Page 1


SMALL BUSINESS  JOURNEY TO SUCCESS                 

M. GORDON HUNTER  &  DAN KAZAKOFF 


Small Business: Journey to Success  First edition 2012    Copyright© 2012 Academic Publishing  All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any  material form (including photocopying or storing in any medium by elec‐ tronic  means  and  whether  or  not  transiently  or  incidentally  to  some  other  use  of  this  publication)  without  the  written  permission  of  the  copyright holder except in accordance with the provisions of the Copy‐ right  Designs  and  Patents  Act  1988,  or  under  the  terms  of  a  licence  is‐ sued  by  the  Copyright  Licensing  Agency  Ltd,  Saffron  House,  6‐10  Kirby  Street, London EC1N 8TS. Applications for the copyright holder’s written  permission  to  reproduce  any  part  of  this  publication  should  be  ad‐ dressed to the publishers.  Disclaimer: While every effort has been made by the editor, authors and  the publishers to ensure that all the material in this book is accurate and  correct at the time of going to press, any error made by readers as a re‐ sult of any of the material, formulae or other information in this book is  the sole responsibility of the reader. Readers should be aware that the  URLs  quoted  in  the  book  may  change  or  be  damaged  by  malware  be‐ tween the time of publishing and accessing by readers.    ISBN: 978‐1‐908272‐39‐3  Printed by Good News Digital Books  Published  by:  Academic  Publishing  International  Limited,  Reading,  RG4  9AY, United Kingdom, info@academic‐publishing.org   Available from www.academic‐bookshop.com  


Contents   Dedication and Acknowledgements ......................................................... iv  Preface ....................................................................................................... v  Chapter 1  Overview ................................................................................ 1  1.1  Introduction ............................................................................... 1  1.2  Small Business Defined .............................................................. 2  1.3  Projects ...................................................................................... 7  1.4  Research Approach .................................................................... 9  1.5  Overview of Theoretical Perspective ....................................... 11  1.6  Format of the Book .................................................................. 13  1.7  Conclusion ................................................................................ 17  Chapter 2  Perspectives of Small Business ............................................ 19  2.1  Introduction ............................................................................. 19  2.2  Entrepreneurial Process and Small Business ........................... 19  2.3  Classification of Small Business ................................................ 24  2.4  Three‐Circle Model ................................................................... 26  2.5  Three Dimensional Development Model ................................. 28  2.6  Performance of Small Business ................................................ 32  2.7  Growth of Small Business ......................................................... 35  2.8  Succession ................................................................................ 38  2.9  Conclusion ................................................................................ 39  Chapter 3  Perspectives of Entrepreneurs ............................................ 41  3.1  Introduction ............................................................................. 41  3.2  Types of Entrepreneurs ............................................................ 42  3.3  Characteristics of Entrepreneurs ............................................. 45  3.4  Project A: (Preliminary Investigation into Variety in Canadian  Small Business) ......................................................................... 52  3.5  Project B: (Multi‐Generation Small Business) .......................... 59  3.6  Conclusion ................................................................................ 63  Appendix A .......................................................................................... 64  i 


Chapter 4  Entrepreneurship Theory .................................................... 65  4.1  Introduction ............................................................................. 65  4.2  Entrepreneurship Theory and Research .................................. 66  4.3  Entrepreneurship Theory and Small Business ......................... 74  4.4  Conclusion ................................................................................ 80  Chapter 5  Agency Theory ..................................................................... 81  5.1  Introduction ............................................................................. 81  5.2  A Context for Agency Theory ................................................... 81  5.3  Agency Theory .......................................................................... 83  5.4  Conclusion ................................................................................ 91  Chapter 6  Stewardship Theory ............................................................. 93  6.1  Introduction ............................................................................. 93  6.2  Stewardship Theory ................................................................. 93  6.3  Stewardship Theory and Small Business .................................. 99  6.4  Conclusion .............................................................................. 105  Chapter 7  Long‐Lived Companies ....................................................... 107  7.1  Introduction ........................................................................... 107  7.2  Common Factors for Success ................................................. 108  7.3  Learning .................................................................................. 110  7.4  Longevity ................................................................................ 112  7.5  Analogies ................................................................................ 114  7.6  Conclusion .............................................................................. 117  Chapter 8  Multi‐Generation Small Business ...................................... 119  8.1  Introduction ........................................................................... 119  8.2  Literature Review ................................................................... 120  8.3  Project (Little Empires: Multi‐Generation Small Business in  Southern Alberta: Canada) ..................................................... 126  8.4  Findings .................................................................................. 128  8.5  Conclusion .............................................................................. 132      ii 


Chapter 9  Small Business Response to the Financial Crisis ................ 135  9.1  Introduction ........................................................................... 135  9.2  Literature Review ................................................................... 136  9.3  Project .................................................................................... 138  9.4  Discussion ............................................................................... 139  9.5  Conclusion .............................................................................. 144  9.6  Addendum .............................................................................. 145  Appendix A ........................................................................................ 147  Chapter 10  Small Business Failures .................................................. 149  10.1  Introduction ........................................................................... 149  10.2  Literature Review ................................................................... 150  10.3  Method ................................................................................... 153  10.4  Results and Discussion ........................................................... 155  10.5  Controllable ............................................................................ 155  10.6  Uncontrollable ....................................................................... 161  10.7  Conclusion .............................................................................. 165  10.8  Addendum .............................................................................. 166  Appendix A ........................................................................................ 169  Chapter 11  Journey to Success ......................................................... 171  11.1  Introduction ........................................................................... 171  11.2  Review of the Theories .......................................................... 171  11.3  The Three Dimensional Developmental Model and the Theories  ................................................................................................ 174  11.4  The Entrepreneur Continuum ................................................ 176  11.5  Small Business Framework and Continuum ........................... 177  11.6  Evolution of Emphasis ............................................................ 180  11.7  Conclusion .............................................................................. 182  Reading List ............................................................................................ 183  Index ...................................................................................................... 188   

iii


Dedication  

M. Gordon Hunter  To my wife Shirley  We are eternal partners in our journey of life  And our children  Jeffrey (Brandi) Callum and Robb (Cheryl)   

