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SCRAPBOOK ADRIAN COLEMAN, M. ARCH., GSAPP 2009-2012


SCRAPBOOK ADRIAN COLEMAN, M. ARCH., GSAPP 2009-2012


OPPOSITE_ICE DRAWING Fall 2009, Sato studio

FOREWORD Like many before, I began my graduate studies with the ritual of the ice drawing. The assignment is to document the melting process of an oversized ice cube with scrupulous, pseudo-scientific observation. I modified the exercise to a sensory experiment. Grasping the frozen block in my left palm, I recorded my changes in skin color, body temperature, and my own subjective rating of pain. A more straight-laced critic might have halted this idiocy. Yoshiko, now sadly departed, seemed amused. She encouraged my behavior. In my two attempts, I was never able to bear the ice for more than two hours. Nonetheless, I lost sensation in my pinky for nearly a week. My drawing speculated on two extreme outcomes had I held the ice longer. In the first, my capillaries contract, flesh fades to blue-gray, and pain subsides to deathly, vegetative numbess. In the alternate ending, I assume a meditative trance. Illuminated by a higher mental clarity, my body temperature rises and the ice melts faster. Unwittingly, the drawing has been a rough template for my Columbia experience, My architectural interests have often concerned experience, memory, and induced perception. You will find these themes through out this book. The portfolio itself is something of a time capsule, intended more for tomorrow than for immediate consumption today. How will I perceive these projects in ten years? In twenty years? I may look back upon these pages and find a few good ideas. Conversely, I may also look back and discover a trove of nonsense. Whether fond recollections, fragments of inspiration, or simply junk, this is my SCRAPBOOK. Like Yoshiko, I hope you are amused. Adrian Coleman, May 2012


CONTENTS A_PROJECTS The Oshima Sea Rooms Fall 2011, Critics: Kunio Kudo, Lynn Breslin Museum of the Diaspora Spring 2010, Critic: Charles Eldred Railyard Housing_The Infrastructural Living Room Fall 2010, in collaboration with Idan Naor, Critic: Robert Marino The Chapel of the Street, Sensory Ethnography Lab Spring 2012, Critic: Mario Gooden Bob the Pavilion Spring 2011, studio collaboration, Critics: Galia Solomonoff, Nate Carter, Liam Gillick The House That Weeps Fall 2009, Critic: Yoshiko Sato B_TECHNICAL STUDIES Tromhaus Spring 2011, team collaboration, Critic: David Wallance Advanced Curtain Wall Spring 2012, Critic: Dan Vos, Robert Heingtes C_PAINTINGS


OSHIMA SEA ROOMS OSHIMA ISLAND, KESENNUMA, JAPAN Kunio Kudo and Lynne Breslin, Critics (Fall 2011)


Oshima Sea Rooms Oshima Island, Kesennuma, Japan

The small fishing town of Kesennuma was ravaged by the Japanese tsunami in march 2011. In memorial, the Oshima Sea Rooms are a ritualistic sound procession. Passing through an island cliff, the visitor proceeds through an anechoic changing room, a resonant bath chamber, and finally an offshore sea organ. Meditating on its aural qualities, the visitor recalls and reimagines the enigma of the sea.


APPROACH


LEFT_THE SEA ROOMS COME INTO VIEW RIGHT_PLANS


ABOVE_SOUND AS MEMORY BELOW_A SERIES OF SOUND CHAMBERS an anechoic chamber, a resonating bath chamber, and a sea organ RIGHT_SITE SECTION


APPROACH TO THE ANECHOIC CHANGING ROOMS


ANECHOIC CHANGING ROOMS These suspended spaces, mounted on enormous hydraulic shock absorbers, are designed exclude all external sounds. The anechoic chambers are entered through an airlock. The interior is lined with fiberglass wedges to disrupt the slightest echo, The floor is a hung mesh surface, eliminating the sound of footsteps. External noise is completely muffled such that the sound of visitors’ breathing and heartbeat is distinctly audible. This initial aural experience compells the visitor to clear their head and confront their internal human vibrations.


RESONATING BATH CHAMBER


RESONATING BATH CHAMBER, SECTION PERSPECTIVE The loud pounding of the waves carries through the chamber’s occuli and reverbates against the hard, smooth surfaces of the space. The agitation of sound contrasts the docile salt water pool, which is an isolated volume of the sea. The ritual of bathing becomes a meditation on the serenity, violence, and mystery of the sea.


