the 4Cs and the world’s most widely recognized gem authority.

Look for GIA-graded diamonds and jewelers who offer them.

CARLSBAD ANTWERP BANGKOK DUBAI GABORONE HONG KONG JOHANNESBURG LONDON MOSCOW MUMBAI NEW YORK OSAKA RAMAT GAN SEOUL TAIPEI TOKYO


PERFECTGEMS

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER. BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

SAY CHEESE

HUILE D’OLIVE—TRÈS CHIC!

Spain produces more than 100 different types of must-try cheeses including Quesos de Valdeon, a maple-leaf wrapped blue cheese made deep in the Picos de Europa, and the very sophisticated Sant Gil d’Albio, an artisanal goat’s milk cheese with luscious depth, great acidic balance, and hints of nuts and herbs. There’s even a perfect cheese for summer alfresco dining. Max McCalman, author of Mastering Cheese, says, "Manchego is my go-to cheese for a picnic. Simply irresistible, everyone loves Manchegos. They hold up well outdoors on a picnic and they are extremely nutritious. I prefer them between five and nine months of age, in particular Carpuela, a nine-month-old raw milk Manchego. It is versatile with a broad range of wines; for example, it pairs nicely with a Spanish Tempranillo."

On the southern slopes of the Alpilles Mountains near Provence is a wonderfully restored and very elegant 18th-century castle and estate, Château d’Estoublon. Traveling gourmands stop here for lunches paired with the château’s olive oil, which is not only delicious, but so stylish it’s offered in a couture spray flacon. Five olive varietals planted over 212 acres are hand selected, gathered in nets and processed within 24 hours of picking. (The green production method—processing olives harvested before they darken—brings out the full, fresh flavors.) Later this year, visitors won’t have to eat and run. The château will open to guests, offering the opportunity to spend a few days drinking wine, eating, touring the vineyards and olive groves (even picking olives for individual bottles of oil) and reveling in the beauty of Provence.

44


SPARKLING STRINGS

At his atelier in the little town of Deidesheim, Germany near the Rhine River, master craftsman Jens Ritter creates handmade guitars that are also works of contemporary art. His Eye of Horus bass, custom-designed for Phil Lesh of The Grateful Dead with black piano finish, silver Egyptian inlay and blue LED lights, is on display at the Smithsonian Institution, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired the Cremona bass guitar for their permanent collection. Ritter’s creations aren’t just for viewing. Prince, George Benson, Mary J. Blige, and the musicians behind Madonna, Christina Aguilera and Van Halen own (and play) Ritter’s guitars. For the reflective rock star, the Princess Isabella is made of German alder, mahogany and ebony with platinum inlays and is covered in over 7,000 Swarovski aquamarine crystals.

TOP HATS

No spring ’15 fashion show was complete without hats. From city streets to the beach, they’re everywhere. Be heads above the crowd with a hat by Angiolo Frasconi. Founded in Campi Bisenzio (one of the major centers of famed centuries-old Florentine straw hat production) just after World War II, Angiolo Frasconi has been a family-owned company for three generations, creating collections of handmade hats that are molto elegante. The designs combine handcrafted tradition, innovation and fine natural fibers— straw first and foremost—but also classical raw materials of the tradition: linens, cottons, felt, wool and cashmere expertly crafted and trimmed by hand. The new collection focuses on creativity and the best of Italian craftsmanship.

Donald Sultan, one of the world’s leading avant-garde artists, achieved fame in the late 1970s as part of the New Image movement. Known for elevating the still-life tradition through the deconstruction of his subjects and the use of industrial materials, he pushes the restrictions of his medium through gouging, sanding and buffing to create depth and texture. Sultan’s philosophy emphasizes “the impermanence of structure and the malleability of form...the whole oeuvre is a celebration of substances before they disappear.” Many of his pieces are on display, including those at the Art Institute of Chicago, The British Museum, the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This summer, Sultan will present his latest work, a sixfoot square creation utilizing black buttons on a modernistic surface, at New York’s prestigious Ryan Lee Gallery.