Dan Kazakoff  To my wife Kathy and children, Thomas and Kirstin,   For their constant support and encouragement 

Acknowledgements Many people are involved either directly or indirectly in the writing of a  book.  Some of the chapters are related to specific projects about small  business.    We  are  indebted  to  those  very  busy  small  business  owners  and managers for participating in our interviews and for their forthright  comments.  We  appreciate  the  assistance  and  encouragement  from  Dan  Remenyi  publisher  of  Academic  Publishing  International.    We  acknowledge  the  helpful  comments  we  received  from  the  anonymous  reviewers.    Your  input has certainly improved our manuscript.  We hasten to add that any  errors which remain in the final version of the book are entirely our own. 

iv


Preface This book is about small business.  The small business sector is an impor‐ tant part of an economy.  Small business employs 48% of the total work  force in Canada and 50% in the USA.  The contribution to GDP by small  business  is  29%  in  Canada  and  30%  in  the  USA.    Unfortunately,  many  small  businesses  fail.    In  Canada,  75%  will  have  failed  after  9  years.    In  the USA, 50% will have failed after 4 years.  Given the importance of this  group  of  businesses,  the  question  arises  then  about  what  factors  con‐ tribute to the success of these businesses.  This book addresses this im‐ portant  issue  from  both  the  perspectives  of  failure  and  long  term  suc‐ cess.  The journey  through  the  book includes stops at many stories providing  perspectives  on  small  business.    Chapter  1  defines  small  business  and  proposes  a  definition  of  successful  ones.    The  chapter  also  includes  a  description  of  how  small  business  is  differentiated  from  large  compa‐ nies.    Chapter  2  provides  a  perspective  of  small  business  through  the  entrepreneurial  process.    Dimensions  of  the  small  business  including  Business, Family, and Ownership are employed to depict the small busi‐ ness  evolution.    Further,  the  small  business  is  described  in  relation  to  aspects  of  performance,  growth,  and  succession.    Chapter  3  presents  perspectives of entrepreneurs.  Types of entrepreneurs include nascent,  novice,  and  experienced.    It  is  noted  that  experienced  entrepreneurs  may  be  regarded  by  the  terms  serial  (owning  small  businesses  sequen‐ tially) or portfolio (owning multiple small business concurrently).  Chap‐ ter 4 describes Entrepreneurship Theory which explains what entrepre‐ neurs do and why they do it.  Chapter 5 describes Agency Theory.  As a  small  business  grows  and  more  skills  become  necessary  the  entrepre‐ neur  requires  a  way  to  ensure  employee  attitudes  and  work  activities  are aligned with those of the entrepreneur.  Agency Theory provides the  context  to  understand  this  alignment  process.    Chapter  6  describes  Stewardship Theory which involves a person stepping forward and sub‐ suming  individual  goals  to  those  of  the  small  business.    Stewards  feel  they  have  been  entrusted  with  the  resources  of  others  and  will exhibit  behaviours beyond their own self‐serving interests.  Chapter 7 provides  v 


a description  of  The  Living  Company:  Habits  for  Survival  in  a  Turbulent  Business Environment, by Arie de Geus and relates the many aspects of  longevity to small business.  Chapter 8 describes a project which investi‐ gated multi‐generation small business.  Chapter 9 describes another pro‐ ject  which  investigated  how  some  of  the  multi‐generation  small  busi‐ nesses  in  Chapter  8  responded  to  the  financial  crisis  of  2008‐2009.   Chapter 10 provides a different perspective of small business reporting  on a project which investigated small business failures.  Chapter 11 pre‐ sents  the  main  thesis  of  the  book  regarding  the  evolution  of  emphasis  regarding the small business journey to success. 

vi


Chapter 1   Overview  1.1 Introduction  This chapter presents an overview of small business and a description of  the material presented in the remainder of the book. A series of investi‐ gations form the basis of this manuscript. The results of these investiga‐ tions,  along  with  relevant  literature,  provide  the  background  and  sup‐ port  for  the  concepts  that  describe  the  small  business  journey  to  suc‐ cess.  Small  Business  Journey  to  Success  will  be  of  value  to  many  audiences.  The contents may be employed by small business managers to provide  guidance  in  conducting  their  daily  operations  and  planning  for  the  fu‐ ture. Students will gain insight into important consideration for the long  term  survival  of  small  business.  Academics  will  find  the  book  a  rich  source of further research ideas. Finally, accountants, bankers, and con‐ sultants will be able to identify important areas upon which to focus as  they  provide  advice  to  small  business  managers  to  facilitate  their  jour‐ ney to success.  Many countries realize the importance of small business to their econo‐ mies.  In  Canada  (Industry  Canada,  2010)  small  business  employs  5  mil‐ lion people representing 48% of the total work force in the private sec‐ tor. Further, small business contributes 29% to Canada’s GDP. An earlier  report  (Industry  Canada,  2008)  showed  that  during  an  exceptionally  good economic period from 1997 to 2003, an average of 125,000 small  businesses  failed  annually.  From  a  long  term  perspective,  the  same  re‐ port determined that only 25% of small businesses remain in operation  after  9  years.  This  finding  is  similar  to  that  reported  by  Zontanos  and  Anderson  (2004)  who  found  that  over  two  thirds  of  small  businesses  close  within  the  decade  they  open.  From  an  even  longer  perspective,  very  few  small  businesses  continue  on  to  subsequent  generations  of  ownership. Cater et al  (2006) determined that 30%  of small businesses  1 


