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ISSUE 85

New release from June 2018.

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2018

www.aboutthegarden.com.au

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Issue 85

2018

RECIPE: Chicken Pies p12

Winter Citrus p14 The Serenity Prayer

18 CONTAINS

MONTH FERTILISER

Instant nutrition and trace elements for optimal growth Maximised fertiliser content & enhanced water use efficiency Sublime texture for root enhancement An enhanced, sophisticated formula which has been master blended to grow vibrant and robust plants. Platinum Peat 80 Potting Mix has elevated the standards of what gardeners expect to grow, love and cherish their plants.

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference. Living one day at a time; Enjoying one moment at a time; Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace; Taking, as He did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it; Trusting that He will make all things right if I surrender to His Will; That I may be reasonably happy in this life and supremely happy with Him Forever in the next. Amen. Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will direct your paths. Proverbs 3, 5-6

Oh, glorious Apostle, St Jude Thaddeus, We salute you through the most Sacred Heart of Jesus. Thou who didst gloriously suffer martyrdom for the love of your Divine Master, We beseech you, obtain for me the grace to remain always faithful to our Saviour, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Managing Director: Conway Searle Contributors: Ashley Searle, Noel Burdette. Magazine Manager: Alana Searle Design & Layout: Alana Searle ATG Group Co-ordinator & Advertising: Jason Searle About the Garden is published seasonally by About the Garden Pty. Ltd. ABN 21 076 919 992 • 4914 D’Aguilar Highway, Kilcoy or P.O. Box 70, Kilcoy Qld. 4515 Phone: (07) 5422 3090 • Fax: (07) 5497 2287 Email: atg@aboutthegarden.com.au The material appearing in About the Garden is subject to copyright. Other than as permitted by the Copyright Act, no part of this magazine may be reproduced without the permission of the publishers. No responsibility is accepted by About the Garden Pty. Ltd. for the accuracy of information contained in the text, illustrations or advertisements. Although believed to be accurately and correctly sourced, thereof disclaims any liability against itself, editor/s or employees arising from any person acting on the material herein. The opinions expressed in the magazine, or by contributors, do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher. ©Copyright 2018 About the Garden Pty. Ltd.

About the Garden Magazine is proudly produced from sustainable resources.


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Superior dual action formula to produce an abundance of flowers + corrective elements to help prevent yellowing in leaves. like us!


Australia has some of the most interesting and beautiful species of flora on the planet, yet in general only a handful have become iconic within our backyard landscapes.

Noel Burdette

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With the wide and varied climatic zones that Australia boasts, it can be understandable that so many of our delightful native species go unrecognised as worthy acquisitions for everyone to enjoy. For no particular reason or fault, some have eluded the heavy commercialism of species such as Grevillea, Kangaroo paw, Westringea, Lillypilly or Lomandra, yet they still have strong appeal in their own right. The mentioned natives offer strong foliage impact, colour and texture while playing an important role in habitat and food sources for wildlife. Their unique presence enrich our landscapes and continue to uphold and strengthen biodiversity in our suburbs.

Cassia Brewsteri or the Leichardt Bean is an eye-catching medium to large sized tree from the tropical and sub-tropical regions and although in its native habitat can tower at over thirty metres, it is more frequently seen in cultivation at a maximum of around half that height at fifteen metres. Flowering from late winter and into early spring, the exquisite pendulous orange racemes at first glance resemble wisteria. A member of the legume family, this species can be quick growing in its early years and can easily be used as a feature tree or where shade is required. This is a (winter) semi-deciduous species that allows the gentle winter light to penetrate the garden and allows for smaller shrubs such as azaleas, Ixora and bromeliads to be planted underneath its gentle canopy. While in bloom, the flowers are a favourite of many of our native bee species but especially the native Carpenter bee.


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The Long Leaved Tuckeroo or Cupaniopsis newmanii hails from rainforest areas of northern New South Wales and into South east Queensland. Unlike its better known cousin the common Tuckeroo (Cupaniopsis anacardioides) that is a common sight as a street or parkland tree, the long leaved Tuckeroo is quite rare in cultivation and can be highly ornamental. Its new growth is its main attraction as its produces fronds from a central point reminiscent of a cycad, yet are soft to the touch and a deep, rich salmon pink in colour. This small rainforest species is perfect for those living in slightly cooler areas, yet are frost free, and wish to capture that lush tropical appeal. Flowers are formed on small racemes from the leaf axils followed by small fruit that are highly desired by small fruit eating birds. Cupaniopsis newmanii is an upright small tree to around four or five metres and is best provided with some light shade and ample moisture in its early years, after which it can be highly tolerant of long dry periods once established.

