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FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 2 T H E M AG A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S

Roaring Twenties Redux Holiday Best Bets Cabaret Renaissance

FALL FOR

COLOR!


Contents fall/winter 2012

S T O R E L O C AT I O N S : P L A Z A AT P R E S T O N C E N T E R 8400 PRESTON ROAD DALLAS, TX 75225 214-692-8400 GALLERIA LEVEL 1 13350 DALLAS PARKWAY DALLAS, TX 75240 972-392-9900 S H O P S AT L E G A C Y– N O R T H 7401 LONE STAR DRIVE PLANO, TX 75024 972-596-2090

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R HANS GSCHLIESSER MANAGING EDITOR

FEATURES

BRIDAL SECTION

4

Welcome Letter

6

Best Bets

26 The Traditions: Worldwide Weddings

8

Events

12 From the Runways 16 Trends: Roaring Twenties Redux 20 Red Carpet: Standout Style 22 Timepieces: David Yurman 24 Designer Profile: Aaron Basha 40 Perfect Gems 42 Photography: Always in Fashion

32 The Details: Something Even Newer

PROJECT MANAGER LISA MONTEMORRA DESIGNERS CYNTHIA LUCERO JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI PRODUCTION MANAGER PEG EADIE

35 The Invitations: Set the Tone

PRESIDENT AND CEO

36 The Beauty: Inner Glow

CHAIRMAN AND COO

38 The Stories: Wedding Day Magic

BRITTON JONES

MAC BRIGHTON Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2012. Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550,

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ers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited

56 Speed: The Thrill of Victory

manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the

58 Perks: Fly in Style

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62 End Page: Working It

Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.

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COVER IMAGE COURTESY DOVES

10 Testimonial: A Stunning Surprise

28 The Rings: New and Non-Traditional

JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


©2012 CHANEL®, Inc. J 12®

Watch in white high-tech ceramic set with 54 diamonds (~1.4 carat). Self-winding mechanical movement. 42-hour power reserve. Water-resistant to 50 meters.


WELCOME

TO OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS,

O

nce again, I’m thrilled to welcome you to our latest edition of Accent magazine, our way of introducing you to the best of our beautiful new products, and keeping you informed of the latest happenings at Bachendorf’s. On that note, we’re happy to report that we have just completed our new Rolex boutique at The Galleria Mall in Dallas. It features the latest prototype marble showcases along with other beautiful details, and is a wonderful addition to the store. I encourage you to visit it in person to get a true sense of this amazing space. During the construction, I’ve been working to create a better shopping experience. We have added several new jewelry lines including Lisa Nik, Bizzotto, Marco Bicego, Konstantino and Phillips Frankel, adding to the great jewelry and watch brands we already offer. Additionally, our Plano store has seen a tremendous increase in traffic, partially thanks to all the great shops and restaurants alongside us in the shopping center. Many of you didn't realize that we moved to the Shops at Legacy a few years ago. It's worth a visit if you’ve never been there. Most importantly, we strive to provide the best experience and customer service at all of our stores. From the simplest repair to the most complicated handcrafted jewelry item, Bachendorf's employees are waiting to assist you. Our goal is to create an enjoyable experience for all. Lawrence Bock President

The Galleria Mall - Level 1 13350 Dallas Parkway Dallas, TX 75240 (972) 392-9900

Shops at Legacy – North 7401 Lone Star Drive Plano, TX 75024 (972) 596-2090

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Plaza at Preston Center 8400 Preston Road Dallas, TX 75225 (214) 692-8400


BACHENDORF’S

BestBets

DOVES 18k white gold diamond ring featuring checkercut clear white topaz set over natural Arizona turquoise

ROBERTO COIN Ipanema necklace in 18K yellow gold with semiprecious stones, and Ipanema circle drop earrings shown in green amethyst and purple amethyst

TW STEEL CEO Diver 44mm watch with titanium PVD case and bezel, sapphire exhibition case back, multifunction automatic Miyota cal.9100 movement, water resistant to 100m

FALLON COLLECTION Stackable diamond cuff bracelets

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MICHELE Deco Diamond timepiece featured on a signature garnet alligator strap

PENNY PREVILLE 18K gold all-beaded pear-shaped emerald cluster earrings with diamond prong top

MARCO BICEGO 18k hand-engraved yellow gold Siviglia necklace

MIKIMOTO Akoya cultured pearls with diamonds set in 18K white gold, from the Petit Soleil collection

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EVENTS AT BACHENDORF’S BACHENDORF'S CELEBRATED THE GRAND OPENING OF DALLAS' ONLY OFFICIAL ROLEX SALON ON JUNE 28, 2012, AT OUR LOCATION IN THE GALLERIA MALL

BACHENDORF'S PROUDLY SPONSORS THE SMU MUSTANGS 2012-2013 SEASON

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BACHENDORF’S DALLAS DIAMOND DASH 2012 WINNERS BRETT HOELTING AND LAUREN LAWSON WITH LAWRENCE BOCK, AND THE 2ND ANNUAL DALLAS DIAMOND DASH PARTICIPANTS

BACHENDORF’S HOSTED THE LA FIESTA EVENT AND DONATED MIKIMOTO PEARL EARRINGS TO 40 OF THE DUCHESSES

WINGS & WHEELS LIFESTYLE EVENT AT MILLION AIR DALLAS

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TESTIMONIAL

A STUNNING SURPRISE I can’t thank you enough for your advice and expertise in helping me choose an engagement ring for the love of my life. Not only did she say “YES!” but she too is crazy about the diamond. The ring set the tone for an incredible day, when I asked Lauren to marry me at the spot where we first met. Arranging a “tailgate” tent on the SMU Boulevard and including several family heirlooms, the proposal was special in every way; we even had a mariachi band to serenade us in the moment! As the Champagne was uncorked, the surprises continued as our parents and families ran in from their hiding spots in the distance. It was the perfect day and it could not have happened without your help. Many thanks, Preston Phillips 10

CINNAMON PHOTOGRAPHY

Dear Amy,


FROM THE RUNWAYS

Color FALL FOR


Signature Collection

Rock Tradition.


Cuffs AND COLLARS

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TRENDS

Nicole Kidman wears Deco-inspired earrings

ROARING TWENTIES REDUX THIS YEAR’S FUN-TO-WEAR FASHION MOVEMENT.

F

rom fashion to jewelry, Art Deco is currently the leading style inspiration. “And come this spring and summer, it will get stronger, then even bigger by fall/winter 2013,” says Ellen Sideri, CEO of ESP Trendlab in New York City, which tracks fashion trends and cultural patterns. Interestingly, the real excitement isn’t about original vintage jewelry and fashion, but rather contemporary styles inspired by that roarin’ era of the 1920s and ’30s. It’s more “Deco redefined.” Each in its own signature style, luxury brands are creating modern collections based on design elements that defined the Deco movement: streamlined shapes, a strong color palette, graphic patterns, geometric stone cuts, linear symmetry, elongated silhouettes and ancient Egyptian and Aztec forms.

designer after another using the 1920s (and the 1910s) as their muse.” For his fall/winter haute couture collection, Jean Paul Gaultier has embraced the period in a big way, with highly graphic gold metal cage designs pieced into dresses and jackets, as well as softer glam flapper looks. And Alexander McQueen’s 2013 resort collection spectacularly marries Art Deco with inspirations from the linear work of the legendary Gustav Klimt. Amanda Gizzi, director of communications for the Jewelry Information Center in New York, explains: “As our country has been coming out of difficult economic times, more and more customers are asking for jewelry that isn’t cookie-cutter. And these modern pieces, which are influenced by Deco but a bit edgier, are perfectly suited to what they want.”

FILM AND FASHION INFLUENCES

THE “NEW DECO” LOOK

Before we tell you what you should look for and how to wear it, let’s explore the big question of why Deco, why now? What brought on jewelry’s obsession with the brilliance of the Jazz Age? In spring 2013, The Great Gatsby remake hits theatres and, with A-lister Leonardo DiCaprio starring as Jay Gatsby, Art Deco designs will be very much in the spotlight. Added to that, in both ready-to-wear and couture for 2012/2013, Art Deco references ruled the runways. Sideri notes, “We’re seeing lots of beads, feathers, and embroidery—but elegant and luxurious—with one

To do New Deco, there are a few jewelry items you want on your wish list: TASSEL EARRINGS AND PENDANTS Swinging tassel earrings and

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Above from left: Stephen Webster Cascade tassel earrings with blue sapphires and white diamonds in 18K white gold from the Forget Me Knot collection; Stephen Webster Forget Me Knot Cascade pendant in 18K white gold; Ivanka Trump black onyx pendant from the Gilded Cage collection in 18K gold

IMAGE.NET BY GETTY

BY LORRAINE DEPASQUE


freelancer collection


pendants were the perfect complements to high-hemline dresses, and today you’ll find lots of colorful versions in whatever gemstone you like. ROPES OF PEARLS If you already have a strand of opera-length pearls, think Clara Bow or Daisy Buchanan and drape them on! Then be sure to get another long rope of pearls to layer in; finish the look by knotting that second strand. The knotted pearl necklace is back! DANGLY COLORED-GEM DROPS “Deco earrings are always very desirable at auction,” says Ann Lange, senior vice president and director of jewelry for the prestigious auction house Doyle New York. “The linear hanging kind, because they’re simple yet they have strong design.”