SECTIONAL MODELS


RESONATING BATH CHAMBER diagrams of various shells

visitors circulate along ramps and out through wind tunnels


APPROACH TO SEA ORGAN


SEA ORGAN DIAGRAMS The sea organ is a musical instrument played by the sea. The movement of water forces air pressure through the tubes of a specific length, provoking a vibration of a tuned frequency. The resulting sound is something akin to whale song. Entering into the sea organ, the visitor confronts a different voice of the sea, altered, personified, perhaps comforting but ever enigmatic.


SEA ORGAN FROM ABOVE


SEA ORGAN INTERIOR


DEPARTURE


OVERHEAD VIEW, OSHIMA SEA ROOMS


MUSEUM OF THE DIASPORA CHINATOWN, NEW YORK CITY Charles Eldred, Critic (Spring 2010)


Museum of the Diaspora, Chinatown, New York City

Diaspora is a condition of memory. Scattered, the people of a diaspora share the memory of a place. Memory, of course, is a malleable artifact. A memory distorts, ferments, or breaks down according to other ingredients with which it is incubated. The memory of an origin mingles with the experience of dispersal. It is a record of starting point, journey, and imagination. The spaces of the Museum intend to reconstruct the process of an evolving memory. The visitor enters the museum understanding it as series of discreet paths: 4 separate exhibitions. As the visitor moves through the building, he or she encounters unexpected intersections and fragmented interiors. No one space is perceptible in its entirety. The visitor’s conception of the building shifts according to the latest architectural cues.

The Museum’s transversal arrangement defies the tradition of linear galleries and segregated exhibitions. Unlike the visitor, the curators understand the Museum as a sequence of intersections. They install shows that cross-cross. An intersection can be subtle, luring the visitor from the exhibition he aimed to follow, or clear and significant, drawing an insightful connection between pieces of art and culture. An intersection can also be a red herring, implying no particular connection but provoking the visitor to examine his surroundings and to question previous assumptions.


A_TITLE andundusdam ipiciet, si nam, ipsunti atiasped modi nullautem quo quam fuga. Aqui B_TITLE andundusdam ipiciet, si nam, ipsunti atiasped modi


PREVIOUS PAGE_ VIEW INTO GALLERY SPACE LEFT_MEMORY DIAGRAM Memory involves a complex chemistry of forgetting and imagining. In this case, the identity of one’s “people” or “family” evolves by seeing certain experiences through certain lenses. RIGHT_GALLERIES INTERSECT


A_TITLE andundusdam ipiciet, si nam, ipsunti atiasped modi nullautem quo quam fuga. Aqui B_TITLE andundusdam ipiciet, si nam, ipsunti atiasped modi


UNDERGROUND COURTYARD beneath the glass floor of the atrium


LEFT_VISITOR’S MAP The visitor understands the museum as a series of dicreet, linear galleries. RIGHT_CURATOR’S MAP The curator understands the museum as one continous loop of intersecting galleries.


ABOVE_BUILDING IN CONTEXT BELOW_BUILDING ISOLATED RIGHT_EXPLODED AXON


LEFT_MUSEUM ENTRY The building is situated between a cluster of existing buildings in Chinatown. From here, visitors can see into the atrium and the underground courtyard below. CENTER_SECT. PERSPECTIVE through museum entry RIGHT_SECT. PERSPECTIVE through atrium and underground courtyard


LEFT_PLANS The plans are not cut conventionally, at a single datum, but along certain pathways that change elevation. The key below describes the cut. RIGHT_SECT. PERSPECTIVE cut through edge of courtyard and the north side


UPPER GALLERY


ADJACENT LOWER GALLERY


RAILYARD HOUSING_THE INFRASTRUCTURAL LIVING ROOM HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY In Collaboration with Idan Naor Robert Marino, Critic (Fall 2010)


Railyard Housing, Hoboken, New Jersey

Traditionally, developments above a railyard involve the construction of a massive platform above the tracks. The new buildings begin on the surface of the platform, segregated from the mechanical functions of the trains below. Hoboken, however, poses a site in which the transit system can not be ignored. Hobokenites physically live in New Jersey but their life is essentially organized in reference to New York. By day, they earn their living in Manhattan and at night, longingly admire the skyline across the Hudson. For many, Hoboken is an economic choice - you live somewhere more financially feasible to be a part of a grand public experience, New York City. The mediator of this relationship is the train system. Our railyard housing strategy proposes an occupiable, vaulted platform in which the relationship of

the tennants to the train below is emphasized. We engage the rail depot as the cafe chooses to engage the street. Each tennant occupies a condensed, duplex apartment. Each bedroom floor looks on to a large communal porch overlooking the railyards. As one move upwards in the building, this space expands into public cafes. Suspended public concourses hang above the rails.