Breynia cernua ‘Ironstone Range’ or Coffee Bush is a true favourite of mine with its gorgeous, deeply coloured burgundy foliage that have a gentle weeping habit. For many years, I have always felt that this species has so much to offer a gardener with any sized garden or style. It can be fast to grow while the weather is warm. Breynias can be regularly trimmed to retain a more shrub-like stature at around two metres in height where it can be used as an attractive screening plant. Removing the lower horizontal branches, it can be encouraged to reach a height of over four metres where it provides a gently weeping canopy exactly as a cool climate Japanese maple would do and can be used in warmer climates in place of any acer species. Like acers, this is a winter deciduous species in cooler regions, while only partly defoliating in warm climates after the foliage shimmers in rich copper and burnished shades in late autumn. The small red berries that are formed underneath the foliage are relished by small birds and the entire tree is seen as a host for several native butterfly species. They do little harm and the entire plant responds soon after with fresh, clean foliage. It’s a small price to pay for the benefit of supporting the life cycle of our treasured butterflies.


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Hibiscus tiliacea Rubra or Red Cottonwood is a species of native hibiscus from the east coast of Australia and can tolerate high salinity and strong winds. This beautiful species with its heart-shaped leaves has strong appeal with its deep claret young growth that slowly turn a deep green bronze as they age. The large, attractive flowers are rich sulphur yellow that gently age to apricot and are set off beautifully against the foliage. The red cottonwood can be safely planted as streetscapes or if planted in a row, can be easily trained into a screen or medium sized hedge. This evergreen hibiscus species is very tolerant of difficult sites and establishes swiftly to turn into a magnificent tree to six metres. Its natural rounded shape is reminiscent of a golden ash commonly seen in colder climates and should be used in a similar fashion in warmer climates where it can take pride and place as a strong feature planting that is both attractive and long-lived.

Finally, something for the shady gardener, Hoya australis Native wax flower is a true champion as both a potted specimen or allowed to do what comes naturally and climb on a frame, archway or fence line in semi-shade to shaded sites in the garden. With many hoya originating from around the world such as the Americas or Asia, it’s easy to forget that Australia can lay claim to some of the prettiest. All Hoya species are extremely easy to grow and have long, productive lives. Hoya australis has many derivatives around the country with each showing small differences in leaf and flower shape and colour. Generally, the flower clusters are white with an attractive pink star-shaped centre. Most (if not all) exude a sweet honey like scent at the beginning and end of the day. They are partly succulent and epiphytic by nature and do not require constant watering making them a truly undemanding species to maintain. The only pruning they will ever need is to lightly prune (during summer) the growing tips to keep them in shape, but never be tempted to remove the old flowering spurs as this is where they will produce new flowers ever year once formed.


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For a smaller acquisition in the garden, but with no less appeal than its other Aussie counterparts, the Holly Fuchsia Graptophyllum ilicifolium is a delightful small shrub up to two metres bringing bright colour into a spring garden. Its shiny bright apple-green leaves are scalloped just like you would expect from a true holly (Ilex species), yet lack the harsh prickles and instead of berries, it produces bright magenta/red tubular flowers that attract the attention of nectar loving small birds from around the neighborhood. The Holly fuchsia is unfussy on soil type and can be allowed to form a feature shrub on its own or lightly trimmed to form a dense screen or low hedge. It is untroubled by any pest or disease.

Another uncommon native species suitable as a medium sized shrub is the native Lolly bush Clerodendrum floribundum. Usually observed as tall tree, it is best kept (in cultivation) at a more manageable height of two metres. Being a lightly foliaged species, regular pruning will encourage dense growth that helps to show off its delicate clusters of white tubular flowers highlighted with lavender stamens. Butterflies of many species find the flowers irresistible when in bloom between December and May. Its high tolerance for drought (once established) enables it to be grown in stoney, impoverished soil as equally as enriched garden conditions. One of the very first native plants I ever grew as a boy was the Native Hop Bush, Dodonaea viscosa. This medium sized shrub up to three metres is easily used in all states of Australia and can be trimmed to great perfection to form dense screening or tightly pruned hedges at one metre. Although its flowers are relatively small and insignificant, the seeds pods that follow are delightful with their three sided appeal. The attractive, oblong-shaped foliage is a light bronze to olive green through the warmer growing season and turn deep bronze red throughout the winter months, providing further appeal. This species was highly popular back in the seventies yet with changing garden trends has suffered a drop in popularity or simply has become forgotten amongst the plethora of new Aussie native species that have been brought on the market. Like the native hibiscus mentioned earlier, the hop bush is capable of windy sites and is very salt tolerant so makes a great choice for coastal gardens or elevated garden spaces as a wind break where it can be used to help establish many other plants that may not enjoy those conditions as much.


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we

love

‘Hollywood Star’ ‘Morning Star’

Hundreds of flowers cover these flamboyant Calibrachoa ‘Superbells’ plants from late winter until well into the following autumn. Their compact habit make them popular for garden displays and in pots. Position: Their habit lends themselves to spilling over container or wall edges producing a waterfall of bright colour. Ideally suited for use in combination plantings either with other colour Superbells or different plants altogether. Full sun position. 30cm spread. Care: Allow the top of the soil to dry out before watering again to keep root diseases at bay. All Superbells are bred for hardiness against root rot diseases and outperform other varieties on the market. Liquid feed every two weeks with Searles Flourish Soluble Plant Food to keep the plant flowering.

Look out for these new release beauties from June 2018.


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Bamboo

screens

Goldstripe is a small narrow screening bamboo perfect for small garden beds or pots and troughs. Goldstripe will naturally grow between 3-4m in height and can be easily trimmed down in height if needed. It is very versatile to suit most gardens or lazy gardeners!

Bamboo ‘Gracilis’ is well known as the best choice for privacy screening between 2m and 8m of height, as it is easily trimmable and very versatile. It has naturally upright growth (most bamboo fan out wide) with attractive bushy green foliage. The natural footprint size of the clump is 1m however this wonderful species can be planted into narrow garden beds or maintained smaller to suit your needs, down to a minimum of 40cm.

For more info on these bamboos, visit www.bamboodownunder.com.au


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Winter is the time for many cultivars of Camellias to make their way into the hearts of many a gardener. Many a love affair is born at this time of the year when it comes to these age old favourites for our gardens. Most winter flowering forms are in the Japonica group and enjoy slightly more sheltered positions in the gardens with protection from intense sun. They are the perfect woodland style species that look natural and at home if planted underneath the protective canopy of both evergreen and deciduous species of trees. All camellias enjoy an acid, moist soil rich in humus and due to their slow development of root structure can take up to two years to become fully established. Camellias are a shining star in the winter garden and are available in a wide assortment of styles and colour tones to suit everyone’s tastes.

The right pH

Camellias are ‘acid-loving’ plants and dislike soils with a pH higher than 6 to 6.5. In most parts of Australia, soils tend to be naturally acidic, which means correcting the soil is not usually necessary. In regions with naturally alkaline soils, it can be easier to grow camellias in pots. Use Searles Azalea, Camellia & Gardenia Specialty Mix for best results. This will help maintain the ideal level of soil acidity for camellias, as well as providing all the nutrients needed for excellent growth, vigour and flowering.


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For more tasty recipes from the garden, visit www.aboutthegarden.com.au


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citrus

more info on citrus care for all year, visit www.aboutthegarden.com.au


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Ingredients

2 oranges 4 eggs 1 1/2 cups of (315g) caster sugar 3 cups (300g) of almond meal 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp ground cardamom Thick cream or mascarpone for serving Orange syrup Zest and the juice of one orange 1/2 cup (100g) caster sugar 1/4 cup of water 1 tsp orange blossom flavouring

Preheat oven to 160˚C. Grease and line a round spring form pan. Fully cover oranges in a large sauce pan of water. Bring to boil and cook for 45 minutes or until oranges are soft and very tender. Once cooked, drain, cut into quarters, discard pips and let cool. Beat with an electric mixer, sugar and eggs until thick and pale. Add orange quarters into a food processor and blend into a fine pulp. Fold gently together in a mixing bowl orange pulp, egg mix, almond meal, baking powder, cinnamon and cardamom. Pour mix into the prepared cake tin and bake for one hour or until cooked throughout. Set aside to cool slightly. To make syrup, add juice, sugar and water into a saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly until sugar dissolves and the syrup thickens slightly. Stir in orange blossom flavouring and zest. Set aside to cool slightly.

TO SERVE: drizzle syrup evenly over cake and serve with cream.

For more tasty recipes from the garden, visit www.aboutthegarden.com.au


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‘Flaming Fire’

Fittonias display compact and tightly knit leaves on a small plant base making them a great designer piece for smaller indoor decor settings and terrarium arrangements. They are low maintenance and available in an appealing range of foliage colours.

Hosta ‘Showboat’

an

Peperomia ‘Emerald’ make a strong statement as indoor plants.

m Hosta ‘Minute

Hostas are everyone’s go-to shade plant and hard to beat for long-lasting, easy-care perennial beauty. A broad range of foliage colours, textures and leaf sizes are available while they offer a practically maintenance-free habit. Some varieties have flowers and really add to their appeal and while they love shade outside, they are trending for indoors use and cope quite well with a little extra care.