especially emerald cuts. “In our Important Estate Jewelry auctions, the top three diamond cuts in original Art Deco are emerald, Asscher and cushion,” says Lange. “Emerald cuts are forever classics, and I’m seeing a lot of interest in contemporary jewelry with cushion cuts.” Step-cut shapes like trapezoids and half-moons are often seen as side stones in Deco designs, so this year and going forward, you’ll see them in the New Deco collections, too. Actress Sofia Vergara’s engagement ring, for example, features a cushion-cut center stone with a trapezoid diamond on either side. COLORS Deco jewelry tends to rely on bold gemstone colors, in contrast to the austerity of the Edwardian period that From Jean Paul preceded the Roaring ’20s. The most Gaultier’s Paris notable shades are black, green, red Haute Couture and blue, plus white, which, if done in collection fall/winter 2012 enamel, for example, can impart a distinctive boldness. Black: Onyx was perhaps the most widely used black gemstone during the 1920s and ’30s, so some New Deco pieces incorporate it, too. But they more often feature black diamonds, black sapphires and black opals. Green: “Carved jade was [used] in a lot of vintage Deco,” notes Lange, so modern jewelry artisans are favoring this green variety as well. But emeralds and agates are two other green favorites. This year, in fact, emeralds are so hot in fashion that it may even be difficult for May-born women (whose birthstone is emerald) to get their hands on it! Red: Rubies, ruby-red enamels and deep red corals top the list of must-have New Deco reds, but especially ruby, as Lange notes, “because there were a lot of Burma rubies in original Art Deco jewelry.” Gizzi adds, “Since this movement started to grow, I’ve seen a lot more dark-red corals in jewelry—something I hadn’t seen in a long time.” Blue: Look for primary-color blue gems, like lapis-lazuli and sapphire, but also cobalt blue alternative materials like enamel, resin and ceramic. A wealth of lapis jewelry was found in King Tut’s tomb, a key reason the blue gem became an important influence on jewelry of the period. White: Rock crystal, white pearls and white diamonds top New Deco’s white stone list. “Certainly, rock crystal was used a lot in Art Deco—it was very prized then and it is now, too,” says Lange. “There were also lots of natural pearls back then.” Consider, too, some of the New Deco pieces that mix black Tahitian pearls with white metal, as the black-and-white color scheme was a key color combination then and now.

DIAMOND CASCADE EARRINGS In the ’20s and ’30s, women often donned earrings made of cascading diamonds to add femininity to their newly invogue short bobbed haircuts. Back then, diamond chandeliers (as they’re now known) replaced ear clips, hair combs and hat pins.

BIG GEOMETRIC RINGS Rings were large and rectangular, and women often wore several on one hand. For evening, oversized emeralds and rubies played a strong role, in white or yellow metal. Contemporary Deco jewelry gives you lots of price options, with many brands even making Deco-style uber-rings with sterling silver and natural gemstones.

BANGLES AND BRACELETS When women started wearing sleeveless styles, bracelets became an important accessory. Bangles were clustered on their wrists or higher on the upper arms. As for flexible gemstone bracelets, Lange says, “Deco diamond bracelets are also very desirable at our auctions; the workmanship was exceptional.” DECO-THEME PIECES If you’re someone who likes to wear symbolic jewelry, there’s a lot of New Deco pieces inspired by the iconography of the ’20s and ’30s, skyscrapers like the Eiffel Tower and the Chrysler Building á la the era’s unique architectural movement. Or choose something unique with carvings or silhouettes of pyramids, obelisks, palm fronds and lotus flowers—motifs that often appeared in period pieces, influenced by the 1922 discovery of King Tut’s tomb.

NEW DECO CUTS & COLORS

CUTS With the exception of tiny beads used for tassels, reminiscent of renowned Deco jewelers like Jean Fouquet, the geometric bent of Art Deco jewelry design is typically achieved by incorporating angular stones,

Above: Gurhan Lotus collection necklace; Lagos ring

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RED CARPET

Standout Style

WITH MEGAWATT SMILES AND FASHIONS TO MATCH, THESE STARS CAN’T HELP BUT CATCH YOUR EYE. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

P

ADRIEN BRODY

MARIA MENOUNOS

roof positive that socialite and reality TV personality Olivia Palermo deserves her reputation as a trendsetter. At Fabergé’s party in the Loft & Garden atop Rockefeller Center, her outfit was simple but stylish, featuring subtle nautical details perfectly

complemented by a large link necklace, pretty bangles and statement-making cocktail ring. In a classic tuxedo and Audemars Piguet Royal Oak timepiece, Adrien Brody looks every bit the consummate gentleman. Over 150 guests joined the Academy Award-winning actor at a black tie gala in Milan to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the iconic watch design. On the rooftop of New York City’s STK, Maria Menounos brought star power to the launch 20

GETTY FOR FABERGE; JACOPO RAULE/GETTY FOR AUDEMARS PIGUET; FINDYOURFACEMATE.COM

OLIVIA PALERMO


RED CARPET party for dating site findyourfacemate.com. Her stack of mixed-material bracelets was right on trend, while her dainty and delicate white gold necklace flashed a subtle show of sparkle to those lucky enough to get close. Golden goddess Frida Pinto (with boyfriend Dev Patel at the world premiere of her film Black Gold in Qatar) chose bold bangles to play up the braided trim on her ethereal gown. The result: a look that’s both flowing and glowing.

SEAN GALLUP/GETTY; JAEGER-LECOULTRE; ANDREAS RENTZ/GETTY

FRIDA PINTO AND DEV PATEL

DIANE KRUGER

JESSICA ALBA

As a juror at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, Diane Kruger was expected to walk every red carpet...and she didn’t disappoint. This heavenly sheath was just one of many wow-worthy ensembles she chose. In order to let floral appliqués and feathers take the spotlight, Kruger accessorized simply with a sparkly clutch and vintage Jaeger-LeCoultre timepiece. In a white hot curve-hugging dress and jewelry inspired by Princesse Grace de Monaco, actress Jessica Alba looked like royalty at a party hosted by Montblanc in Beijing. 21


TIMEPIECES

When and why did David Yurman enter the timepiece business? We entered the business in 1994 with the introduction of the Cable collection, a bracelet that ticks. In 2000 we launched the Thoroughbred collection, our first traditional watches, addressing what we saw as a void in the market. No one was doing iconic timepieces rooted in the tradition of fine Swiss watchmaking, but with an American design sensibility. Is that what makes Yurman watches so special? Yes. David Yurman is America’s only fine timepiece designer and to us, that in itself is special. The Yurman brand has always been inspired by American art and design and our timepiece collections adhere to this aesthetic. Each watch is treated like a piece of art, reflecting David Yurman’s casual sense of luxury and high standards of precision. At the heart of our timepieces is our commitment to quality, design and innovation. From the Classic Ancestrale to the Revolution collection, each watch combines the precision of Swiss movements and manufacturing with sophisticated American design. Tell us about your passion for classic cars and motorsports, and the launch of Shelby Revolution? Cars have always been a passion of mine. I enjoy the mechanical nature of cars. They’re a lot like timepieces in that way—thousands of machined parts coming together to create one cohesive mechanical movement. The Shelby Revolution watch collection came about because Shelby is an iconic American brand and I wanted to celebrate their achievements and the mark they’ve left on American design.

EVAN YURMAN ON WATCHES, CARS AND PERSONAL FAVORITES. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

AMERICAN DESIGN

What are your best-selling watch styles at the moment? The new Revolution collection has had an incredible response, both the automatic and the chronograph. We offer it in a number of variations, including a beautiful rose gold case. The Shelby, which is a limited edition within the Revolution collection, is extremely popular and is mostly reserved on pre-order. What’s your personal favorite watch these days and why? Recently, I’ve been wearing a steel chronograph Revolution with a bracelet. It has a beautiful, clean aesthetic and I like the heft and feel of it. Plus it’s a sport watch, so I also appreciate its ruggedness.

“I enjoy the mechanical nature of cars. They’re a lot like timepieces: thousands of machined parts coming together to create one cohesive mechanical movement.” –Evan Yurman, Director of Design, Men’s and Timepieces, David Yurman

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EVAN AND DAVID YURMAN

And your personal favorite car? There are so many beautiful cars out there that it’s difficult to pick one, but my favorite genre is certainly American muscle. There’s an elegant simplicity to American muscle cars, both vintage and modern, that I find appealing. It’s that simple design that makes it so easy for owners to customize and improve them, and essentially express their own personalities.


DESIGNER PROFILE

THE PRINCE OF CHARMS

W

ith his distinguished good looks and old-world charm, it’s little wonder that Aaron Basha has established himself as a major player in the world of fine jewelry. Under his impassioned leadership, the Aaron Basha collection has flourished, appealing to people across the globe. His charm, wit, charisma, sophistication, personal style and vision have helped propel the brand from New York to Europe to Dubai and beyond. Basha is most famous for his signature collection baby shoe charms, worn by celebrities, in-the-know mothers and adoring grandmothers the world over. Since 1990, he has designed these fine jewelry charms, charm bracelets and charm necklaces in addition to his trendsetting collection of evil eyes— the ancient talisman of good luck—as well as an exquisite collection of unforgettable, one-of-a-kind couture pieces. The Aaron Basha collections are diverse, but each piece is infused with wit and whimsy and is designed to celebrate life, love and good fortune. Basha prides himself on seeking out the joy in life. Whether in the everyday or in life’s most celebrated moments, his personal style reflects his outlook. He believes in fanciful, whimsical, mystical elegance. “To me, the point of dressing with style is about effortless pleasure and pure delight. From our signature baby shoe charms to our evil eye collection to our array of shirt studs and cuff links, we make dressing well an act of expressing whimsy and enjoyment. We are in the business of elegance, but we are also in the business of fun.