ENTRY TO THE RAILYARD HOUSING A reflecting pool prevents bystanders from wandering on to the tracks.


SITE PROCEDURES clockwise beginning at upperleft: (A) the empty Hoboken railyard (B) Tunnels are constructed to facilitate as many existing train lines as possible. (C) Lateral tunnels are constructed to facilitate pedestrian travel across the tracks. (D) Infrastructural housing is built into the vaulting of the tunnels.


VIEW ALONG CENTRAL CORRIDOR A suspended promenade hangs aboves the train yard. An industrial escalator moves people rapidly up into the buildings above.


LEFT_STACKING DIAGRAM Due to the arched nature of the tunnels, the footprint of the interstitial buildings expands with increased height. CENTER_SECTION All units open on to a large infrastructural terrace overlooking the trains. As one moves up in the buildings, the terrace expands and allows public activeties such as cafes. RIGHT_CAFE a cafe at the top of the vaulting


LEFT_ELEVATIONS The exterior elevation of the buildings incorporates large shutters. While the interior face is characterized by collective experience, the exterior expresses an individualism in the separate balconies and a facade that is determined by the occupants. CENTER_UNITS Two bedroom (above) and one bedroom (below) units. Typically, the second bedroom floor of each unit opens on to the terrace, although this situation flips at the higher floors once the terrace becomes completely public (and available to non-occupants). RIGHT_VIEW FROM TERRACE


TYPICAL 4TH FLOOR Occupants enter in the bottom storey of their unit, where living spaces are located.

TYPICAL 4TH FLOOR

0’

8’


TYPICAL 5TH FLOOR The second storey of each unit contains bedroom spaces and opens out on to the infrastructural terrace. When this terrace becomes mor public higher up, the sequence of the living and bedroom spaces is reversed.

TYPICAL 5TH FLOOR

0’

8’


LEFT_MODEL SHOT The buildings are contructed form massive, cast archways. RIGHT_ STRUCTURAL DRAWING The cast semi-arches of a single railyard housing building.


STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM The platform and new neighborhood are constructed from long series of their cast archways, which make up the tunnels in which returning trains dock.


VIEW ALONG TUNNEL The suspended promenade through the tunnels and above the tracks inevitably references the connection to New York but provides the possibility of a uniqueHoboken identity.


THE CHAPEL OF THE STREET & SENSORY ETHNOGRAPHY LAB JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA Mario Gooden, Critic (Spring 2012)


The Chapel of the Street & Sensory Ethnography Lab, Johannesburg, South Africa The space of Johannesburg presents distinct economic and cultural landscapes. The systems of value are not intrisinically divorced. Rather, the disjoined economic landscape reflects expired or external cultural biases, the prejudices of apartheid or the pressure to emulate Western success. In return, Johannesburg projects an architecture of estrangement: transportation infrastructure that divides communities, hermetically-sealed skyscrapes, suburban developments bound in walls. In contrast, the Chapel of the Stree and the Sensory Ethnography Lab explore an architecture of exchange through the excavation and ritualization of site-specific memory and programs. The Chapel is an African film forum whose cinemas can be entered at street level, through a retractable screen, or through a promenade of street programs

folded into the sides of the building. Across the street is a parking garage with bankers who do no use the street. They park their cars and use skybridges to get to work. The Chapel forces them to confront the street. The Sensory Ethnography Lab is a profane surface that is punctured, excavated, and interrupted by programs of sacred space, specifically a series of public galleries related to the history of the Freedom Charter, and a laboratory that collects artifacts ad memories of the site, recording oral histories of locals at the market.


THE CHAPEL OF THE STREET


SENSORY ETHNOGRAPHY LAB The groves into the plaza surface are interview booths, where the market slightly folds into the ground.


RESEARCH

I'm African RT @narriage: Bengazi ukuthi ubuya eLimpopo RT

RT @khayadlanga: My latest column "Land is a black and white issue."

