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The Serenity Prayer

TM

Issue 90

in spring 19... Salvia sensations Leafy greens Spring up daisy

4 12 15

On the table - recipe - Crumbed chicken & haloumi salad

16

Spring pests

18

At your local - Flowering plants - Indoor foliage

8 11

About spring - Edibles - Passionfruit - Berries - Succulents - Garden Events - Climatic zones

20 21 21 23 24 24

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference. Living one day at a time; Enjoying one moment at a time; Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace; Taking, as He did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it; Trusting that He will make all things right if I surrender to His Will; That I may be reasonably happy in this life and supremely happy with Him Forever in the next. Amen. Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will direct your paths. Proverbs 3, 5-6

Let nothing disturb thee. Let nothing affright thee Who has God. Wants for nothing. All things pass God alone suffices. God never changes. (St Teresa of Jesus) Patience gains all.

Front cover image: Calibrachoa ‘Holy Moly’.

Salvias p4

For more information, visit www.provenwinners.com.au Managing Director: Conway Searle Contributors: Ashley Searle, Mike Wells Magazine Manager: Alana Searle Design & Layout: Alana Searle ATG Group Co-ordinator & Advertising: Jason Searle About the Garden is published seasonally by About the Garden Pty. Ltd. ABN 21 076 919 992 • 4914 D’Aguilar Highway, Kilcoy or P.O. Box 70, Kilcoy Qld. 4515 Ph: (07) 5422 3090 atg@aboutthegarden.com.au

Leafy greens p12

The material appearing in About the Garden is subject to copyright. Other than as permitted by the Copyright Act, no part of this magazine may be reproduced without the permission of the publishers. No responsibility is accepted by About the Garden Pty. Ltd. for the accuracy of information contained in the text, illustrations or advertisements. Although believed to be accurately and correctly sourced, thereof disclaims any liability against itself, editor/s or employees arising from any person acting on the material herein. The opinions expressed in the magazine, or by contributors, do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher. ©Copyright 2019 About the Garden Pty. Ltd.

About the Garden Magazine is proudly produced from sustainable resources.


Rapid response + long term fertiliser

Enhanced water efficiency & retention


Salvias are classified as annuals, biennials, perennials and herbaceous shrubs. They are rugged plants which grow equally well in rubbly clay or friable loam, providing they are well drained. There are over 500 species of Salvias from edible sages (S. officinalis) and small to large shrubs up to 3m high. There is a Salvia to suit all climates, seasons and garden styles. Most Salivas show off their flowers best in spring through to autumn. Salvia comes from the Latin salvare, a reference to the plant’s ability to heal. Ancient herbalists used various species of sage to cure anything from snake bites to epilepsy. S. sclarea ‘Clary sage’ derives its common name from its reputed ability to improve vision. More recently S. officinalis has become popular as a natural antiseptic and mouthwash for sore throats and gum disorders. Sage wine was administered as a soothing tonic for body and mind while sage beer was notoriously intoxicating. Salvias are fast gaining a reputation for variety, value and versatility. If you’ve got a sunny spot, why not give them a go? Salvias can easily be propagated by either sowing seeds (for annual types) or by taking cuttings or dividing old clumps (for biennial, perennial and herbaceous types).

Planting and care of Salvias

Plant salivas en masse for a stunning display of colour in garden beds or use the smaller more compact varieties for pot displays around patios and entertainment areas. Most love a full sun position and well drained soil. Mix 5 IN 1 Organic Fertiliser into the soil before planting for strong healthy foliage and flower display. An occasional application of soluble fertiliser, such as Searles Flourish Flowers & Foliage Soluble Plant Food will keep the plants flowering optimally, although too much nitrogenous food will result in excess foliage at the expense of flowers. They are tolerant of moderate droughts although in poor soils it is a good idea to protect their roots with mulch during prolonged periods of hot and dry weather. Annual and perennial varieties can be pruned after flowering to remove spent flowers and reproportion top heavy plants. The larger shrubby types should be cut to approximately 45cm from the ground in autumn, after which they will produce fresh new growth almost immediately.

