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Academy of Ancient Music Baroque in high definition 24 September West Road Concert Hall, Cambridge, UK 25 September Wigmore Hall, London, UK

Welcome! We are thrilled to have you with us for Baroque in high definition, the opening concert of our varied 2009–10 London and Cambridge seasons.

The inspiration behind tonight’s programme came over a year ago, when our Chief Executive Peter Ansell was blown away by the impact of the Andante from Vivaldi’s glorious Violin Concerto in B flat major in the concluding scene of Gabriele Salvatores’ film I’m not scared. Peter’s experience motivated us to meditate on the powerful effect which music has on many films, and after countless discussions with our friends at the Cambridge Film Festival this evening’s programme came into being. Film and music enjoy a truly fascinating relationship. As Carlo Cenciarelli explains in his article on the use of tonight’s music in films (pages 3–4), “western art music has always played an important role in cinema”, but “in the process of using it, cinema shapes the way we listen to it”. The music also tells its own story, of course, and in his programme note Stephen Rose takes a closer look at the nuts and bolts of the works we perform tonight (pages 5–7).

Tonight’s concert comes at a hugely exciting time for the AAM. We have just completed our landmark three-year project to record Handel’s instrumental music Opp.1–7. The final disc — Handel’s Trio Sonatas Opp.2 and 5 — will hit the shelves next month, but those who want to beat the crowds can buy it hot off the press at our CD sales desk tonight. This month we have performed at the BBC Proms, teamed up with Sarah Connolly to celebrate Purcell’s 350th birthday live on BBC Radio 3, and taken Haydn’s music home to Esterhaza Palace, where the composer worked for much of his life. Early next month we’re off to Libya and China: we’ll be performing Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas in the stunning Roman amphitheatre at Sabratha on the north African coast, and opening the Macau International Music Festival with Haydn’s Nelson Mass and music by Purcell and Christopher Gibbons. To find out more, turn to page 13, or pick up a season brochure after tonight’s concert. This evening’s performance could not have taken place without the support of RBC Wealth Management. We are delighted to have the opportunity to thank the Bank publicly for its tremendous generosity.

THESE PERFORMANCES ARE STAGED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE CAMBRIDGE FILM FESTIVAL WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM RBC WEALTH MANAGEMENT


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Programme Richard Egarr director & harpsichord Pavlo Beznosiuk violin Rodolfo Richter violin Katharina Spreckelsen oboe

As featured in HANNAH AND HER SISTERS (1986)

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Concerto in F minor for harpsichord BWV1056 Allegro Largo Presto

As featured in MASTER AND COMMANDER (2003)

Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713) Concerto Grosso in G minor Op.6 No.8 ‘Christmas Concerto’ Vivace — Grave, Arcate sostenute e come stà Allegro Adagio — Allegro — Adagio Vivace Allegro Pastorale ad Libitum: Largo

As featured in LE ROI DANSE (2000)

?Jean de Cambefort (1605-1661) & others Overture from Le Ballet de la Nuit

Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687) Sarabande from Les Plaisirs LWV2

?Jean de Cambefort & others Le Roi representant le soleil levant from Le Ballet de la Nuit

As featured in LORENZO’S OIL (1992)

Alessandro Marcello (1669-1747)

Jean-Baptiste Lully

Concerto in D minor for oboe Andante e spiccato Adagio Presto

Plus j’observe ces lieux and Passacaille from Armide

As featured in I’M NOT SCARED (2003)

Concerto in D minor for two violins BWV1043 Vivace Largo ma non tanto Allegro

Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) Concerto in B flat major for violin RV583 Largo e spiccato — Allegro non molto Andante Allegro — Adagio Interval of 20 minutes Please check that your mobile phone is switched off, especially if you used it during the interval

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As featured in CHILDREN OF A LESSER GOD (1986)

Johann Sebastian Bach

Would patrons please ensure that mobile phones are switched off. Please stifle coughing as much as possible, and ensure that watch alarms and any other electronic devices which may become audible are switched off. Thank you.


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Baroque in high definition

Carlo Cenciarelli describes the use of tonight’s music in film soundtracks As the title ‘Baroque in high definition’ suggests, cinema both uses pre-existing music and mediates our experience of it. On the one hand Western art music has always played an important role in cinema — from the compiled anthologies for silent-movie accompanists, via the late romantic idiom of symphonic Hollywood scoring, to its consistent quotation in contemporary cinema. On the other hand, in the process of using music, cinema shapes the way we listen to it. By means of selecting and cutting, rearranging and juxtaposing with other music, associating with images, narratives, people, spaces and places, films can direct our musical imagination. The contrasting films which inspire tonight’s programme give a sense of the range of functions performed by baroque music in cinema as well as the way in which cinema ‘performs’ this music. Corelli — Concerto Grosso in G minor Op.6 No.8 (Master and Commander) Corelli’s concerto plays on an English battleship during the Napoleonic wars in Peter Weir’s Master and Commander. The film centres on a prolonged naval chase in the Pacific Ocean. Between battles, the captain, who is a dedicated violinist, joins in duets with the ship’s surgeon, a cellist and long-time friend. They play arrangements of Mozart, Boccherini, and the Adagio of Corelli’s concerto. As the film unfolds, these duets become emblematic of the consolation they take from their friendship and, more generally, of the closeness of the ship’s community. At its first entry, the Adagio takes over from cheerful sailor chants, underscoring an aerial shot of the ship, offering a view of the ocean at night. We hear the music in its full orchestration, but in the closing bar the texture is paired down to violin and cello. Through the windows of the stern, a light illuminates the protagonists playing in the privacy of the captain’s cabin.