45

DONALD SULTAN, TILE AND AQUA LANTERNS, FEBRUARY 15, 2014

PUSHING THE RIGHT BUTTONS


spirits

Engaging the Senses

Drinking well isn’t just about great taste. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

enhances wine or cocktails, but there’s no doubt a heavy-cut crystal whisky glass or big red wine glass enhances our perception of the drink. Texture also plays a significant role: granular sugar is a plus on the rim of a Sidecar, but a minus in the drink (where liquid simple syrup is often used instead). Sound: People underestimate how much sound influences experience. To play with this sense, British bartender Tony Conigliaro experimented by serving the same drink against two different soundtracks (classical and techno), resulting in completely different tasting notes from attendees. Sense of Place: Terroir is a French word which suggests that wine, in particular, is influenced by soil, microclimates and even the personality of the winemaker. But we also experience a sense of context; visiting a winery or distillery can actually make the product taste “better,” because you now have a connection to the producer. A specific cocktail can induce memories of a perfect date or a great travel experience. Sense of Balance: Equilibrioception, regulated by the inner ear, is severely hampered by consuming too much alcohol. But there’s another sense of balance: one of balance in your cocktail, where all the elements— sweet and sour, alcohol and sugar, fruit and savory—come together perfectly. Learning to identify a balanced drink (or what a drink is lacking) goes a long way toward creating ideal food pairings. It even turns out that senses can do double duty. Synesthesia crosses wires, and allows those with that neurological condition to “hear” colors and “see” sounds. To some degree, we all do it: Green means “go” and fast food restaurants decorate in bright colors to make people hungrier and eat faster. Get to know your senses and how they work, and you’ll enjoy your drinking and dining experience in a whole new way.

46

GETTY1

I

f someone asks what senses are involved when you’re sipping a glass of wine or a cocktail, the correct answer is “all of them.” Taste, smell and sight are all pretty obvious. But touch (mouth feel, a chilled glass), sound (the bubbles in the glass, the crack and tumble of ice) and more come into play to truly round out your drinking experience. It turns out we rely on far more than five senses (maybe as many as 21) to make sense of the world. Thermoception, for example—our sense of hot and cold—turns out to be a completely different thing than our sense of touch. When it comes to enjoying a glass of wine or a cocktail, understanding how our senses interact goes a long way to understanding why we like or don’t like a particular food or drink. “Dimmer lighting in a bar can mask colors and aesthetics, causing the imbiber to rely on aromas, texture and flavors to engage with the drink,” says Pamela Wiznitzer, president of the New York branch of the U.S. Bartenders Guild and an M.S. candidate in food science at NYU. “Similarly, the sounds of cracking ice and shaking and straining a cocktail can cause a Pavlovian sensation. Bars that elevate the background music may drown out that component, leaving the guest with visual stimulation as the only option. It’s one reason why drinks at brightly lit rooftop and pool bars tend to rely on vivid colors and wild garnishes, while cocktail lounges emphasize complex, savory ingredients.” Sight: “Blind” tastings can be taken to an extreme at restaurants that offer “dining in the dark” options. A few years ago, Wiznitzer crafted a deconstructed Pisco Sour cocktail featuring reduced lime syrup and gelled pisco “pearls.” Guests put the drink together on their palate in total darkness for a new experience. Smell: An old trick has you pinch your nose shut to learn that an onion and an apple taste the same. Somewhere between 70 and 90 percent of what we “taste” actually happens with our olfactory nerves. Opus One winemaker Michael Salacci hires a parfumist to lead sensory training sessions and provide an outside opinion while blending the brand’s iconic Cabernet Sauvignon-based wine. Taste: The old “tongue map” (sweet at the tip of the tongue, salty on the sides, etc.) has been largely debunked by science. But it does turn out that different chemical reactions are responsible for differing tastes. Wired magazine’s August 2014 What’s Inside column noted that for the popular hot sauce sriracha, capsaicinoids in spicy peppers bind to TRPV1 receptors in nerve endings conveying touch, temperature and pain, while salt is probably interacting with ion channels in your taste buds. Touch: There’s a lot of debate on whether the “right” glassware actually


ONLINE!