We have learned to fly the air like birds and swim the sea like fish but we have not yet learned the simple art of living together as brothers.

LEFT This is a diagram of the property values of two adjacent neighborhoods, the wealthy Sandton and the poorer township of Alexandra. The extreme disparity is mediated by architecture - an enormous highway that divides one side from the other. RIGHT The second diagram maps the path of Twitter users and their tweets. The Tweets affect this value landscape in that they represent someone using a relatively expensive mobile device with a relatively expensive subscription package. More importantly, some tweets are strong declarations of identities once problematic in South Africa’s recent history. The capacity of mobile technology to give enhanced voice to the previously downtrodden in any part of town suggests a new value of universal connectivety. This exchange, unlike the disparities, is not yet marked in the built landscape.


Carlton Centre shopping area

Small Town Mall

street vendors

Carlton Centre shopping area

Small Town Mall

street vendors

“bad” buildings with upper floor, interior markets

bus station

“bad” buildings with upper floor, interior markets

Central Business District

bus station Carlton Centre shopping area

Small Town Mall

street vendors

“bad” buildings with upper floor, interior markets

Central Business District

economic currency of space cultural currency of space

bus station

Central Business District

economic currency of space


LEFT_CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT SITE RESEARCH alternately landscapes of cultural and economic value RIGHT_CHAPEL OF THE STREET The corner is an upstairs public square.


LEFT_SECTION PERSPECTIVE The Chapel across from the banker’s parking garage. CENTER_EXPLODED AXONS revealing different types of street program RIGHT_ELEVATION AND SECTION


SKYPE LOUNGE EXERCISE TRACK FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SELLERS AFRICAN NEWSPAPER WALL AFRICAN NEWSPAPER WALL STREET FOOD COURT PUBLIC SQUARE CAFE RETRACTABLE TRANSLUCENT CINEMA SCREEN

EXTERIOR CINEMAS

INTERIOR CINEMAS

SKYPE LOUNGE EXERCISE TRACK FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SELLERS AFRICAN NEWSPAPER WALL AFRICAN NEWSPAPER WALL STREET FOOD COURT PUBLIC SQUARE CAFE RETRACTABLE TRANSLUCENT CINEMA SCREEN

EXTERIOR CINEMAS

INTERIOR CINEMAS


AFRICAN NEWSPAPER WALL Every day, newspapers from across Africa are hung along this walkway.


SOAPBOX CORNER a place for public assembly and expression. In the distance is the public SKYPE lounge.


KLIPTOWN RESEARCH The memory of a dusty field, where the Freedom Charter was signed, is paved over by a modern plaza development in 2011. Other social activeties, such as the taxi rank and the path to the local train station, are also erased.

footpath to train station

taxi rank

field of Freedom Charter signing, 1955

KLIPTOWN, 2001

KLIPTOWN, 2011

footpath to train station

taxi rank

field of Freedom Charter signing, 1955

KLIPTOWN, 2001

Walter Sisulu economic currency of space Square

KLIPTOWN, 2011

footpath to train station

KLIPTOWN, 2001

Walter Sisulu Square

taxi rank

field of Freedom Charter signing, 1955

Walter Sisulu Square

economic currency of space

KLIPTOWN, 2011

economic currency of space cultural currency of space


ABOVE_SITE SECTION BELOW_SITE PLAN The intervention encourages the marketplace to fill the footprint of the taxi rank and excavates into the earth to recover the cultural value of the site’s memories.


VIEW TOWARDS VITRINES The Media Library, which collects oral histories, is housed in crystalline vitrines along the former path to the railway station.


RAMP TOWARDS THE FREEDOM CHARTER GALLERIES


SECTION PERSPECTIVE view through the Freedom Charter Gallery and into the adjacent archaeology laboratory, underground, where researchers collect and study artifacts related to the history of the site


VIEW TOWARDS MEDIA LIBRARY


BOB THE PAVILION COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK CITY In Collaboration with 11 other architecture students and (in theory) 12 other art students Galia Solomonoff, Nathan Carter, Liam Gillicks. Critics (Spring 2011)