“What is life, without marking life’s milestones?” he asks. “Moments of celebration come and go, but the charms worn by our customers serve as daily remembrances of life’s most precious moments. Our charms create a visual biography signifying the touchstones along life’s path. They are woven into the fabric of life, given by mothers and fathers to daughters, husbands to wives, and children to their parents. Children grow up knowing which charm is ‘theirs’ and thus form a lifelong bond with our brand. The charms become loving representations that are cherished and handed down from generation to generation.” Born in 1930 to parents both in the jewelry business, Basha had an appreciation for fine metals and precious gems in his blood. Trained and certified as a master diamond cutter by age 16, it was evident that he had inherited the family gift. This gift, along with his passion for travel, adventure and seeking new experiences across the globe, would shape his future. In the 1970s, Basha opened his first boutique in Canada, and in the ’80s, he opened another in London’s tony Mayfair district. But wherever he roamed, one thing remained constant: his love of family and his appreciation of life’s most precious moments. To celebrate the birth of his first grandchild, Basha crafted a stunning baby shoe of gold and diamonds for his wife to wear as a charm. And so the iconic Aaron Basha baby shoe charm was born. “I am most happy,” Basha reveals, “when I can help people find the perfect piece to express what is in their hearts.”

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NOLET’S GIN

AARON BASHA HAS MARRIED HIS PASSION FOR THE ART OF WHIMSY WITH HIS LOVE OF FAMILY, RESULTING IN A COLLECTION THAT CELEBRATES LIFE.


WEDDINGS

STORY PHOTOGRAPHERS

A SPECIAL BRIDAL SECTION FROM ACCENT MAGAZINE


THE TRADITIONS

BY JACQUELIN CARNEGIE

Worldwide Weddings

INDIA TOURISM OFFICE, NY

BIG-DAY CUSTOMS FROM CENTURIES-OLD CULTURES.

lthough American-style weddings have gained popularity throughout the world, many countries retain their own colorful wedding traditions. These customs can vary from region to region and according to local religious traditions, but it’s interesting to note that almost all cultures have some version of “tying the knot.” A current trend in the U.S. is to research one’s family heritage and incorporate some of the noteworthy elements into a Western-style ceremony, or to replicate a traditional wedding outright. Here are a few highlights from centuries of tradition around the globe.

Hindu woman is married involve jewelry: Mangalsutra: black and gold beaded necklace with a gold or diamond pendant. The groom ties it around the bride’s neck during the ceremony; it’s comparable to a Western-style wedding ring. Bangles: gold and glass, often studded with precious and semi-precious stones such as diamonds, gems and pearls; mandatory, signifying long life for the husband. Armlets: encrusted with jewels or hanging crystals. Bichiya: toe rings worn as a symbol of the married state along with Anklets on both feet. Mang Tika: gold pendant adorned with jewels that hangs in the middle of the forehead. Nose Ring: an essential In many cultures, before the INDIA gold accessory in the left nostril. Rani Haar: gold wedding, the women gather Indian weddings are planned in accordance with filigree necklace with precious stones symbolizing at the bride’s house for a age-old customs and are known to be some of the prosperity. Earrings and Jhoomar: a piece of henna party with singing most beautiful and lavish. Weddings usually last five jewelry with gems worn on the side of the head; and dancing. The bride’s hands and feet are covered days with a number of rituals before, during and matches the design of the rani haar necklace. Waist with beautiful after the ceremony. The bride is adorned with lots of Band: like a necklace around the belly studded with henna designs. gold jewelry to symbolize wealth (a wearable “savings precious or semi-precious stones. Rings: worn on both account”) and purity. The gold given to the bride by her hands, attached to a bracelet by a central medallion. family, which they often start acquiring as soon as she’s born, contributes These are the most important aspects of a Hindu wedding ceremony: to her own “independent” wealth. Many of the symbols that indicate a Mangalfera: The couple walks around the sacred fire four times,

DID YOU KNOW?

A C C E N T

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B R I D A L


stopping to touch a stone in the path with their toes to symbolize obstacles in life that they’ll overcome together. The four rounds signify: Dharma, righteousness; Artha, monetary accomplishment; Kama, energy and passion; Moksha, liberation from everything in life. Saptapadi: After the groom's scarf has been tied to the bride's dress signifying they’ll always stay together, the couple takes seven steps around the sacred fire representing nourishment, strength, prosperity, happiness, progeny, long life and marital harmony. The marriage is then considered legalized according to the Hindu Marriage Act as well as traditional customs.

MEXICO

have a Scottish surname, there’s a good chance you have a corresponding family tartan, so the men in your wedding party can all sport kilts. Bagpipes are appropriate music as is dancing the Lang Reel. Other Scottish wedding traditions vary by region: In the Borders, a sprig of heather in the bridal bouquet brings luck. In Aberdeen, Grampian, Angus and Dundee, luck comes with a sixpence in the bride’s shoe. And for financial luck, the bride’s father throws a handful of coins for the children to “scramble.” In the northeast, the best man gifts the happy couple with a clock, while the maid of honor gives them a tea set. In Shetland, wedding celebrations continue for two days with dancing and drinking. It’s said that “tying the knot” comes from an ancient Celtic practice with roots in pagan rituals. The bride and groom rip their wedding tartans and tie two strips together to symbolize the unity of the two families.

“I once read that watching a traditional Mexican boda is like studying the history of the country over the past seven centuries. Rituals and traditions from the Spanish, Aztec, Native American and AngloAmerican cultures are all incorporated into the ceremony,” says Carmen Laborin of the Mexico Tourism Board. Many Mexican wedding processions are accompanied by a JAPAN mariachi band and a donkey carrying bottles of It’s believed that the wedding tequila and wine for toasts along the way. Traditional Shinto wedding ceremonies are held ring originated in ancient Egypt Mexican brides have several vestido de novia at shrines. Brides wear shiromuku (formal white about 4,800 years ago. The ring’s (wedding dress) options depending on their kimono) and grooms wear montsuki (formal circlular shape was said to region and personal taste: everything from black kimono). The bride gets a ring and nine represent eternity, eternal love and a Western-style fancy white dress to a lucky gifts for happiness. It's common that only devotion. Rings were placed on the third finger of the left hand because beautifully embroidered, simple cotton huipil family members and close relatives attend. ancient Egyptians believed to an elaborately embroidered velvet dress or A Shinto priest offers prayers to the deities that it contained a vein one made from the local textiles with and the ceremony begins by purifying the couple. (vena amoris) that symbolic designs. After the purification and vows, the bride and groom led to the heart. Las Arras: In an ancient tradition, during the exchange cups ceremony, the groom gives the bride 13 gold coins of sake (rice wine) representing Jesus and the 12 apostles, which symbolizes the groom’s in the sansan-kudo (threecommitment to support his wife throughout their life together; her times-three) ceremony acceptance is a promise to take care of him. The bride also receives an symbolizing their union and ornate box for the coins’ safekeeping. the uniting of their families. El Lazo: The lasso is a beaded or jeweled rope or ribbon tied around Finally, symbolic offerings of the couple in a figure eight as they exchange their vows, signifying their sakaki (tree sprigs) are given to eternal bond and unity. Once the service is over, it’s removed. The the Kamisama (deity). During ceremony is followed by a parade with mariachi music and a reception that the kekkon hiroen (reception), lasts ’til the wee hours of morning with eating, drinking and dancing. the bride changes clothes several times, a tradition SCOTLAND dating to the 14th century, Today, at most Scottish weddings, the groom, his best man and the signifying her readiness to groomsmen are kitted out Highland-style in matching tartans. If you return to everyday life.

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: JORGE TINAJERO; JOYCE YOUNG OF TARTAN SPIRIT; YASUFUMI NISHI COURTESY JNTO

DID YOU KNOW?

A C C E N T

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B R I D A L


THE RINGS

BY LAURIE SCHECHTER

NEW AND NON-TRADITIONAL UNIQUE OPTIONS ABOUND TO SUIT EVERY COUPLE’S TASTE.

ince engagement and wedding rings are choices you live with forever, it’s no wonder that current bridal ring trends reflect the individual style and personality of their wearers more than a strict tradition or a certain set of rules. In fact, non-traditional is the new trend! One has only to look to recent famous weddings and engagements for proof: think Angelina Jolie’s custom-designed engagement ring of graduated tablet-shaped diamonds, or the new Mrs. Mark Zuckerberg and Jessica Simpson, both showing off ruby engagement rings. Many of today’s rings are rooted in history. The giving of rings along with taking vows of marriage dates back to ancient times. The wedding band, fashioned into a circle, symbolizes never-ending immortal love, and

the finger it is worn on was thought to have a special vein connected directly to the heart. Both customs are said to have originated in Ancient Egypt. The forerunner to the modern-day engagement ring was the ancient Greeks’ betrothal rings. Early betrothal rings from the Middle Ages, called ‘‘posy’’ rings, were inscribed with poems and love notes. Engagement rings with diamonds were first given by royalty and nobles beginning in the 15th century, mixed with rubies in the 17th and 18th centuries, and had messages spelled out in colored stones in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today’s betrothed have all this history to mine, with the benefit of modernity found in unusual designs and wide range of metals, stones and shapes available.