Marcello — Concerto in D minor for oboe (Lorenzo’s Oil) Lorenzo’s Oil is a fictionalised account of a child who falls ill with a rare degenerative disease, and centres on his parents’ determined quest for a cure. The film’s soundtrack consists entirely of pre-existing music. Marcello’s concerto — the film features the Adagio — fulfills two roles. Together with the use of nineteenth-century Italian opera (Donizetti and Bellini’s Norma), it serves as a marker of the nationality of Lorenzo’s father. Also, used alongside music with either explicit religious affiliations (such as Mozart’s Ave Verum Corpus) or cultural associations with rituals of mourning (such as Barber’s Adagio for Strings), it helps to dignify the suffering of the film’s protagonists. In turn, this invites us to consider the mournful tone of the oboe’s line. Set in the context of the protagonists’ suffering, the subtlety of the Italianate melody, its expansive ascents, melismas and gently piercing, sustained notes can be heard as expressive of nuances of grieving, acquiescence, and expectation. Vivaldi — Concerto in B flat major for violin (I’m not scared) The Andante of Vivaldi’s concerto underscores the concluding scene of Gabriele Salvatores’ I’m not scared. The narrative crux of the film is the friendship established between ten-year-old Michele and a boy who has been kidnapped by Michele’s own parents. In a climactic finale, Michele understands that the boy is going to be killed and, in the process of releasing him, is accidentally shot by his father. This narrative shock is followed by the entry of Vivaldi’s Andante, which steers the film towards an uplifting ending. The kidnapped boy returns to find out what has happened to Michele, and stands, helpless but defiant, in front of his gaolers. A police helicopter hovers over a cornfield enveloping the protagonists in white light and wind. As the solo violin gains in confidence, grows in volume and reaches its

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high point, the two boys stretch their hands towards each other, and the film reaches its close.

addresses Molière. “Listen,” he says, pointing at the musicians. “He will set your words to music as he sets music to my dreams.”

JS Bach — Concerto in F minor for harpsichord (Hannah and Her Sisters) In Woody Allen’s Hannah and Her Sisters, Elliot secretly courts his sister-in-law, Lee, with music and poetry. Lee seems to encourage him. While her partner is downstairs, she puts on a record of Bach’s Concerto in F minor, cueing in the Largo. As Bach begins, they fall quieter. Elliot seems to be struggling to retain his composure. We hear his thoughts (“I want so badly to kiss her. Not here, you idiot... This is a very delicate situation... This has to be done very skillfully, very diplomatically”) just before he jumps to her lips. In the process of doing so he clumsily pushes her against the gramophone, causing the record to skip to the Presto. The match between action and music, invoking the timing of an early cinema gag, is played out for comic effect. If the Largo contributed to the choreography of the moment of romance, now the Presto matches its unravelling.

JS Bach — Concerto in D minor for two violins (Children of a Lesser God) Children of a Lesser God tells the love story of John, a teacher of children with special needs, and Sarah, a deaf girl who works in his school. The Adagio of the double concerto recurs four times, and Bach’s music is established both as the sound of their romance and the symbol of the obstacles they have to overcome. The most topical of Bach’s recurrences is in the middle of the film, when Sarah asks John to “show her” the music. Looking embarassed, John closes his eyes and tries to externalise his response to the music. He points his finger towards the ceiling at the high entry of the second violin, then clasps his hands together as the two contrapuntal lines interlace. Then he forfeits. The music continues in the background as they embrace.

Lully — Sarabande from Les Plaisirs; Plus j’observe ces lieux and Passacaille from Armide (Le Roi Danse) Le Roi Danse by Gerard Courbiau tells the story of Louis XIV’s ascent to power via his relations with court composer Lully and playwright Molière. Lully’s music is presented as an integral part of Louis XIV’s transformation into the Sun King, royal dancer and proverbial example of absolute monarch. The ballets become integral to the aestheticisation of the King’s body. Also, the King’s passion for music and dance seems to imply that his extraordinary concentration of powers stems from an aesthetic imperative. In this sense, the use of Plus j’observe ces lieux is particularly suggestive. The scene imagines the King walking through marshes, followed by Lully and a group of musicians and dictating his unbounded vision of the court of Versailles to the architect Le Vau. The King then stops and

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Carlo Cenciarelli © 2009


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Programme Notes Stephen Rose introduces the music in tonight’s programme The concertos and dance-movements performed in this programme all originated in the decades around 1700, yet have found new life and new meanings in films of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. One reason why these pieces function so successfully in new contexts is that their harmonic vocabulary speaks across the centuries, commanding the attention of present-day listeners who may or may not be familiar with baroque musical style. Composers such as Corelli and Lully were among the first musicians to use the harmonic style often known as common-practice tonality. Their pieces contain simple chordal progressions that create expectations of harmonic resolution, and yet frequently dash these expectations by introducing surprisingly dissonant chords or by evading the anticipated cadence. Vivaldi and Bach went one step further, using the ritornello technique whereby a recognisable musical motto returns in different keys; this allowed the sense of tonal tension and resolution to be extended across a whole movement. In short, these baroque composers pioneered fundamental techniques of musical communication that would continue to be used for centuries after their deaths. Indeed, many film composers rely on harmonic tension and resolution as a way to provide a musical counterpart to the on-screen narrative. The compositions of Arcangelo Corelli (1653–1713) codified the harmonic vocabulary of the high baroque. All of Corelli’s surviving output consists of instrumental compositions which, without a verbal text, must make sense on their own terms. Indeed, Corelli’s sonatas and concertos have an impeccable tonal logic. He discovered exactly the devices that made the music sound in a clear key, favouring a trio texture where the two upper parts push purposefully through a series of dissonances to a cadence. The elegance and economy of Corelli’s harmonies were widely recognised by his contemporaries. For the English writer Roger