Archinect

June 9, 2011

OP-ED: The Neglected Public Bathroom BY ADRIAN COLEMAN

According to the New York Post, the National 9/11 Memorial will open this year with no bathrooms. The $508 million project will draw legions of visitors and is characterized by gushing water, but anyone seeking a toilet will have to leave the site for a nearby department store. This omission of public bathrooms resonates with a personal architectural experience. Over the past six months, I participated in a collaboration of art and architecture students to design a pavilion at Columbia University. It is located in a courtyard behind the architecture school and will be up for most of the summer. A temporary structure, a pavilion is often the architect’s opportunity to build without the inconvenience of plumbing or other practicalities. Bucking the trend, our team eschewed highbrow inutility to design a public bathroom. Our mantra was an adapted Carl Andre quotation: A society that does not provide public bathrooms does not deserve public art. Columbia has almost no specified public bathrooms. By deploying a public bathroom in an academic courtyard, we wanted to recast a space of seclusion as open and engaged with the city. What distinguished our design from most public bathrooms was its composting toilet. Because our design was

temporary, we couldn’t connect to existing pipelines. A septic tank, as in a portable toilet, was also impractical because it required frequent emptying. A composting toilet is a waterless technology that breaks human waste into organic fertilizer. Numerous community gardens in New York use this method because it requires little maintenance, produces a useful product, and is astonishingly unsmelly. Sewer gases are the product of anaerobic digestion, which takes place in a wet system with little oxygen. Composting toilets, through sawdust and a continuous airstream, dry and oxygenate the tank to enable aerobic digestion. Microbes decompose matter efficiently. Instead of manufacturing sulfate or methane gases, the composting toilet produces soil-enriching nitrates and nitrites. In our proposal, the fan-assisted ventilation of the tank also pressurized a large inflatable canopy. This balloon signified the bathroom from a distance. It represented its sphere of influence. We enjoyed the idea that something as taboo as the toilet could support a whimsical and highly visible thought-bubble. Alas, the reality of architecture is that few projects are realized as they are designed. Sometimes the powers-thatbe are not interested in experimentation. Columbia Facilities reviewed our proposal early in the semester and expressed

sufficient approval such that plans for ordering the composting toilet began during Spring Break. However, during April, with construction under way, Facilities informed us that the composting toilet was not permitted. They raised concerns about the smell of the bathroom, the legality of the installation, and the possibility of a leak. In response, our team put together a lengthy document to address each of their concerns. We included a letter from the manufacturer that verified the toilet would neither smell nor leak and that our installation scheme was consistent with manual specifications. We included passages of code to indicate our proposal was within the boundaries of the law. We also included a contingency plan so that in the unlikely case of a leak, a hazardous waste company could remove the toilet and decontaminate the site within twelve hours. Facilities was unmoved. Next, they claimed our composting toilet had been used in recreational or residential situations but not an academic courtyard. It would require six months of testing prior to installation. The reasoning was finicky, but we realized no matter how we argued our case, Facilities was determined to block the composting toilet. Ultimately, we completed our pavilion with the composting toilet for display purposes only. Named Bob for its gentle undulation, the balloon hangs above

the non-functional bathroom and is in inflated by an electric fan separate from the composting system. Although our pavilion does not operate as we wished, we hope the diagram of our intention endures. For many of us, Bob is the first built proect in which we were principal designers. The process was inspiring, frustrating, and eye-opening. I am proud of our pavilion, but our non-functional bathroom remains a lost opportunity. That Columbia University found our public bathroom threatening perhaps confirms its urban disengagement. That the City of New York and Columbia University both found public bathrooms to be extraneous or unjustified suggests a broader theme. Our society is invested in the photogenic image of architecture but not the gritty infrastructure to facilitate collective experience. As a young architect interested in more than art museums, I hope to challenge this trend throughout my career. -----------------------------------Adrian Coleman is a graduate architecture student at Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, Preservation, and Planning. Directed by Professors Galia Solomonoff, Liam Gillick, and Nathan Carter, he and other students designed Bob the Pavilion, which will host various events through the summer of 2011.


VIEW FROM GOOGLE EARTH A secluded academic courtyard is activated by a lone public bathroom, signified above by the pneumatic.


LEFT_VIEW TOWARDS CHAPEL RIGHT_CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAM The typical American house is unwrapped and reduced to a toilet under a roof.


