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Academy of Ancient Music

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London & Cambridge 2010–2011

A superb period-instrument band

NEW YORK TIMES, 2009


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London & Cambridge 2010–2011 Page

CAMBRIDGE

LONDON

23 September

24 September

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The Bach Dynasty: JS Bach’s forebears Music by Heinrich, Johann Christoph and Johann Michael Bach with the Choir of the AAM

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The Bach Dynasty: JS Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos

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South American connections Music by South American composers and their European contemporaries

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The Bach Dynasty: JS Bach at Christmas including the Magnificat

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The Bach Dynasty: JS Bach’s sons Music by Carl Philipp Emanuel, Johann Christian, Johann Christoph Friedrich and Wilhelm Friedemann Bach with Steven Isserlis

24 January

26 January

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Handel’s tragic muse with Bernard Labadie and Karina Gauvin

18 March

16 March

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The Bach Dynasty: JS Bach’s St John Passion with the Choir of King’s College, Cambridge

19 April

20 April

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Mozart’s La Finta Giardiniera

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The Bach Dynasty: JS Bach’s cantatas

19 October 24 November

25 November

23 December

24 June 19 July

18 July 3


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The future of ancient music “

The ultimate raspberry to anyone who says baroque music is predictable

That’s how The Independent on Sunday described us just a few months ago — but AAM concertgoers have been expecting the unexpected for over 35 years. Back in 1973, most orchestras played old music in a modern style. Centuries of change had eroded the sound-worlds known to Bach, Handel, Haydn and Mozart: the instruments were different; the pitch was different; the number of players was different; the very essence and spirit of performances was different. But change was in the air. Wouldn’t it be great, people asked, if we could turn the clock back; if we could find out more about composers’ original intentions and get closer to the style in which music was originally performed? This was the spirit in which Christopher Hogwood founded the AAM. It was revolutionary. Centuries of convention were cut away and baroque and classical masterworks were heard anew. Music lovers worldwide were electrified. Ancient music got a thrilling new lease of life. 250 CDs later, after performances on every continent except Antarctica and under the leadership of our current Music Director Richard Egarr, we’re as passionate as we’ve ever been about breathing new life into the music we perform. We are thrilled to present this season of concerts in London and Cambridge, with the music of JS Bach and his relatives at its heart. We hope you will enjoy it as much as we do. Are you under 26? If so, why not be part of the future of ancient music? As an AAMplify member you’ll get £3 tickets for our concerts at Wigmore Hall, Cadogan Hall and West Road Concert Hall, as well as discounts on CDs and opportunities to meet Richard Egarr and members of the AAM. Register for free by emailing AAMplify@aam.co.uk 5


©PRIVATE COLLECTION/THE BRIDGEMAN ART LIBRARY

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Bach Family Tree. German School. c.1750-1770


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The Bach Dynasty Destiny marked Johann Sebastian Bach out as a musician. For a hundred years before his birth his ancestors had been renowned in the towns, villages and courts of mid-Germany as instrumental players, church organists, instrument makers and composers. Such was the family’s reputation that when, in 1693, a musical vacancy occurred at the court in Arnstadt, the count called urgently for “a Bach”. Johann Sebastian took considerable pride in his position within this celebrated dynasty. In 1735, when at the age of 50 he began turning his mind to the task of securing his legacy, he produced a genealogy extolling the achievements of no fewer than 52 musical relatives. Perhaps the most illustrious among his ancestors were the sons of his great uncle Heinrich Bach: Johann Michael — described in the genealogy as an “able composer” — and the “profound” Johann Christoph. The music of Heinrich and his sons is the focus of JS Bach’s forebears, the first concert in the series. Johann Sebastian’s many children maintained the family traditions with distinction. In January, the great cellist Steven Isserlis joins us for JS Bach’s sons, a programme exploring the music of Johann Christian, Carl Philipp Emanuel, Johann Christoph Friedrich and Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. But Johann Sebastian himself is the undisputed giant of the dynasty. His output is vast; its quality extraordinary. The Bach Dynasty brings together several of his iconic works, including the Brandenburg Concertos — “some of the finest chamber music ever written” in the words of Richard Egarr; the Magnificat; the St John Passion; and a number of the cantatas from the 1710s and 1720s.