In actuality, the halo has never really gone away, but it has been trending more strongly for the past few years, which aligns with the reigning popularity of round diamond cuts. The difference now is the variety of designs available, and the cuts and arrangement of the stones. Double halos with two rows of surrounding stones, three-stone rings (a descendent of the early 20th-century princess ring) incorporating halo diamonds, and the stilltrending-strong eternity wedding bands with halo diamonds are all turns on the halo’s road to success. A. Jaffe reports, ‘‘Styles with cushion shaped halos surrounding the center diamond, as well as a cushion cut diamond standing alone in the center setting, are very popular engagement rings. Matching halo earrings and pendants for the bride have also become increasingly popular.’’

2.RESPONSIBLY SOURCED

Choosing diamonds that are sourced in an ethical manner is increasingly important among socially conscious brides. Without question, all the stones we sell in our store are responsibly sourced. Forevermark is among those that guarantee diamonds are carefully selected to meet “high standards of business, social and environmental integrity" (less than 1% of the world's diamonds are eligible to become a Forevermark diamond). Along with this heightened consciousness is the popularity of “recycling” diamonds: wearing vintage or heritage rings, family heirlooms which can be adapted and updated for a fresh look.

3.COLOR MY WORLD

Color seems to be the biggest driver at retail today. It’s the big story for women’s and men’s fashion on the runways and in the stores. Today’s bride, to set herself apart, might even opt for color instead of traditional white for her wedding dress. And color is, of course, also a big trend in engagement rings. Beautiful colored diamonds and other colored gemstones are surging in popularity in no small part due to the Duchess of Cambridge’s (previously Princess Diana’s) gorgeous sapphire engagement ring.

A C C E N T

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B R I D A L

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: FOREVERMARK, FOREVERMARK, SCOTT KAY, A. JAFFE, BEAUDRY

1.RETURN OF THE HALO


T H E O R I G I N ATO R O F C U LT U R E D P E A R L S . S I N C E 1 8 9 3 .


TRENDS FOR SAME-SEX COUPLES

4.I’LL TAKE MINE

According to recent stats, there are currently around 50,000 samesex marriages in the United States. This number will continue to grow, and many brands are tailoring their designs to appeal to the emerging market. Of course, since same-sex marriages are grounded in the same traditions as conventional marriages, many of these design trends cross over to the mainstream.

WITH A TWIST

You can’t get much more non-traditional and unique than a twisted band engagement ring. It’s an individual statement with a modern spin that can quickly update the classic solitaire or take pavé in a new direction. In streamlined metal or an all-diamond band, it’s an attention grabber either way.

5.WIDEN

YOUR HORIZONS

Wide diamond bands and channel rings—where the band can be any width with diamonds filling the “channel” in the center—are trending as wedding bands and, in some cases, can even serve as both the engagement and wedding ring. With the high-powered real estate it occupies on the finger, it’s a glamorous and practical all-in-one statement.

6. MIXING IT UP

Using alternative metals and mixing metals are trends, and the unique options available have increased at an exponential rate. In both engagement rings and women’s wedding bands, there’s been a strong introduction of rose gold on its own or mixed with white gold, platinum or yellow gold. In men’s wedding bands, in addition to the classic yellow gold, white gold and platinum, there are many examples of alternate metals and materials: everything from palladium, tungsten carbide and cobalt to ceramic, titanium and seranite, all with two-tone as a leading direction.

A C C E N T

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WEDDING BANDS AND COMMITMENT RINGS Like the alternative lifestyle they represent, same-sex couples are choosing alternatives for their wedding bands. In traditional yellow or white gold, there might be some kind of unique treatment, like hammered details, on the band. But rings in less common metals are where personal statements can really stand out, especially for men. BioBlu27 Cobalt, the same material used in aerospace and medical applications, has a unique look and is available with diamonds or without. And with new ring styles come new traditions. Some women are foregoing engagement rings altogether, while men can opt for man-gagement rings: wedding bands worn on the right hand before the marriage, then transferred to the left during the wedding ceremony (a mini-trend in opposite sex relationships, as well). At the end of the day, says Dan Scott, CMO of Scott Kay, ‘‘Love is love. We need to remind ourselves that wedding bands are much more than jewelry; wedding bands embody precious, lifelong vows made between any two people in love." And no matter the sexual orientation, today’s couples are choosing rings that suit their personal style.

B R I D A L

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: MEMOIRE, SCOTT KAY, RITANI, ROBERTO COIN, SCOTT KAY, ROBERTO COIN CENTO, MEMOIRE, RITANI, MEMOIRE

VINTAGE AND VINTAGE-LOOK ENGAGEMENT RINGS Some women in same-sex marriages are opting for customary engagement and wedding rings, but with more of a personal statement. Perhaps because of the sentimental value that they hold, vintage and vintage-look rings bring to mind the sentiments behind a marriage itself. (Christine Quinn, New York City’s City Council Speaker, married using her fiancée’s mother’s engagement ring.) Vintageinspired is also becoming a coveted look in new rings. Pavé-set diamonds, intricate hand engraving, filigree work and halos are all details reflecting this movement.


The Norman Silverman Bridal Collection

The Stimulus

The Response


T H E D E TA I L S

BY LISA MONTEMORRA MENGHI

Something Even Newer AS TIME MOVES FORWARD, SO DOES OUR DESIRE TO RE-INVENT OLD TRADITIONS.

It’s a ritual dating back to the Victorian era that’s meant to bring luck to newlyweds: on her wedding day, the bride carries or wears something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue. Here, a few ideas for the modern bride who wants to honor this age-old custom with a fresh, updated twist.

SOMETHING OLD • Think out of the box. Your ‘somethings’ can be places or decorations instead of worn items. One example: hold your wedding at a historic site. • Display old photos of ancestors (extra points if taken on their wedding days) at your ceremony and/or reception. It’s heartfelt and gives your guests an insight into your family history. • Wear lace or a button from a family member’s wedding dress in your hair, or incorporate it into your bouquet. • Have your ring bearer carry the rings in a treasured heirloom instead of on the standard satin

book table. It will elicit good memories of shared family meals and togetherness. • Give your grandmother’s crystal candleholders or vase a vacation from the curio cabinet with a place of honor at your ceremony. • Borrow a pretty silver knife from a friend or family member and use it to cut the cake. • Set your sweetheart table with heirloom china and silver, to make your first meal as husband and wife even more special. • If your parents are sentimental, they probably still have their wedding cake topper. Get it out of that dusty box in the garage and give it another go.

SOMETHING BLUE our bouquet Embellish y a family dress. m o with lace fr

SOMETHING BORROWED • Borrow a family tablecloth to dress up the escort card or guest

A C C E N T

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• Incorporate a beautiful blue stone or side stones into your wedding band. Sapphire, blue topaz, tanzanite and aquamarine are all excellent choices. • Why not wear a pair of strappy blue evening shoes? They’ll be a fun flash of color beneath your dress. • Getting rid of wedding cake guilt

B R I D A L

Something b and yummy lue... too! is easy: decorate it with delicious fresh blueberries and meet your daily fruit quota! • When you go for your wedding day pedicure, choose a pretty pale blue. Or how about a strip of blue to replace the white on a French manicure? • Use a small blue clutch for your lipstick, cell phone and other wedding day necessities. • Signature drinks are always fun. Why not use Blue Curaçao to concoct your custom cocktail? • Splurge on luxurious blue lingerie for your wedding night.

SOMETHING NEW

• A brand new piece of jewelry, of course! You’ll be investing in an heirloom that will have special meaning for the next generation of your family.

CANDLESTICKS: 1STDIBS.COM; CAKE: FANTASY FROSTINGS, SOUTH PASADENA, CA

Above: Sterling Silver Floral Stemmed Pair Candlesticks ca. 1943, USA

pillow. A jewelry box from a beloved family member could also hold a flower girl’s petals. • Instead of wearing heirloom jewelry in its intended manner, pin or sew it onto your gown as a featured design element. • Find an alternative use for your mother’s or grandmother’s veil. Use it to wrap your bouquet or drape it over a photo display table.


PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Carat Weight 1.53

Color Grade E

Clarity Grade VS1

Cut Grade

Excellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621

Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

A GIA report is certainty from the source. As creator of the 4Cs and the International Diamond Grading System™, GIA sets the standards for diamond assessment, worldwide. Unbiased. Scientific. A report from GIA gives you a clear understanding of your diamond’s quality. Look for GIA Diamond Grading Reports and the jewelers who offer them. www.4cs.gia.edu

THE UNIVERSAL STANDARD BY WHICH GEMS ARE JUDGED.


PRICELESS INSIGHT LAWRENCE BOCK knows jewelry from the inside, out.

T

hree things a jeweler can’t do without. Employees. Inventory. A great mission statement. How did you get into the business? My grandfather, who started the business (pictured above), and father paved the way. Since 1951 the family has been involved in jewels and gemstones. It’s in my blood. All-time favorite piece of jewelry? A 10 carat vivid blue diamond from the De Beers Millennium collection that I had the privilege of fashioning into a ring. Most valuable lesson learned at work? The more you build your employees’ skill and knowledge, the better they will perform for your customer. What should a customer always look for? In a jeweler, outstanding reputation in the community and professionalism in the store. In a diamond, a GIA certificate.

Why is a GIA report so important? It’s the most accurate and comprehensive evaluation of gemstones. GIA standards are the highest in the world. The fact they are a nonprofit organization also adds to that credibility. Insider’s tip? Find a living, breathing, trustworthy person to be your jeweler. The internet is great for information, but will never trump face-to-face, customized service. Best source for diamond know-how? 4cs.gia.edu. Not only to explain what to look for in a diamond, it’s information jewelers use themselves.