Varieties of Salvias

The most flamboyant and well-known of all the salvias is the red bedding variety Salvia splendens, with cultivar names such as ‘Blaze of Fire’, ‘Fireball’ and ‘Bonfire’. Like most of the showiest garden plants it hails from Brazil and in Australia it epitomises tropical and subtropical gardening. Salvia splendens grows to approximately 45cm high and although page 04 | About the garden magazine


Image supplied by

Image supplied by pma.com.au

often cultivated as an annual can be treated as a perennial in all but the coldest climates. Its large flower spikes appear year-round, especially if the old ones are removed as they fade. Salvia splendens and cultivars self-seed prolifically which is useful if you want to bulk up your stock for free or if you need to replace tatty old plants. It is one of the few salvias that performs equally well in sun and shade. Some newer varieties like Salvia ‘Heatwave‘ and ‘Wish’ Collection are more compact with a more rounded canopy and love flowering through the warmer months which make them perfect for small gardens and pots positioned on patios during the festive season.

Blue Shades

You would need about ten blue salvias to rival one red one, as the parent of the blue group of salvias, S. farinacea, is a much more slender and discrete plant than its red cousin. Cultivar names like ‘Blue Night’, ‘Blue Bedder’ and ‘Touch of Blue’ describe the wide variety of shades this delightful species displays. Some varieties sport blue stems, and because S. farinacea is the best in the genus for flower arranging, they can be used to great effect in posie arrangements. Salvia farinacea has also been hybridised to produce cream, white and blue/white flowers, all of which contrast well with the species’ characteristic greyish-green foliage. This group of salvias needs cutting back to ground level in autumn when flowering has finished and the stems have turned lank and woody. Mark the clump with a stake as the new growth sometimes takes a few weeks to appear.

Wintering flowering varieties

Finally, a plant that not only provides bright colour, but as a bonus, brings with it a delightful perfume to

the garden. Salvia dorisiana ‘Fruity Sage’ is a winter flowering salvia that is a delight to the senses on both levels. The hot pink blooms that appear from late June until early October are a true bright spark in the garden and are relished by honeyeaters of all kinds. The perfume however is emitted from the large, furry (evergreen) foliage and smells reminiscent of fruit salad which gives rise to its other common name of ‘Fruit salad sage’. This species of salvia is happiest in partial shade with moisture retentive soil. Strong pruning is recommended at the end of About the garden magazine | page 05


MEXICAN SAGE This sage variety is prized for its velvety purple flowers which stand proud of its woolly new growth. Mexican sage, S. leucantha, grows best in a warm temperate zone and its dry preferences make them suitable for Mediterranean gardens. They are hardy, tolerating droughts but prefer a good soaking in hot weather. Mexican sage will flower most of the year in a sunny spot, but their main flowering season in Spring to Autumn.

its flowering season when it will recover extremely quickly by putting on lush new growth.

Special effects

Many salvias have unusual foliage such as S. officinalis ‘Tricolor’ with pinkish cream and grey variegations, or S. officinalis ‘Purpurea Variegata’ with dark purple leaves.

SIZE

1.2mH 80cmW

Go Go ‘Scarlet’

Go Go ‘Purple’ SIZE

1.2mH 60cmW

FULL SUN

The stems and underleaves of the Mexican bush sage, S. leucantha, are almost pure white and softly hairy, which offset the purple and white woolly flowers to excellent effect. Salvia flowers come in a rainbow of violets, yellows, maroon, pinks, purples, blues, whites, creams and greens. As if this isn’t enough, some salvias such as S. ‘Black Knight’ develop persistent calyces which are as colourful, if not more so, than the flowers they support, lending a lively two-tone effect to the plant.

Salvias for soggy sites

Most salvias resent wet feet but one – S. uliginosa, revels in the soggy conditions that give rise to its common name of bog sage. This is a particularly graceful variety, sprinkled with a waft of sky blue flowers on long wands that sway in summer breezes. But be warned, its delicate appearance belies a ferocious system of fleshy underground stolons that can become a menace if allowed to spread unchecked.

page 06 | About the garden magazine

All Salvias are blooming machines. They never stop flowering. ‘GoGo’s’ are bred from Salvia splendens, a native of Brazil which has been grown in our gardens as an annual for many years. It makes a great show of spectacular colour. ‘Go-Go’ Purple’ and ‘Go-Go’ Scarlet’ make up the team of sterile plants which live for two or three years and with attention keep sending up flower spikes all year long. Salvias as a whole are splendid and showy plants. They are hardy in most situations liking strong light to grow and flower to their best. They are used in formal and informal plantings, patio and terrace plantings and large pots. In mixed garden plantings they hold their own with their large plume like heads of bracts and flowers showing up strongly amongst the shrubs around them. The actual flowers hide amongst the bracts and are pale pink to white in colour.