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Š THE BRIDGEMAN ART LIBRARY

Richard Egarr director & harpsichord

Choir of the AAM

Harpsichord by Jan Rucker. 1634.


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JS Bach’s forebears Music by Heinrich, Johann Christoph and Johann Michael Bach In October 1707, Bachs from far and wide converged on the village of Dornheim for a great family celebration. Johann Sebastian — 22 years of age and already a rising star — was to marry his distant cousin Maria Barbara Bach. Maria Barbara’s father, Johann Michael, had a formidable reputation as one of the most illustrious Bachs of the previous generation. He spent his early life in Arnstadt, went on to hold the prestigious posts of town clerk and organist in Gehren and was, as JS Bach later described him, an “able composer”. Perhaps even more eminent was Johann Michael’s brother, Johann Christoph, who had the good fortune to work with several of the greatest musicians of his age — including Johann Pachelbel and JS Bach’s father Ambrosius. The Bachs counted him among their brightest stars: JS Bach continued to promote his works in Leipzig well into the eighteenth century; and CPE Bach described him as “the great and expressive composer”. Both Johann Christoph and Johann Michael had learnt their art from their father, Heinrich Bach, who was described in his funeral eulogy as an “organist who touched the heart... a musician famous for his art”. Heinrich’s ‘Ich danke dir, Gott’ opens the programme.

Heinrich Bach ‘Ich danke dir, Gott’ Johann Michael Bach ‘Liebster Jesu, hör mein Flehen’ Anon ‘Es ist g’nug’ H Bach Sonata à 5 Johann Christoph Bach ‘Die Furcht des Herren’ JC Bach ‘Ach, dass ich Wassers gnug hätte’ H Bach Sonata à 5 JC Bach ‘Mein Freundin, du bist schön’

CAMBRIDGE Thursday 23 September 2010 7.30pm West Road Concert Hall

LONDON Friday 24 September 2010 7.30pm Wigmore Hall Pre-concert talks with Richard Egarr at 6.30pm TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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©AKGIMAGES / CATHERINE BIBOLLET

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Richard Egarr director & harpsichord


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JS Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos The AAM and Richard Egarr bring their distinctive interpretation of JS Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos to Cadogan Hall on the heels of a celebrated new recording and a 14-concert tour of the USA.

JS Bach Brandenburg Concerto No.1 in F major

The Brandenburg story is well known. Having been penned in the 1710s, the concertos were presented by Bach to the Margrave of Brandenburg in a concerted but ultimately unsuccessful attempt to gain princely patronage; and in the Margrave’s library they languished, unperformed, unnoticed and seemingly forgotten even by Bach’s closest family — until they were rediscovered many years after his death.

JS Bach Brandenburg Concerto No.4 in G major

JS Bach Brandenburg Concerto No.2 in F major JS Bach Brandenburg Concerto No.3 in G major

JS Bach Brandenburg Concerto No.5 in D major JS Bach Brandenburg Concerto No.6 in B flat major

Happily for the music lovers of today, these works, replete with vibrant contrast and glittering instrumental virtuosity, were quickly recognized as some of the most masterful music of the baroque period. In the words of Richard Egarr, “these six concertos represent one of the glories of the instrumental repertoire — and arguably some of the best chamber music ever penned”.

The Egarr-AAM Brandenburgs really blow. In a good way. They blow centuries of library dust off these pieces, and they blow fantastic horn and trumpet lines. Egarr & co are in it to win it! Whew! The first disc hardly played 10 seconds when I was grabbing for the remote control to play again the most amazing horn parts I have ever heard — wild, outdoorsy, jazzy, almost bepop. As the six concertos unfolded, there was no sense of letdown, just continuing pleasant surprises... So, yes, a very strong recommendation... STEREOPHILE MAGAZINE, JUNE 2009

LONDON Tuesday 19 October 2010 7.30pm Cadogan Hall Pre-concert talk with Richard Egarr at 6.30pm TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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ŠTHE GRANGER COLLECTION, NEW YORK

Juanita Lascarro soprano

Rodolfo Richter director & violin

Detail of Peruvian wooden kero, showing an Incan, Spaniard and African. Mid -17th century.


