__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1


Case Studies in Innovation  For Researchers, Teachers and Students    Edited by 

Heather Fulford 


Case Studies in Innovation   Volume One  First published: June 2012  ISBN: 978‐1‐908272‐37‐9  Copyright © 2012 The authors    All rights reserved. Except for the quotation of short passages for the purposes of  critical review, no part of this publication may be reproduced in any material form  (including  photocopying  or  storing  in  any  medium  by  electronic  means  and  whether  or  not  transiently  or  incidentally  to  some  other  use  of  this  publication)  without the written permission of the copyright holder except in accordance with  the provisions of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988, or under the terms of  a  licence  issued  by  the  Copyright  Licensing  Agency  Ltd,  Saffron  House,  6‐10  Kirby  Street,  London  EC1N  8TS.  Applications  for  the  copyright  holder’s  written  permis‐ sion to reproduce any part of this publication should be addressed to the publish‐ ers.    Disclaimer: While every effort has been made by the editor, authors and the pub‐ lishers  to  ensure  that  all  the  material  in  this  book  is  accurate  and  correct  at  the  time of going to press, any error made by readers as a result of any of the material,  formulae or other information in this book is the sole responsibility of the reader.  Readers should be aware that the URLs quoted in the book may change or be dam‐ aged by malware between the time of publishing and accessing by readers. 

Note to readers.  Some papers have been written by authors who use the American form of  spelling and some use the British. These two different approaches have  been left unchanged.    Published by: Academic Publishing International Limited, Reading, RG4  9AY, United Kingdom, info@academic‐publishing.org   Printed by Good News Digital Books  Available from www.academic‐bookshop.com  


Contents List of Contributors ....................................................................................... ii  Introduction to Case Studies in Innovation .................................................. iii  From Technological Innovation to Innovation in Management Practices:  The Case of Episkin® ..................................................................................... 1  Claire Auplat  A Case Study of Entrepreneuring: Redesigning Technologies for a  Commercially Viable Cancer Detection Product ......................................... 13  Lynne Baxter and Cathie Wright  New Product Development and Commercialisation Process in the SME  Fashion Design Houses ............................................................................... 29  Shuyu Lin and Dr Niall Piercy  Regional Innovation and Competitiveness: Analysis of the Thessaloniki  Metropolitan Region ................................................................................... 47  Panayiotis Ketikidis, Sotiris Zigiaris and Nikos Zaharis  The Steps of an Organisational Routine’s Transformation: The Case of the  Employee Driven Innovation Routine at the French National Railways  Company (SNCF) ......................................................................................... 65  Carine Deslee  Academic Intrepreneurship: Transition Strategies for Commercialisation of  High Volume Electronics Products in a South African University ............... 85  Jonathan Youngleson and S Jacobs  A Method for Monetizing Technology Innovations .................................. 106  Arcot Desai Narasimhalu  The Importance of Social Innovation in the Dutch Manufacturing Industry:  Innovation as a Joint Effort Between Research, Education   and Business. ............................................................................................ 124  Saskia Harkema  Intermediaries in the Management Process of Innovation: The Case of  Danish and German SMEs ......................................................................... 142  Susanne Gretzinger, Holger Hinz and Wenzel Matiaske  Knowledge Management and Open Innovation in a Bioengineering  Research Case ........................................................................................... 158  Manel González‐Piñero, Elena López Cano, Miguel Ángel Mañanas  Villanueva, Juan Ramos Castro and Pere Caminal Magrans  i 


List of Contributors  Claire Auplat, Advancia School of Entrepreneurship, Paris, France  Lynne Baxter, The York Management School, University of York, York, UK  Pere Caminal Magrans, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain  Carine Deslee, Université de Lille 2, France  Manel González‐Piñero, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain  Susanne Gretzinger, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark  Saskia  Harkema,  The  Hague  University  of  Applied  Sciences,  The  Nether‐ lands   Holger Hinz, University of Flensburg, Germany  S Jacobs, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa  Panayiotis Ketikidis, CITY College – International Faculty of the University  of Sheffield, Thessaloniki, Greece  Elena López Cano, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain  Miguel Ángel Mañanas Villanueva, Technical University of Catalonia, Bar‐ celona, Spain  Wenzel Matiaske, Helmut‐Schmidt‐University Hamburg, Germany  Arcot Desai Narasimhalu, Singapore Management University, Singapore  Juan Ramos Castro, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain  Cathie  Wright,  School  of  Management  and  Languages,  Heriot  Watt  Uni‐ versity, Edinburgh, UK  Jonathan  Youngleson,  Tshwane  University  of  Technology,  Pretoria,  South  Africa  Nikos Zaharis, South East European Research Centre (SEERC), Thessaloniki,  Greece  Sotiris Zigiaris, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece   