Introducing a new way to shop at brucegweber.com

Shop our new website from your phone, tablet, or computer to ďŹ nd the best in bridal, fashion, watches, unique gifts, and much more! Create a wishlist, or join the conversation by connecting to us on social media or following our blog.


personalities

Right: Chenoweth’s 2014 CD release of career favorites.

Diminutive

Diva

Kristin Chenoweth’s big voice and bright smile have been lighting up stages and screens for decades. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

W

hat Kristin Chenoweth lacks in height she makes up for in vocal power, acting ability and fashion sense. The 4'11'', 46-year-old superstar has thrilled Broadway audiences with her work in such shows as You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown (which earned her a Tony), Wicked and Promises, Promises. She’s also a frequent TV and film actress, best known for her roles as Annabeth in The West Wing, Courtney in Four Christmases, Olive Snook in Pushing Daisies (for which she won an Emmy) and April in Glee. And did we mention she regularly sells out concert halls and major arenas? Last fall, Chenoweth released her latest CD, Coming Home, a concert version of which also aired as a PBS special. She’s currently appearing on Broadway opposite Peter Gallagher as

48


From top: Chenoweth in The Good Wife; with Peter Gallagher in On the Twentieth Century; in Glee; as Glinda the Good in Wicked.

tempestuous 1930s film star Lily Garland in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of the hit musical On the Twentieth Century. Accent recently caught up with Chenoweth to chat about her career, her fashion choices and her favorite pieces of jewelry. The character of Lily Garland in On the Twentieth Century has long been on your radar. How does it feel to finally get the chance to portray her on Broadway? It’s definitely been on my bucket list. The composers, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, told me before they passed away that I was the next rightful owner of that role. I’ve always kept that in the back of my mind, and it seemed like now the time was right. And here I am doing it! I’m very nervous, because it’s a difficult score to sing, and there’s some major physical comedy. When you play a character like Lily, who is a bit of a diva, which parts of your personality do you draw from? I guess there is strength in me that I can only see at times when I’m being pushed to the limit, and Lily is a push-to-thelimit type of character. And vocally she’s a soprano, so that is right in my wheelhouse. The character you’re best known for may be Glinda from Wicked. Do you ever get tired of singing songs from that show at your concerts? Sometimes I wonder if the audience really wants to hear Popular again, but they prove me wrong every time. They always do! How did you choose which songs to record for Coming Home? It’s a culmination of songs I’ve been singing my whole life, so it’s more of a career record. Gospel music is a big part of my life, so I included a song I grew up singing, Little Sparrow, which is a tribute to Dolly Parton. There’s Somewhere Over the Rainbow, which I’ve been singing since I was itty-bitty. And I Could’ve Danced All Night from My Fair Lady shows my vocal training. Everything I do is represented on that album. What are your favorite things to do off-stage? When I need to get away, I like to go to Cabo San Lucas and lie by the pool and drink margaritas and hang out and eat. I also like to just stay in bed and watch TV. Tell us about your sense of fashion, both in real life and on the red carpet. I keep it pretty simple. I think simple is better when you’re petite. And I like to mix and match. If I get a dress from Zara, then I’ll pair it with Christian Louboutin shoes. Do you have a surefire look for attracting attention? I don’t think cleavage ever hurts. How do you use jewelry to complete a look, and what are some of your favorite pieces? I don’t do a lot of big jewelry unless I’m on stage. Personally, I like smaller stacked necklaces and rings. I have a brand-new pair of broken arrow earrings that my friends gave me knowing I’m from a little town in Oklahoma called Broken Arrow, so currently those are my favorite. Have you inherited any family jewelry heirlooms that mean something particularly special to you? There is a black onyx ring that my grandma had. She gave it to my mom and my mom, not too long ago, gave it to me. That’s one of my prized possessions. So is another ring that my grandma had throughout her life; it’s an opal with diamonds around it. Those are the kind of things on which you can’t put a monetary value.