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South American connections Music by South American composers and their European contemporaries

Lobo de Mesquita Adagio and Fugue in G minor Zipoli Arias from Dell’offese a vendicarmi

The AAM’s Brazilian leader Rodolfo Richter and acclaimed Colombian soprano Juanita Lascarro star in a programme revealing connections between the music of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century South American composers and their European contemporaries.

A Scarlatti Concerto Grosso No.1 in F minor from VI Concertos in Seven Parts

The Spanish and Portuguese settlement of South America began at the turn of the sixteenth century, and European culture took hold over the following decades as the colonisers’ influence on the continent deepened. Some European musicians travelled to the New World to take up positions within the colonial hierarchy: Tomás de Torrejón y Velasco, for example, served as superintendent of an armoury and Chief Justice of a Peruvian province. Domenico Zipoli, on the other hand, was one of a group of Jesuit missionaries who travelled to Paraguay. And, over time, second- and third-generation settlers began to make their livelihoods in music — including the Brazilian composer José Joaquim Emerico Lobo de Mesquita.

Anon Cachua

Many of these musical greats enjoyed real prominence in South America long after their deaths — but they failed to gain widespread recognition in Europe. We right that wrong, showcasing music from the Old World alongside masterworks from the New.

JA Hasse Overture to Cleofide

The Colombian soprano Juanita Lascarro is utterly irresistible... The singing is first class. THE INDEPENDENT, JUNE 2009

M Corrette ‘Les Sauvages’ from Concerto Comique No.25 in G minor Torrejón y Velasco Desvelado dueño mio

Anon Sonata Chiquitana XVIII Handel Il Delirio Amoroso

CAMBRIDGE Wednesday 24 November 7.30pm West Road Concert Hall

LONDON Thursday 25 November 7.30pm Wigmore Hall Pre-concert talks at 6.30pm TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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Mhairi Lawson soprano

Madeleine Shaw alto

Ben Johnson tenor

Stephan Loges bass

Pavlo Beznosiuk violin

Frank de Bruine oboe

Š LEBRECHT MUSIC & ART

Choir of the AAM

Richard Egarr director & harpsichord

Detail of altarpiece at St. Bavo Cathedral, Ghent by Jan van Eyck and Hubert van Eyck. 1432.


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JS Bach at Christmas including the Magnificat

JS Bach Cantata No.70 ‘Wachet! betet! betet! wachet!’ JS Bach Concerto in D minor for harpsichord

On Christmas Day 1723 the Leipzig congregation was roused from its musical slumber by the exuberant trumpet and timpani lines and joyful choruses of JS Bach’s Magnificat. Every advent the Leipzig churches broke for a fortnight from the weekly performance of new cantatas and Bach, in his first year as the town’s Kantor, had taken advantage of this lull to perfect his first large-scale setting of a Latin text.

JS Bach Concerto in C minor for violin and oboe JS Bach Magnificat in D major

The foundations for the Magnificat were laid ten years earlier, when Bach’s individual musical style began to develop under the patronage of the Duke of Weimar. Cantata No.70 was written for Advent 1714 and demonstrates all the promise which would come to spectacular fruition in the Magnificat. Bach’s musical inspiration came from disparate sources, both sacred and secular, and tonight we contrast the two sacred works with two masterpieces of very different origins. The virtuosic style of the Concerto in D minor for harpsichord stems from its use as a showpiece for the harpsichord purchased in the 1730s by the Collegium Musicum — the Leipzig student music society of which Bach was president. The Concerto in C minor for oboe and violin, meanwhile, demonstrates a Vivaldian sense of rhythmic buoyancy, but adds a remarkable dialogue between the solo instruments and the orchestra which is by turns playful, mellifluous and fiery.