About the garden magazine | page 07


see what’s new and in store at your local gardening outlet Beacon ‘Coral’

‘Bright Red’

Beacon ‘White’

SIZE

30cmH 35cmW

PART SHADE

LOVES POTS

‘Orange’

‘Violet’ ‘Salmon’

page 08 | About the garden magazine


When daylilies are massed in the landscape they are a truly splendid sight, yet they also look good as individual specimens in the garden or in a pot. This means they suit gardens of all sizes and shapes, from the patio to the acreage lot; as well as all types of gardeners, from the truly dedicated to the lazy weekender. Today’s varieties flower for long periods and when not in flower, the foliage makes an attractive feature. They are not true lilies at all, nor bulbs, but herbaceous perennials which form clumps that can be divided every three years in autumn. Plant late winter/early spring in rich well composted soil and fertilise during flowering season with a instant release fertiliser - Searles Flourish for continued big blooms. Control mites and aphids with Searles Bug Beater.

‘Tangles’ is a charming disease free, low growing bush covered in large clusters of lilac blooms which flower late into the season and finish with medium sized green hips. This beautiful rose is named after a Southern Right Whale who became entangled in waters near Portland, Victoria. This rose is dedicated to the Southern Right Whale and the growing number of volunteer photographers who spend time recording sightings of these majestic mammals. Without them the work of DELWP and other conservationists to monitor the recovery of this species would be almost impossible. $2.00 from each sale of a Tangles rose will support their critical research.

SIZE

1.5mH 1mW

To read the incredible and heart-warming rescue story of Tangles visit www.treloarroses.com.au SIZE

90cmH 70cmW

LOVES POTS

The spectacular flowers of bottlebrush (callistemon spp.) like ‘Little Robyn’ (above) are irresistible to nectar-feeding birds and insects. We’ve all heard of Grevillea ‘Robyn Gordon’ as a simple garden favourite, so let us introduce you to Grevillea ‘Little Robyn’ as a more compact selection. Grevillea ‘Little Robyn’ is a small, spreading, evergreen shrub with attractive, fern-like foliage. For most of the year it bears a profusion of pinkish-red flowers. Makes an ideal screening plant or garden specimen and is a magnet to nectar eating birds. Suitable for cool temperate to sub-tropical and semi-arid climates, in well drained clay loams or sandy soils, neutral to acid pH. Feed with low phosphorus native fertiliser and prune regularly.


find these beauties at your local gardening outlet Dreameria ‘Daydream’

DRY TOLERANT

SIZE

30cmH 60cmW

FULL SUN

SIZE

5-8mH 3-5mW

Small gardens call for small shade and shelter trees, and Eucalyptus Dry White is the perfect choice. It is graceful and semi-weeping with single or several trunks, featuring clear-white to pale-grey smooth bark. The foliage is very fine allowing for winter light to penetrate, with pink new tips, and it has high levels of peppermint oil which provide a pleasant aroma on warm days. Flower buds appear for an extended period, before masses of clustered white flowers appear in late winter. A second flowering can occur in summer, much to the delight of honeyeating birds and bees. Grows in climates from cool temperate to sub-tropical and semi-arid in well drained clay loam soils of a neutral to acid nature, both inland with frost or near-coastal sites. page 10 | About the garden magazine


live green

Pothos ‘Snow Queen’ is the easiest trailing indoor plant to keep looking good. Ideal for hanging baskets and pots. Position in moderate light for the best growing conditions. Let the soil dry out before re-watering.

Monstera deliciosa or Swiss cheese plant is fast becoming one of the most sought after plants among households today! Monstera plants prefer a warm climate away from direct sunlight, and only need watering when the top few centimetres of the soil goes dry. They will also require monthly feeding in spring and summer, so be sure to get your hands on Searles Flourish Green & Growth Soluble Plant Food which is ideal for indoor plants.