Small Business: Journey to Success  are passed to the second generation;  12% to the  third generation; and  4% to the fourth generation.  In the United States small business employs 50% of the work force and  contributes 50% to private non‐farm sector GDP (Michma and Bednarz,  2006). Further, small family run businesses in the United States contrib‐ ute  approximately  30%  to  overall  GDP  employing  27%  of  the  national  workforce  (Astrachan  and  Shanker,  2003).  On  an  annual  basis  in  the  United States, there are an equal number (about 50,000) start‐ups and  closures. By the end of the second year one third of start‐ups have not  survived;  and  one  half  have  failed  after  four  years  (Small  Business  Ad‐ ministration, 2010).  These  small  business  statistics  raise  questions  about  the  factors  that  contribute  to  small  business  success  and  small  business  failure.  Given  that  there  may  be  a  different  set  of  factors  that  contribute  to  success  versus  failure,  both  sides  of  this  issue  are  addressed  in  this  book.  The  emphasis here is on successful businesses. The term “successful” is de‐ fined in a following sub‐section of this chapter.  This chapter includes the following subsections. First, issues surrounding  the  definition  of  small  business  are  presented.  Second,  the  idea  of  de‐ termining a successful small business is presented. Third, small business  is  differentiated  from  large  business.  Fourth,  an  overview  of  four  small  business  research  projects  is  presented.  The  projects  are  reviewed  in  more detail in subsequent chapters. Fifth, a brief overview of small busi‐ ness  theoretical  perspectives  is  included.  Each  of  the  theories  is  dis‐ cussed in more detail in subsequent chapters. The combination of theo‐ ries forms the basis for the proposed small business journey to success.  This chapter concludes with a brief description of all of the chapters in‐ cluded in the book. 

1.2 Small Business Defined  Some time ago, an interesting definition of a small business was devel‐ oped by the Wiltshire Committee. A small business is,   “…a business in which one or two persons are required to make all  the critical management decisions.”   (Wiltshire Committee, 1971:7).  2 


Overview There  currently  exist  many  different  definitions  of  “small  business”.  While  some  measures  such  as  total  assets  or  annual  sales  or  revenue  may be considered they tend not to be employed because they are diffi‐ cult  or  impossible  to  determine.  Many  small  businesses  are  privately  held  and  are  not  required  to  report  such  statistics.  Indeed,  research  shows that small business managers tend not to rely upon these statis‐ tics  even  when  they  are  available  (Halabi  et  al,  2010).  Therefore,  most  research  investigations  and  many  government  agencies  employ  the  number of employees as a way to define small business (Longnecker et  al, 1997). This statistic is readily available because of the income tax re‐ mittance requirement of most payroll systems.  There are, however, inconsistencies in how this statistic is employed to  define small business. In Canada the number is 100 employees for goods  producing  firms  and  50  employees  for  service  firms  (Industry  Canada  2010).  Firms  employing  between  101  and  499  persons  are  considered  medium. In the United States a small independent business is defined as  having  fewer  than  500  employees  (Michma  and  Bednarz,  2006).  There  does not seem to be a differentiation made based upon sector. Perhaps  the  most  specific  definition  of  small  business  is  provided  by  the  Euro‐ pean Parliament (2002). They define micro businesses as having 0 – 10  employees.  Small  businesses  include  up  to  50  employees,  and  medium  sized businesses have up to 250 employees. Because of these inconsis‐ tencies  researchers  tend  to  take  a  contingency  approach  to  defining  small business based upon size (number of employees) for each research  project.  While  these  definitions  vary  investigators  tend  to  follow  rela‐ tively closely a version of the above categories. 

1.2.1 “Successful” Small Business  There is also an issue regarding the decision of how to define a “success‐ ful” small business. Naturally, a small business must make a profit in or‐ der to survive. But beyond survival, how could the concept of “success”  be incorporated? Some authors (Smallbone and Wyer, 2000; and Dobbs  and Hamilton, 2007) propose growth as a measure of success. However,  more  recent  research  (Tan  et  al,  2009)  has  shown  that  the  small  busi‐ ness  growth  path  may  diverge.  Hunter  and  Kazakoff  (2008)  found  sup‐ port  for  small  business  divergence.  See  the  discussion  in  Chapter  2.  As  discussed in Chapter 3, there are many different types of entrepreneurs  (Westhead  et  al,  2005a,  2005b).  Westhead  and  Wright  (1999)  deter‐ 3 


Small Business: Journey to Success  mined there are differences in motivations of entrepreneurs. Some indi‐ viduals  at  certain  stages  of  the  small  business  life  are  less  growth  ori‐ ented.  Beyond  making  a  profit  and  creating  growth,  the  following  idea  is  pro‐ posed  regarding  defining  a  successful  small  business.  De  Geus  (2002)  investigated  the  common  aspects  of  long‐lived  large  companies.  While  he  focused  on  large  companies  the  general  concept  seems  to  apply  to  small business. He made the following comment:  Companies die because their managers focus on the economic activity of  producing  goods  and  services,  and  they  forget  that  their  organizations’  true nature is that of a community of humans. (De Geus, 2002:3)  Thus,  a  community  of  humans  contributes  to  longevity  and,  as  con‐ tended here, the success of the small business. The factors which help to  establish  and  maintain  the  community  of  humans  are  discussed  throughout this book. These factors are exemplified by those small busi‐ nesses  which  exist  for  more  than  one  generation.  As  they  proceed  be‐ yond the first generation the small business will experience the crisis of  succession and will indeed change. To be clear, a successful small busi‐ ness  is  considered  to  be  a  multi‐generation  small  business.  In  all  likeli‐ hood  the  small  business  will  remain  within  the  family.  But  this  is  not  necessary for the determination of success. 

1.2.2 Small Business Vs Large Company  It is important to  note  that, “... a small business is  not a little  big busi‐ ness  ...”  (Welsh  and  White,  1981).  Managers  of  small  business  adopt  a  perspective and make decisions which are different from those made by  administrators  of  big  business.  These  differences  have  been  docu‐ mented  by  many  researchers  and  the  following  examples  are  included  here.  Stevenson  (1999)  presented  a  perspective  on  approaches  to  business  practice,  included  here  in  Table  1.1.  A  continuum  of  business  practice  includes major aspects related to strategic orientation and decision mak‐ ing.  Small  business  managers  and  large  company  administrators  are  placed at each end of the continuum. Strategically, small business man‐ agers will tend to focus externally and attempt to capitalize on emerging  opportunities  (Stevenson,  1999).  At  the  other  end  of  the  continuum,  4 


Overview large  company  administrators  will  place  their  attention  internally  and  focus on the efficient use of current resources.  Table 1.1: Approaches to Business Practices. Adapted from Stevenson, 1999. 

PROMOTER

TRUSTEE

Aspects of Business Practice

Strategic orientation

Resource commitment and control decisions

Small Business

Large Company

Capitalize on an opportunity

Focus on efficient use of current resources to determine the greatest return

Act in a very short time frame

Long time frame, considering long term implications

Multi-staged

One-time up-front commitment

Minimum commitment of resources at each stage

Large scale commitment of resources at one stage

Respond quickly to changes in competition, market, and technology

Formal procedures of analysis such as capital allocation systems

The decision making process also varies between small business manag‐ ers and large company administrators. Indeed, Stevenson’s (1999) terms  of  “promoter”  (small  business  manager)  and  “trustee”  (large  company  administrator)  seem  very  appropriate  in  this  context.  The  promoter’s  decision making time frame is very short. Decisions are made in multiple  stages  with  a  minimum  commitment  of  resources.  This  allows  the  pro‐ moter to react quickly to changes in the environment. The trustee’s de‐ cision  making  time  frame  is  based  upon  a  long  term  perspective.  After  thorough analysis, one time commitments are made regarding the allo‐ cation of large scale resources. This approach is supported by formalized  internal  and  repeatable  systems  for  allocation  of  resources  including  financial and human capital.  5 


Small Business: Journey to Success  Another example of small business managers’ perspective relates to the  concept  of  “resource  poverty”  (Thong  et  al,  1994).  This  term  suggests  that  small  business  managers  lack  important  resources  associated  with  skills, time, and finances.  These  three  aspects of resource poverty con‐ tribute  to  the  perspective  on  business  practice  (Stevenson,  1999)  out‐ lined  above.  First,  businesses  that  are  small  employ  few  people.  This  small  number  of  employees  may  not  possess  the  appropriate  skills  to  support  the  entire  business  operation.  This  point  leads  to  the  second  aspect  of  resource  poverty.  With  fewer  people  and  available  skills  the  small business manager will be limited in the time available to devote to  decision making activities. Third, as most small businesses are privately  held,  they  tend  to  be  similarly  financed  resulting  in  a  limited  supply  of  money.  In  general,  small  business  has  difficulty  obtaining  financing.  In‐ deed, small business has more difficulty than large companies in access‐ ing  financial  resources  (Ang,  1991).  Small  business  managers  may  take  an informal approach generally described as the “3Fs” – Family, Friends,  or  Fools.  This  approach  may  prove  difficult.  Initially,  the  amount  of  fi‐ nances  available  may  be  limited.  Further,  if  repayment  is  delayed  for  some reason personal relationships may be negatively affected. A more  formal  approach  would  be  to  establish  a  business  relationship  with  a  lending  institution  (Cole  and  Wolken,  1996;  Ang,  1992).  However,  be‐ cause  of  the  centralized  nature  of  credit  granting  policies  unique  re‐ gional  or  industry  sector  aspects  of  small  business  operations  may  not  be  considered  (Hunter,  2011a;  Boot,  2000;  and  Degryse  and  Van  Cay‐ seele, 2000).  The final example of small business managers’ perspective relates to the  approach  to  marketing.  Small  business,  in  addition  to  their  lack  of  re‐ sources  as  outlined  above,  will  rely  upon  a  relatively  small  customer  base (Zontanos and Anderson, 2004) in a concentrated local area (Wein‐ rauch  et  al,  1991).  Thus,  it  is  paramount  that  small  business  managers  establish and maintain a long term and close relationship with their cus‐ tomers  (Berry,  1983;  McKenna,  1991;  and  Cardwell,  1994).  There  is,  however, concern that with a downturn in the economy a focused cus‐ tomer approach may create more of a negative performance affect than  a  slightly  more  diversified  approach  to  marketing  and  customer  rela‐ tions. 

6


Overview

1.3 Projects There  has  been  in  general  a  call  for  more  research  into  small  business  (Zachary  and  Mishra,  2010).  Mullen  et  al  (2009)  call  for  more  rigour  in  small business research through the application of state‐of‐the‐art quan‐ titative techniques. Their comments are supported by their review of a  large number of publications in highly regarded small business research  journals. Conversely, Tan et al (2009) suggest that qualitative research is  appropriate because it “...takes full account of the small entrepreneurial  firm context.” (Tan et al 2009:245). While each chapter in this book will  present a review of the appropriate research, there are specific projects  which  have  been  employed  in  the  development  of  this  manuscript.  These projects have taken a qualitative perspective to the investigation  of small business. This qualitative approach facilitates an in‐depth inves‐ tigation into relevant issues involved in small business operations. Each  project is presented in more detail in subsequent chapters. An overview  is included below. 

1.3.1 Variety in Small Business  This project is presented as part of Chapter 3 and discusses various per‐ spectives of small business entrepreneurs. The research project (Hunter,  2011b) examined variety in small business entrepreneurs. Research par‐ ticipants with high level overview experience provided comments about  their  interpretations  of  variety  in  small  business.  The  research  partici‐ pants represented a variety of geographic areas. They were involved in  oversight  organizations  such  as  local  Chambers  of  Commerce  or  Eco‐ nomic  Development  Associations.  The  consensus  was  that  variety  was  based  upon  the  specifics  of  the  small  business’  location.  Personality  types  of  the  small  business  managers  affected  their  approach  to  con‐ ducting  business.  Entrepreneurs  might  be  aggressive  or  conservative.  The experience of the entrepreneurs regarding their type suggested va‐ riety in their approach to acquiring information. 

1.3.2 Multi­Generation Small Business  Chapter  8  presents  an  overview  of  a  book  titled  Little  Empires  (Hunter  and  Kazakoff,  2008).  This  project  investigated  multi‐generation  small  business  in  Lethbridge,  Alberta,  Canada.  The  individuals  who  partici‐ pated  in  the  project  generously  allowed  their  names  and  the  name  of  7 


Small Business: Journey to Success  their small business to be used. Indeed, in most cases the names of the  family and the business are the same. This is to be expected in relatively  small  businesses  –  even  more  so  in  businesses  that  have  existed  for  some  time.  The  participants  are  rightfully  proud  of  their  name,  family  and  business,  and  the  success  they  have  achieved  throughout  multiple  generations of existence. Twenty individuals from eleven different busi‐ nesses  were  interviewed.  Their  comments  form  the  basis  for  their  re‐ spective chapters and the subsequent analysis chapters.  The goal of writing the Little Empires (Hunter and Kazakoff, 2008) book  was  to  identify  those  characteristics  which  not  only  contribute  to  the  current  success  of  the  small  business,  but  also  to  the  survival  of  the  small  business  beyond  the  tenure  of  the  founding  entrepreneur.  The  emerging themes that are identified serve to show the unique approach  taken by small businesses that continue past the early generations. Little  Empires (Hunter and Kazakoff, 2008) provides valuable insights into the  strategies  utilized  by  small  business  regarding  their  continued  ap‐ proaches  to  ensuring  the  viability  of  a  business  initiated  by  a  previous  generation. 

1.3.3 Small Business Response to the Financial Crisis  Chapter  9  represents  a  follow‐up  to  the  book  discussed  in  Chapter  8.  This  exploratory  investigation  (Hunter  and  Kazakoff,  2012)  documents  the comments of participating family members of multi‐generation small  businesses regarding their experiences in responding to the recent (2008  – 2009) financial crisis. Themes were identified relating to previous crisis  experience,  external  factors  imposed  upon  the  small  business,  and  in‐ ternal  factors  which  could  be  managed.  While  those  individuals  who  were interviewed had no direct experience with previous financial crises,  they felt they were significantly influenced by those with experience to  take a conservative approach to finances. External factors related to the  down‐turn in the specific market, the banks’ approach to financing, and  the  overall  business  environment.  Internal  factors  that  could  be  man‐ aged included revising their business model, investigations into diversifi‐ cation,  and  decisions  about  employee  lay‐offs.  Throughout  the  inter‐ views the participants demonstrated a clear consideration of the oppor‐ tunities arising from the financial crisis. 

8


Overview

1.3.4 Small Business Failures  As  a  counter‐point  to  the  Chapter  8  presentation  of  successful  multi‐ generation  small  business,  Chapter  10  reports  on  an  investigation  into  small business failures. This research project (Hunter, 2011a) documents  the comments of bankruptcy professionals in the assessment of the op‐ eration  of  small  business.  Interviews  were  conducted  with  three  re‐ search  participants  regarding  their  experience  with  a  total  of  twelve  small business failure instances. The results suggest that it is incumbent  upon  the  small  business  owner  to  proactively  adopt  processes  to  deal  with issues that are controllable and to respond to the non‐controllable  issues. The small business owner must continue to focus on the business  and retain a passion to see the business succeed. 

1.4 Research Approach  Each of the above projects employed a similar approach to gathering the  data, via one‐on‐one interviews and analyzing the data contained in the  resulting  transcripts.  A  qualitative  perspective  was  taken  for  each  pro‐ ject.  Qualitative  researchers  interact  closely  with  research  participants  gathering interpretations of their personal experiences relating to a spe‐ cific  subject.  Within  this  perspective  resides  Ground  Theory  which  is,  “...the discovery of theory from data systematically obtained from social  research.”  (Glaser  and  Strauss,  1967:2).  In  general,  qualitative  data  are  gathered relative to a specific research question and without the a priori  adoption of a research framework. Emerging themes are identified via a  continual comparison of the data from an interview transcript and pre‐ viously  identified  themes.  This  method  of  analysis  is  known  as  the  Grounded Theory Method. It is common practice in qualitative research  to  identify  emerging  themes.  Eventually,  these  themes  may  be  em‐ ployed to develop a response to the initial research question. “By com‐ paring where the facts are similar or different, we can generate proper‐ ties  of  categories  that  increase  the  categories’  generality  and  explana‐ tory power”. (Glaser and Strauss, 1967:24). The data gathering interview  process is considered complete when new themes cannot be identified  in  subsequent  interviews.  This  situation  is  referred  to  as  “theoretical  saturation (Glaser and Strauss, 1967).  A  Narrative  Inquiry  (Scholes,  1981)  approach  was  taken  for  qualitative  data gathering. This approach incorporates the concepts of contextually  9 


Small Business: Journey to Success  rich and temporally bounded. The term contextually rich refers to first‐ hand  experience.  It  is  recognized  that  personal  experiences  are  more  vividly  remembered  (Swap  et  al,  2001;  and  Tulving,  1972).  The  term  temporally bounded relates to the sequentially oriented personal recol‐ lections.  Thus,  discussions  should  be  organized  with  a  beginning,  a  se‐ quence of events, and an end with regards to the area of investigation.  This  sequential  approach  also  promotes  more  thorough  and  accurate  recollections  of  experiences  (Bruner,  1990;  Czarniawska‐Joerges,  1995;  and Vendelo, 1998).  McCracken’s  (1988)  Long  Interview  technique  was  employed  to  gather  the  research  participants’  comments.  This  technique  supports  a  rela‐ tively  free  flowing  unbiased  approach  to  conducting  interviews.  The  technique  involves  four  stages.  In  the  first  stage,  the  researcher  devel‐ ops  a  thorough  understanding  of  the  existing  literature.  Then,  in  the  second stage, the researcher conducts a self‐assessment regarding his or  her  knowledge  and  skills  relative  to  the  research  question.  Interviews  are  conducted  in  the  third  stage.  The  interview  protocol  employed  for  each project is included in an appendix for each respective chapter. Not  only  did  this  protocol  provide  a  relatively  flexible  guide  for  each  inter‐ view,  it  also  provided  consistency  across  a  number  of  interviews.  The  fourth  stage  involves  a  detailed  analysis  of  the  interview  transcripts  to  identify emerging themes. This is common practice when qualitative in‐ terviews  are  used  to  gather  data  (Luna‐Reyes  and  Andersen,  2003;  Thompson, 1997; and Miles and Huberman, 1994).  Within the interview, three types of  generic  questions are posed. First,  at the beginning of the interview, “grand tour” (McCracken, 1988) ques‐ tions  are  posed.  General  in  nature  and  non‐directive  in  manner,  these  questions are meant to set the research participant at ease and to estab‐ lish the context for subsequent more probing questions. Second, subse‐ quent  questions  are  referred  to  as  “planned  prompts”  (McCracken,  1988).  They  are  directly  related  to  the  topic  of  the  investigation.  They  may result from a prior literature review or appear as open ended ques‐ tions related to the topic in anticipation of determining new previously  unidentified  issues.  Third,  “floating  prompt”  (McCracken,  1988)  ques‐ tions may also be posed in order to obtain more detail about a response  from  the  research  participant.  These  questions  originate  from  the  re‐ sponse by the research participant to a planned prompt question. Thus,  the researcher will decide to probe even further in an attempt to more  10 


Overview fully understand the research participant’s comment and perhaps choice  of words. 

1.5 Overview of Theoretical Perspective  From a theoretical perspective, it is proposed here that there is a series  of stages of emphasis through which the small business progresses that  facilitates its long term survival. There exists a progression from the sole  entrepreneur  who  initiates  a  small  business;  through  the  appropriate  growth of the small business; to the recognition of the small business as  a  valuable  asset  by  subsequent  entrepreneurs,  some  of  whom  may  be  family members.  There are many theories which may be employed regarding the analysis  of  the  firm  in  general  and  small  business  in  particular.  The  theories  which will be employed in this treatise will be as follows:    

Entrepreneurship Theory  Agency Theory  Stewardship Theory 

While these theories will be discussed in detail in a later series of chap‐ ters, a brief overview is presented here. 

1.5.1 Entrepreneurship Theory  Many  researchers  have  contributed  to  the  development  and  evolution  of  Entrepreneurship  Theory  (Schumpeter,  1934;  Shackle,  1962;  Kirzner,  1973  and  1992;  Herbert  and  Link,  1988  and  1989;  Baron,  1998;  and  Shane  and  Venkataraman,  2000).  Perhaps  the  most  well  known  com‐ ment on entrepreneurship was made by Drucker (1998) who suggested  entrepreneurship  involves  an  innovative  approach  to  establishing  and  maintaining the viability of a business.   Entrepreneurship is a long term creative process beginning with a vision  of a business or process and culminating in a living system. This process  is  known  as  the  entrepreneurial  act  (Long,  1983;  Long  and  McMullan,  1984; McMullan and Long, 1990). Both small business and large compa‐ nies are merely considered points reached on a continuum that includes  a  beginning  with  an  abstract  business  idea  that  the  founding  entrepre‐ neur  resolves  to  pursue  as  a  business  venture.  The  business  venture  is  shaped by strategic decisions made by the entrepreneur in response to  11 


Small Business: Journey to Success  environmental challenges. As an early start‐up these challenges may re‐ late to identifying, evaluating and pursuing a particular business oppor‐ tunity. As these challenges are successfully addressed the business ven‐ ture moves closer to the development of a self‐sustaining living system  that is capable of innovating and adapting to an ever changing environ‐ ment.  An entrepreneur will continually seek out new and innovative opportu‐ nities (Pretorius et al, 2006). Someone who adopts this approach is de‐ scribed as an authentic leader (Jensen and Luthans, 2006). The interests  of the organization are considered and placed before personal interests.  Employees  are  treated  with  respect  and  mutual  trust  evolves.  The  en‐ trepreneur is the focal point for the development of both business val‐ ues and a positive operating culture (Denison et al, 2004).  While the entrepreneur or authentic leader will establish a positive mo‐ dus operandi there will always be a consideration for further innovation  and change. As the founding entrepreneur passes the business to a sub‐ sequent entrepreneur subsequent change will result. 

1.5.2 Agency Theory  The  formal  relationship  between  managers  and  employees  may  be  de‐ scribed by Agency Theory (Ross, 1973; and Jensen and Meckling, 1976).  As a manager hires employees, Agency Theory suggests that in order to  align  the  objectives  of  the  two  parties  a  contract  must  be  established  which  outlines  activities  to  be  performed  in  order  to  accomplish  the  agreed upon objectives. The manager acts as the principal and the em‐ ployee  as  the  agent.  The  contract  represents  the  control  mechanism  that attempts to align the agent’s objectives with those of the principal.  As the business grows or new skills become required, it will be necessary  to hire employees. Thus, ways must be found to ensure the goals of the  employees  are  aligned  with  those  goals  established  by  the  business  (McConaughy  et  al,  2001).  So  a  contract,  either  written  or  implied,  should  be  established  to  create  a  control  mechanism  to  ensure  align‐ ment  of  the  goals  of  the  employees  with  those  of  the  small  business  manager. Agency Theory provides a framework to analyze this alignment  process. 

12


Overview Through the establishment of a contract the principal is able to delegate  tasks  to  be  performed  by  the  agent.  The  contract  outlines  the  level  of  performance  of  the  tasks  assigned  to  the  agent.  According  to  Agency  Theory the contract is necessary to ensure the agents will not attempt to  maximize their own interests over those of the principal. The pursuit of  self‐interests  over  business  interests  is  referred  to  as  agency  cost.  The  less the two parties are aligned the higher the agency cost. This cost is  related to the effort required to attain alignment. The main purpose for  Agency  Theory  is  to  establish  mechanisms  to  control  the  alignment  of  interests between principal and agent; and thus reduce agency costs. 

1.5.3 Stewardship Theory  This  theory  (Donaldson  and  Davis,  1989  and  1991)  suggests  the  emer‐ gence of a “steward” who is motivated by intrinsic rewards (Davis et al,  1997). Stewards realize they are leaders who know they have been en‐ trusted with  resources that they must nurture and grow (Smith, 2004).  Further,  stewards  realize  they  are  responsible  for  holding  an  asset  in  trust for another (Block, 1996). Thus, a steward is motivated by different  considerations than those of the principal/agent relationship expounded  by Agency Theory, where a formal mechanism is required for controlling  and  monitoring  the  relationship.  As  a  further  comparison,  Agency  The‐ ory  focuses  on  extrinsic  rewards;  while  Stewardship  Theory  considers  intrinsic rewards. The former are tangible and the latter are intangible.  Stewardship  Theory  outlines  the  behaviour  of  a  steward  who  acts  in  a  similar  way  to  the  authentic  leader  described  above  by  Jensen  and  Lu‐ thans  (2006).  Thus  a  steward  may  act  in  ways  that  provide  support  for  the long term goals of the business, but which may not produce imme‐ diate financial results (Mowday et al, 1982, O’Reilly and Chatman, 1986;  and Smith et al, 1983).  Further, a steward will  take  action  that  may be  beyond  the  scope  of  the  business  and  may  provide  benefits  to  those  outside of the specific entity (Westhead, 2003). 

1.6 Format of the Book  The main idea presented in this book relates to the evolution of empha‐ sis  in  relation  to  a  series  of  theoretical  perspectives  along  a  journey  to  success. This evolution is outlined in later chapters. Earlier chapters pre‐ sent contextual material in support of the thesis about the evolution.  13 


Small Business: Journey to Success 

Chapter 1: Overview  This chapter  provides a definition of small business and a discussion of  the  importance  of  small  business.  It  also  includes  a  brief  overview  of  a  series of projects which led to the development of the thesis presented  in a later chapter. The results of these investigations, along with relevant  literature,  provide  the  background  and  support  for  the  concepts  that  describe the small business journey to success. 

Chapter 2: Perspectives of Small Business  This  chapter  focuses  on  the  small  business  as  a  unique  entity.  The  en‐ trepreneurial act involves the process of identifying an opportunity and  building  a  structure  to  pursue  the  opportunity  (McMullan  and  Long,  1990).  Structures  of  small  business  involve  the  depiction  of  the  partici‐ pation of the entrepreneur (Deeks, 1973). Over time the small business  will evolve along dimensions related to ownership, business, and family  (Gersick  et  al,  1997).  Also  presented  in  this  chapter  are  methods  for  evaluating  performance  and  growth  along  with  a  discussion  of  succes‐ sion from the perspective of the small business as an entity. 

Chapter 3: Perspectives of Entrepreneurs  This  chapter  includes  a  description  of  the  types  of  entrepreneurs  in‐ volved in small business. The emphasis of this chapter is on the individ‐ ual. The types of entrepreneur include novice, serial, and portfolio. Per‐ sonality  types  determine  the  entrepreneur’s  approach  to  conducting  business.  Some  entrepreneurs  might  be  aggressive  while  pursuing  growth and expansion while others might take a more conservative ap‐ proach.  The  variety  of  the  small  business  is  mainly  based  upon  specific  aspects of location. 

Chapter 4: Entrepreneurship Theory  The Entrepreneurship Theory suggests entrepreneurs take an innovative  approach  to  establishing  and  maintaining  the  viability  of  a  business.  (Drucker, 1998). Entrepreneurs continually take an innovative approach  to seek new opportunities (Pretorius et al, 2006). The chapter presents  an overview of the theory and how it relates to small business. 

14


Overview

Chapter 5: Agency Theory  Agency Theory (Ross, 1973; and Jensen and Meckling, 1976) involves the  establishment  of  a  formal  contract  relationship  between  the  business  manager  (principal)  and  the  employees  (agents)  to  facilitate  the  align‐ ment of objectives. The contract represents a formal control mechanism  to ensure alignment. (McConaughy et al, 2001). While Agency Theory is  not specifically related to small business this chapter presents an over‐ view  of  the  theory  and  how  it  may  is  represented  in  small  business  through  growth  when  it  becomes  necessary  to  acquire  the  services  of  individuals with appropriate skills. 

Chapter 6: Stewardship Theory  Stewardship Theory (Donaldson and Davis, 1989 and 1991) suggests the  emergence of a “steward”, motivated by intrinsic rewards, to manage a  valuable  resource  on  behalf  of  others  (Smith,  2004;  and  Block,  1996).  Decisions made in this context will not focus on immediate financial re‐ wards but will take into consideration the long term survival of the busi‐ ness (Mowday et al, 1982, O’Reilly and Chatman, 1986; and Smith et al,  1983). 