LONDON Thursday 23 December 2010 7.30pm Cadogan Hall Pre-concert talk with Richard Egarr at 6.30pm TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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ŠKEVIN DAVIS

Steven Isserlis cello

Richard Egarr director & harpsichord


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JS Bach’s sons Music by Carl Philipp Emanuel, Johann Christian, Johann Christoph Friedrich and Wilhelm Friedemann Bach JS Bach’s influence loomed large in the lives of his four composer-sons — and yet the music and biographies of each are surprisingly diverse. Carl Philipp Emanuel was fiercely loyal to his father’s legacy, and undoubtedly inherited his compositional verve. The famous Concerto in A major for cello demonstrates a broad musical palette, from the scurrying opening allegro to the expansive largo. Johann Christian, meanwhile, lived a cosmopolitan life which saw him become tutor to Queen Charlotte. Whilst in London he organised regular public concerts, for which he wrote the Concerto in D major for keyboard. Wilhelm Friedemann, conversely, never escaped his father’s shadow. Johann Sebastian’s attention nurtured a promising talent, and the Concerto in A minor for keyboard forms part of a vibrant early output. But the story is ultimately tragic: in 1749 Wilhelm Friedemann was accused of plagiarising his father’s work, and eventually died a pauper after selling off his father’s estate. Johann Christoph Friedrich’s tragedy occurred some 150 years after his death, when the majority of his work was destroyed in the Second World War. The surviving music shows influences from Italy, England — and JS Bach.

The music world — and music itself — is infinitely richer for the presence of Steven Isserlis GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE

Johann Christian Bach Concerto in D major for keyboard Op.13 No.2 Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach Concerto in A major for cello Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach Sonata in G major for cello Wilhelm Friedemann Bach Concerto in A minor for keyboard CPE Bach Symphony in G major for strings

CAMBRIDGE Monday 24 January 2011 7.30pm West Road Concert Hall

LONDON Wednesday 26 January 2011 7.30pm Wigmore Hall Pre-concert talks with Richard Egarr at 6.30pm TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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©PHOTO SCALA, FLORENCE / THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 2010

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Karina Gauvin soprano

Bernard Labadie conductor

Lucretia by Philipe Bertrand. 1704.


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Handel’s tragic muse with Bernard Labadie and Karina Gauvin

Handel Orchestral interludes from Ariodante Handel ‘Misera, dove son!’ from Ezio

Handel’s operas stand among the greatest treasures of Western art. They illustrate memorable plots with music of considerable power and beauty, and they hold significant places in the history of opera: Rinaldo was the first Italian opera written for the London stage, and Ariodante and Alcina were premiered in the opening season of the Covent Garden Theatre in 1735. We bring six of Handel’s operatic masterworks to life with Canada’s leading conductor Bernard Labadie and his compatriot Karina Gauvin. These six operas are set in distant times and exotic climes, from Cyprus to Scotland, ancient Rome to eighth-century Seville. Whilst they all resolve peacefully, it is the tragic elements of the plots — mistaken identity, scheming fathers, spiteful witches, botched suicide attempts, the plight of women trapped between love and power — which provoke Handel’s most profound musical writing, from Fulvia’s declaration of her love for the young Aestius in Ezio to Alcina’s lament for her lost magical power. We set these arias against the elegant interludes written to illustrate the dances in Ariodante and Alcina.

Handel ‘La mia costanza’ from Ezio Handel Orchestral interludes from Alcina Handel ‘Ah, mio cor, schernito sei’ from Alcina Handel ‘Credete al mio dolore’ from Alcina Handel Orchestral interludes from Rodrigo Handel ‘Ti pentirai, crudel’ from Tolomeo Handel ‘Lascia ch’io pianga’ from Rinaldo Handel ‘Tornami a vagghegiar’ from Alcina

LONDON Wednesday 16 March 2011 7.30pm Wigmore Hall

CAMBRIDGE

Karina Gauvin proved to have an ardent voice and bags of appealing musicality THE TIMES, APRIL 2008

Friday 18 March 2011 7.30pm West Road Concert Hall Pre-concert talks at 6.30pm TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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Elin Manahan Thomas soprano

James Laing counter-tenor

Andrew Tortise tenor

Marcus Farnsworth bass

Andrew Kennedy Evangelist

David WilsonJohnson Christ

©GEOFFREY ROBINSON

Choir of King’s College, Cambridge

Stephen Cleobury conductor


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JS Bach’s St John Passion JS Bach’s St John Passion had an inauspicious conception. Less than a year into his tenure as Leipzig’s Kantor, the young composer wrongly assumed that the annual Passion performance would take place in the Thomaskirche. When informed by the authorities that the venue would in fact be the Nikolaikirche, Bach immediately raised several problems — “that the booklet was already printed, that there was no room available, and that the harpsichord needed some repair”.