STRIPE TYPE

Two indoor foliage plants with intriguing leaf patterns are the Calathea (pictured left) and the Boston Fern (right). Both are stripy in their appearance and love a well lit indirect sunny spot. Water when the soil dries out. Plant in Searles Terrarium and Fern Specialty Mix for 5 months continued feeding and deep foliage greening. About the garden magazine | page 11


Story by:

Mike Wells

‘Leafy’ greens come in all shapes, colours, sizes and in particular, tastes and flavours! Have you ever wondered what exactly is in the leafy ‘mesclun’ or similar ‘Provencal’ mixes seen on supermarkets and greengrocers’ shelves? In many cases, what’s in the (plastic) bag bears little resemblance to the true mixes from which they have supposedly originated. This spring, why not plant a true mesclun or Provencal mix in your vegie patch? The word “mesclun” (incidentally ‘Provencal’ mix is identical) is derived from the Catalan word mescler (literal translation ‘to mix’) originating from the Provence region of France. Firstly, what’s in a traditional mesclun salad? In many cases, it tends to be whatever sprouts firstly in a spring vegie garden! In reality, mesclun comprises a complex quartet of flavoursome young leaves from the following plants: chervil, roquette (rocket), lettuce and endive (sometimes called Frisee lettuce). From that base, many other mixes are created by adding the crisp, young leaves from a range of edible favourites, including spinach, beetroot, mizuna, chard, tatsoi, and a large selection of lettuce leaves from varieties such as Tango, Mâche (lamb’s lettuce), red and green oakleaf, and red and green Romaine. It’s best to begin preparing your vegie bed a few weeks before sowing your mesclun mix seed with a light cultivation and incorporation of a soil conditioner such as Searles Florigro Soil Activator, or Premium Compost Mix. The addition of Searles Kickalong Organic Vegetable & Herb Fertiliser will ensure healthy seedlings emerge soon after germination. Seed sowing a mesclun mix can be quick and easy. Pick a sunny spot in the vegie garden. Simply broadcast the mixed seed randomly page 12 | About the garden magazine

over the prepared bed, rake lightly with a steel rake, and tamp down with the flat side of the rake afterwards. Water lightly to moisten the soil, not too heavily, as you can wash the seed from the soil. Gardeners who prefer neat rows of plants may wish to plant into shallow, straight furrows. Either way, there’s really no need to thin any closely planted seeds as you’ll be harvesting young leaves before the plants reach full size. If you want to mulch your vegie bed, it’s probably best to wait until your seedlings have emerged so that they aren’t covered and restricted from emerging by the mulch material. Finely chopped lucerne is recommended as it’s easy to apply and eventually provides essential nitrogen and other nutrients as it decomposes. Keep an eye out for hungry snails and slugs, as they’ll be pretty well starved after the cooler winter days. If needed, spread Searles Snail and Slug Pellets thinly at the rate of 5g per square metre. If the previous winter has been long and dry, birds such as pesky sparrows will see the soft, green leaves in your garden and cause general havoc by eating your precious plants to the ground. Exclude birds, and even roaming cabbage white butterflies, by covering your leafy greens with 30% white shadecloth draped over plant stakes until harvest. Not only will it prevent your crop being eaten, if the spring days turn terribly hot, your tender young plants will not be burnt by the suns’ rays! It’s vital that adequate nutrition is available for rapid growth of your mesclun greens. Slow growth and hungry plants will produce bittertasting greens all round, something to be avoided at all costs. Once seedlings emerge, fertilise immediately with Searles Flourish Vegetable and Tomato Soluble Plant Food and then every 10-14 days afterwards. For


leafygreens

About the garden magazine | page 13


increased resistance to pest and disease attack, it’s also recommended to apply Searles Seamax Organic Fish & Kelp every fortnight. For continuous production, sowing your leafy green mix every 7 to 10 days apart will ensure a steady supply. Harvesting your mesclun mix is easy! Wait until the leaves are around 5-10cm in length and use scissors to simply snip them off around 2-3cm above soil level. This will leave enough of the growing crown for the plants to re-grow new leaves, for a cut-andcome-again garden! If you wish, you can allow some plants to grow to full maturity for use in other salad mixes later in the season. Wash leaves in cold water immediately after harvesting, drain them on towels or lightly pat them dry, make your salad and enjoy the freshest, crispest, most mouth-watering salad greens you’ve ever tasted!