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Bindii in lawns?

Treat with...

Bubbly leaves?

Treat with...

Winter is a time when Bindii start to invade our home turf, causing much pain and frustration. If you have ever walked on a bindii and felt the sharp pain they cause, you may be interested to know that it is actually the seed that forms the prickle. Bindii starts growing in winter and if you kill the weed before it sets seed then you will have less bindiis for next year to contend with. Spray your lawn now, with Searles Lawn Perfect, to avoid the painful prickles in spring.

Lilly-pilly trees are a very popular hedging plant, but can be vulnerable to psyllids (tiny, native, sap-sucking insects) which cause unsightly, but harmless lesions on new growth. To avoid this problem ask your local garden expert for lilly-pilly strains that are resistant to psyllid attack. Control infestations with Searles Conguard. Look out for psyllid activity from late winter and early spring through to end of autumn.

Visit us online for what to

grow now, harvest now & bake now.

Sooty mould on citrus

Sooty leaves?

Treat with...

Sooty mould grows on the honeydew secretions made by sap-sucking insects like scale, aphids and mealybug. Sooty mould is unsightly but does not directly harm the plant, other than to inhibit photosynthesis. Of more concern are the sap-sucking insects which grow the mould. Control these pests with Searles Pest Gun. Plants that are under stress from other factors such as lack of water can be more susceptible to these kinds of problems, so water regularly in hot, dry weather.

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hints & tips *Image courtesy of Plants Management Australia www.pma.com.au

It is commonly thought that plants don’t need fertilising in winter, but this is not true. Plants will ourish with the right winter fertilising. What is more important is the type of fertilisers used. High nitrogen fertilisers are more suited for spring through to autumn, but not really for winter. However, fertilisers containing high amounts of Potash (Potassium) are excellent for developing deep green leaves and promoting plant strength and vigour through winter in readiness in spring growth. To promote good healthy growth & reduce fungal disease, fertilise with both Searles Liquid Potash & SeaMax Seaweed. Both these liquid fertilisers will promote hardy growth that builds plants resistance and prepares them for spring.

Now that the cooler weather of winter is here, gardens don’t loose as much water to evaporation as they do in summer. Because of this, soils can easily waterlog if over watered, particularly on the southern side of homes and in well shaded areas. If you have an automatic watering system, during these cooler months reduce the watering time to at least half that of summer. When watering, do so in the morning so that both soil & plants can dry off before nightime. This will reduce fungal disease. If possible, water directly onto soil & not onto plant foliage. Fungal diseases love wet conditions and if the plant leaves are wet during the night, this creates ideal conditions for fungal diseases to proliferate, so this is very important for healthy plant growth.


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Sub Tropics /Tropical

• Broccoli • Cauliflower • Cabbage • Lettuce • Brussel sprouts • Onions & leeks • Beetroot • Carrots • Pumpkin • Sweet corn • Tomatoes • Zucchini

Cooler Climate • Broccoli • Cauliflower • Cabbage • Leek • Brussel sprouts • Onions & leeks • Beetroot • Carrots • Turnip • Potatoes • Broad Beans • English spinach & Sliver Beet

ANSWER

Year after year many gardeners are devastated by the damage Possums do to buds, flowers and new growth on their roses, shrubs, trees and herbs. However for over 30 years many rose growers, both amateurs and commercial and others ‘in the know’, have used and confirmed D-TER Animal & Bird Repellent’s real success. “I have used your D-TER for 6 months now – am thrilled at the results. It’s the only product to keep Possums off our roses on our 1.5 acres.” Marion C. Vic. “D-TER has made the difference between the joy of roses and the despair of seeing them stripped by Possums and Parrots … Thousands of visitors flock to see our garden and the roses in particular in October and November each year, I am so often asked if D-TER really works, I only need to point to the wondrous display of cascading roses as proof.” Heather C. NSW. “I have used D-TER for the past 3 –5 years and found it the only one to ‘deter’ the 10,000 (sic) possums on my quarter acre block.” Myra M. Vic. “We purchased your D-TER Animal & Bird Repellent last year to reduce the activity of possums on the roof of our home. The product has been very effective…..I wish to purchase a further 1Kg jar. Neil S. NSW

Importantly, D-TER is registered for use against all animals and birds, is extremely effective in repelling them, environmentally sound; very safe, not a poison, has no withholding period and does not harm humans or the creatures. For further information contact Lorac Australia Ph. 02 9589 0703

Protect herbs, vegetables, trees and shrubs from possums, kangaroos, wallabies, rabbits, hares, bandicoots, deer, foxes and other wildlife. Protect vegetables, fruit trees, ornamentals, seedlings and buildings from cockatoos, crows, ducks, pigeons, rosellas, starlings, swallows, other birds, fruit bats and microbats. Protects homes, gardens, patios, shop fronts and paved areas from both dogs and cats or rats and mice.

Protects one plant or a whole area — perimeter &/or band sprays. Repels — without harming animals or humans. Not considered a poison — no withholding period. Easy to use — spray on. Effective when dry. Safe, Proven and Effective. Available in 100g, 1Kg & 4Kg Sizes.

is unique. Reject products said to be "just as good", nothing is at all "like it". For more specific information send 2 x $1 stamps, Please mention your problem, post to:

D-TER, Dept. A, PO Box 3, Oyster Bay, NSW 2225. Enquiries: Phone: (02) 9589 0703 Fax: (02) 9589 0147

GG20-260/02

TO YOUR POSSUM PROBLEMS


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Tropical

Darwin

Subtropical Temperate

Cairns Broome

Cool Mediterranean Arid

Townsville Whitsundays

N.T.

Mackay

Mt. Isa Longreach

Alice Springs Carnarvon

Kalgoorlie

S.A. Port Augusta

Perth

Gympie Roma Toowoomba Warwick

Esperance

Mt Gambier

Armidale

Tamworth

Orange

Adelaide Victor Harbour

Moree

N.S.W.

Bunbury

Regional Garden Diary

Hervey Bay

QLD Coober Pedy

Geraldton

Rockhampton Gladstone

Blackall

W.A.

Albany

Emerald

Sunshine Coast

Brisbane

Gold Coast

Grafton Port Macquarie Newcastle

Sydney

Canberra Wodonga

Vic.

Melbourne

Tas.

Hobart

Of course some of the most striking of all succulent species to flower during the depths of winter would have to be the hybrid flowering Aloes. Many have made their way onto the market over recent years and are only now being appreciated for their amazing resilience and dramatic flowering capabilities. Available in a variety of sizes, there is a flowering aloe to suit any style and size of garden. Flowering Aloes are one of the best attractants for nectar feeding birds in the winter along with an essential source of pollen for our native stingless bee species. A full sun position suits them best with good drainage, yet they enjoy deep watering to help produce strong flowering stems.


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Control scale and insects like mealy bug and citrus leaf miner on your citrus during winter before there take over and spoil all your hard work. Searles Ecofend Fruit & Garden Insect & Scale is a perfect fully organic spray to control these pests and keep the surrounding environment happy and healthy.


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Salvia dorisiana ‘Fruity Sage’ is a winter flowering salvia that brings with it a delightful perfume to the garden. The hot pink blooms that appear from late June until early October are relished by honeyeaters of all kinds. The perfume is emitted from the large, furry (evergreen) foliage and smells reminiscent of fruit salad. Happiest in partial shade with moisture retentive soil. Strong pruning is recommended at the end of its flowering season to promote lush new growth.

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ tolerates extremes of heat, cold and drought and makes a striking contrast against other plant foliage. Beautiful in Meditteranean-style gardens or in pots, it loves full sun, part shade, good drainage and grows 40cmH x 50cmW. Flowers from winter into spring.


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Email: atg@aboutthegarden.com.au

Phone: (07) 5422 3090 Fax: (07) 5497 2287

Winter 2018

www.aboutthegarden.com.au

REGIONAL ZONES Darwin

Cairns Broome Townsville Whitsundays

N.T.

Mackay

Mt. Isa Longreach

Alice Springs Carnarvon

Emerald

W.A.

Hervey Bay

QLD

Gympie Roma Toowoomba Warwick

Coober Pedy

Geraldton Kalgoorlie

S.A. Port Augusta

Perth Esperance

Tropical Subtropical Temperate Cool Mediterranean Arid

Mt Gambier

Armidale

Tamworth

Orange

Adelaide Victor Harbour

Moree

N.S.W.

Bunbury Albany

Rockhampton Gladstone

Blackall

Canberra Wodonga

Vic.

Melbourne

Tas.

Hobart

Sunshine Coast

Brisbane

Gold Coast

Grafton Port Macquarie Newcastle

Sydney

to control Bindii before the painful prickles arrive in early spring.


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About the garden winter 2018 magazine  

Great gardening advice for winter gardening in Australia. Packed with information on new release plants, easy care plants, different Austral...

About the garden winter 2018 magazine  

Great gardening advice for winter gardening in Australia. Packed with information on new release plants, easy care plants, different Austral...