Chapter 7: Long­Lived Companies  Examples are included here about large companies that have existed for  a long time. Analogies are provided in support of the description of small  businesses.  The  emphasis  here  is  on  the  business  entity.  This  chapter  employs  and  reviews  the  book  titled,  The  Living  Company,  by  Arie  De  Geus  (2002)  to  provide  the  context  for  a  discussion  about  long‐lived  small  business.  The  author  investigated  large  companies  that  have  ex‐ isted in one form or another for a very long time. It was difficult to find  many.  For  instance,  de  Geus  (2002)  determined  that  the  average  life  span of Fortune 500 companies was only 40 to 50 years. In general De  Geus (2002) compares “economic” companies with “long‐lived” compa‐ nies.  Economic  companies  focus  on  Return  on  Investment  (ROI)  ap‐ proaches to making decisions and consequently do not survive for very  long.  Long‐lived  large  companies  focus  on  empowering  employees  and  developing  a  culture  that  emphasizes  learning.  This  focus  results  in  a  company that survives and continues to search for improvement. 

15


Small Business: Journey to Success 

Chapter 8: Multi­Generation Small Business  This  chapter  describes  multi‐generation  small  businesses  and  proposes  that this is a way to define a successful small business. The chapter pre‐ sents an overview of the project that investigated multi‐generation small  businesses and the factors that contributed to their success. These small  businesses  are  privately  held  and  do  not  have  publically  traded  invest‐ ment vehicle. Ownership of the small business is held within the family  unit which may be children, or grandchildren of the founding entrepre‐ neur. In some cases individuals may become involved in the small busi‐ ness through marriage. A multi‐generation small business is one that has  been  passed  down  from  one  generation  to  the  next  within  the  family  unit.  The  goal  of  this  project  was  to  identify  those  characteristics  that  not only contribute to the current success of the small business, but also  those that have contributed to the survival of the small business beyond  the tenure of the founding entrepreneur. The majority of investigations  into  multi‐generation  small  business  have  focused  upon  factors  sur‐ rounding succession planning. This is an important aspect to consider for  multi‐generation small businesses and, indeed, consideration for succes‐ sion  emerged  from  this  investigation.  However,  succession  planning  is  just one, albeit an important issue, relating to the success of small busi‐ nesses over more than one generation. 

Chapter 9: Small Business Response to Financial Crisis  The financial crisis of 2008‐2009 had a major affect on all economies and  impacted  many  small  businesses.  This  chapter  reviews  how  multi‐ generation small business reacted to the crisis. This exploratory investi‐ gation  documents  the  comments  of  participating  family  members  of  multi‐generation  small  businesses  regarding  their  experiences  in  re‐ sponding  to  the  recent  financial  crisis.  Themes  were  identified  relating  to  previous  crisis  experience,  external  factors  imposed  upon  the  small  business, and internal factors that could be managed. While those indi‐ viduals  who  were  interviewed  had  no  direct  experience  with  previous  financial crises, they felt they were significantly influenced by those with  experience to take a conservative approach to finances. External factors  related to the downturn in the specific market, the banks’ approach to  financing,  and  the  overall  business  environment.  Internal  factors  which  could be managed included revising their business model, investigations  into  diversification,  and  decisions  about  employee  lay‐offs.  Throughout  16 


Overview the  interviews  the  participants  demonstrated  a  clear  consideration  of  the opportunities arising from the financial crisis. 

Chapter 10: Small Business Failures  This chapter reviews the common causes of small business failures and  documents the comments of bankruptcy professionals in the assessment  of the operation of small business. The results suggest that it is incum‐ bent  upon  the  small  business  manager  to  be  able  to  proactively  adopt  processes to deal with issues that are controllable and to respond to the  non‐controllable  issues.  The  small  business  manager  must  continue  to  focus on the business and retain a passion to see the business succeed. 

Chapter 11: Journey to Success  The main thesis of the book is presented in this chapter. This idea relates  to  an  evolution  of  theoretical  emphasis.  The  evolution  is  not  a  distinct  set of discrete stages but more of a shifting of emphasis. To begin, En‐ trepreneurship  Theory  applies  in  the  innovative  approach  to  managing  the small business. This theory continues to apply throughout the life of  the small business as new opportunities are continually investigated. As  the  small  business  grows  employees  are  hired  to  respond  to  required  skills.  Agency  Theory  provides  a  mechanism  to  ensure  alignment  be‐ tween  the  entrepreneur’s  business  goals  and  the  employees’  personal  goals. This mechanism usually exists in the form of an employment con‐ tract. Eventually, the founding entrepreneur will move on either to other  opportunities  (business  or  retirement)  or  unfortunately,  death.  If  the  small business is going to survive beyond the departure of the founding  entrepreneur an individual must step forward. Further, if the small busi‐ ness is going to continue beyond this transition the self‐initiated individ‐ ual will take a “stewardship” approach to managing the valuable asset.  Thus, Stewardship Theory then applies. The steward will make decisions  that are in the best interest of the long term survival of the small busi‐ ness. 

1.7 Conclusion This chapter has set the stage for the remainder of the book. Small busi‐ ness has been defined and the concept of a successful small business has  been  introduced.  Small  business  was  differentiated  from  large  compa‐ nies.  An  overview  of  a  series  of  projects  that  have  investigated  small  17 


Small Business: Journey to Success  business was presented in support of an applied context for the journey  to success. Then a theoretical context was introduced via an overview of  three applicable theories as they relate to small business. Both the rele‐ vant  projects  and  theories  have  been  presented  in  support  of  discus‐ sions  in  subsequent  chapters.  Finally,  the  format  for  the  remainder  of  the  book  was  presented  along  with  an  overview  description  of  each  chapter.  The  next  chapter  presents  a  description  of  the  entity  of  the  small business including aspects such as evaluation, growth, and succes‐ sion.   

18

Small Business: Journey to Success  

This is a 26 page extract from the book. This book highlights the issues required to be mastered for the success of a small business over t...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you