Gardeners with limited growing space can easily raise mesclun mix, and any other leafy greens, in seedling trays, planting troughs or recycled Styrofoam boxes. Searles Herb & Vegetable Specialty Mix will be ideal for sowing your seed, as it contains both readily-available and controlled release fertilisers for up to 5 months of nutrition. It also holds adequate water for plump, juicy leaf growth as it contains peat moss, Penetraide rewetting granules and water crystals. Ensure your planter is in a sunny, protected position for maximum growth.

page 14 | About the garden magazine


Argyranthemum frutescens

um erm p s o Oste

Marguerite or federation daisies - Marguerite or Federation

daisies (Argyranthemum frutescens), remain a highly popular choice with many who enjoy cottage style gardens where they can fill in tight spaces with flashes of vibrant colour for months on end. Well suited to various Australian climatic zones.

African Daisies (Osteospurmum) are the heralds of spring. Also known as the flower of the Veldt in their native South Africa, they are often confused with their (short-lived) cousins the Dimorphotheca. No matter what you call them, their vibrant flowers provide a show that simply lights up a garden. Although similar in appearance to the Marguerite daisy, African daisies are tough contenders in the garden and can withstand growing in difficult sites including steep slopes and coastal gardens. For those in warmer parts of the country, the African daisies are often the better choice for long-term enjoyment throughout our heat-filled summer months. Gazanias - Great living mulch to carpet

the ground and help in the control of weeds. There are two distinct forms you can choose from, one that makes tight clumps and another that produces aboveground stolon’s or runners that take root as they spread.

Erigeron

The simple Erigeron, or Seaside daisy (Erigeron karvinskianus) is a delicate, yet robust daisy species and is capable of growing just about anywhere if given half a chance.

Shasta daisy - This spreading perennial is now available

in both dwarf and taller forms and makes excellent cut flowers. Flowers usually appear (depending on cultivar) from late winter through to early summer and are a favourite of butterflies and bees of all kinds.

Sunflowers - No one frowns when looking at a sunflower. As one of the most recognizable of all daisies, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is a joy to have in any garden. Easy to grow in any well-drained sunny corner, they are best grown from seed directly sown into position. Another member of the sunflower family is the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus). Edible daisies - Finally, in keeping with the ‘productive’ theme, many daisies also play a strong role in the world of herbs. Three in particular are Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea), Calendula (Calendula officinalis) and Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium).

Protect herbs, vegetables, trees and shrubs from possums, kangaroos, wallabies, rabbits, hares, bandicoots, deer, foxes and other wildlife. Protect vegetables, fruit trees, ornamentals, seedlings and buildings from cockatoos, crows, ducks, pigeons, rosellas, starlings, swallows, other birds, fruit bats and microbats. Protects homes, gardens, patios, shop fronts and paved areas from both dogs and cats or rats and mice.

Protects one plant or a whole area — perimeter &/or band sprays.

Repels — without harming animals or humans. Not considered a poison — no withholding period. Easy to use — spray on. Effective when dry. Safe, Proven and Effective. Available in 100g, 1Kg & 4Kg Sizes.

is unique. Reject products said to be "just as good", nothing is at all "like it". For more specific information send 2 x $1 stamps, Please mention your problem, post to:

D-TER, Dept. A, PO Box 3, Oyster Bay, NSW 2225. Enquiries: Phone: (02) 9589 0703 Fax: (02) 9589 0147

GG20-260/02

Headlining in spring gardens is the daisy family with easy to grow habits, making them perfect for spring garden colour.

Gazania


simple recipes made from garden kitchen produce

For more tasty recipes from the garden, visit www.aboutthegarden.com.au

page 16 | About the garden magazine


Combine flour, salt and pepper on a large plate. Lightly whisk eggs in a shallow dish. Combine breadcrumbs, parmesan, salt and pepper in a separate shallow dish. Lightly coat chicken in seasoned flour, shaking off excess, then dip in egg, followed by breadcrumb mixture, pressing crumbs on gently to coat. Add oil to a large frying pan so it is 1cm deep. Heat over medium-high heat until oil is sizzling. Cook chicken, in batches, until just cooked through. Pan fry sliced haloumi. Prepare dressing: Combine honey, vinegar and cumin in a small bowl and whisk briskly. Whisk in olive oil and season with pepper.

Combine lettuce, tomatoes and onion in a serving bowl. Toss crumbed chicken and fried haloumi through salad, drizzle dressing and sprinkle sesame seeds over top and serve immediately.