ii


Introduction to Case Studies in  Innovation  “In  today’s  competitive  landscape,  the  opportunities  and  threats  happen  swiftly  and  are  relentless  in  their  fre‐ quency,  affecting  virtually  all  parts  of  an  organisation  si‐ multaneously. The business environment is filled with am‐ biguity  and  discontinuity,  and  the  rules  of  the  game  are  subject  to  constant  revision.  The  job  of  management  ef‐ fectively  becomes  one of  continual experimentation  – ex‐ perimenting  with  new  structures,  new  reward  systems,  new technologies, new methods, new products, new mar‐ kets,  and  much  more.  The  quest  remains  the  same:  sus‐ tainable competitive advantage. Innovation and entrepre‐ neurial actions represent the guiding light and motivating  force  for  organisations  as  they  attempt  to  find  their  way  down this path.” (Kuratko, Goldsby and Hornsby 2012:4).   In  Leading  Issues  in  Innovation,  the  companion  volume  to  this  book,  the  editor, Daniele Chauvel, notes that “the concept of innovation has spanned  R&D  laboratories  and  organisation  boundaries  by  extending  to  the  whole  organisation and its environment, integrating the duality of internal vs ex‐ ternal  sources  of  innovation”  (Chauvel  2011:iv).  This  shift  in  focus,  she  comments further, has “a direct impact on actors” with the result that “in  the  knowledge  society,  any  knowledge  worker  becomes  a  potential  inno‐ vator”.   The ten cases and research studies presented in this volume serve to illus‐ trate the points that Chauvel has made regarding the reach and scope of  the  innovation  function:  in  today’s  knowledge  economy,  innovation  is  about  interaction  and  interfaces,  collaborations  and  combinations,  and  enterprise  and  education.  The  studies  have  been  selected  from  papers  presented at the European Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship  and  published  first  in  the  refereed  proceedings  of  that  conference.  They  have been chosen because they present interesting and topical discussion  points for both students and lecturers in the areas of innovation manage‐ iii 


ment, types of innovation, sources of innovation, knowledge transfer and  exchange, entrepreneurial processes, and commercialisation. Each study is  prefaced by some brief editorial commentary, together with some indica‐ tions of specific topics that could be discussed in relation to the study. It is  envisaged  also  that  these  discussion  topics  could  act  as  useful  points  of  departure for further research and academic inquiry in these areas.   The  cases  cover  a  variety  of  organisational  types,  including  small  busi‐ nesses,  medium‐sized  enterprises,  large  corporates,  and  public  sector  or‐ ganisations.  They  incorporate  discussion  of  small‐scale  R&D  laboratories,  larger  higher  educational  institutes,  through  to  industrial‐sized  research  and  commercialisation  establishments.  With  regard  to  geography,  the  cases are drawn from a range of locations, providing an international focus  to the topics and themes under discussion.   Despite  the  diversity  that  can  be  seen  in  the  cases  and  research  studies  discussed in this volume, many of the challenges associated with successful  innovation emerge as being remarkably similar. These include the identifi‐ cation, management and resolution of the tensions between, for example,  creativity and commercialisation, education and enterprise, invention and  innovation,  collaboration  and  competition,  know‐how  and  knowledge  ex‐ change,  resources  and  risks.  A  common  thread  running  through  these di‐ verse  studies  is  that  when  organisations  of  different  types  break  down  their traditional organisational boundaries, and when individuals of differ‐ ent  types  work  together,  then  innovation  and  entrepreneurial  processes  can succeed, and true knowledge transfer can take place, leading to wealth  creation and economic development. A key theme that emerges is the im‐ portant role to be played by universities in the development and commer‐ cialisation of innovations, and in the transfer of knowledge to businesses in  order to foster economic and regional development. The studies draw out  discussion of topics such as the value of cross‐disciplinary teamwork, lead‐ ership and strategic thinking in innovation management, networking, and  partnering with organisations of different types.   Taken together, the studies provide an important reminder that innovation  is not an isolationist activity: it is relational, and a key to its success is iden‐ tifying the important relationships and ensuring that their quality is main‐ tained and nurtured. So, this is a book of cases and research studies about  innovation and entrepreneurial thinking, but underlying each study is not  iv 


so much  a  traditional  emphasis  on  innovation  processes  or  the  entrepre‐ neurial process, but rather an emphasis on the people involved in innova‐ tion and on innovation partnerships.   “[…]  innovative  thinking  is  an  integrated  mind‐set  that  permeates  individuals  and  organisations  in  an  effective  manner” (Kuratko, Goldsby and Hornsby 2012:4).  

Heather Fulford, 2012  Centre for Entrepreneurship  Aberdeen Business School      References  Chauvel,  D.  (2011)  Leading  issues  in  innovation  research.  Volume  One.  Reading: Academic Publishing International Ltd.   Kuratko,  D.  F.,  Goldsby,  M.  G.  and  Hornsby,  J.  S.  (2012)  Innovation  accel‐ eration: transforming organisational thinking. New Jersey: Pearson Educa‐ tion, Inc.     

v

Profile for Academic Conferences and publishing International

Case Studies in Innovation for Researchers, Teachers and Students  

This is an 8 page extract from the book. Many would say that innovation is a major driving force in our economy but they would be wrong. Inn...

Case Studies in Innovation for Researchers, Teachers and Students  

This is an 8 page extract from the book. Many would say that innovation is a major driving force in our economy but they would be wrong. Inn...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded