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L’Accademia del Fitness

FOOD INTOLERANC:

A LIGHT ON THE PRESENT AND ON THE FUTURE A healthy diet keeps the body “young”, helps prevent excessive accumulation of subcutaneous fat and, if necessary, it avoids contact with gluten, lactose or other food allergens. But not only this. A healthy diet makes it possible to prevent inflammation, which is the cause of many common disorders such as swelling, abdomen cramps, dysentery headache, eczema which are characteristic of what we call food intolerance. Clinical experience and research give us more and more evidence that in sensibilized people any food is potentially able to determine the appearance of symptoms due to the production of cytokines or other inflammatory substances. This leads us to the need to identify 1) sensible subjects 2) the foods which give (or can give) intolerance problems. However, it is not easy to give a clear clinical picture to food intolerance: it is not a matter of allergy or of real forms of intolerance such as for instance intolerance to gluten or lactose. This has contributed to the circulation of many research methodologies which the American Gastroenterological Association has defined as “unreliable” and has ended up putting these forms of intolerance under a not very positive light. This category includes famous tests such as the EAV/Vega, the kinesiological and cytotoxic tests which are unreliable for two main reasons: they are difficult to repeat and excessively depend on the operator’s experience. However, also the field of food intolerance has adopted more and more the immunoenzymatic method E.L.I.S.A. (Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay), which has been standardized in laboratory and has been exploited in the execution of the RAST test in the allergologic field. This procedure guarantees the univocity of results and high levels of repetitivity and therefore distinguishes itself from all the other methods. This method established itself when it appeared clear that the immune system played a key role in the mediation between the intake of food and the appearance of the symptoms, exactly as in the case of allergies. However, unlike allergies, in this case the mediation is not operated by immunoglobulins class E (IgE), but by a different class, G (IgG), the dosage of which allows us to give evidence that a contact with food which can determine inflammatory events has occurred. Research has progressively advanced further and from the general analysis of IgG it has gone on to a particular subclass represented by IgG4. This is a fundamental step in clinical practice, as was underlined in 2008 in a publication by the Department of Laboratory Medicine in the Hospital of Padua (Time to reconsider IgG4, Clin Chem Lab Med 2008; 46(5):687-690). This study

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N. 10 - July 2013  

Wellness & Antiaging magazine

N. 10 - July 2013  

Wellness & Antiaging magazine