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I NTRODUCTION

MAQUETTE OF JANSEN’S DOUBLE-HEIGHT LIVING ROOM FOR THE NEW YORK RESIDENCE OF DRUE AND HENRY J. HEINZ II, C. 1963

gone from an almost exclusive espousal of 18th-century taste to a concentration on contemporary design. In the new headquarters, Ortiz-Cabrera demonstrated economy while promoting innovative design. The walls were covered in overlapping panels of brown butcher paper, which provided a “wonderful, energetic look,” remembered Amar. “He was a genius in the way he could take very little and make it come across as something so magnificent.”66 Added to this simple scheme were faux-wood doors, trimmed in black lacquer, with gold fittings. The furniture was more traditional, but spare in quantity, with Louis XVI–style chairs and a fabric-lined bookcase serving as the main grouping. The mix “was chic for that time because no

one dared to take such chances . . . that’s what made Carlos so great.”67 This transformation was no doubt to Delbée’s liking. Unfortunately, it was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in clients. Those that remained true to Jansen included connoisseur and art patron Ailsa Mellon Bruce, a banking heiress whose drawn-out commission ended with her 1969 death; the completed apartment, which included a dining room with “paneling” made of upholstered silk trimmed with various decorative tapes, was never photographed nor celebrated to the benefit of Ortiz-Cabrera and Jansen, Inc.68 The unfortunate reality was that the New York office had sacrificed the style for which it was best known to

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Jansen: Decoration (excerpt)  

Jansen showcases 30 of the company's most alluring commissions, including rooms for the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, the Shah and Shahbanou...

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