North, Corelli’s example “cleared the ground of all other sorts of musick whatsoever”. Corelli’s pupil Francesco Gasparini described his teacher as the “true Orpheus of our time, who, with so much artfulness, study and grace, moves and makes harmonies with those basses of his, with suspensions and dissonances so well regulated and resolved... that it may well be said that he discovered the perfection of a harmony that enraptures.” Corelli’s assured harmonic skill is evident throughout his Concerto Grosso Op.6 No.8 ‘Christmas Concerto’. The main part of this concerto consists of a succession of short sections, each characterised by a strong sense of harmonic direction. Interest is also assured by the constant contrasts of tempo and the alternations of texture between the trio of soloists (two violins and cello) and the sound of massed strings. The concerto justifies its nickname with the concluding Pastorale — here the harmonic tensions and rapid contrasts of the earlier movements give way to rocking melodies and long, sustained phrases. The 12/8 metre and the static bass-line evoke the stylised music of shepherds’ pipes; this was a musical topos associated with Christmas throughout Catholic lands. Whereas Corelli pioneered lucid harmonic designs in his Concerti Grossi, Venetian composers of the early eighteenth century wrote concertos inspired by the textures and harmonic tactics of opera. Rather than use a trio of soloists, they singled out a single instrumentalist (analogous to the solo singer in an operatic aria); and they aped the earcatching formulae of opera, such as the use of diminished seventh chords to signal sudden drama. Above all, the Venetian composers used the device of the ritornello (‘little return’) as a way to hold their listeners’ attention and create coherence across the different ideas in a movement. These methods of musical

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A R C A N G E LO CO R E L L I Š L E B R E C H T M U S I C A N D A R TS

communication are all used in the Concerto in D minor for oboe by Alessandro Marcello (1669–1747), the son of a Venetian nobleman. The first movement opens with the ritornello stated by the stark texture of unison strings (a favourite way for opera composers to catch the attention of listeners); the oboe line is more melodious, yet is repeatedly pushed forward by harmonic sequences leading to the cadence. The slow movement grows out of repeated notes in the strings that form dissonant clusters, over which the oboe enters with its gentle melody. The finale, a vigorous 3/8 dance, opens with an oboe solo, answered by rushing downward scales in the strings that maintain the harmonic momentum. The Venetian style of concerto writing is exemplified by Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741),

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whose violin concertos combine showy solo parts with a sheer harmonic vigour created by incessantly repeated figures or dissonances. This harmonic panache is audible in his Concerto in B flat major for violin RV 583, even though the scoring is somewhat Corellian. The orchestra is divided into two choirs of strings, which are heard in alternation as well as being used as a backing for the solo violin. In the middle movement, both string choirs offer a rich accompaniment for the solo line; it gains a hypnotic effect by being based on a 7-bar repeating bass-line. The solo part starts with staccato repeated notes, then gradually enlarges its tessitura to include figures spanning a third, then eventually arpeggios across two octaves. The finale is a lively gigue, where Vivaldi again delights in the variety of texture available with the two string choirs.


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The musical characteristics of Venetian concertos seized the imagination of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750) when he was in his mid-twenties. Although he never visited Italy, he encountered Italian instrumental music when his patron in Weimar returned from a European tour with copies of Vivaldi’s latest concertos that Bach then excitedly transcribed for keyboard. Bach also transcribed Marcello’s Oboe Concerto for harpsichord. Not only was Bach attracted by the driving rhythms and insistent dissonances of Venetian composers; he also learned that the ritornello was a way to structure a large-scale movement, and he henceforth applied this principle in almost all of his music. As his first biographer Johann Nikolaus Forkel would write, Vivaldi’s music taught Bach the crucial compositional principles of Ordnung, Zusammenhang and Verhältnis (order, continuity and proportion). Bach’s Concerto in F minor for harpsichord BWV 1056 shows the continuing influence of Vivaldi in its driving rhythms and repeated melodic motifs, such as the way that the opening four bars circle around repeated Fs. The key is an unusual choice for the early eighteenth century — Bach’s contemporary Johann Mattheson described it as one of ‘unavailing melancholy’ and ‘heartache’ — and on unequally tempered instruments the remoteness of some of its harmonies is audible. The central Largo, in the equally unusual key of A flat major, combines a filigree melody on the harpsichord with pizzicato strings; this is probably a transcription from a lost oboe concerto by Bach. The final Presto, a gutsy 3/8 dance, again makes use of pizzicato strings, particularly in the echoes heard every eight bars in the opening section. In contrast with the concertos that make up the bulk of this programme, the items by JeanBaptiste Lully (1632–1687) are dances from his ballets and stage works. Whereas Corelli

