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THE ABTA MAGAZINE GUIDE TO THE

CARIBBEAN

Incredible cuisine Pulsating carnivals Authentic adventure


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ABTA Caribbean

THE ABTA MAGAZINE GUIDE TO THE

CARIBBEAN

Introducing the ABTA Magazine Caribbean Guide 2018

M

ade up of more than 7,000 individual islands, islets, reefs and cays, the vast and diverse 28-island-nation Caribbean region is as beautiful as it is culturally rich. From the time-worn façades of Cuba in the northeast down to the lush rainforests of Trinidad & Tobago in the southwest, these English-, Dutch-, Spanish- and French-speaking islands boast African, Asian and European influences, reflected in the local customs, distinctive cuisine, plentiful rum and pulsating carnivals. This diversity illustrates the region’s rich and complex history, seen in its architecture, plantations and monuments. Although home to some of the world’s most paradisical beaches – azure waters lap against white sand beneath cloudless skies – there is much more to the Caribbean than that which can be enjoyed from a sunlounger. From incredible dive spots such as the Great Blue Hole in Belize to pictureperfect natural landscapes like St Lucia’s iconic Piton mountains, there is something to suit all activity levels. The region is also witnessing a rise in thrill-seeking pursuits, with zip lines through the rainforest, river tubing, parasailing and white-water rafting seeing a spike in demand among visitors. With the ABTA Magazine Guide to the Caribbean we hope to build on your knowledge of this fascinating region and equip you with all you need to sell all types of holidays there. Take a look at our in-depth map on page 6, find out more about all the latest hotel openings on page 8, then take our tour of food (page 16), culture (page 22) and attractions (page 27), before enjoying our expert cruise advice (page 32) and general tips (page 34).

A flavour odyssey Captivating culture Perennial pursuits

We hope you enjoy reading.

Three things you (probably) didn’t know about the Caribbean… The region has taken its love of rum to the next level, with entire festivals devoted to it

16 ABTAmag.com

Go beyond the beaches and you’ll discover a huge repertoire of sights and activities

27

English is the first or second language spoken on most of the islands

34 September 2018 3


Be embraced by the balmy ocean breezes of The Bahamas. Stroll through our tropical waterscape, teaming with exotic marine life and surrounded by the sights, sounds and tastes of a rich Bahamian culture. Experience the warmth of unhurried and welcoming hospitality. And discover that when you slow down, just a little, life’s simplest pleasures have a chance to catch up. Book your clients’ Atlantis Holiday through any tour operator and earn up to £25 per new booking for travel until 31st December 2018. Report your bookings for guest stays until 31st December 2018. Four night minimum stay. Earn an extra £20 per booking with Nassau, Paradise Island Rewards. Join now and report your guest bookings at www.atlantisbahamasrewards.com


ABTA Caribbean

In the guide 06 Map Your guide to the region, from the Bahamas down to Trinidad and Tobago

16

22

27 ABTA Magazine is created by Waterfront Publishing on behalf of ABTA Waterfront Publishing 12-18 Hoxton Street London N1 6NG waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 9360

Director Sam Ballard sam@waterfront-publishing.com Director Anthony Pearce anthony@waterfront-publishing.com Head of sales Simon Leeming simon@waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 9337

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08

News The Caribbean is building new luxury hotels and welcoming more cruise ships

13

Comment Carol Hay of the Caribbean Tourism Organisation goes beyond the beaches

16

Taste of the Caribbean Matthew Hampton gives a flavour of the diverse cuisine available

22

Island vibes How to immerse yourself in the region’s irresistible energy and colourful culture

27

Caribbean calling A look at the unforgettable sightseeing tours boosting the region’s appeal

32

Drop anchor Cruises are more accessible than ever, with itineraries to suit every budget

34

Good to know Key advice on health and travel, the best time to go and how to get there

Media sales executive Bryan Johnson bryan@waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 9338 Account manager Emily Snipe emily@waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 4815

With thanks to: Matthew Hampton, Carol Hay and the CTO ABTAmag.com info@ABTAmag.com Twitter: @ABTAMagazine Facebook: ABTAMagazine

Head of design Billy Odell billy@ABTAmag.com

ABTA 30 Park Street, London SE1 9EQ

Business travel editor Jenny Southan jenny@ABTAmag.com 020 3456 7899

Chief executive Mark Tanzer

Sub-editors Emily Eastman, Nathaniel Cramp

Chairman Noel Josephides

July 2018 5


ABTA Caribbean

USA

MIAMI

THE BAHAMAS TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

CUBA

MEXICO

CAYMAN ISLANDS

JAMAICA

BELIZE

PUERTO RICO

HAITI

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

ANGUILLA VIRGIN ANTIGUA & ISLANDS BARBUDA ST KITTS AND NEVIS GUADELOUPE DOMINICA

HONDURAS

MARTINIQUE

ST LUCIA

ARUBA

NICARAGUA

BARBADOS

ST VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES

CURACAO

GRENADA

EL SALVADOR

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

PANAMA

VENEZUELA

COSTA RICA COLUMBIA

The Caribbean is made up of 26 different countries, listed below with their capitals

GUYANA

Cayman Islands

BRAZIL

GEORGE TOWN

Cuba

HAVANA

Anguilla

The Bahamas

Dominica

Antigua and Barbuda

Barbados

Dominican Republic

Aruba

British Virgin Islands

Grenada

THE VALLEY ST JOHN’S

ORANJESTAD

6 September 2018

NASSAU

BRIDGETOWN ROAD TOWN

ROSEAU

SANTO DOMINGO ST GEORGE’S

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Turks and Caicos Islands

PUERTO RICO

I

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

ANGUILLA VIRGIN ANTIGUA & ISLANDS BARBUDA ST KITTS AND NEVIS GUADELOUPE DOMINICA

MARTINIQUE

ST LUCIA

ARUBA

ST VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES

CURACAO

BARBADOS

GRENADA

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

VENEZUELA

MBIA

GUYANA Guadeloupe

Netherlands Antilles

Haiti

Puerto Rico

Jamaica

Saint Barthelemy

Trinidad & Tobago

Martinique

Saint Kitts & Nevis

Turks & Caicos Islands

Montserrat

Saint Lucia

US Virgin Islands

BASSE-TERRE

PORT-AU-PRINCE KINGSTON FORT-DE-FRANCE BRADES

ABTAmag.com

WILLEMSTAD SAN JUAN GUSTAVIA

BASSETERRE CASTRIES

Saint Martin

PHILIPSBURG & MARIGOT

BRAZIL Saint Vincent KINGSTOWN

PORT OF SPAIN

COCKBURN TOWN

CHARLOTTE AMALIE

September 2018 7


ABTA Caribbean

News

Looking at the latest launches, innovations and destinations

Portfolio expansion Sandals announces new travel and room options

High-end hotel boom Construction is under way on a host of brand-new hotel and resort developments across the region By Karl Cushing A raft of new high-end hotels is cementing the region as a luxury tourism powerhouse. Kimpton’s new Kawana Bay Silversands Resort, overlooking Grenada’s Grand Anse Beach, will offer 101 studio rooms and 45 suites and is the operator’s second property in the region. Meanwhile Kempinski is to follow last year’s opening of the Gran Hotel Manzana Kempinski La Habana, Cuba, by opening the Cabrits Resort & Spa Kempinski Dominica in an enviable location, enveloped by Cabrits National Park. Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, which opened Mandarin Oriental, Canouan in St Vincent and The Grenadines in July, is preparing to open its second managed property in the Caribbean, the Mandarin

8 September 2018

Oriental, Grand Cayman, in 2021. Highlights of the new resort, set on a 67-acre slice of Grand Cayman’s south coast, include five restaurants and bars; Spa at Mandarin Oriental; and the Beach Club. The resort will offer 100 guestrooms and 89 branded residences. Rosewood Hotels & Resorts is also upping its game – the Rosewood Half Moon Bay Antigua will sit on a 132-acre plot along Half Moon Bay, adjacent to a 27-acre national park. This summer the operator opened its Rosewood Baha Mar on Nassau’s Cable Beach in The Bahamas, offering 237 guestrooms, suites and villas, and completed its renovation of Rosewood Bermuda. Rosewood Little Dix Bay, which sustained major damage in Hurricane Irma, is set to reopen in late 2019. ABTAmag.com

By ABTA Magazine staff Sandals is introducing a luxury airport transfer service at its two Jamaica properties for guests staying in its exclusive Club and Butler room categories. The return BMW transfers from Montego Bay airport will be open to guests staying at Sandals Montego Bay, from October 15, and Sandals Royal Caribbean Resort & Private Island from November 15. Sandals is also adding an over-the-water wedding chapel at its Montego Bay property, along with an over-the-water bar, Latitudes, later this year. Meanwhile guests at the operator’s Beaches Negril property now have nine additional room categories to choose from. The new family-friendly options, which are already available to book online, include Negril Luxury Double suites; Tropical Beachfront Concierge King suites; and Tropical Beachfront Two-Bedroom Grand Butler Family Suites, including Butler Elite services. ABTAmag.com

ABTAmag.com


ABTA Caribbean

And relax… Journey to Cuba Seabourn becomes the latest cruise line to sell itineraries from the United States to Cuba By Karl Cushing Carnival Corporation continues to ramp up its Cuban offering, with Seabourn having opened bookings on a programme of sailings from Miami and San Juan, Puerto Rico. The 458-guest Seabourn Sojourn will operate four separate itineraries to Cuba and take in five ports of call on the island. Sojourn’s maiden voyage on November 4, 2019 will be a 12-day round-trip cruise from Miami featuring overnights

in Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba, and a further stop in Antilla (Nipe Bay). The cruise will also visit Port Antonio, Jamaica and West End, Cayman Brac. Seabourn follows sister lines Carnival Cruise Line and Holland America Line in gaining approval to sail to Cuba, where the capital Havana enjoys its 500th anniversary next year. Back in 2016, Carnival’s line Fathom was the first in 50 years to gain permission to sail to Cuba from the US. ABTAmag.com

The Caribbean’s spa scene is hotting up By ABTA Magazine staff The adults-only Hyatt Zilara Rose Hall resort in Montego Bay, Jamaica has opened a new Zen Spa with four beachfront treatment cabanas. Other properties investing in their spas include Eden Rock, in St Barths, which is currently closed for major renovations but is set to reopen from December 22 to late May, 2019. Caroline Beckett, a senior product manager at Elegant Resorts, which features the property, said: “They will close next summer to build a brand-new spa in the old restaurant at the top of the rock, which should be fabulous.” ABTAmag.com

Discounted Dominican Save over half on selected departures in September and October By Karl Cushing Xclusivity is offering savings of 59% off selected departures to the five-star Casa De Campo resort in the Dominican Republic for September and October. The savings are open to bookings made before September 30, with seven-

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night all-inclusive breaks in an Elite room starting from £1,149pp, including return flights from Manchester on September 24 or October 5 and 12 – a saving of £1,686pp. Packages are backed by complimentary inclusions such as a free massage and unlimited horse riding.

Highlights of the resort include the 20 restaurants, of which six feature in the all-inclusive package, a spa offering holistic treatments, and three championship golf courses (supplement payable), including Teeth of the Dog – arguably the best course in the Caribbean. ABTAmag.com

September 2018 9


Promotion

Nature’s island Dominica is back in business, once again delighting visitors with its unmatched natural beauty and unique attractions

T

he Caribbean’s Nature Island, Dominica, offers a completely different style of Caribbean holiday. With black-sand beaches and lush rainforests, it’s the perfect destination to combine exploration and adventure with rest and relaxation.

10 September 2018

Visitors are once again flocking to the island. Following September 2017’s Hurricane Maria, routes, services, amenities and transportation have been restored throughout the island. Guests are being welcomed with open arms to discover Dominica’s delights.

Getting there is simple. The island enjoys good links to international and regional markets with regular flights offered by regional carriers including LIAT, Seaborne Airlines, Winair, Air Sunshine and Coastal Express Carrier. The island is well-connected, with L’Express des Iles’ fast

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Pictured Left: The beautiful Trafalgar Falls. Right: Dominica is one of the world’s top diving spots

ferry service operating scheduled services between Dominica, Guadeloupe, Martinique and St Lucia.

SPOILT FOR CHOICE A total of 544 rooms are available, with more due to open over the coming year. Secret Bay and Citrus Creek Plantation are expected to reopen in the last quarter of 2018. Fort Young Hotel is set to open in March 2019 and two new properties, Jungle Bay Resort and Cabrits Resort Kempinski, are due to open during the first half of 2019. Anichi Resort is slated to open in late 2019 or early 2020. These three new hotels will increase Dominica’s room stock by 340 and give visitors a huge variety of

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accommodation options for their holiday. Most sites and attractions – 19 of the 23 on the island – are currently open to visitors. These include the signature sites of Trafalgar Falls, made up of the Father Falls and Mother Falls; Middleham Falls; Emerald Pool, situated in a World Heritage Site that includes the Boiling Lake and the Valley of Desolation; Fresh Water Lake; and the Indian River.

PRISTINE TRAILS Visitors can also enjoy magnificent easy-to-moderate hikes across the island, which lead you through pristine landscapes. Among the best are Syndicate Nature Trail – nestled on the foothills of Dominica’s highest mountain,

Morne Diablotins – and the Cabrits/Fort Shirley trail. Diving tours are currently available with six operators offering excursions to all of the key dive sites on the north, south and west coasts of the island. Divers can explore a world of incredible underwater vistas and discover why Dominica is ranked among the world’s top-10 dive sites. On November 3, Dominica marks 40 years of independence. This year, it will also celebrate a year of recovery and the resilience of the island and her people.

For more information about Dominica, vist dominica.dm

September 2018 11


ABTAMAG.COM ABTAmag.com is the new home of ABTA Magazine. The website hosts digital versions of the bi-monthly magazine, as well as additional news, comment, analysis and competitions. ABTAmag.com will also host ABTA Golf, the ABTA Magazine Guides and the ABTA Handbooks.

New beginnings

Travel industry insights / May 2018

After a difficult few years, Turkey, Tunisia and Egypt are back on the map for British travellers. Katherine Lawrey welcomes the return of old favourites

King of the north How Belfast became one of the world’s most exciting cities

ABTA Magazine

Generation game

Why business travel has been reshaped around the needs of millennials

Royal Caribbean

Waterslides, robotic barmen and the world’s largest cruise ships

ABTA Magazine A BTA SIBLE

L

RESPON

T R AV E

Turning the plastic tide

Sustainability guru Dr Catherine Wilson explains how the industry can cut plastic waste

O

n July 11, 1907, the chemist Leo Baekeland wrote in his diary: “unless I am very much mistaken, this invention will prove important in the future”. If anything, Baekeland, a pioneer of plastic, was underplaying his hand. Soon, plastic was king and today an estimated 300 million tons are produced each year – just 10 per cent of which is recycled. Production is expected to double in the next 20 years, but about 50 per cent of all plastics, from miniature hotel toiletries to disposable coffee cups, are used just once, sometimes only for a few seconds, and then thrown away without a second thought. The main benefit of plastic – its durability – has become its greatest environmental threat: a plastic bottle takes a whopping 450 years to decay. The result is an estimated eight million tons of plastic waste entering the ocean every year. Over time, the plastic degrades and fragments into microparticles, which absorb toxic chemicals in ever greater

Clare Jenkinson concentrations as they travel up the food chain, ending up on our dinner plates. Roughly 75 per cent of litter in the sea is plastic and this is having a direct impact on wildlife – from turtles suffocating on plastic bags and litter islands affecting ecosystems, to fish consuming fatal amounts of microparticles. With as much as 80 per cent of tourism connected to coastal areas, the impact of ocean plastic is a huge concern. Plastic waste is a visual eyesore, reducing beach use, wildlife sightings and well-being. The logical conclusion is fewer visitors, revenue and jobs. Sadly, travel and tourism is a major contributor to the problem. Between 2011-2013, researchers monitoring litter on 23 beaches across Sweden, Finland, Estonia and Latvia, found that an estimated 33 per cent of the waste was generated by leisure or tourism. More than half of this rubbish was plastic. It’s clear that plastic has become a global problem; no part of the world has been left untouched.

We spoke to ABTA’s senior destinations and sustainability manager, about the Better Places programme – and how businesses are using it to tackle plastics What is the Better Places programme?

It is a series of tools and guidance designed to help ABTA Members implement a sustainability approach or improve on their current sustainability performance.

What’s the thinking behind it?

ABTA believes sustainable tourism is essential for the industry’s long-term viability and profitability – and Better Places addresses the environmental, social and economic impacts of tourism. We’ve focused on the actions we know have a material impact and made the process simple.

How does this relate to plastics?

The programme helps Members adopt the sustainability policy that works for them and – as we know plastics is a hugely important topic for the industry – we can offer guidance and support on how businesses can address this issue in their wider policy.

What’s been your best achievement?

Thousands of employees in the travel sector have now been trained on child protection and accessible tourism. Also, in the past 18 months we’ve seen a significant increase in the number of Members engaging with the programme as sustainability rises up the agenda.

How can Members get involved?

Contact sustainable tourism@abta. co.uk or visit Better Places on the Member Zone for more information.

56 May 2018

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May 2018 57

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Comment

Carol Hay of the Caribbean Tourism Organisation shares the activities on offer beyond the region’s tropical beaches

T

houghts of the Caribbean continue to conjure up images of miles upon miles of powdery soft beaches fringed by a tranquil, turquoise sea. The Caribbean is the epitome of relaxation, and we would not want it any other way. But the secret is out – the Caribbean is also a hub of adventure and culture. So for those who can tear themselves away from some of the best beaches in the world, let’s explore the Caribbean. Zip lines are increasingly popular – an exhilarating experience whizzing through the rainforest while taking in incredible aerial views. Destinations including Antigua, St Lucia and Grenada boast some amazing lines. Sledging through the mountains in Jamaica; galloping across the countryside on horseback in Barbados; revving it up on a jeep safari in Antigua; exploring a volcano on foot in Martinique; or scaling the Waitukubuli trail in Dominica – there are exciting options to suit all tastes. For those who can’t keep out of the water, experience the kitesurfing in Barbados, sailing in the British Virgin Islands or St Vincent and the Grenadines, kayaking in the Turks and Caicos or rafting in Jamaica. Some of the best dive sites in the world can be found in Belize, Tobago and the Cayman Islands, so jump in and discover the diverse marine life. A little pampering is good for all of us, and here in the Caribbean we take care of the mind, body and soul. Relax at a spa and wellness

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resort, yoga retreat or meditation zone, or take it up a notch with marathons, triathlons and fun runs in St Kitts. If a hike is more to your liking then try Montserrat or St Eustatius, one of our lesser known gems – green, hilly and with incredible ocean vistas. Culture buffs will love St Maarten with its Dutch influences and Saint Martin for its French vibes – a great choice for those who want more for their pound, plus the British Territory of Anguilla is only a ferry ride away. On the subject of culture, the Caribbean is awash with music, dance, performing arts, the spoken word and much more. Join the splendour of a street parade, carnival or local celebration in Trinidad, or check out the creative arts scene in Haiti, where you can purchase some authentic souvenirs to take home. Great duty-free shopping can be found in the Bahamas along with some unique items in the local market. Throughout the Caribbean you can enjoy the finest selection of fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices, seafood and rum. The Turks and Caicos islands are renowned for their seafood – conch, lobster and grouper await your taste buds. Food festivals take place in Barbados, Anguilla, Puerto Rico and Jamaica, and some of the best chocolate in the Caribbean can be sampled in Grenada, Tobago and St Lucia. So come and experience as much as you can in the Caribbean. Visitors to these islands will benefit from your detailed knowledge and personal recommendations. ABTAmag.com

September 2018 13


Promotion

Island charms

H

Revel and relax in Saint Lucia, the island that has it all

ome to the iconic Piton Mountains, dense rainforests and golden-sand beaches, Saint Lucia is the very definition of paradise. Famed for its pristine bays, pretty botanical gardens and cascading waterfalls, the Caribbean island is the perfect destination for relaxation, adventure, culture and, of

14 September 2018

course, romance – it has been voted the World’s Leading Honeymoon Destination nine times at the World Travel Awards. Thrill seekers will be delighted by the island’s charms: it plays host to a range of activities, including diving, kayaking, hiking, mountain biking and zip lining, while visitors can also choose from

creole cooking classes, whalewatching tours, mud bathing at the famous Sulphur Springs, and visits to cocoa plantations (including the 140-acre Rabot Estate) and the historic Saint Lucia Rum Distillery.

RICH CULTURE For an authentic slice of island life, visitors can enjoy the Jazz Festival; Roots & Soul Festival;

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Pictured left: A man scales a palm tree with the Piton Mountains in the background. Right: The pristine Marigot Bay

Arts & Heritage Festival; and Carnival, which all fall under the umbrella of the Soleil Summer Festival (stlucia.org/ summerfestival). Other cultural highlights include the Pigeon Island National Landmark, home to Fort Rodney, which was once used by the British to observe French ships from neighbouring Martinique – visible from the islet’s peak on a clear day. Another option is the Lushan Country Life tour on which guests trek through a lush rainforest and visit the medicinal gardens of a familyowned heritage site. They’ll also enjoy a traditional Saint Lucian breakfast of cocoa tea and salt fish bakes, plus sample local produce found in abundance on the island,

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including sugar cane, starfruit and mangoes.

TWIN CENTRE Visitors should pick their corner of the island depending on the type of holiday they want. The north is the entertainment hub: here, you will find the bustling Gros Islet ‘Jump Up’, where rum flows freely and stallholders serve barbecued meats and fish; and the Anse La Raye Fish Fry. Both take place every Friday evening and last well into the night, capturing the island at its most exhilarating. The north is also home to Rodney Bay Village and its nearby marina – a lively area full of restaurants, bars and shops. The south, in contrast, has a more relaxed feel. Soufrière is home to the Piton Mountains,

a Unesco World Heritage Site, the Sulphur Springs – the Caribbean’s only drivein volcano – plus waterfalls, cocoa plantations, and incredible snorkelling and diving opportunities.

HOW TO LEARN MORE By completing Saint Lucia’s online training programme (saintluciaexpert.com), travel agents can learn more about an island that truly has it all.

Call 020 7341 7000 Email sltainfo@stluciauk.org Website stlucia.org Online training programme saintluciaexpert.com Facebook @saintluciaexpert Twitter @saintluciauk Instagram @travelsaintlucia Register for e-newsletter newsletter@stluciauk.org

September 2018 15


ABTA Caribbean

Taste of the Caribbean Matthew Hampton gives a flavour of this island region’s culinary fare, which packs a punch with depth, heat and speciality ingredients

I

f all the Caribbean had to offer was jerk chicken, that would be enough, for the fire and smoke of the barbecue pit has wafted so far around the world there are now whole festivals devoted to it. And yet Caribbean cuisine does not stop there. From the sea to the spice market, chefs have an enviable larder at their disposal, and they certainly make use of it. Red snapper, tilapia, plantain, allspice, breadfruit and, of course, fiery scotch

16 September 2018

bonnet peppers … all are staples of the Caribbean kitchen. Herbs and spices are especially prized. “We grow so many spices, you can smell them on the breeze,” says Brian Benjamin, the ‘BB’ of BB’s Crabback restaurant in Grenada. The island is known as the spice isle thanks to its plentiful nutmeg plantations. “Nutmeg can be used in everything from salad dressing to ice cream and added to cocoa

tea with cinnamon and bay leaf for a refreshing drink.” For Fabien Vigee, executive chef at St James Club Morgan Bay in St Lucia, local produce really does have a more pronounced taste: “Homegrown herbs are more aromatic and starchy foods are more dense in texture, thus creating more flavourful dishes. A sweet potato grown in the US would be totally different in texture and flavour from one grown in the Caribbean!”

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But it is what chefs do with those ingredients that really matters. Vigee, for example, soaks his breadfruit in seawater and then cooks over an open wood fire. “Some of our cooking techniques came about because of unavailability of ovens, fridges and all the culinary luxuries that now exist.” And in leaner days when certain ingredients were unavailable – or unaffordable – chefs had to get creative. From fish heads to chicken backs, unheard of cuts of meat became delicacies. Nowadays, produce is plentiful, and the food scene has moved on apace, with chefs drawn to top-class hotels and restaurants to show off their skills. British chef Alan Larch, for example, oversees the reopening this winter of the CuisinArt resort in Anguilla, which was one of the first resorts in the world to operate its own hydroponic farm. This meant just about anything could be grown on-site without having to import ingredients. Also in Anguilla, Belmond Cap Juluca has even more international names on board for its grand reopening this winter. Another Brit, Andrew Gaskin, oversees a new Pimms

ABTAmag.com

Don’t miss

FOOD FESTIVALS Oistins Fish Fry, Barbados What began as an informal cook-off has now become a weekly event attracting hundreds of people. Every Friday and Saturday, visitors and locals head to Oistins for the best of the daily catch, straight off the barbecue. tinyurl.com/oistinsfry

Montego Bay Jerk Festival, Jamaica Music and jerk combine on August 1 for the ultimate Jamaican celebration of spice. Think of it as the Glastonbury of jerk. montegobayjerkfestival.com

Grenada Chocolate Festival A week-long celebration of the Caribbean’s sweetest crop. Activities include joining a farmer for a day, cooking with chocolate and even making your own bar. The 2019 festival takes place from May 31-June 7. grenadachocolatefest.com

September 2018 17


ABTA Caribbean

Don’t miss RESTAURANTS

Scotchies, Jamaica

Standout Caribbean restaurant The Cliff attracts celebrities and well-heeled visitors, drawn in by the view and the service as much as the food. It is pricey, but The Cliff Beach Club next door has the same views and is slightly more informal. thecliffbarbados.com

Chef Allen Susser’s ‘Jade Cuisine’ sets a high bar for St Lucia. The restaurant is part of the five-star hotel of the same name, set on a cliff above Anse Chastanet. Visit at night, when the sultry heat matches the dark wood and exotic decor. jademountain.com

Scotchies in Ocho Rios and Montego Bay is a pure, downhome Caribbean jerk shack where the grill is constantly alight. There are dozens of good barbecues across Jamaica, but this one is a favourite of the Stewart family, founders of the Sandals empire. It’s fair to say they know a thing or two about Caribbean food… scotchies.restaurantsnapshot.com

restaurant on the beach, as well as Maundays Lounge, a tapas bar experimenting with Peruvian fusion. CIP’s by Cipriani is back too, serving Italian classics with a local accent. No visit to the Caribbean would be complete without a little rum tasting, and again there are whole festivals devoted to the stuff. Barbados is the biggest producer, with Mount Gay and Malibu dominating supermarket shelves. But visit for the

Barbados Food and Rum Festival in October and you can taste all manner of smaller batch samples. Equally important, and a little sweeter, Caribbean cocoa beans are among the most highly prized in the world, which might explain why Hotel Chocolat bought its own producer in St Lucia. The Rabot Estate near Soufriere supplies all of the upmarket brand’s beans; you can even book a stay at Boucan – the hotel at the

heart of the estate – to see how beans become chocolate bars. Few things go better with chocolate than coffee, which is the perfect excuse to indulge in yet another local speciality. Jamaica’s Blue Mountain estate is renowned for its mildly flavoured beans, and of the 20 per cent that isn’t exported, you can buy the ideal gift for the caffeine addict in your life, or just enjoy a simple espresso while watching the sun set: the gourmet way to end the day.

The Cliff, Barbados

18 September 2018

Jade Mountain Club, St Lucia

ABTAmag.com


Experience

the Transformation of

Half Moon

Offering discerning travellers elevated experiences from arrival to departure.

THE LUXURY OF SPACE & PRIVACY

210 well-appointed rooms & suites, 98% of which have ocean views.

NEW GASTRONOMIC EXPERIENCES

Eight dining options from casual beachside dining and vegan offerings, to award-winning fine dining.

YOUR DAYS ARE YOURS TO DESIGN

Fern Tree Spa oasis with yoga pavilion and wellness programme, Robert Trent Jones Sr. golf course, tennis, equestrian centre, water sports and children’s village.

Just 10 mins away from Montego Bay’s airport (MBJ), reward your sense of discovery at one of Jamaica’s most iconic destinations.

www.halfmoon.com reservation@halfmoon.com +1 800 626 0592


Promotion

Experiences that will take your breath away Nestled comfortably right in the middle of the Caribbean, Jamaica is a sparkling gem of an island that provides a welcome feeling of escape

W

hen you think of Jamaica, you might think of beaches, bikinis and sunshine. You’d be absolutely right, but there’s a whole world of wonder beyond the beach. This island nation has something for everyone. The famous Blue Mountains are a perfect example. If you’re

20 September 2018

feeling energetic, you can conquer these spectacular peaks with the added bonus of seeing Jamaica’s Blue Mountain coffee plantations, which are nestled into the hills 5,000ft above sea level. Those who make the 7,500ft hike to the peak are rewarded with breathtaking views spanning more than 100 miles.

The island offers thrilling pursuits, too. Those seeking an instant adrenaline rush can zip wire through the rainforest canopy or ride a bobsled at Mystic Mountain. Or, if you feel like something a bit more relaxing, why not take a bamboo raft down the scenic Rio Grande River, where you’ll experience the peaceful

ABTAmag.com


Gateways   London, Birmingham, Manchester Population   2.8 million Time   -5 GMT Travel Time      9 hours 40 mins Currency   Jamaican dollar Language    English www.visitjamaica.com

serenity of the Jamaican landscape from the water. Dive into the deep end with a dip in Port Antonio’s 200ft-deep Blue Lagoon. Or you can head to Dunn’s River Falls and climb the stunning 600ft waterfall. One of Jamaica’s national treasures, the waterfall is scattered with a series of miniature pools, providing the perfect place to relax as you make the leisurely climb to the top. All of this physical activity isn’t without reward though. When the sun goes down, there’s a world of food and nightlife to keep you entertained. Sample the world-famous Jamaican jerk chicken and experience authentic Jamaican rum. In fact, you can take the Appleton Estate Rum Tour and get an inside look at the 18th-century-style

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rum-making process that’s still in use today. A trip to Jamaica wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the Bob Marley Museum located inside his former home. It’s the ultimate place to celebrate the life and music of the Father of Reggae, whose music resonates within the heart of every Jamaican. It’s this genre of music that echoes across the island, in bars, restaurants and out on the street. Soak it up and drink it in. This is the home of reggae, and Jamaicans aren’t shy about sharing their love of it. Jamaica has some of the most beautiful beaches in the world, so why not experience them in a slightly different way? Take a beach horse-riding expedition along the sand and in the warm Caribbean Sea.

Pictured Left: Hike the lush Blue Mountains. Above: Sample authentic jerk chicken

This is just a taste of the diverse experiences that Jamaica has to offer. Combined with the warmth and friendliness of the locals, a voyage to Jamaica promises to be an escape from everyday life you’ll never forget.

To learn more about Jamaica, join the Jamaica Tourist Board travel agent training and rewards programme at www.jamaicarewards.co.uk Learn and earn, then sell it and see it. Our promise to you.

September 2018 21


ABTA Caribbean

Island vibes Embrace the spirit of the Caribbean by immersing yourself in the colourful culture and irresistible energy of island life, writes Matthew Hampton

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or a taste of Caribbean culture, you don’t even need to get on a plane. The influence of reggae in popular music is just as strong as jazz or the blues. But it is more of an attitude than anything: Caribbean music, and Caribbean culture generally, is about doing your own thing on your own terms. There’s only one constant: it is usually very loud.

22 September 2018

Take the traditional carnival, which is celebrated on just about every island at different times of the year. Trinidad and Tobago is where the party started – way back in the 18th century – when the French Catholic celebration of Lent fused with traditional local festivals, which featured masks, music and dance and were as much a protest against colonial rule as anything.

From these complex origins sprang a party season of pure joy. Trinidad and Tobago still host the biggest carnival, but all are worth visiting – there’s a list of events at tinyurl.com/ caribbean18carnival. Crop Over in Barbados is one of the longest, from June to August, and visitors can join in with the costumes and parades too – check out visitbarbados.org/ crop-over-festival.

ABTAmag.com


Much of the cultural calendar across the Caribbean is fuelled by tradition Much of the cultural calendar across the Caribbean is fuelled by tradition, with church on Sunday a central fixture. Attending a service is one of the easiest and most informal ways of experiencing Caribbean culture like a local. If you want to see what makes the local community tick, don’t be shy; join the congregation. If you feel you need a bit more of an introduction, Elite

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Island Resorts have what could best be described as a Caribbean choir boot camp. The hotel group launched a five-day singing workshop last year, which promises to teach anyone how to hold a tune. Hosted by Mike King – who has worked as a vocal coach on The Voice

UK – it is great for improvers wanting to boost their confidence while performing; for total beginners, it’s a chance to try something new. It has already proven a big hit with guests and 2019 workshops will take place in Barbados, Antigua and St Lucia in May and September 2019. Dates once confirmed can be found at eliteislandholidays.com. Getting out of your hotel and finding the local music scene

is one of the most rewarding parts of a Caribbean holiday, but you do need to know where to look. Ask if any jump ups are happening in the area. This may be a spontaneous block party or a regular event, but jump ups are the easiest way to meet locals. One of the best is at Gros Islet in St Lucia, just down the road from The Landings hotel. Every Friday, the town heaves to sound systems so loud they practically shake the buildings. In a similar vein, St Lawrence Gap in Barbados has a party most nights, but, surprisingly, it is not the same across the Caribbean. Record producer Justin Nation lives and works in Antigua, where apart from the Shirley Heights jump up on a

September 2018 23


ABTA Caribbean

Sunday, nightlife tends to be confined to hotels. For a true flavour of Caribbean music, he says, try Jamaica for reggae, or Trinidad for soca. “Think of the Caribbean as one big England, minus the cold. There are so many different genres and sub genres of music. “There isn’t one next big thing as there are just so many artists. Caribbean music is massive right now, so that whole pop star formula has gone out the window … There are so many to mention but one

Pictured Below: St Lucia Carnival splendour. Left: Creole Day is marked with local drink. Over: Grenada’s Jab Mas festival celebrates freedom

24 September 2018

to look out for in Jamaica is Chronixx – a young reggae star. And Kes, from Trinidad, are an amazing soca band.” Certainly, scenes vary from island to island, and while some are sleepy outside of the big resorts, others are very lively. Blogger Kered Clement recommends Street Food Wednesday at the Dodgy Dock restaurant in True Blue Bay resort in Grenada. “People come in droves to enjoy local food and the sounds of Solid, Dodgy Dock’s house band. Their energy is mesmerising! “Bars around St George’s are brimming with visitors and islanders alike, bumping to a varied mix of soca, reggae, R&B, soul and pop covers from local bands.

Bananas nightclub offers deals on Tuesdays and Fridays. Grenada has some of the best beach, boat and pool parties and mark my words, it’s the stuff you see in music videos, but better!”   Of course, if old school reggae is more your style, it is best to be back in Jamaica, where the off beat is as strong as when The Wailers first struck it. You can see where the legendary band recorded at Tuff Gong Studios in Kingston, now part of the Bob Marley museum, along with his home at 56 Hope Road. “Nothing beats a real experience,” says Nation. “You need to put your feet in the sand and play on the mud.” We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

ABTAmag.com


Paradise island

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Nevis: unspoilt, unpretentious and unforgettable

he island of Nevis is one of the most unspoilt and relaxing locations in the Caribbean. Vividly green with blue skies, clean air and long empty beaches, Nevis has a pace of life that encourages guests to stop and appreciate the natural beauty all around. It’s a very special place famed for its charm and the easy-going genuineness of its people. Nevis, with a total area of 93 sq km, is the smaller of the two islands that make up the Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis. The sister islands are separated by a 3km channel of water known as ‘The Narrows’ – so close that you can swim between the two in an annual competition. Guests can fly into Robert L Bradshaw International Airport on Saint Kitts and take a water taxi

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to Nevis, or connections via Antigua to the island’s own Vance W Amory International Airport are also available. While on Nevis, guests can explore by 4x4 Funky Monkey Jeeps, hire a car or book a local taxi with a knowledgeable driver. They can enjoy lunch at one of the local restaurants, swing by Pinney’s Beach for a famous Killer Bee cocktail at Sunshine’s Beach Bar & Grill or pick a fresh mango from the trees which grow more than 40 different varieties. The island may be home to just 420 hotel rooms, but there is something for everyone, from the rustic charm of the three-star Oualie Beach Resort, offering an authentic Caribbean experience on a fantastic beach, through to the luxury five-star Four Seasons Resort with its cabana-style beach

houses, three infinity pools and an award-winning spa. Nisbet Plantation Beach Club is a historic plantation inn on a beach, spread over 12 lush hectares with only 36 rooms. Montpelier Plantation & Beach, where history meets luxury, is a boutique resort offering Relais & Chateaux hospitality. The family-owned and operated Mount Nevis Hotel is the perfect intimate hideaway. Quiet villages dotted with brightly coloured houses and unspoilt beaches, together with an unhurried lifestyle and genuine hospitality, only add to the unique appeal of Nevis.

nevisisland.com Facebook.com/nevisnaturally Instagram @nevisnaturally Represented in the UK by Clear Marketing International

September 2018 25


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Caribbean calling On land and beneath the waves, the region’s idyllic allure is enhanced by its sightseeing repertoire. Matthew Hampton shares the highlights

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e’ve come a long way from climbing Dunn’s River Falls. The legendary Jamaican waterfall has seen more than a million visitors scale its slippery stone steps, holding hands in human chains and having plenty of fun along the way. But fighting through crowds and vendors is now tougher than climbing the falls themselves, so to appreciate the Caribbean’s true natural beauty, try a few of these new and old classics.

ABTAmag.com

LIGHT UP KAYAKING, ANGUILLA

MYSTIC MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE, JAMAICA

See water sports in a new light in Anguilla – quite literally. Liquid Glow is a night-time kayaking trip through the clear waters of Little Bay in an illuminated boat. The clear plastic kayaks are equipped with LEDs, which create an extraordinary rainbow effect in the water. There are day tours, too, but night-time is more spectacular. From £26; anguillakayak.com

The rainforest above Ocho Rios is the setting for a network of zip-lines, chairlifts and a rollercoaster ride inspired by the Cool Runnings bobsled team. The coaster is powered by gravity alone, and riders control the speed with the brake (top tip – just leave it off for a more thrilling ride!). The complex has proven so popular that versions have opened in St Maarten, Costa Rica,

September 2018 27


ABTA Caribbean

St Lucia and Panama. From £86; rainforestadventure.com

SCULPTURE SNORKELLING, GRENADA Goggle at incredible underwater sculptures in Grenada’s Molinère-Beauséjour marine park. British sculptor Jason de Caires Taylor created the installation in 2006 to great acclaim. The Calabash Boutique Hotel at L’Anse Aux Epines Beach has a new snorkelling or diving tour to see the concrete figures. Enjoy a fournight package from £615pp; calabashhotel.com/offers

CLIMBING GROS PITON, ST LUCIA The larger of St Lucia’s iconic Piton mountains is actually

28 September 2018

easier to climb – and the only one you are allowed to without a specific permit and guide. It’s a rewarding hike through lush rainforest that anyone of reasonable fitness can manage given a bit of time. Climbers do not legally have to take a guide on Gros Piton, but you do need to pay the national park fee of around £10. grospiton.com

attracts reef sharks and even a hammerhead or two, but mostly divers wishing to tick it off their bucket list. You will need to have logged at least 24 dives to get deep and see the stalagmites, but it is a real achievement when you do. Find a reputable dive master at scubaschoolbelize.com, and expect to pay from £300 with equipment rental.

THE GREAT BLUE HOLE, BELIZE A genuine adventure for experienced divers, the Great Blue Hole is a 300m-wide sinkhole best reached with a charter from Belize City. Made famous by French ocean explorer Jacques Cousteau in the 1970s, it is effectively a 125m-deep vertical cave that

Pictured Below: Reach the summit of St Lucia’s Gros Piton. Previous page: Grenada’s underwater sculptures are popular with divers

ABTAmag.com


Five of the best beaches Anse de Pitons, St Lucia Location is everything and Anse de Pitons occupies perhaps the best spot in St Lucia. Directly in front of the luxurious Sugar Beach Resort in the shadow of the Piton Mountains, the stunning beach shelves gently for a few metres, then dives dramatically into a wall of coral. All beaches in St Lucia are public, so you don’t need to be a guest at Sugar Beach to enjoy it. It helps if you are, though…

Crane Beach, Barbados Directly below the Crane Resort in St Philip, Crane Beach is the classic Caribbean experience – a white strip of sand looking east to the wild Atlantic. Enjoy the view from L’Azure, the Crane’s lunch spot, then bag your place in the sun. Again, all beaches are public so you don’t need to pay.

ABTAmag.com

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ABTA Caribbean

James Bond Beach, Jamaica So-called because of Bond creator Ian Fleming’s link with Jamaica (his villa, GoldenEye, is just next door and the beach appeared in the first film, Dr. No). There’s a £2 entry charge, but for that you get changing rooms and a chilled atmosphere without a crowd. And what price for a slice of pop culture heritage?

Carlisle Bay, Antigua For real exclusivity, stay at Carlisle Bay in Antigua, which has a private beach adjacent to the hotel’s secluded Bay Suites. Owing to the hotel’s location on the peninsula, it is the only place to stay on this particular stretch of sand, making it one of the quietest in the Caribbean and a popular choice for honeymooners. B&B is from £660 per night for a Bay Suite. carlisle-bay.com

Pink Sands, Harbour Island, Bahamas Is it really pink? Incredibly, yes – that hue is not just an Instagram filter. The Bahamas have about the prettiest beaches anywhere thanks to the high deposits of broken coral and shells in the sand. Depending on what time you catch it, the colour can change, turning almost salmon at sunset. It is soft, too, and shelves gently into the Atlantic.

30 September 2018

ABTAmag.com


Postcards or posts to social media the stunning Caribbean is meant to be shared An aerial tram ride above the lush landscape of St Lucia might be one story you just have to share when you get home. Swim amongst tropical marine life in St Maarten, or simply sit back on the soft sands of Antigua with a cocktail cooler. In the sun-kissed Caribbean you’ll create memories to relish for years to come.

13 nights Caribbean Transatlantic from

with

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PER SEA VIEW (OUTSIDE) CABIN TO SPEND ON BOARD* BASED ON AZURA A905A, NF GRADE | 9 MAR 2019

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ABTA Caribbean

Drop anchor The Caribbean is best by ship. With itineraries for every budget, cruises here have never been so accessible, writes Anthony Pearce

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olidays in the Caribbean are the bread and butter of the cruise industry. Last year, 35 per cent of all cruise ships were deployed to the region – the highest of any destination. The Mediterranean received the second-highest deployment at 18.3 per cent. With such great volume comes great diversity: there are Caribbean cruises to suit all budgets and customers, from young families to wealthy retirees and everyone in-between. In 2016, 8.6 million

32 September 2018

people from around the world took a cruise to the Caribbean. Most cruise lines have a presence in the Caribbean, even those that sail exclusively from the UK, meaning vessels range in size and style, from Star Clippers’ 200-guest tall ships to Royal Caribbean International’s state-of-the-art mega ships, including Symphony of the Seas, the world’s largest. Not only do the likes of Norwegian Cruise Line and Carnival Cruise Line sail there, but so do smaller ship operators such as

Viking Cruises, SeaDream and Seabourn, as well as expedition lines including Aurora Expeditions and Hurtigruten. Cruise itineraries are generally divided by eastern, southern and western options. To the east, ships call at the likes of the Virgin Islands (St Thomas, St John and St Croix), the British Virgin Islands (Virgin Gorda, Jost Van Dyke and Tortola), Puerto Rico and Grand Turk, while St Barts, Antigua, Anguilla and Dominica are often visited by the smaller

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vessels. To the west, ships visit Cozumel, Mexico and make stops in Honduras, Belize, Grand Cayman and Jamaica. In the southern Caribbean, stops include Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, St Lucia, Barbados, Grenada and the Grenadines. In the Bahamas (although not technically part of the Caribbean, but often a stop on the way) you’ll find many of the biggest cruise lines’ private islands: Castaway Cay (Disney Cruise Line), Half Moon Cay (Holland America Line), Great Stirrup Cay (Norwegian Cruise Line), Princess Cays (Princess Cruises) and CocoCay (Royal Caribbean). In Hispaniola, the

second-largest island in the Caribbean, you’ll find Labadee (also Royal Caribbean). The opening up of Cuba to cruise ships from America under the Obama administration has also changed the dynamic of these itineraries, many of which will now call at Havana, and other Cuban ports, before heading south to Belize City and Cozumel, although Donald Trump has threatened to undo his predecessor’s good work. However, Brits don’t need to worry: they visit Cuba as tourists (whereas Americans still need to travel under one of 12 approved reasons).

Outstanding excursions 1 Power snorkelling off Grand Turk

3 Historical highlights of Antigua

The Caribbean’s crystal waters are an undeniable attraction, teeming with tropical fish, sea turtles, dolphins and stingrays. Discover the underwater world off Grand Turk with a twist – power snorkelling involves handheld units that propel you through the water, making diving down a breeze.

Discover Antigua’s British military past on a half-day or full-day excursion, taking in Nelson’s Dockyard, a Unesco World Heritage Site, and Shirley Heights.

2 Thrill-seeking in Belize City Set out on an adventure from Belize City. Popular shore excursions include cave tubing, where you’ll explore spectacular cave systems held in sacred regard by the ancient Mayans, and canopy zip lining, where you’ll whizz through Belize’s lush tropical rainforest.

ABTAmag.com

4 Stingray swim in Grand Cayman Visit Stingray City, where rays flock to eat from your palm. You’ll be given snorkelling equipment to join these graceful creatures in Grand Cayman’s turquoise waters.

5 Kayak around Cienfuegos Bay Viking Ocean Cruises offers a two-hour kayaking tour around Cienfuegos Bay on Cuba’s southern coast. Learn about marauding pirates and the lively history of the port.

September 2018 33


ABTA Caribbean

Good to know HEALTH AND TRAVEL ADVICE The Caribbean is made up of 13 sovereign states and 17 dependent territories. The Foreign Office offers information on a countryby-country basis, and it’s best to keep up to date with the latest advice (gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice) and travel with organised tours. Millions of Britons visit the Caribbean each year, and most holidays are free from incident. Although there are few health risks in the Caribbean, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization do recommend vaccines such as hepatitis A and B, typhoid and other routine vaccinations, depending on the country (see fitfortravel.nhs.uk for the latest advice). Outbreaks of Zika have been recorded on most Caribbean islands.

the likes of Dominica, Saint Martin and Puerto Rico, leaving residents without electricity or running water. While the overwhelming majority of islands remained safe and open to visit in the immediate aftermath – and those that were affected began to welcome visitors again within months – many islands saw tourist numbers fall as a result of the coverage.

LANGUAGE English is spoken throughout the region and is the official language of the likes of Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas and St Vincent and the Grenadines. It is the second language in Antilles and Puerto Rico. Martinique and Guadeloupe are French-speaking. Creole and local patois are also spoken.

WEATHER

GETTING THERE

One of the best things about the Caribbean is its climate. It doesn’t get cold and it rarely gets too hot. On many islands, temperatures tend to float around the mid to high 20s, going into the 30s in peak season (DecemberMay). Rain is unavoidable – it’s the reason these islands are so lush and green – but it rarely lasts long. Hurricane season occurs between June and November, although storms aren’t that common. Hurricanes Irma and Maria, which arrived in the Caribbean in August and late September 2017 respectively, did cause considerable damage to

British Airways and Virgin Atlantic operate most of the direct flights that connect the UK with the Caribbean. From London there are non-stop flights to Barbados, St Lucia, Antigua, Tobago, Jamaica (Montego Bay), Mexico (Cancún) and Cuba (Havana). There are also flights from London to the Dominican Republic (Punta Cana), St Kitts and Puerto Rico (San Juan) that touch down in Antigua, and flights to Grand Cayman and the Turks and Caicos that touch down in Nassau, or to Grenada touching down in Tobago. From Manchester, you can fly direct to Barbados with Virgin Atlantic.

34 September 2018

ABTAmag.com


JAMAICA

SAINT

LUCIA

ANTIGUA

BAHAMAS

GRENADA

BARBADOS

THE BE ST BE N E FI TS IN THE INDUSTRY

COMPETITIVE COMMISSION

BOOKING INCENTIVES

ADVANCED TRAINING

MARKETING OPPORTUNITIES

Receive excellent commission on every booking that you make – even on extras such as airport lounge passes and Island Routes excursions. Top tip: Upsell your clients to create a higher revenue booking and earn more!

To reward you for your commitment, we offer a number of booking incentives. From free nights with ‘Sell & Go’ and free luggage with ‘Sandals Specialist’ to exclusive event invites with ‘Chairman’s Royal Club’ and so much more.

To help you sell more, we offer a number of training options – such as our full day MasterClasses. Plus, we know that seeing is believeing and therefore host regular FAM trips to the Caribbean at our Luxury Included® resorts.

If you’re looking to grow your business with Sandals Resorts, we are here to help. Work with your local Business Development Manager and implement a marketing plan that works for you and your target audience.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE WORLD’S LEADING ALL-INCLUSIVE RESORTS Call Agency Sales 020 7590 0210 | Email agencysales@sandals.co.uk | Visit sellingsandals.co.uk OR TO BOOK Call 0808 164 3459 | Visit sandals.co.uk/agents Competitive commission based on bookings made through Unique Caribbean Holidays Ltd. (UCHL).

2017

22 Years Running


The ABTA Magazine Guide to the Caribbean  

Made up of more than 7,000 individual islands, islets, reefs and cays, the vast and diverse 28-island-nation Caribbean region is as beautifu...

The ABTA Magazine Guide to the Caribbean  

Made up of more than 7,000 individual islands, islets, reefs and cays, the vast and diverse 28-island-nation Caribbean region is as beautifu...

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