LEFT_PROPOSED SECTION The private courtyard is activated by the buoyant pneumatic, which in turn is propelled by exhaust from the public bathroom. RIGHT_BOB SEEN FROM SCHMERHORN


LEFT_BOB AT NIGHT During the summer, several performances, parties, and gatherings took place at the pavilion. RIGHT_BATHROOM WALL OF PROJECTION The wall of the bathroom consists of a translucent scrim, such that the occupant can watch films from the comfort of the “throne.” This idea of projection and pubic anonymonity recalls the graffitied walls of other public bathrooms.


LEFT_THE TOILET strictly for display purposes. A piece of acrylic was bolted beneath the seat. CENTER_THE WELL the courtyard’s ceremonial well, embedded in the decking, in seeming dialogue with the purely exhbitional toilet


RIGHT_BOB AT NIGHT


THE HOUSE THAT WEEPS NEW YORK CITY Yoshiko Sato, Critic (Fall 2009)


The House that Weeps New York City

Over the next decades, the United Nations predicts that world population will grow most intensely in urban areas. Simultaneously, water will become a scarcer, more precious resource. Could architecture address both issues? This laboratory considers how future urban architecture might harvest water from atmosphere. Structurally, the laboratory is a system of occupiable box beams hung with ultra-lightweight, glazed shingles. The laboratory acts as a Trombe wall: sunlight shines through the thin glass exterior on to the massive concrete structure behind, heating the air in the cavity between the layers. This creates a stack effect. Hot air rises and is diverted through the interior of the box beams to the central atrium, which acts as a chimney. The air cavity loses pressure, and cool air streams in at the base of the

building. At night, the lightweight glass shell cools quickly and easily. Water vapor in contact with the glass sheds energy and condenses on the surface, running into collection troughes at the bottom of each canted shingle. The water is used to support experimental gardens in the air cavity between the glass and the box beams. This space is accessible only during the daytime; at the night, the air cavity is sealed off as an insulating layer, ensuring the glass shell only radiates energy towards the outside of the building. Meanwhile, the thermal mass wall radiates only towards the interior.


THE HOUSE THAT WEEPS a laboratory for collecting water from the atmosphere


LEFT_AXON The building is comprised of a concrete tube structure on which hangs a thin, glass shel.. CENTER_AXON. SECTION The buliding features large cavities for air movement along it’s perimeter and in a center atrium.


RIGHT_EXPLODED AXON The exterior glass shell is removing, revealing the masonry structure. This particular combination of lightweight and heavy materials allows the building to release large amounts of heat at night, encouraging vapor to condense on the thin layer of exterior glass.


LEFT_SECTIONAL DIAGRAM Through a stack affect, air warms and rises through the exterior cavity, through the building, and out through the solar chimney. CENTER_ELEVATION The concrete thermal mass retains heat during the day and sheds it through out the night. The facade is used as condensing surface.


PLANS The laboratory incorpates garden spaces within the air cavity between the glass and concrete core. These spaces are accessible only during the day. At night, the air cavity must be sealed to maximize its insulating effect, thereby forcing the building to shed heat towards the exterior. MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

REE BMLT UAC LE DA OM A NIR E A T U DT O R P

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REE BMLA UAN LD DR OM T T CIE U O P R EA T A

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REE BMLT UAC LE DA OM A NIR E A T U DT O R P

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REE BMLA UAN LD DR OM T T CIE U O P R EA T A

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MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

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MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

MATERIAL PRODUCT TRADENAME MODELNUMBER

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0 0 32’

DAYLIGHT VS. 24 HR PROGRAM

0

0

8'

8'

0

8'

8'

8'

0

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8'

0

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8'

0

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8'

0


VIEW OF GARDEN WITH AIR CAVITY The plants are grown with water collected from the atmosphere.


THE LABORATORY AT NIGHT


MODEL SHOTS


TECHNICAL STUDIES


TROMBHAUS BRONX, NY in collaboration with Idan Naor, Garth Priber, and Michael Marsh Technical Project David Wallance, Critic Spring 2011 The Tromhaus is an industrial workshop for boutique manufacturing. Conceptually, a packed wall supports the entire building, housing the service cores, mechanical systems, vertical circulation, and trombe system. The trombe system involves thin tubes of fluid that warm inside a thermal mass and circulate through the building back into the heat exchanger. This greatly reduces the building’s reliance on active heating during the winter. In the summer, metal shades block the sun from warming the trombe wall.


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

15'-6"

T.O. MASS WALL 131'-6"

28'-0"

ROOF 116'-0"

14'-0"

7TH FLOOR 88'-0"

14'-0"

5TH FLOOR 60'-0"

14'-0"

4TH FLOOR 46'-0"

14'-0"

3RD FLOOR 32'-0"

2ND FLOOR 18'-0"

18'-0"

131'-6"

14'-0"

6TH FLOOR 72'-0"

1ST FLOOR 0'-0"

SOUTH ELEVATION The southern face incorporates the trombe wall and all of the building central mechanical and circulation systems.


LEFT_EAST ELEVATION

1

2

1

3

T.O. MASS WALL 131-6"

15'-6"

15'-6"

T.O. MASS WALL 131'-6"

RIGHT_NORTH-SOUTH SECTION

3

2

ROOF 116'-0"

28'-0"

28'-0"

ROOF 116'-0"

EXHIBITION SPACE

7TH FLOOR 88'-0"

14'-0"

14'-0"

7TH FLOOR 88'-0"

SHARED INDUSTRIAL FABRICATION SPACE 6TH FLOOR 72'-0"

131'-6"

14'-0"

14'-0"

PRIVATE OFFICE (MEZZANINE) 5TH FLOOR 60'-0"

14'-0"

14'-0"

5TH FLOOR 60'-0" SHARED INDUSTRIAL FABRICATION SPACE 4TH FLOOR 46'-0"

14'-0"

14'-0"

4TH FLOOR 46'-0" PRIVATE OFFICE (MEZZANINE) 3RD FLOOR 32'-0"

DRYWALL PARTITIONS

14'-0"

14'-0"

3RD FLOOR 32'-0"

2ND FLOOR 18'-0" SUNSHADING SYSTEM

18'-0"

HOLLOWCORE CONCRETE SLAB

10” PRECAST CONRETE PANELS

2ND FLOOR 18'-0"

SHARED INDUSTRIAL FABRICATION SPACE

DIAGONAL BRACING SET BACK ONE WAY

18'-0"

131'-6"

6TH FLOOR 72'-0"

1ST FLOOR 0'-0"

1ST FLOOR 0'-0"

1

1

2

3

2

3


SOUTHERN WALL ASSEMBLY AXONOMETRICS

19

11

12

8

5 7

6 21 15 3

14 13 1

16

2

17

4

18

9

10

1

4” x 4” STAINLESS STEEL STANCHION BOLT-MOUNTED TO INTEGRAL STANCHION BASE AND NOTCHED FOR POHL EUROPANEL ‘BUTTON’

10

C 15 X 50 C CHANNEL SPANNING BETWEEN COLUMNS AND SECURING CONCRETE PANEL TIE-BAKCS

19

W 14 X 53 STEEL BEAM BOLTED TO COLUMNS WITH 2-EA ‘L’ BRACKETS PER SIDE

2

FIN PLATES WELDED TO ENDS OF STANCHIONS TO RECEIVE STEEL CROSS BRACING RODS

11

W 12 X 120 STEEL COLUMN RUNNING FULL-HEIGHT AND SPLICED AS REQ’D

20

CAST IN PLACE REVEAL FOR SWEAT-CONNECTION OF HYDRONIC PIPES

3

1/8” WELDED ANODIZED ALUMINUM SUN SHADE UNITS SEPERATED FROM STANCHION WITH NEOPRENE GASKETS

12

ADJUSTABLE STAINLESS STEEL DIAGONAL CROSS BRACES SUPPORTING ALUMINUM STANCHIONS FOR SUN SHADES (WITH NEOPRENE SPACER)

21

HALFEN HCWL1 DEAD-LOAD GLAZING ANCHOR SUPPORTING LOWER END OF VERTICAL MULLIONS

4

CAVITY BEHIND STANCHION TO BE FILLED WITH FIRE STOPPING AND BATTON INSULATION AROUND STANCHION BASE

13

2” THICK CONCRETE TOPPING

22

HALFEN HWLC1 WIND-LOAD GLAZING ANCHOR SUPPORTING UPPER END OF VERTICAL MULLIONS

5

KAWNEER 1600 VERTICAL MULLION SUPPORTED BY HALFEN GLAZING ANCHORS

14

OLDCASTLE PRECAST HOLLOWCORE PLANKS 8” THK x 4’-0” WIDE, SPANNING FULL +/- 28’-0” STRUCTURAL BAYS

6

10” THICK PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS +/- 7’-0” x 14’-0” ON A MID-FLOOR TO MID-FLOOR MODULE, DEAD-LOADED TO GROUND

15

KAWNEER 1600 HORIZONTAL MULLION FRAMING IGU ABOVE AND ALUM. SHEATHED PANEL BELOW

7

HEAT-TREATED 1” IGU PANEL

16

INTEGRAL STANCHION NOTCHES TO RECEIVE POHL EUROPANEL (OR EQUIVALENT) ‘BUTTON’ SUNSHADE SUPPORTS (NEOPRENE SLEVE BTWN)

8

HYDRONIC HEATING TUBES SLID INTO PRECAST CHANNELS IN CONCRETE PANELS AND SWEAT-CONNECTED IN REVEAL LOCATIONS

17

ALUMINUM SHEATHED FOAM SPANDREL PANELS WITH CENTER CUTOUT TO ACCOMMODATE STANCHION

9

HALFEN ANCHOR CHANNEL CAST INTO CONCRETE PANEL WITH LONG HALFEN TEE-BOLT INTO C-CHANNEL

18

W 10 X 45 STEEL EDGE BEAM BOLTED TO COLUMNS WITH 2-EA ‘L’ BRACKETS PER SIDE


ADVANCED CURTAIN WALL Technical Project Dan Vos, Robert Heintges, Critics, Spring 2012 The proposed curtain wall system is a unitized doubleskin façade with responsive, computer-operated louvers. The system is intended to moderate heating and cooling costs in a temperate climate. The cavity between the glazing acts as a thermal buffer and a natural ventilation channel. The automated louvers negotiate solar gain. Conceptually, this system considers environmental control as an aesthetic prompt. Across the building’s curved elevation, the angle of the louvers adjusts to the sun angle and each panel’s respective orientation. Accordingly, the elevation oscillates with the changing gradient of the louvers. The building’s shifting image is a product of the sun’s arc.


ELEVATION

ADRIAN COLEMAN ADVANCED CURTAIN WALL

3

ELEVATION 1 1/2" = 1'


SECTION, ELEVATION, PLAN

11 1/2"

10 1/2"

8' 8"

13' 5"

5 7

2' 11"

6

8

ADRIAN COLEMAN ADVANCED CURTAIN WALL

2

PLAN, SECTION, ELEVATION 1 1/2" = 1'


SEASONAL DIAGRAMS describing at what times of yearthe wall intakes and exhaust external air

WINTER

ADRIAN COLEMAN ADVANCED CURTAIN WALL

SPRING/FALL/SUMMER NIGHT

SUMMER DAY

4

SEASONAL DIAGRAMS DIAGRAMS SEASONAL 111/2" 1/2”==1' 1’


1/2"

LEFT_PLAN DETAIL AT ANCHOR PLATE

5

PLAN DETAIL AT VERTICAL OPENING 6" = 1'

4"

RIGHT_SECTION DETAIL AT STACK JOINT anchor

shuttle and bracket

6"

12"

1/2"

1/2"

4"

6

PLAN DETAIL AT ANCHOR 6" = 1'


horizontal air intake vertical air exhaust

louver controlling air intake to fan/coil unit 4 1/4"

3/4"

computer-controlled sunshade fan/coil unit

electrical junction box

5"

7

PLAN DETAIL AT ANCHOR 6" = 1'


PAINTINGS MOSTLY BROOKLYN, GENERALLY WATERCOLOR selected works (2009 - 2012)


LEFT_SUBWAY SECTION andundusdam ipiciet, si nam, ipsunti atiasped modi nullautem quo quam fuga. Aqui RIGHT_ BROOKLYN THRIFTSTORE


MECHANICAL UNIT ON DEMOLSIHED WAREHOUSE


G TRAIN AT 4TH AND 9TH STREETS


GRAFFITI TRUCK AT SMITH AND 9TH STREETS


BROOKLYN GROCERY


TRUCK 1


GOWANUS CANAL FROM 9TH STREET BRIDGE


SCRAPBOOK: ADRIAN COLEMAN, M. ARCH., GSAPP 2009-2012  

architecture portfolio from Columbia GSAPP, 2009-2012

SCRAPBOOK: ADRIAN COLEMAN, M. ARCH., GSAPP 2009-2012  

architecture portfolio from Columbia GSAPP, 2009-2012

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