favoured a trio texture, Lully focused musical interest on the top and bottom parts of his dance music; indeed, he often left the inner parts (‘parties de remplissage’) to be filled in by the assistants in his compositional workshop. The Sarabande from the ballet Les Plaisirs (1655) is an early example of Lully’s dance writing, with an intriguingly irregular mix of three-bar and four-bar phrases. More ambitious are the movements from Armide, a tragédie en musique of 1686. The Air Plus j’observe cex lieux contains rippling lines, depicting the river that forms the pastoral backdrop to Act 2; while the Passacaille (accompanying the dance of ‘The Pleasures’ at Armide’s enchanted palace in Act 5) is based on a repeated four-bar descending bass-line, occasionally interspersed with episodes that lead in different harmonic directions. The closing piece in tonight’s concert, JS Bach’s Concerto in D minor for two violins BWV 1043, again shows his absorption of Italian styles. Indeed, the writing for two solo violins often gives a trio texture reminiscent of Italian composers such as Corelli and Giuseppe Torelli. However, the contrapuntal elements reflect Bach’s German heritage, particularly in the absorbing fugue that occupies the first movement (with the theme heard first in the orchestra, then in the two solo violins). The counterpoint relents in the Largo, a pastorale in the manner of Vivaldi. But it returns with a vengeance in the restless finale, where the soloists pursue each other closely and set up conflicting rhythms against the tutti. Here Bach shows another side to his compositional personality. He pushes his themes and his players to their utmost, almost as if a Protestant work ethic makes him ashamed of underemployment. Stephen Rose © 2009

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Richard Egarr director & harpsichord Glyndebourne to the Beijing Concert Hall to Carnegie Hall. On top of a busy schedule of concerts worldwide with the Academy of Ancient Music, he has recently collaborated with the Residentie Orchestra of the Hague, the Brabant Orchestra, the Flemish Radio Orchestra and Choir, the Netherlands Bach Society and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Richard has given innumerable solo performances around Europe, Japan and the USA. Recent USA tours have included JS Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier and Goldberg Variations. As an orchestral soloist he has appeared with the AAM, the English Concert, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, the Orchestra of the 18th Century, the Dutch Radio Chamber Orchestra and the Netherlands Wind Ensemble.

Richard Egarr, acclaimed Music Director of the Academy of Ancient Music, is one of the most versatile musicians performing today. He has worked with all types of keyboards, performing repertoire ranging from 15th-century organ music to Berg and Maxwell Davies on modern piano. He is in great demand as a soloist and a chamber musician as well as a conductor. Richard enjoyed his musical training as a choirboy at York Minster, at Chetham’s School of Music in Manchester, and as organ scholar at Clare College, Cambridge. His studies with Gustav and Marie Leonhardt further inspired his work in the field of historically-informed performance. As a conductor, Egarr has directed repertoire ranging from JS Bach’s St Matthew Passion to John Tavener’s Ikon of Light. Numerous opera, oratorio and orchestral performances have taken him to venues ranging from

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In chamber music, Richard forms an “unequalled duo for violin and keyboard” (Gramophone) with violinist Andrew Manze, performing music from the Stylus Phantasticus to Mozart and Schubert. They have toured extensively throughout Europe, North America and the Far East. Egarr records exclusively for Harmonia Mundi USA. His solo output includes works by Frescobaldi, Gibbons, Couperin, Purcell, Froberger, Mozart and JS Bach. His awardwinning recordings with Manze include sonatas by Bach, Biber, Rebel, Pandolfi, Corelli, Handel, Mozart and Schubert. With the Academy of Ancient Music he has recorded JS Bach’s harpsichord concertos, JS Bach’s complete Brandenburg Concertos, and a set of Handel discs including the Concerti Grossi Op.3, the Organ Concertos Op.4 and 7 and the Sonatas Opp.1, 2 and 5.


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PAV LO B E Z N O S I U K

Katharina Spreckelsen oboe Katharina Spreckelsen was born in Wolfenbüttel, Germany. After studying medicine for two years at Göttingen University, she began her professional music career, studying first with the late Michel Piguet at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis and then with Paul Goodwin at the Royal College of Music in London.

Katharina is principal oboist for the English Concert, the Early Opera Company and the Gabrieli Players. She regularly performs in this country and all over the world with these and many other ensembles, including the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. Katharina is equally at home as a concerto soloist, chamber musician and orchestral player. Katharina is Professor of Baroque and Classical Oboe at the Royal Academy of Music in London. Pavlo Beznosiuk violin A long-standing presence on the early music scene, Pavlo Beznosiuk has earned the respect of musicians, audiences and critics alike through

RODOLFO RICHTER

his virtuosity and versatility on renaissance, baroque and classical violins and viola. He has a formidable reputation throughout the world as soloist, chamber musician and increasingly as a director. As well as directing the Avison Ensemble, Pavlo has a continuing role as leader and a guest director of the Academy of Ancient Music. He has also directed the Orchestra of The Age of Enlightenment, The Hanover Band, L'Arte dei Suonatori and Le Jeune Orchestre Atlantique. Pavlo’s extensive list of recordings is testament to his popularity as one of the field's outstanding players. They include an acclaimed version of Biber’s “Rosary” Sonatas with actor Timothy West, Vivaldi's Violin Concerti Op.6 with the AAM, world premiere recordings of music by JJ Walther and JP von Westhoff, Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante with Monica Huggett and prizewinning recordings of the Schubert Octet and Cherubini Quartets with Hausmusik. The five-year, ground-breaking project with the Avison Ensemble to record Avison's entire output is drawing to a close with the muchpraised recent release of Avison's arrangements of Scarlatti’s keyboard sonatas.