Set the Tone T H E I N V I TAT I O N S

QUIRKY WORDING

THE NEW NEONS

SECOND IMAGE FROM RIGHT COURTESY BELLA FIGURA; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY BREA MCDONALD FOR GUS & RUBY LETTERPRESS

LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION “We get a lot of clients asking to do something location-specific, like this custom design that features the Boston skyline,” says Samantha Finigan of Gus & Ruby Letterpress in Portsmouth, N.H. Whether your bash is in the city or country, it’s a great personalized touch. (Bonus points if the design is handillustrated.)

Neon colors are hot right now. They’re showing up everywhere from fashion to home décor, and of course, in wedding design. Neon on white looks fresh and is the prefect way to make a simple graphic statement. For the not-so-bold, Finigan assures us that “muted watercolor pastels are also a big color trend, especially in letterpress printing.”

BY JILLIAN L A ROCHELLE

HAVE FUN WITH FONTS With typefaces this interesting, who needs colors or imagery? We think they’re plenty pretty on their own. According to Finegan, “Justified [centered] type with variations in font has been a huge hit.”

Carolina and Logan replaced the usual “reception to follow” with this fun phrase promising “wild revelry” after the ceremony. RSVP cards are another great place to experiment with expressions. Instead of “will attend” and “will not attend,” try “wouldn’t miss it for the world” and “we’ll be there in spirit,” or the simple-but-cheeky “yay” and “nay.”

IMPACTFUL INVITATIONS WILL GET YOUR GUESTS EXCITED FOR THE BIG DAY. In addition to the trends we’ve highlighted here, Finigan recommends adding a foil stamp or a splash of unexpected color to freshen up a traditional invitation design. Envelope liners are a fun way to introduce a pattern that might otherwise overwhelm your invitation. And don’t forget about the front of the envelope: it’s the very first thing guests will see when they open the mailbox! Hand calligraphy is always the ultimate luxe touch, and some brides are choosing an assortment of vintage stamps to add a final pop of visual interest. A C C E N T

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B R I D A L


THE BEAUTY

BY AMY SCIARETTA & JILLIAN L A ROCHELLE

Inner Glow

ESTEEMED MAKEUP ARTIST TRISH M C EVOY SHARES HER SECRETS FOR A RADIANT WEDDING DAY.

What are your favorite wedding day looks? A woman looking like herself at her prettiest, happiest, radiant best! Her makeup should suit her personal style and be natural looking, longwearing and adjusted to photograph well.

Any tips for the groom? He should get his skin exfoliated and eyebrows groomed.

The Makeup Planner is one of your best-selling products. How can it help streamline the getting ready process?

t 25, McEvoy founded Trish McEvoy Beauty, which became a multimillion dollar company just five years later. Then in 1978, she partnered with her husband, Dr. Ronald Sherman, to open the Trish McEvoy/Dr. Ronald Sherman Skin Care Center—the very first medispa in the U.S.—in New York City. Well known for her amazing brushes, products and Makeup Planners, McEvoy is eager to teach every bride how to glow.

When should a woman start preparing her wedding day beauty plan? As soon as she gets engaged! In the months leading up to the big day, she should follow a customized exercise, facial and skincare regimen, depending on her specific needs, to make sure she looks her best.

My patented Makeup Planner is the only portable makeup vanity. I designed it to make women’s lives easier when it comes to makeup organization. Its refillable mirrored magnetic “pages” hold individual pans of eye and face color, keeping all your makeup in one place and visible at a glance, while adjacent brush sleeves are instantly accessible. The allaround zipper makes it portable.

Can you tell us a little about your makeup lessons? Women leave my lessons and the makeup lessons my artists teach confident in their ability to apply their own makeup well. We demonstrate and test the client on each step one feature at a time, ensuring a woman can execute the step herself and duplicate her look at home. We take the guesswork out of the steps that make a difference, and demystify how each of our clients can achieve her desired look.

What’s new at the Dr. Ronald Sherman/Trish McEvoy Skin Care Center? It houses a full medical and cosmetic dermatology practice and beauty studio under one roof. All my skincare products are created in partnership with my Skin Care Center. From injectables and laser treatments to facials, microdermabrasion and chemical peels, to airbrush tanning, lash extensions, brow and makeup services, we have a well-edited list of popular treatments that are all recommended based on the age and needs of the individual.

How much should time of day and time of year influence a bride’s makeup choices? I don’t believe they should. Beautiful wedding makeup is timelessly beautiful. But a dramatic red lip and smoky eye, while timeless, are probably not appropriate for a bride. B R I D A L

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S E C T I O N


THE STORIES

BY MICHAL D I MICELI

Wedding Day Magic

PHOTO BY GREG WOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

A GREAT-GRANDMOTHER VISITS A NEW BRIDE…

had always wanted a vintage wedding, and my dream came true on Saturday, June 9th, 2012 when I wed the man of my dreams in Madison, Connecticut. We worked hard to get all the details right, but I swear it was a few pieces of jewelry from my beloved late great-grandmother that made the day magical. My dress was a magnificent 1960s lace gown I discovered at my local consignment shop. It had puffy shoulders and a high collar, but I saw the potential and had it tailored into a sleeveless mermaid shape. The veil was the original, also from the ’60s, and the engagement and wedding rings were English platinum dating from the early 1900s. The ceremony and reception were held at the beautiful Madison Beach Club, which dates back to the 1920s. My family and I have spent many happy times there, so it was a delight to share it with 140 people I adore. We collected old mason jars to use as flower vases, and I decorated the reception with family wedding photos going back three generations. Everything was in place for my vintage theme, but the most important element was surely the influence of my great-grandmother, Mama Crowley. As a kid, I’d spend hours sitting with Mama. She was confined to her bed, but always looked elegant in her silk and lace robe, with her pink high-heel slippers waiting on the floor. I can’t remember now what we talked about, but I do remember loving to be in her presence and arranging all of her glass figurines and miniature Limoges shoes (a wonderful collection I now own). B R I D A L

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Mama Crowley loved family, loved to travel and always looked stylish. She believed in living life fully and with passion...and that you might as well look beautiful while you’re doing it! I learned so much from her, and I know that she shaped the woman I am today. Although we lost her almost 30 years ago, I’ve felt her presence throughout my life, never more so than on my wedding day. My lovely grandmother Joan is convinced that her mother (Mama Crowley) sent me Joe. He is everything I could have asked for in a life partner, and exactly who my great-grandmother would have chosen for me. The weather on the morning of June 9th was a little iffy, so my hairstylist (of all people) suggested that I leave rosary beads facing outside to guarantee sunshine. It just so happens that I had packed Mama Crowley’s rosary beads at the last minute, so my mother dutifully hung them from the balcony of my hotel room. The weather continued to be touch-and-go for a while, but the minute I took my first step down the aisle, Mama cleared the skies and the weather stayed gorgeous for the remainder of the day. (I should mention that Mama was a novice nun before she married, so I’m sure she had some pull…) Not only did Mama’s rosary beads work their magic on my big day, but I also wore her gold and pearl drop earrings and her pearl and sapphire gold bracelet, connecting me physically, emotionally and spiritually to this amazing lady. I look forward to passing on the love, traditions and family heirlooms to my future family. S E C T I O N


PerfectGems

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER.

CHRIS LEE

SLH

BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

UPSTAGED

Renée Fleming, the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, and the New York Pops are just a few of the artists performing at Carnegie Hall this season. You could buy tickets, but to really be involved in these remarkable occasions, join the Patrons. You’ll have access to rehearsals and meet-the-artist cocktail parties, a ticket concierge to arrange for special seating requests, and the very glamorous Opening Night Gala. In addition, Patrons are offered one of the most fascinating insider experiences in New York City: while telling stories and sharing his extraordinary knowledge, Carnegie Hall archivist Gino Francesconi escorts Patrons on a private tour up, down and all around, including visits to the Maestros’ Suite and other fascinating parts of the historic hall. Chances are this excursion will end on a high note.

TRUFFLE TIME!

Every autumn, New York’s famed SD26 offers white truffles gathered in the Piedmont region of Italy. To celebrate the arrival of these delicacies, the restaurant presents a special menu (through December). Marisa May, who owns and runs SD26 with her father, Tony May, has a favorite among the elaborate dishes: uovo in raviolo con burro tartufato. Created by Nino Bergese (personal chef to the last king of Italy) and now prepared by SD26 chef Matteo Bergamini, a single, large raviolo is stuffed with a barely cooked egg whose yolk spills forth into a sauce of brown butter, all under a mantle of white truffles. SD26’s wine director, Michael Doctor, pairs this treat with a Barolo, La Corda della Briccolina, Batasiolo 1995. Ms. May ha gusto bella.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

ALWAYS IN FASHION

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. © 2012 CINDY SHERMAN.

CELEBRATED ARTIST CINDY SHERMAN GOES INCOGNITO. BY DAVID HOWLETT

All of the photographs in Sherman’s MoMA show are untitled. As in a children’s picture book with no text, the viewer has to supply his or her own narrative. The scenarios require some thought to decipher; men and women or people from different backgrounds may see two different stories. Following the “film stills,” Sherman produced a series of “centerfolds,” in which she appears sprawled on a sofa or stretched on a floor—but fully clothed. In Untitled #96, she wears an orange plaid ensemble and looks

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Above: Sherman appears four times in a Balenciaga dress for a gala event. Untitled #463. 2007-08. Chromogenic color print, 68 5/8” x 6 (174.2 x 182.9 cm). Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York © 2012 Cindy Sherman.

NOLET’S GIN

E

ven though she’s one of the most photographed women in America, you probably wouldn’t recognize Cindy Sherman if you saw her on the street. That’s because Sherman has built a career—the subject of a superb and exciting retrospective at New York’s Museum of Modern Art— of photographing herself in a wide variety of disguises. In the late-’70s, Sherman first made a splash with her series of untitled “film stills.” The black-and-white photos show a woman in a scene from a movie that could have been directed by Alfred Hitchcock. But the stills are not from real movies. Instead they come from Sherman’s imagination. She appears as a character about to discover a clue to a crime, or looking over her shoulder, suddenly certain she’s being followed.


A

From top left: “I know a lot of people in the entertainment business.” Untitled #474. 2008. Chromogenic color print, 7’ 6 3/4” x 60”(230.5 x 152.4 cm). “On her first trip to the big city, our heroine suspects she is being followed.” Untitled Film Still #21. 1978. Gelatin silver print, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2”(19.1 x 24.1 cm). “Will I ever find true love?” An image from Sherman’s centerfold series. Untitled #96. 1981. Chromogenic color print, 24 x 47 15/16 (61 x 121.9 cm). high fashion itself. One photo shows four young women (all Cindy Sherman, of course) at what could be a party for a gallery opening or fashion show. Identically dressed and holding red plastic drink cups, they display a sort of forced gaiety, with toothy smiles and expressions of excitement. The photo was commissioned by Vogue Paris, and Sherman wears a Balenciaga dress. We are free to think what we want, but it seems that Sherman is critiquing the fashion scene and the red carpet mentality it fosters. In another picture, we see a wealthy, middle-aged woman in a sequined couture dress. She has on tasteful gold jewelry and stands in front of a display of what might be celebrity publicity shots. Perhaps the pictures are of an earlier generation, but this woman is a survivor. She is confident, comfortable and famous. And she is Cindy Sherman. This exhibition travels to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (July 14 to Oct. 7, 2012), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (Nov. 10, 2012 to Feb. 17, 2013) and Dallas Museum of Art (March 17 to June 9, 2013).

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THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. © 2012 CINDY SHERMAN.

languidly into the distance. The character clutches a newspaper clipping that has advertisements for “singles,” suggesting a failed romance. The pose, perhaps based loosely on a Playboy spread, makes us ask whether a clothed woman is not more interesting by far than a naked one. In Sherman’s photos, the body parts are hidden but her characters’ souls are exposed. In the late-’80s, Sherman posed herself in the guise of famous portraits from art history. In elaborate costumes, she is a nursing Renaissance Madonna or a bald (male) Italian aristocrat. She seems to suggest that photography is a serious rival to the art of painting. Sherman is not a narcissist, concerned only with her own image. She started photographing herself simply because no model was willing to sit for the six hours she needs to make a single picture. Sherman performs every role herself: model, wardrober, hairdresser, photographer, a fact that helps make sense of the varied disguises in the pictures. Perhaps Sherman is commenting on the different roles we all play as we live our lives: worker, daughter, mother and so forth. In each role we behave—and appear—differently. trip through this exhibit also shows the way the science of photography has evolved over recent decades. In the ’70s, Sherman took 23 small pictures of herself against a white curtain in the style of a photo booth. In them, she progressively changes from a woman with glasses (we would guess Sherman as herself) to a Geisha, and finally a film star. These are simple black-and-white photos made from contact prints. In her recent “society” portraits, Sherman poses in front of a green screen so that she can later fill in whatever background she wants (in several cases, The Cloisters museum in New York). She also uses Photoshop to move her eyes closer together, to make herself look older, or to appear heavier. Sherman has mastered the modern techniques and one suspects she will continue to use all the latest special effects. A key to understanding Sherman’s relationship to fashion is buried in a side room in the middle of her MoMA show. A stop-action movie she made in the ‘70s shows Sherman as a cut-out paper doll in her underwear. The doll selects paper clothes to try on, and admires herself. Essentially, this is Sherman playing dress-up, something she has done with great success for the last 35 years. More recently, Sherman seems to have been examining the world of


FOOD

FIRST-GENERATION FAME CHEF GEORGE MENDES IS A NATIONAL TREASURE. BY SHIRA LEVINE

What’s your ideal meal? I love my beef. At Keens Steakhouse, I dig into a nice porterhouse, a Caesar

salad, some oysters and wine. A good steak on my day off helps me feel nourished and relaxed. You’ve traveled a lot during your career. Besides New York’s, what other food scenes do you take inspiration from? My family roots in Portugal are a huge influence. I go twice a year and love visiting the local cafés, beer bars and gastropubs. Everything is so simply prepared and fresh. Also, Paris, the south of France, Barcelona and San Sebastian are important to me. That’s where I spent my early years learning. What Canada and Denmark are doing with the foraging movement is another great influence. It’s nothing extremely new though, just a return to the basics. It’s funny that people today see eating locally as a trend. Everything is in season somewhere in the world. It’s my responsibility as a chef to utilize what’s nearby, support farmers, focus on what is sustainable for the area and care about our oceans. It’s a responsibility I take seriously. How do your Portuguese roots shape your sensibility as a chef? My parents are immigrants and farmed their own food. They continued a lot of those values at our home in Connecticut. We had a garden that I’d help my dad prepare each season. It was a way of life for us. Our kitchen table was especially influenced in the spring and summer months because of that garden. It taught me the importance of knowing where my food came from. The [Portuguese] culture, the homey rustic feel of eating at home during the holidays, and the feasts my family would prepare are my strongest memories. Christmas, New Year’s Eve and Thanksgiving were always big lavish feasts that my mom and aunt would spent days preparing for.

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JERRY ERRICO

I

f you watch Bravo’s cooking shows, Chef George Mendes might be a familiar face. He appeared on the third season of Top Chef Masters, which won him many foodie fans of the (mostly) female variety. But sex appeal isn’t the only dish Mendes serves up. For this first-generation American born to Portuguese parents, cooking has always been about the fresh, the local, the in-season, the simple: in other words, the most delicious foods nature has to offer. Growing up in Danbury, Connecticut, Mendes was always surrounded by good food. He’d help his mother and aunt in the kitchen and work in the garden out back with his father. As a result, Mendes enjoys working with his hands. It was either a career in interior design and architecture, or working as a chef. His decision to cook came ultimately, he says, “because I constantly have to be in motion and doing something; I couldn’t be stuck in an office.” A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, he worked under culinary legends Alain Ducasse and David Bouley and refined his palate in France, Spain, San Francisco and D.C. at a number of Michelin-starred hotspots. In 2009, he finally went solo to open Aldea in New York City. The rustic yet classic restaurant featuring Spanish, French and Portuguese influences has already scored a Michelin star of its own, been deemed one of the country’s 10 best new restaurants by GQ’s Alan Richman, and helped Mendes become a finalist for the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef New York Award. Accent managed to catch Mendes in a rare free moment to chat about his impressive accomplishments.


How do you describe the cuisine at Aldea? I operate with my history in mind: the Portuguese were seafarers and explorers, discovering new lands. We brought spices and new flavors that influenced a lot of menus. Aldea is Portuguese-inspired with global influences. Early on, Portugal had colonies throughout the world, so you can see flavors from Brazil, Japan and India in my menu. You can also see my French training in there. All of my exploring has helped define my style. What is your presentation style? Minimalist. I like to focus on the color of food. My favorite time of year is spring, where all these edible colors pop out naturally. I’m not one to manipulate. I love the bounty of what comes in during those months. And maybe it’s my Mediterranean roots, but I love to enjoy my meals in the sun.

Top Chef really give food the opportunity to shine. I love to be in my restaurant, but it was a great platform for exposure. Would you do TV again? I would, if it were the right fit. I’d love an educational role where I teach the public about Portuguese cuisine, about growing your own food and eating as local as possible. I don’t want to be formed into a character. Do you have a cookbook in the works? It’s scheduled for spring 2014. It will be about Aldea, and be an introduction to Portuguese cuisine for the home cook. It will also include the story of my life and, of course, some great recipes.

FROM GEORGE MENDES’ KITCHEN

I know the term ‘fusion’ is kind of overused... I hate the word fusion. Some chefs will mismatch cuisines just to be creative, but they don’t necessarily know what they’re doing in terms of pairing flavors. You should know your history and combine things because they work. You don’t just pair because you want to create some new, unheard-of style. These fusion chefs overlook history and ancestry. True cooking comes from your heart, your ancestry, what was in your home. What are some exciting things on your menu right now? We’re using a lot of ramps, wild leeks, wild onions and wildflowers. We’re working with a forager, Evan Strusinski, who is bringing in things from the wild—herbs and plants not readily available from our regular sources. We’re always looking for new ingredients. We’re using chickweed, different kinds of mints and wintergreens, fiddlehead ferns, ramps and all kinds of exciting stuff in the mushroom category. If you’ve never eaten at Aldea, try the sea urchin toast; it’s refined and elevated. Or anything with shrimp, my duck rice... I’d say they all encompass rustic refinement. That’s a lot to introduce to the average (potentially not-soadventurous) eater! It’s about coming across what grows naturally in the woods that people don’t know they can eat. The forager has been providing us with things that I didn't know existed! For winter we’ll work with more robust, heartier flavors. Warm foods with an elevated level of refinement. Look for the tripe stew with root vegetables and quail eggs. Plus, winter means blue truffle season. Are there plans to open a second restaurant? We have plans but there is no forecast. When the right place comes along, then it’s the right time. We need a place that allows our vision to flourish, so it could take another 18 months to come together. You were on Top Chef Masters, so you’ve got an insider’s perspective on the reality show business. What are your thoughts about these cooking shows? I’m really split on it. Food TV can have a great impact on business, but it really depends on the chef’s desires. Does he want to be on TV, or does he want to be in his restaurant? Top Chef Masters was difficult, but it was a fantastic experience. Some of the food shows are just about entertainment; they pretty much forget the food. But Tom Colicchio and

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Eggs Baked with Peas, Linguiça and Bacon extra-virgin olive oil, as needed 11/2 ounces slab bacon cut into 1/2-inch slices, then into 1/4-inch batons 1/ 2

white Spanish onion, finely diced

3

garlic cloves, thinly sliced

1

fresh California bay leaf, notches torn every 1/2 inch

1

pinch crushed red chile flakes

3

tbsp. strained tomatoes

2

ounces linguiça, cut into 1/2-inch dice

1/ 4

ounce chorizo, casing removed and thinly sliced

2

cups frozen petit peas kosher salt to taste

4

large eggs

1/ 2

cup parsley leaves, chopped

fresh lemon juice, to taste Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat a 4-quart cocotte over medium heat. Add just enough olive oil to coat the bottom, then add the bacon. Cook, stirring

occasionally, until the fat is rendered and the bacon lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Transfer the bacon to a dish. Add the onion, garlic, bay leaf and chile flakes to the cocotte and cook, stirring, until tender but not browned, about 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes and 1 teaspoon olive oil and cook, stirring and scraping down the sides of the pan, for 4 minutes. The tomatoes should be sizzling steadily. Stir in the linguiça, chorizo, reserved bacon and 1 teaspoon olive oil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 2 minutes. Stir in the peas and season to taste with salt. Make 4 little nests for the eggs in the mixture, spacing them a few inches apart. Carefully break an egg into each nest, making sure each egg is nestled in the stew and flush with the top. Transfer to the oven and bake until the egg whites are set but the yolks are still runny, about 8 minutes. Top with the parsley and season to taste with lemon juice. Serve immediately. Serves 4.


THE ARTS

“IN HERE, LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL.” BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

J

ohn Iachetti doesn’t spend much time behind his desk at the entrance to Feinstein’s. Smiling and charming, the director of entertainment greets guests and personally escorts them to their tables, as if hosting an exclusive private dinner party. His enthusiasm is infectious. There’s an air of anticipation as musicians settle on the small stage, the lights dim, and a voice announces the performer. The audience applauds (when a favorite takes the stage they cheer like baseball fans). For the next 70 minutes, a talented entertainer will be close enough to touch, playing to each individual, talking and joking with the crowd. On an average night, it’s exciting. On a great night, when a truly incomparable artist is at the peak of his or her powers, it’s an unforgettable experience. Cabaret in America has had its ups and downs. Popular at speakeasies during the Roaring Twenties and again at supper clubs during and after the Second World War, today it’s having a renaissance in grand rooms with gourmet chefs and elaborate wine lists, as well as little, out-of-the-way clubs. “I think cabaret is popular again because it’s a personal experience,” says Iachetti. “For the audience, it’s like sitting in a living room listening to brilliant performers tell their stories.” While cabarets occasionally feature instrumentalists or comedy acts, it’s the singers that fill the rooms. The great stars, like the legendary Barbara Cook, Marilyn Maye and Michael Feinstein, blend equal measures of artistry, emotion, and nostalgia…and often dress to the nines. Michael Feinstein is

always in a tuxedo. Marilyn Maye wears a jeweled brooch, a gift from Bob Mackie and Joe McFate, as well as an enormous star sapphire ring. (“I think it’s my obligation to be chic and I love jewelry,” she says.) Then there are the “insiders,” often brilliant entertainers with devoted followings in cabaret circles. And, of course, new performers who appear at open-mic shows, hoping for their big breaks. New York is the bastion of cabaret. Feinstein’s, currently at the Loews Regency (moving to a new location in January 2013), and the Café Carlyle at the Carlyle Hotel offer the ultimate in elegance and entertainment. Renowned for its sophisticated style, the glamorous Café Carlyle has been a classic New York destination since 1955 and still maintains the ambiance of a 1930s supper club. Famous and very fashionable guests settle back on comfortable blue-hued banquettes beneath enchanting (recently restored) Marcel Vertes murals for truly superb food and illustrious performers. Farther downtown, there’s Birdland, where on Monday nights the multitalented Jim Caruso holds his celebrated Cast Party. At this casually elegant gathering, eminent show business names, Broadway and cabaret pros, and new talent including the staff (bartender William Minyard brings down the house when he sings) show up to perform and mingle with the audience until the wee hours of the morning. The Duplex has been a Greenwich Village landmark for nearly 60 years. New Yorkers (and visitors anxious to explore the real thing) climb a set of

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THIS PAGE: COURTESY OF FEINSTEIN’S AT THE LOEWS REGENCY. OPPOSITE PAGE: PAT JOHNSON STUDIOS; RICHARD TERMINE; CHRISTOPHER HADLO CK

CABARET RENAISSANCE


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Above: The Rrazz Room in San Francisco Right: Michael Feinstein and Barbara Cook perform Left: The Duplex in New York City’s Greenwich Village

somewhat rickety stairs to a long narrow room where some of the greatest entertainers, including Barbara Steisand and Woody Allen, have appeared. Booking manager Thomas Honeck says, “The Duplex has always been a place of beginnings…giving young performers a shot, a place to feel comfortable to try new things and stretch.” Today, audiences pack the room nightly for acts such as superb songstress Colleen McHugh, who offers enchanting contemporary interpretations of classic tunes, the comedic Recignos Brothers, and other fresh, innovative singers and comedy acts. abaret is, fortunately, not limited to New York. In Austin, the charming Austin Cabaret Theater, produced by Stuart Moulton, has presented Carol Channing, Elaine Stritch and Natalie Douglas in her tribute to Lena Horne. The attractive Royal Room at the Colony in Palm Beach combines gourmet food with shows by some of the best cabaret performers in the business. And then there’s the Rrazz Room in San Francisco. Owners Robert Kotonly and Rory Paull have created a plush nightclub with an extraordinary wine list and uncommon cocktails. Alternating tradition and innovation, some nights, the Rrazz Room sticks with the standards and the city’s society figures gather for Betty Buckley or Tony Martin. On other evenings, the club encourages young people to venture into the cabaret experience with acts like The Three Degrees and Jefferson Starship. Chances are, there’s now a cabaret near you. Go hear the music play.

C

52

THE ARTIST’S VIEWPOINT Bebe Neuwirth “There is nothing that can compare to the experience of attending a live performance. The music is more deeply felt, the performance more deeply felt….” Barbara Cook “Cabaret is a place where honesty has a lot to do with how effective you are. You’re not playing a character, you’re your honest self.” Marilyn Maye “You create a real relationship with your audience; you make a moment, an evening.” Pianist Tedd Firth “I’ve worked with very well-known performers and first-timers. Cabaret has a common appeal: the chance to perform in an intimate setting that’s unlike any other performance environment.” Natalie Douglas “Sometimes I can feel the audience’s reactions…[they develop] an almost spiritual connection with me, the music, the lyrics and the musicians.” Colleen McHugh “Cabaret, at its best, provides the ultimate connection between song, performer and audience.” Jim Caruso “People have been ringing the death-knell for cabaret for years, yet it continues to thrive….”


TRAVEL

IT’S ABOUT TIME

AT FLORENCE’S HOTEL L’OROLOGIO, THE MAGIC IS IN THE DETAILS. BY STU NIFOUSSI

T

o the casual tourist, the Hotel L’Orologio is a luxurious boutique inn overlooking Florence’s famed Piazza Santa Maria Novella, with a theme relating to clocks and watches. But to those who share owner Sandro Fratini’s passion for horology (the measurement of time), the hotel is a treasure trove of memorabilia and unique design, with discoveries around every corner. Fratini owns the small upscale hotel chain WTB (which stands for Why the Best?) with six hotels in Florence; he is also chairman of Super Rifle S.p.A, the parent company of Rifle jeans. A lifelong collector of vintage watches, he owns more than two thousand, mainly from his three favorite

For true watch aficionados, however, the real excitement is found on the ground floor, within rooms off the lobby. Claudio Delli, general manager of WTB Hotels, showed off the incredible details waiting to be discovered by those who choose to look more closely. Among them: the exclusive mirrors designed in the style of Rolex watch bands, and the sundial etched into the floor beside a reflecting pool that appears to be illuminated by stellini, tiny stars in the ceiling above. Then there are the door handles in the shape of Rolex watch hands (sometimes called Mercedes because they’re similar to the Mercedes logo), and the hand-painted reproductions of watch

brands: Rolex, Vacheron Constantin and Patek Philippe. At L’Orologio, Fratini has been able to combine his affinity for fine watches with his talent for consumer marketing, creating a singular and fascinating hotel experience. Each room at Hotel L’Orologio is identified in two ways: with a room number, as you might expect, and also with a name corresponding to a watch owned by Signore Fratini. Each floor is devoted to a particular brand: the first to Vacheron Constantin, the second to Rolex, and the top two floors to Patek Philippe. Within each room are photos or artwork related to its namesake watch.

faces that decorate the floor in the smoking lounge beside Il Bar de L’O. But the pieces de resistance were the elegant busts of Messieurs Patek and Philippe that grace the pedestals in the sitting area. One could spend hours cataloging the little touches that make this hotel unique in the world. WTB plans to roll out L’Orologio as their premier nameplate to other “artistic” cities in Italy, with new hotels planned for Venice and Rome. The company also markets L’Orologio products including scarves, alligator sneakers and other items, with an eye toward building L’Orologio into an internationally recognized brand.

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NOLET’S GIN

ONE COULD SPEND HOURS CATALOGING THE LITTLE TOUCHES THAT MAKE THIS HOTEL UNIQUE IN THE WORLD.


AUTOMATIC MOVEMENT TWA200 Ø 45 MM $595.00


SPEED

THE THRILL OF VICTORY O

ver the decades, numerous Hollywood film stars have been bitten by the racing bug. There may be some profound reasons for this, or it may simply be that famous actors are accustomed to glamour and attention. When filming is over, the thirst for the excitement, danger and competition kicks in. (Or as Paul Newman once put it, “There’s no acting needed when driving; it’s just you and the machine.”) The connection between film stars and motor racing dates back to the turn of the 20th century, when Barney Oldfield became the first man to travel at one mile per minute. His fame as a racecar driver led to film stardom in the first half of that century. A significant number of racing films were made during that time, but the greatest of all was John Frankenheimer’s 1966 film Grand Prix starring James Garner. Garner went on to form a successful racing organization called American International Racers (AIR); when filming was completed, his cars raced with considerable success at Le Mans, Daytona, Sebring and other famous race circuits around the world. Steve McQueen’s film Le Mans may not have been a critic’s choice for best drama, but the racing action was brilliant, and his reputation as an accomplished racecar driver and motorcycle racer subsequently grew. Paul Newman filmed Winning around the same time; while it also lacked dramatic quality, the racing scenes

filmed at the Indianapolis 500 brought viewers to the edge of their seats. Newman’s racing was legendary, and at the age of 80 he was even part of a winning team at the Rolex 24 at Daytona. James Dean, James Coburn and Tom Cruise also enjoyed motor racing, earning respect in the amateur ranks of the sport. But today it’s Patrick Dempsey who charms race fans on and off the track. His dedication to the sport is unparalleled as a driver, team owner and ambassador for motor racing. Actors may not appreciate equal billing on film credits, but at a race circuit, they overwhelmingly acknowledge the team effort, giving much credit to their crews, their sponsors and their cars. Famous names like Ferrari, Porsche, Aston Martin, Lotus, Corvette, BMW and others have loyal fans of their own. In certain cases, the driver and the car are even upstaged by the race circuit. Just hearing names like Daytona, Sebring, Le Mans, Monaco, Spa-Francorchamps and Monza brings intense emotion to motor racing enthusiasts. And just as actors aspire to win an Academy Award, racecar drivers dream of winning a series championship. In 2012, endurance road racing in America celebrated two remarkable anniversaries: The Rolex 24 at Daytona marked its 50th and Sebring its 60th. Both venues have earned a unique place in the history of international motorsports—stars in their own right.

56

Above: Patrick Dempsey enjoys a day at the races.

NOLET’S GIN

CARS, STARS AND HISTORIC RACE CIRCUITS. BY DAVID A. ROSE


PERKS Radiolaria Grid by Nuala O’Donovan

PARISIAN PAMPERING

Arrive refreshed in an Open Skies BizBed.

Dream up any excuse you can— birthday, anniversary, graduation—to fly to Paris in style on Open Skies, an all business class airline. Choose from a selection of unbelievably comfortable BizBeds or ample BizSeats. The flight attendants are friendly and the fares are reasonable for the service offered (check the website for seasonal deals). Flights from New York (Newark) arrive at Orly Ouest, a much smaller airport that’s easier to navigate than Charles de Gaulle, with the same direct transport links into the center of Paris. Visit flyopenskies.com. —JC

THESE AMENITIES WILL LEAVE YOU FEELING LIGHTER THAN AIR… BY JACQUELIN CARNEGIE AND SHIRA LEVINE

FLY IN STYLE

Remember when the open skies were friendly and flying felt glamorous? Your vacation started at the airport, before security measures became a burden. Flight attendants were bright-eyed, gorgeous and envied for having the dream job. Inflight amenities were small treasures, and yes, bags flew free. We think it’s high time to bring the fun back to flying.

Finally, an edible in-flight meal.

58

NOLET’S GIN

FLYING CHEFS

Most airline food is just dreadful, but Turkish Airlines has remedied the problem with on-board chefs on all its long-haul, business class service. So whether you’re headed to Cape Town, Hong Kong or Istanbul, you can enjoy meals prepared by chefs with years of top restaurant and hotel experience. The menu includes traditional Turkish dishes as well as international favorites like Chilean Sea Bass. In addition to the food, the business class service is impeccable, with attentive flight attendants and plush sleep seats. With more than 200 international flight destinations, you can enjoy a decent meal and great service around (and above) the globe. Visit turkishairlines.com. —JC


S ER EI N D I A MON D SER EI N D I A MON D T W O- T ON E


THE GOLDEN AGE OF TRAVEL

Embracing the idea that a luxe lifestyle shouldn’t stop when you’re suspended 34,000 feet above ground, Singapore Air has introduced the Airbus A380, a behemoth double-decker flying cruise ship. Enjoy one of the 60 leather lie-flat business class seats, the most spacious in the world at 34 inches wide, in the upper deck of the plane. When you’re not asleep beneath Givenchy bedding, the entertainment is addictive courtesy of SilverKris, an extensive multimedia library of current and classic movies and TV shows from around the world. A true mark of luxury is choice. That means making delightful decisions such as: Dom Perignon or Krug? Should I sample eight wine varietals or two Singapore Sling recipes? You’ll also relish the options on the seasonal menu, served on fine Givenchy china and linens. Think capsicum confit and kalamata olive potatowa. (Passengers can pre-reserve their entrées using the Book-The-Cook feature, exclusively at singaporeair.com.) And for $18,000 a seat, choose a Pullman train car-inspired single- or double-occupancy cabin suite—the ultimate in in-flight privacy. —SL

WE HAVE LIFT-OFF

Only a cheeky billionaire like Sir Richard Branson can get away with using the term “Upper Class” to distinguish top-deck seating aboard his Virgin Atlantic flights. Considered businessclass-affordable, yet not-quite-first class, the 33-seat cabin offers fabulous quirks that make that other class the forgotten one. The nightclub-esque walk-up bar decked out in 1,000 Swarovski crystals and manned by a generous bartender comes off as exclusive and hip without seeming pretentiously stuffy. (Booze and that thick velvety curtain help, too.) Mood lighting changes color throughout the flight, encouraging passengers to “relax, unwind, fall asleep and adjust time zones.” The loungelike seats flip forward into the longest flat beds in business class, complete with down duvets. The black cotton sleepwear is a charming and comfy offering not to be passed up before you disappear into the pod-like seats; they’re angled into a herringbone formation and enclosed with cubicle-like “suite” walls, so high that the person seated next to you has to peer over to communicate. The solution: Come mealtime, personal entertainment systems fold away so a couple can face one another to dine. Visit virginatlantic.com. —SL

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Top Steakhouse List by D Magazine 2011


END PAGE

WORKING IT

HOW TO GET UPGRADES WITHOUT EVEN TRYING. BY LENORE RICH

W

ithout question, perks are addictive. Once you’re accustomed to the good life, it’s hard to go back. But as computers become more sophisticated, armed with every bit of data about me, my ability to embellish my qualifications for an upgrade is as antiquated as thinking a logo-embellished designer tote will do the trick. This will no longer work—there are just too many bag imposters out there. Nor will demanding an upgrade using frequent flyer points (accumulated mainly through purchases): the airline’s computer already knows who has more points than I do, and who actually flew on its planes to acquire them. So what does work? Hotel loyalty programs, complimentary in most cases, will give you automatic upgrades, maybe breakfast, perhaps a better room, spa entrance, free WiFi access, etc. Just check out their website and sign up.

62

My favorite credit card, Starwood Preferred guest, gives me one point for each dollar spent, transferrable to most airlines. For every 20,000 points I move into an airline account, they rebate 5,000 more points, making it possible to get a better deal from Starwood than from the actual airline. The points are also redeemable towards hotel rooms and tickets to special events. The Hyatt card doesn’t charge international fees and gives you two free nights at any Hyatt in the world. Automatic platinum status is an additional perk. I recently stayed for free in a beautiful New York City Hyatt, was upgraded to a suite and treated royally—all for the $75 annual fee. The day before you arrive at any hotel, call the front desk to confirm your room and strike up a conversation with your new best friend. Upon check-in, remind him or her of your previous conversation. On that note, human interaction (a smile, a compliment, casual conversation, eye contact) is the most obvious but easily overlooked art form in this era of social media and virtual ‘friendships.’ It’s also not a bad idea to compliment another branch of the hotel brand. In most cases, there’s a degree of ‘sibling rivalry’ between them and they’ll try to out-do each other. And never underestimate the importance of good jewelry. I once stood in a box office line to get tickets to a nearly sold-out show. The attendant was wearing a beautiful pin and I complimented her on it. After hours of handing tickets to patrons who never even looked up at her, she was delighted and in turn complimented me on my earrings. A short conversation ensued and I landed house seats. When traveling, I try to wear either bold, creative jewelry or simple pieces in unexpected ways. Thematic pins are always conversation starters, and sometimes more is more—especially since it’s safer to wear it than pack it! A final tip that always works: don’t forget to mention that you’re celebrating a special occasion. (But better not make it a birthday unless it’s true: the computer already knows…)


Discover the art of luxury living.

Buying or selling a home is all about the connections you make along the way.

Holly Bock Deason 972.380.3421| hbockdeason@briggsfreeman.com | briggsfreeman.com/holly


© D.YURMAN 2012


BACHENDORF’S ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

FALL/WINTER 2012


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