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same tack? A race, of course! Paul had us trim the sails very precisely in order to ensure a win. We steadily pulled ahead of the catamaran. The passengers aboard the catamaran seemed so impressed that one pulled out a camera to take pictures of us before we got too far ahead for them to capture the action. Several hours and more than 20 nautical miles away from our morning anchor, we pulled into Leverick Bay. We dropped anchor, all of us satisfied and tired from a great day of sailing – and our racing win over a catamaran. Day 4 • Paul checks the weather at Leverick’s and the debate continues: Will we make an attempt to sail to Anguilla? • High speed sailing drills in the anchorage with nervous and excited onlookers aboard anchored boats who witness fine sailing skills but wonder if there is a chance someone might get hit in the maneuvers...

This day was to be another step in our progression toward becoming stronger sailors, helping prepare us for bigger waters ahead. We woke and Tom prepared a breakfast of omelets in our tiny floating kitchen. As we ate, Paul regaled us with a story of a disastrous and somewhat comical sailing race in Lake Michigan in which he participated years before. He waved his arms wildly and gave a detailed account of rigging snapping in powerful winds and then the mast snapping… Paul was animated and I imagined 32

INTERNATIONAL

he shared his sailing story in much the same way that other sailors and pirates of the Caribbean might have hundreds of years ago. After our hearty breakfast, we went ashore again. It was time for Paul to connect his laptop to the Wi-Fi network and check the latest weather report to see if there might be a chance for us to consider sailing the Sombrero Passage to Anguilla. Paul determined that weather reports of rough seas between the Virgin Islands and Anguilla were too much for our mixed crew to chance the passage. Instead, we would sail for St. Croix the next day. Paul assured us the weather would provide us plenty of excitement and challenge, that mother nature could always surprise us. Paul continued to incrementally push our comfort zone as a crew. On this day, we practiced boat-handling skills and man overboard drills, shoring up our collection of skills before we headed out to bigger waters. Paul also ran safety lines on both the port and starboard sides of the boats. We also donned our safety gear and practiced working aboard the Solstice while clipped in with safety lines. After this practice, we hoisted the anchor and sailed into the bay to begin a rigorous day. During the previous days, Paul had assessed us to measure skill level and our ability to work together. Now, it was time to put the tasks we’ve learned and our individual skills together to tack, jibe, and maneuver the boat on command. We also had to practice the most important skill of all: to properly respond to a man overboard drill and to demonstrate the skill necessary to maneuver the boat to come to the rescue of a shipmate in the water.

ÉCLAT INTERNATIONAL - Feb/Mar 2016 Issue  

The Broad Museum in Los Angeles Art Basel Miami Beach Sailing in the Caribbean

ÉCLAT INTERNATIONAL - Feb/Mar 2016 Issue  

The Broad Museum in Los Angeles Art Basel Miami Beach Sailing in the Caribbean

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