JS Bach St John Passion

Out of these ashes, however, rose a musical phoenix. Bach’s recent arrival in Leipzig left him unaccustomed to the town’s ways; it also made him keen to impress. The Good Friday Vespers service was the musical highpoint of the year, and Bach took the opportunity to engage in a showcase performance which exceeded the ambition of any of his previous works. The result is a work of intimate scale and moving lyricism, reaching immediately to the emotional heart of the Passion story. The St John Passion revolutionised Leipzig’s musical calendar and changed the face of Western music. The AAM’s acclaimed annual Passion performances with the Choir of King’s College, Cambridge keep this rich tradition alive.

CAMBRIDGE Tuesday 19 April 2011 7.30pm King’s College Chapel

I would happily sit in King’s College Chapel listening to this choir sing for the rest of my days THE TIMES

LONDON Wednesday 20 April 2011 7.00pm Cadogan Hall TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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ŠCATHY TYLER

Rosemary Joshua Klara Ek Sandrina Arminda

Elizabeth Watts Serpetta

Katija Dragojevic Ramiro

James Gilchrist Contino Belfiore

Andrew Kennedy Don Anchise

Andrew FosterWilliams Nardo

Richard Egarr director & harpsichord


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Mozart’s La Finta Giardiniera Making his Barbican debut with the AAM, Richard Egarr brings a stunning line-up of soloists to Mozart’s first mature opera — a classic exploration of the dramatic and sometimes hilarious consequences of entangled passions and thwarted love.

Mozart La Finta Giardiniera

As Marchioness Violante Onesti takes to the stage disguised as the garden maid Sandrina, the scene is set for an action-packed evening of betrayal, madness and mistaken identity. Masters court their servants; the Count is dramatically but wrongly exposed as a murderer; after leaping to his defence the garden maid is abandoned and left to her fate in the dark and dangerous woods; the Mayor, in whose garden the story unfolds, looks on in vexation as chaos descends upon his household. Penned at the prodigiously young age of 18, Mozart’s exuberant score combines searchingly expressive love arias with thrilling, inventive finales.

Rosemary Joshua was a dynamo... crystalline in tone and effervescent in personality.

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH, FEBRUARY 2009

LONDON Friday 24 June 2011 6.30pm Barbican Centre Pre-concert talk with Richard Egarr at 5.30pm in the Fountain Room (limited availability) TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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Š LEBRECHT MUSIC & ART

Choir of the AAM

Richard Egarr director & harpsichord

Thomaskirche and Thomasschule, Leipzig. 1735.


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JS Bach’s cantatas For the final concert in The Bach Dynasty series we present three of JS Bach’s finest cantatas from across his thirty-year tenure at Leipzig. The cantatas are an extraordinary and unique musical phenomenon, combining astounding and consistent quality with a vast, ambitious scale — Bach is thought to have completed five cycles totalling 300 cantatas, of which around 200 survive.

JS Bach Cantata No.20 ‘O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort’ JS Bach Cantata No.126 ‘Erhalt uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort’ JS Bach Cantata No.146 ‘Wir müssen durch viel Trübsal’

Originally placed at the heart of the liturgy, the cantatas’ role was to exhort, inspire and celebrate. The works in this programme have at their core a transformation from despair to hope, and this is effected by the music itself — whether the jubilant affirmation of life by the bass soloist and trumpet in No.20 or the peaceful chorale which concludes No.126. This is music with the most profound purpose. In the pursuit of spiritual joy Bach revises his best secular music for sacred contexts. Cantata No.146, which concludes the concert, bursts into life with a glorious reworking of the Concerto in D minor for harpsichord, including an organ part of stunning virtuosity and a choral section of intense atmosphere.