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The next year sees the release of Pavlo’s recording of JS Bach’s solo sonatas and partitas on LINN Records and Handel's Concerti Grossi Op.6 with the Avison Ensemble, duo recitals and a recording of Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante with Rachel Podger, performances of Haydn’s violin concerti with AAM and recitals combining Bach’s solo violin music with music by Berio and Bartok. He will also take part in the first concerts of The Division Lobby, an ensemble exploring group and solo improvisation from 17th-century Italy. Exciting new ventures with the Avison Ensemble include recording Vivaldi’s Violin Concerti Op.8, the entire output of Arcangelo Corelli, and concerts marking the anniversaries of Handel and William Herschel, whose Violin Concerto in D minor Pavlo resurrected with the Avison Ensemble. Pavlo teaches baroque violin at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. Rodolfo Richter violin Rodolfo Richter was trained as a modern violinist with Klaus Wusthoff and Pinchas Zuckermann and has studied composition with Hans Joachim Koellreutter and Pierre Boulez. He studied baroque violin with Monica Huggett at the Royal Academy of Music and has performed with most of Britain’s leading period ensembles. Also in demand as a chamber musician, he has regularly collaborated in concerts and recordings with the Bach Players, Sonnerie, and Hausmusik, and since 2002 he has been a member of the acclaimed Palladian Ensemble (now known as Palladians).

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Rodolfo was a prize-winner at the prestigious International Early Music Competition for Ensembles in Bruges (2000), and won first prize at the Antonio Vivaldi International Violin Competition (2001). Since then, he has often been invited both as a soloist and director of many orchestras, including Academia Montis Regalis (Italy), Barokkanerne (Norway), B'Rock (Belgium), Die Kölner Akademie (Germany), Harmonia Universalis (Brazil), St. James Baroque, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, the Hannover Band and the English Concert, as well as the Academy of Ancient Music. He has recorded Vivaldi’s solo concertos, JS Bach and Telemann’s triple concertos, JS Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos and Handel’s Trio Sonatas op.2 and op.5 with AAM, as well as an album of sonatas by Tartini and Veracini and the first recording of the complete sonatas by Erlebach. Future recording plans include Vivaldi's concertos and music by John Cage with B'Rock, and an album of JS Bach’s Trio Sonatas. As a soloist and chamber musician Rodolfo has performed throughout the UK and toured extensively in Europe, USA, South America, Australia, the Middle and Far East. He has appeared in such prestigious venues as London’s Wigmore Hall, the Concertgebow in Amsterdam, Konzerthaus Wien, Sidney’s City Hall, Chicago’s Orchestra Hall, and the Alice Tully Hall and Carnegie Hall in New York. He teaches baroque violin at the Royal College of Music in London.


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Academy of Ancient Music Violin 1 Pavlo Beznosiuk* Rebecca Livermore Liz MacCarthy Pierre Joubert

Double Bass Judith Evans

Bassoon Alexandre Salles

Oboe Katharina Spreckelsen Lars Henriksson

Harpsichord Richard Egarr

*Sponsored chairs Leader Mr and Mrs George Magan Principal cello Dr Christopher and Lady Juliet Tadgell

Violin 2 Rodolfo Richter William Thorp Jo Lawrence Marianne Szucs

Principal flute Christopher and Phillida Purvis

Viola Trevor Jones Rachel Byrt*

Sub-principal viola Sir Nicholas and Lady Goodison

Cello Joseph Crouch* Cassandra Luckhardt*

Sub-principal cello Newby Trust Ltd

Chief Executive Peter Ansell Orchestra Manager Andrew Moore

Music Director Richard Egarr Emeritus Director Christopher Hogwood CBE

Board of Directors Adam Broadbent John Everett Matthew Ferrey John Grieves Christopher Hogwood CBE Heather Jarman Christopher Purvis CBE (Chairman) Dr Christopher Tadgell Sarah Miles Williams

Development Board Adam Broadbent Delia Broke Kate Donaghy John Everett Matthew Ferrey John Grieves Madelaine Gunders Elizabeth Hartley-Brewer Annie Norton Christopher Purvis CBE Dr Christopher Tadgell Madeleine Tattersall Sarah Miles Williams

Marketing & Development Manager Simon Fairclough Concerts & Tours Manager Kate Caro Assistant Marketing & Development Manager Toby Chadd Finance Manager Elaine Hendrie Intern Annabel Marsland

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Academy of Ancient Music Recently hailed as “one of the world’s great orchestras” by China Daily following its debut performance in Beijing, the Academy of Ancient Music is a household name renowned worldwide for its energized, passionate performances of baroque and classical music. Since it was founded by Christopher Hogwood in 1973 the AAM has reached music lovers worldwide with over 250 recordings and live performances on every continent except Antarctica. The AAM specialises in performing on instruments and in styles dating from the time when the music was composed. Under Hogwood’s leadership it established itself as a leading authority on how music was originally performed. This pioneering work had a transformative impact on the world of classical music, and lies at the heart of the AAM’s reputation for musical excellence. In 2006, Hogwood passed leadership of the AAM on to Richard Egarr. In his first three years as Music Director, Egarr has led tours to four continents, released CDs which have already won Gramophone, MIDEM and Edison awards, and founded the award-winning Choir of the AAM. Concerts with Egarr in 2009–10 see the orchestra performing music ranging from Monteverdi to Britten around the world. Highlights include a tour of music by anniversary composers Purcell and Haydn to Africa and the Far East, a Christmas tour of Handel’s Messiah around Europe, and a fascinating programme showcasing the music of Monteverdi’s little-known contemporary Dario Castello. The vitality of the AAM’s music making continues to be fostered by a range of guest directors. This season the orchestra works with Pavlo Beznosiuk, who directs a programme contrasting the Pergolesi and Vivaldi settings of