49

“Sometimes I wonder if the audience really wants to hear Popular again.. . they always do!”


service

Why choose a True Jeweler

WHEN IT’STIMETO SELLYOUR JEWELRY? You can easily sell your unwanted jewelry to someone who will dismantle it and use the metal and gemstones for other projects. We do that too sometimes, when appropriate. But since we understand fashion, we’re always looking for older designs that are still beautiful. Our craftsmen can refurbish an old piece, repair it when needed and bring it back to life. In the end, you get more money for your unwanted jewelry, and we find it a new home with somebody who will truly appreciate it. We get to make two people happy. Items shown available at STORE5a.com

50


culture

Italy’s designers step up to preserve cultural landmarks. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

L

ast spring, in the wake of crippling recessions, Matteo Renzi, Italy’s newest (and youngest) prime minister, called on the private sector to help fund emergency restoration of collapsing structures in the ancient wonder that is the buried city of Pompeii. Heavy rains and flooding had caused severe damage, and the government was unable to cover the whole bill. Now the program is expanding to the country’s museums, fountains and other icons, particularly in Rome. And its fashion giants—including Fendi, Bulgari and Tod’s—are stepping up to the plate. While corporate sponsorship of public projects is nothing new in the U.S., it’s fairly unprecedented in Italy, where there’s a resistance to mixing private and government programs. “The ideological refusal to permit the private sector to intervene—as if only the public sector could guarantee the guardianship of heritage—must end,” Renzi announced last March. Soon after, luxury jeweler Bulgari said it would put $2 million toward an extensive refurbishment of the storied Spanish Steps in the Piazza di Spagna, where decades of heavy traffic have taken a toll on the 290-year-old structure. Scheduled to begin this year, it will help celebrate Bulgari’s 130th anniversary as a “special gift from

Roberto Cavalli held a runway show beneath Milan’s Arch of Peace and donated $120,000 towards its restoration.

GETTY 1; RUNWAY IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIES DIRECTIONS

Fashion Facelift

Bulgari to its city,” CEO Jean-Christophe Babin said in a statement. These gestures are not completely without precedent: In 2010, Roberto Cavalli presented his collection beneath Milan’s Arch of Peace in exchange for a $120,000 donation toward its restoration. What’s changed is the scale—and the ability to do some branding during construction. Tod’s, the shoe company famous for its elegant driving moccasins, announced it is helping to finance a series of projects at Rome’s 2,000-yearold Colosseum. Plans for the $30 million comprehensive restoration have been in the works since 2012. (They met with some controversy, since part of the agreement involves promotional opportunties for Tod’s in exchange for the funding.) A series of restorations of the site’s arches, facades and entrances will keep the famous amphitheater partially shrouded in scaffolding for over two years. In the end, though, the city should be able to enjoy its massive monument for another few millennia. And last summer, Fendi announced it would dedicate almost $3 million to a restoration of the Trevi Fountain, the Neptune-and-chariot adorned destination built in the 18th century and made famous in the films La Dolce Vita and Three Coins in the Fountain. While tourists might lament visiting the site while it’s drained and under scaffolding, it’s also possible they’ll catch Fendi’s creative genius Karl Lagerfeld, who loves photographing Rome’s fountains. For Fendi, restoring the city’s fountains (more projects are planned) makes sense. Insists Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director of accessories and thirdgeneration designer, “It’s our duty to pay tribute to the city of Rome which has given us so much.”

52


CENTO COLLECTION


© D.YURMAN 2015


BRUCE G. WEBER ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2015

Bruce G Weber  

The Magazine of Life's Celebrations