LONDON

Bach’s cantatas undoubtedly represent the true kernel of his compositional life — they contain simply everything

Monday 18 July 2011 7.30pm Wigmore Hall

RICHARD EGARR

CAMBRIDGE

Tuesday 19 July 2011 7.30pm West Road Concert Hall Pre-concert talks with Richard Egarr at 6.30pm TURN TO PAGE 30 FOR BOOKING INFORMATION ‰

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AAM Handel Opp.1–7 recording cycle Solo Sonatas Op.1

Organ Concertos Op.4

“the AAM’s delightful playing is warmly recommended”

WINNER OF 2009 EDISON AWARD

GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE AWARDS ISSUE 2009

SHORTLISTED FOR 2008 GRAMOPHONE AWARD FOR BAROQUE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

Trio Sonatas Opp.2 & 5

Concerti Grossi Op.6

“these are outstanding accounts”

“an issue of joyous vitality”

BBC MUSIC MAGAZINE 2009

Concerti Grossi Op.3; Sonata à 5 WINNER OF 2007 GRAMOPHONE AWARD FOR BAROQUE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

WINNER OF 2009 MIDEM AWARD

GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE AWARDS ISSUE 1998

Organ Concertos Op.7 “an outstanding achievement” ANDREW MACGREGOR, BBC RADIO 3 2009


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AAM Bach family recordings CPE Bach 6 Symphonies Wq182

JS Bach Brandenburg Concertos

Christopher Hogwood director & harpsichord

Richard Egarr director & harpsichord

“deliberate and unfettered virtuosity”

“they blow centuries of library dust off these pieces” STEREOPHILE 2009

GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE 1979

CPE Bach 8 Symphonies; 4 Quartets

JS Bach Harpsichord Concertos

Christopher Hogwood director & keyboards

Andrew Manze violin Richard Egarr harpsichord

“crisply articulated and gracefully phrased”

“seasoned chamber musicians enjoying themselves to the full”

GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE 1992

GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE 2002

JC Bach Symphonies, Overture to Adriano in Siria

JS Bach Magnificat

Simon Standage director & violin

“charming and enjoyable music”

“the astonishing variety of Bach’s cantatas is brilliantly illustrated”

GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE 1993

BBC MUSIC MAGAZINE 2000

Choir of King’s College Cambridge Stephen Cleobury conductor

AAM releases are available from major record shops, online retailers and iTunes. A selection of CDs is available directly from the AAM. Contact details can be found on the back of this brochure.

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Supporting the AAM Since 1973, millions of lives have been enriched by the musical excellence of the AAM. Last year we played for 50,000 people worldwide; and we touched the lives of hundreds of thousands more with our broadcasts and recordings. As we approach our 40th anniversary, we are seeking to develop our traditions of excellence and innovation for the music lovers of the future — but year by year the cost of doing so is increasing. In 2010–11 we must raise £400,000 to make our ambitions possible. You can help by: • Joining the AAM Society, our core group of regular supporters, from just £4.80 per week. Members enjoy a close and ongoing involvement with the life of the orchestra: they attend rehearsals, dine with AAM musicians after London performances, and on occasions travel with us on international tours. • Supporting one of our special appeals — this year these include The Bach Dynasty, our keynote 2010–11 series of concerts in London and Cambridge; a series of concerts exploring the birth of baroque and classical music which will be at the heart of our work in 2011–12; and AAMplify, a new scheme which will see younger people becoming more closely involved with our work over the coming years. • Leaving a legacy. By remembering the AAM in your will, you could strengthen the orchestra’s position for the long term, enabling it to flourish and enrich the lives of music lovers for generations to come, while also potentially reducing the overall tax liability due on your estate. For more information about supporting the AAM, please contact Simon Fairclough on s.fairclough@aam.co.uk or 01223 301509.


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AAM Funders and Supporters AAM Business Club Cambridge University Press Kleinwort Benson RBC Wealth Management CHK Charities Ltd Dunard Fund John Ellerman Foundation EsmÊe Fairbairn Foundation Fidelity UK Foundation Goldsmiths’ Company Charity The Idlewild Trust The Michael Marks Charitable Trust Anthony Travis Charitable Trust Arts Council England through the Sustain programme Cambridge City Council Orchestras Live Members of the AAM Society Members of the AAM Bach Patrons

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Booking information

WIGMORE HALL 36 Wigmore Street, London W1U 2BP Tickets £18, £24, £28, £32 (AAMplify members £3 — find out more on page 5) including a free programme Booking for the concerts in September and November opens on 20 May 2010. Booking for the concerts in January and March opens on 2 November 2010. Booking for the concert in July opens on 1 February 2011. Ways to book • By telephone on 020 7935 2141 10am–7pm daily (days without an evening concert 10am–5pm). There is a £2.00 administration fee for all telephone bookings, which includes the delivery of your tickets by first class post. • Online at www.wigmore-hall.org.uk 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. There is a £1.00 administration fee for online bookings, which includes the delivery of your tickets by first class post. • In person at the Wigmore Hall box office, 10am–8.30pm daily (days without an evening concert 10am–5pm). No advance booking in the half hour prior to a concert. Facilities for disabled people For full details please contact House Management on 020 7258 8210 or email housemanagers@wigmore-hall.org.uk Director John Gilhooly Registered charity number 1024838

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CADOGAN HALL 5 Sloane Terrace, London SW1X 9DQ Tickets for 23 December and 20 April £15, £22, £28, £32, £40 Tickets for 19 October £10, £17, £25, £32, £35 (AAMplify members £3 — find out more on page 5) including a free programme Booking now open. Ways to book • By telephone on 020 7730 4500 10am– 8pm Monday–Saturday; 3pm–8pm Sunday (concert days only). There is a £2.50 administration fee for all telephone bookings. • Online at www.cadoganhall.com. There is a £2.50 administration fee for online bookings. • In person at the Cadogan Hall box office 10am–8pm Monday–Saturday; 3pm–8pm Sunday (concert days only).


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BARBICAN CENTRE Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS Tickets £11, £16.50, £21, £28, £35 Booking now open. Ways to book • By telephone on 020 7638 8891 9am–8pm Monday–Saturday; 11am–8pm Sunday. There is a £2.50 administration fee for telephone bookings, which includes the delivery of your tickets by first class post. • Online at www.barbican.org.uk. There is a £1.50 administration fee for online bookings. • In person at the Advance Box Office, Silk Street entrance Monday–Saturday 9am–9pm; Sunday and bank holidays 12noon–9pm.

WEST ROAD CONCERT HALL 11 West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DP Tickets £14, £20, £27 (AAMplify members £3 — find out more on page 5) including a free programme

KING’S COLLEGE CHAPEL King’s College, Cambridge CB2 1ST Tickets £25, £35, £45 (£5 for unsighted seats)

General booking opens 24 June 2010 Book tickets for individual concerts through the Arts Theatre box office.

Ways to book • By telephone on 01223 769342 • In person from The Shop at King’s, 13 King’s Parade 9.30am–5.30 Monday–Saturday, 9.30am–4.30pm Sunday.

Ways to book for individual concerts • By telephone on 01223 503333 12noon–8pm Monday–Saturday • Online at www.aam.co.uk/cambridge There is a 70p administration fee for online bookings. • In person at the Arts Theatre box office 12noon– 8pm Monday–Saturday.

Booking opens 17 January 2011.

Subscription booking opens 24 May 2010 Book for all five concerts in the West Road Concert Hall series through the AAM subscriptions office between 24 May and 21 June and receive a 15% discount. Ways to book subscription tickets • By telephone on 01223 301509 9am–5.30pm Monday–Friday. • By email on subscriptions@aam.co.uk • At the subscription booking desk at the West Road concert on 18 June. Subscription booking closes at 8am on Monday 21 June. Tickets will be sent to subscribers in the week of 28 June.

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Academy of Ancient Music Music Director Richard Egarr Emeritus Director Christopher Hogwood CBE 32 Newnham Road, Cambridge CB3 9EY +44 (0)1223 301509 info@aam.co.uk www.aam.co.uk

Registered charity number 1085485 Email info@aam.co.uk to receive AAM Update, our email news bulletin Design: www.theoakstudio.co.uk

AAM 2010-2011 season brochure  

Details of all the Academy of Ancient Music's concerts in London and Cambridge during 2010-2011

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