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“A superb period instrument band” N E W YO R K T I M E S , MA R C H 2 0 0 9

the Stabat Mater; violinist Giuliano Carmignola, who directs early masterpieces by Mendelssohn and Schubert; Stephen Cleobury, who conducts a major European tour of Monteverdi’s Vespers will the choir of King’s College, Cambridge; Paul Goodwin, who conducts Haydn symphonies at Esterháza Palace, the historic seat of the composer’s patrons; and Stephen Layton, who conducts the AAM’s traditional Good Friday performance of JS Bach’s St John Passion with Polyphony. The AAM’s pioneering recordings under Hogwood for Decca’s L’Oiseau-Lyre label cover much of the baroque and classical orchestral canon. They include the first recordings on period instruments of Mozart’s complete symphonies and Beethoven’s piano concertos, and prize-winning opera recordings starring Cecilia Bartoli, Emma Kirkby and Joan Sutherland. Further projects have resulted in recordings for EMI, Chandos, Erato and Harmonia Mundi, and the orchestra has released award-winning recordings with the choirs of King’s College, Cambridge, Trinity College, Cambridge and New College, Oxford. With Richard Egarr, the orchestra has recently completed a landmark new cycle of Handel’s complete instrumental music published as Op.1-7. Other recent releases include JS Bach’s complete Brandenburg Concertos with Egarr, Purcell and Handel discs with Stephen Layton and the Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge on Hyperion, and, for EMI, Handel’s Messiah with Stephen Cleobury and the Choir of King’s College, Cambridge. The AAM is Orchestra-in-Residence at the University of Cambridge.


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Forthcoming concerts and tours October 2009

Telemann Handel Scarlatti Handel Telemann Handel

Concerto in D major for trumpet Concerto in F major for organ No.13 ‘The Cuckoo and the Nightingale’ Cantata ‘Su le Sponde del Tebro’ Concerto Grosso in B flat major Op.3 No.2 Concerto for trumpet and violin Motet ‘Silete venti’ Richard Egarr director & harpsichord, Lorna Anderson soprano, David Blackadder trumpet

2 October, 8pm

Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Tetbury, UK

Purcell

Dido and Aeneas Richard Egarr director & harpsichord, Wilke te Brummelstroete Dido, Maarten Koningsberger Aeneas, Lorna Anderson Belinda, Giles Underwood The Sorcerer

5 October, 5pm

Roman Amphitheatre, Sabratha, Libya

Haydn

Nelson Mass Richard Egarr director & harpsichord, Liesbeth Devos soprano, Kelley O’Connor mezzo-soprano, Ben Hullet tenor, Jonathan Lemalu bass

11 October, 8pm

Macau Cultural Centre Grand Auditorium, Macau, China

November 2009

Haydn

The Creation Stephen Cleobury conductor, Elin Manahan Thomas soprano, Andrew Kennedy tenor, Christopher Purves bass, Choir of King’s College, Cambridge

11 November, 7.30pm

King’s College Chapel, Cambridge, UK

A C A D E M Y O F A N C I E N T M U S I C , 2 0 0 9 - 2 01 0 S E A S O N 13


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The AAM Society “The great thing about being a member of the AAM Society is that it is such fun! You really do get closer to the music and the musicians” AAM SOCIETY MEMBER

The Academy of Ancient Music receives no regular public funding. Income from ticket sales and fees does not cover the full cost of performing to world-class standards: the AAM needs to raise £200,000 this year to support its performing and recording activities. To address this pressing financial need, the AAM Society was established by a group of committed founder members who appreciated the orchestra’s superb artistry and wanted to secure its future. Today, the extraordinary generosity of AAM Society members enables the orchestra to continue to perform. Members of the AAM Society enjoy a very close involvement with the life of the orchestra and The Hogwood Circle (Donations £10,000 and above per annum) Sir Nicholas and Lady Goodison * Mr and Mrs George Magan Christopher and Phillida Purvis * Mrs Julia Rosier Dr Christopher and Lady Juliet Tadgell Principal Patrons (Donations £5,000 – £9,999 per annum) Christopher Hogwood CBE * Newby Trust Ltd * and other anonymous Principal Patrons Patrons (Donations £2,500 – £4,999 per annum) Adam and Sara Broadbent Mr and Mrs JE Everett John and Ann Grieves Christopher Rocker and Alison Wisbeach Sarah and Andrew Williams SVG Capital and other anonymous Patrons Principal Benefactors (Donations £1,000 – £2,499 per annum) Lady Alexander of Weedon Mrs D Broke Mr and Mrs Graham Brown Clive and Helena Butler Sir Charles Chadwyck-Healey Bt Kate Donaghy Elizabeth Hartley-Brewer Elma Hawkins and Charles Richter Lord Hindlip Donald and Libby Insall John McFadden and Lisa Kabnick * Mark and Liza Loveday Mr and Mrs C Norton Lionel and Lynn Persey Nigel and Hilary Pye * Mr and Mrs Charles Rawlinson Joyce and John Reeve Michael and Sophia Robinson

its musicians. After performances in London, members dine with the conductor, soloists and musicians from the orchestra. They also have the chance to become a part of orchestral life behind the scenes by sitting in on AAM rehearsals for concerts and recordings. Members at the Principal Patron and Hogwood Circle levels have the opportunity to sponsor a specific position in the orchestra, giving them a special association with a particular AAM musician. Members of the Hogwood Circle are given the opportunity to sponsor a specific concert each season. If you want to get closer to the AAM’s music making while helping to secure the orchestra’s future, please do be in touch with me. Simon Fairclough Development Manager 01223 301509 s.fairclough@aam.co.uk

Sir Konrad and Lady Schiemann * Sir David and Lady Scholey Marcellus and Katharine Taylor-Jones Mrs R Wilson Stephens and other anonymous Principal Benefactors Benefactors (Donations £500 – £999) Dr Aileen Adams CBE Bill and Sue Blyth Claire Brisby and John Brisby QC * George and Kay Brock Jo and Keren Butler David and Karen Coke Mr and Mrs Edward Davies-Gilbert Charles Dumas The Hon Simon Eccles Mr and Mrs Jean-Marie Eveillard Marshall Field Andrew and Wendy Gairdner William Gibson The Hon Mr and Mrs Philip Havers Professor Sean Hilton Heather Jarman * Michael and Nicola Keane Susan Latham The Lynn Foundation Tessa Mayhew Mrs Sheila Mitchell Mr and Mrs Hideto Nakahara Rodney and Kusum Nelson-Jones Nick and Margaret Parker Timothy and Maren Robinson Bruno Schroder and Family JG Stanford Peter Thomson Charles Woodward Peter & Margaret Wynn and other anonymous Benefactors Donors (Donations £250 – £499) Maureen Acland OBE * Angela and Roderick Ashby-Johnson

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John and Françoise Barber Elisabeth and Bob Boas * Mrs Nicky Brown Dr and Mrs S Challah David and Elizabeth Challen The Cottisford Trust Derek and Mary Draper Charles Goldie Steven and Madelaine Gunders Mr David Gye Gemma and Lewis Morris Hall Mrs Helen Higgs Mr and Mrs G and W Hoffman Lord and Lady Jenkin of Roding Richard Lockwood Robin and Jane Raw Annabel and Martin Randall Arthur L Rebell and Susan B Cohen Michael and Giustina Ryan Miss E M Schlossmann Rt Hon Sir Murray Stuart-Smith * John and Madeleine Tattersall Robin Vousden Paul F. Wilkinson and Associates Inc. and other anonymous Donors * denotes founder member Members of the AAM Recording Club Jo and Keren Butler John S Cohen Foundation Sir Nicholas and Lady Goodison Anne and Phillip Greenwood Mike and Jan Hewins Heather Jarman David and Linda Lakhdhir Lowell and Rowena Libson Michael Marks Charitable Trust Christopher and Phillida Purvis Nigel and Hilary Pye Stephen Thomas Mrs R Wilson Stephens Jack and Margaret Vousden Charles Woodward Peter and Margaret Wynn


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Join the AAM Society I would like to help secure the Academy of Ancient Music’s future by joining the AAM Society. Personal details Name ............................................................................................................................................. Address ......................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................

Giftaid declaration Please complete this section only if you pay Income Tax and/or Capital Gains Tax at least equal to the tax that the AAM will reclaim on your donations in the appropriate tax year. Please treat this donation and all donations that I make from the date of this declaration until I notify you otherwise as Gift Aid donations. Signed ...........................................................................................................................................

Tel ..................................................................................................................................................... email ...............................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................(date)

Membership level

Donations by standing order

I would like to join the Society at the following level:

Please complete this section if you would like to make your donation to the Academy of Ancient Music by standing order.

The Hogwood Circle £10,000 or more per annum £ ............................................. (amount) Principal Patron

£5,000 – £9,999 per annum

£ ............................................. (amount) Patron

£1,000 – £2,499 per annum

£ ............................................. (amount) Benefactor

£500 – £999 per annum

£ ............................................. (amount) Donor

Address of Bank ................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................

£2,500 – £4,999 per annum

£ ............................................. (amount) Principal Benefactor

Bank Name ...............................................................................................................................

£250 – £499 per annum

£ ............................................. (amount) Please indicate below how you would like to be acknowledged in AAM programmes. If you would prefer to remain anonymous, please write ‘anonymous’. ............................................................................................................................................................

Account No. ................................................................ Sort Code ................... - ................... - ................... Please pay: Academy of Ancient Music, Lloyds TSB, Gonville Place Branch, Cambridge Sort Code 30-13-55, Account No. 2768172 the sum of £ .............................. (Print amount .......................................................................................................................) per month

Payment details

quarter

I would like to make my donation by

year

CAF cheque (please enclose a CAF cheque made payable to ‘AAM’)

starting on ................................................................. (date) Signed ..........................................................................................................................................

Cheque (please enclose a cheque made payable to ‘AAM’) ...............................................................................................................................................(date) Standing Order (please complete the Standing Order form below)

Name.................................................................................................................... (full name)

Shares (please contact AAM office)

Address ..................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................ Please return your completed form to Simon Fairclough, Development Manager, Academy of Ancient Music, 32 Newnham Road, Cambridge, CB3 9EY

A C A D E M Y O F A N C I E N T M U S I C , 2 0 0 9 - 2 01 0 S E A S O N 15


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Wigmore Hall and West Road Concert Hall 2009–2010 Season

Academy of Ancient Music

WEST ROAD CONCERT

WIGMORE HALL,

HALL, CAMBRIDGE

LONDON

Baroque in high definition Concertos used in film

24 September

25 September

The virtuoso voice Carolyn Sampson sings arias by Handel and Purcell

21 November

22 November

Prodigious minds Giuliano Carmignola directs early masterpieces by Schubert and Mendelssohn

21 February

22 February

‘In Stil Moderno’ Music by composers from seventeenth-century Venice

26 April

28 April

The English school Four centuries of music by English composers

17 June

18 June

Booking information WEST ROAD CONCERT HALL, CAMBRIDGE

WIGMORE HALL, LONDON

Ways to book • General booking is now open through the Arts Theatre box office on 01223 503333.

Ways to book • In person: 7 days a week; 10am – 8.30pm. Days without an evening concert, 10am –5pm. No advance booking in the half hour prior to a concert. • Telephone: 020 7935 2141, 7 days a week; 10am – 7pm. Days without an evening concert, 10am 5pm. • Online: www.wigmore-hall.org.uk, 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. Booking is now open for the concerts in September and November. The concert in February goes on sale on 1 October. The concerts in April and June go on sale on 2 January.

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CD sales desk

JS Bach

Handel

Harpsichord Concertos and Triple Concerto Academy of Ancient Music Richard Egarr harpsichord Andrew Manze director “Egarr plays with sprightly intelligence and crisp articulation”

Trio Sonatas Op.2 & Op.5 Academy of Ancient Music Pavlo Beznosiuk, Rodolfo Richter violin Rachel Brown flute and recorder Joseph Crouch cello Richard Egarr director and harpsichord

GRAMOPHONE

LATEST AAM RELEASE — NOT YET AVAILABLE IN THE SHOPS

Handel, JS Bach, Vivaldi

Handel

Concerti and Concerti Grossi Academy of Ancient Music Pavlo Beznosiuk director and violin Rachel Podger violin Frank de Bruine oboe

Organ Concertos Op.7 Academy of Ancient Music Richard Egarr director & organ “An outstanding achievement” C D R E V I E W, B B C R A D I O 3 , 3 0 AU G U S T 2 0 0 9

R E CO R D E D L I V E AT W I G M O R E H A L L

“An electrifying survey of Baroque concertos” GRAMOPHONE

A C A D E M Y O F A N C I E N T M U S I C , 2 0 0 9 - 2 01 0 S E A S O N 17


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Concerts at

19:07

Artistic Director

King’s 2009-2010

Stephen Cleobury

Bryn Terfel

Haydn The Creation

Choir of King’s College Cambridge

Monteverdi Vespers Dante String Quartet

Boulez Rituel

Guy Johnston and Katherine Stott

Fauré Requiem

Academy of Ancient Music

Schumann Celebration Tickets: Cambridge Corn Exchange Box Office 01223 357851 Details from: www.kings.cam.ac.uk/chapel/choir/concerts

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Page 18


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Music for the London Theatre Mark Padmore tenor/director 26 & 28 November, 7.30pm, Wigmore Hall

PURCELL

Airs and instrumental music from The Fairy Queen and King Arthur

HANDEL

Airs from his London oratorios

Tickets: Box Office: Book Online:

£18, £25, £30, £35 020 7935 2141 www.wigmore-hall.org.uk www.englishconcert.co.uk

S pec i a l C H RISTMA S Co nc e rt s 28th November – 7.30 pm Mahler Eight by the Cambridge University Music Society, Conductor Stephen Cleobury 11th December – 7.30 pm Mediaeval Baebes featuring Ely Imps 12th December – 1.15 pm Ely Cathedral Girls’ Choir, Christmas Recital 22nd December – 7.30 pm Ely Cathedral Christmas Charity Concert featuring the Choristers Christmas Services & Complines

Ely Cat h e d ral CHRI STMAS EX PE RI E NC E Magnificent 40 ft C hristmas Tree Themed C hri stmas Gift Shop www.elycathedral.org

1st, 8th & 15th December – 9.oo pm Advent Compline by Candlelight 12th December – 3.30 pm Christingle Service 20th December – 6.00 pm Christmas Carol Service (1) 24th December 3.00 pm – Children’s Crib Service, 6.00 pm – Christmas Carol Service (2)

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AAM Funders & Supporters The AAM is indebted to the following trusts, companies, public bodies and individuals for their support of the orchestra’s work during the 2008–2009 season: John Ellerman Foundation The Idlewild Trust Goldsmiths’ Company Charity Michael Marks Charitable Trust RBC Wealth Management SVG Capital Orchestras Live Cambridge City Council Members of the AAM Society

Wigmore Hall

Academy of Ancient Music

36 Wigmore Street London W1U 2BP Director: John Gilhooly The Wigmore Hall Trust Registered Charity No.1024838

32 Newnham Road Cambridge CB3 9EY Tel: 01223 301509 Fax: 01223 323202 Email: info@aam.co.uk Web: www.aam.co.uk Registered charity no: 1085485 Registered in England, company no: 4109942

Wigmore Hall is a no-smoking venue. No recording or photographic equipment may be taken into the auditorium, nor used in any other part of the Hall without the prior written permission of the Hall Management. Wigmore Hall is equipped with a ’Loop’ to help hearing aid users receive clear sound without background noise. Patrons can use the facility by switching their hearing aids over to ’T’. In accordance with the requirements of City of Westminster, persons shall not be permitted to stand or sit in any of the gangways intersecting the seating, or to sit in any of the other gangways. If standing is permitted in the gangways at the sides and rear of the seating, it shall be limited to the numbers indicated in the notices exhibited in those positions. Facilities for Disabled People:

Please contact House Management for full details.

20 A C A D E M Y O F A N C I E N T M U S I C , 2 0 0 9 - 2 01 0 S E A S O N

Email us at info@aam.co.uk to receive our monthly email news bulletin.


AAM - Baroque in high definition  

Baroque concertos featured in film soundtracks

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