About the garden magazine | page 17


Dingy swallowtail

Story by:

Mike Wells

Grasshoppers are out and about and love dining on just about any leafy part of a plant. Like most chewing insects, they can do major damage if left unchecked. Searles Bug Beater Natural Pyrethrum Spray may control them before they reach adulthood, making them quick to jump and fly away. Otherwise, sprinkle David Gray’s Cricket and Grasshopper Killer Bait to help control the even hungrier adults. With the warmer weather comes the hatching of many kinds of voracious butterfly larvae. This is the larva of the Dingy Swallowtail or small citrus butterfly, making light work of a new lemon tree shoot. Remove by hand (wear gloves) if they are few in number, otherwise treat large outbreaks with Searles Bug Beater Natural Pyrethrum Spray.

Aphids on sweet corn

Mites of all kinds have been prevalent during the recent long dry spell. This lawn (pictured right) is infected with grass mites, their webbing a dead giveaway. They’re a little harder to spot on garden plants but a silvering of leaves is usually an indication of their presence. They hate moisture so a good soaking deters them. Use Searles Ecofend Fruit and Garden Insect and Scale for better control. Ants protect and receive sweet liquids from their live, sap-sucking buddies, the aphid, whilst surrounded by the brown, mummified bodies of the unfortunate that have fallen prey to parasitizing wasps. Try hand removal, a strong jet of water, or for out-of-control infestations, Searles Pest Gun or Bug Beater Natural Pyrethrum Spray. Controlling those protective ants will also help. Sprinkle Searles Dead Ant Pro Granules ( Bifenthrin) around and in their nests as well.

Grass mites

Azaleas are nearly always affected by this little blighter, the azalea lace bug. A sap sucker, it’s responsible for the silvering of the leaves on most varieties of azaleas in our gardens. Treat with Searles Conguard. Searles Conguard can be sprayed on the underside of leaves. Conguard is best used at dusk, to minimise impact on beneficial insects. page 18 | About the garden magazine

Azalea Lace bug on azalea


Other pests in the sap-sucking category whose numbers begin to explode at this time of year are mealybug and scale. Sometimes mealybugs are quite obvious, small white blobs, usually on soft leaves and new, tender stems of plants. Other times, you may have to go digging for them, as they love to inhabit the “hard to reach” parts of plants, such as the crowded crown of a palm, the sheathing base of soft indoor plants, even the indents in the calyx end of navel oranges. Scales usually attach themselves to the underside (occasionally upper surfaces) of leaves and plant stems, and can be black, brown, red, through to white, and in massive numbers. You may see ants and sooty mould on infected plants, a certain indication of scale, mealybugs or both! And the ants defend them from predators! Best treated with Searles Pest Gun (repeat applications may be necessary). For residual control, use Searles Conguard, sprayed at dusk. An organic alternative would be Searles Bug Beater.

Mealybug on citrus Scale

If you’re a lover of indoor plants, then the main pests from the list of previous perpetrators will include scale, mealybug, mites and sometimes caterpillars. Treat your plants similarly, with the Searles products listed earlier, but take them outside to a protected area to do so.

Bronze orange bug

Mealybug on maidenhair fern

Fruit fly on fruit

If you grow apples, pears, citrus, figs, stone fruit, tomatoes, capsicum and even chillies, then you will be cursing fruit fly very soon. If no control is attempted, devastation will surely follow! Try Searles Fruit Fly Trap, available from your local garden centre. Otherwise try exclusion bags if you are happy to fiddle a bit tying them around individual fruit, clusters or trusses. Bronze orange bugs can be a major pest of citrus trees. They will cause fruit drop and defoliation as they suck sap from the plant. Control small numbers by knocking them into a bucket of hot, soapy water. Treating with Searles Conguard or an organic spray, Searles Ecofend Fruit & Garden, will help as well. Watch out! They squirt caustic fluid so protect your skin and eyes. Oh, and they stink. About the garden magazine | page 19


spring planting and care guide

1.

A sudden bout of wet weather after a dry period can cause ripening tomatoes to split. This can also be caused by irregular watering. Keep moisture levels consistent by watering tomatoes regularly and keeping them well mulched. Water tomato plants on the roots — not the foliage. This will reduce the risk of fungal infections and will also limit water loss through evaporation.

2.

Control blackspot on pawpaw and other tropical fruit trees with Searles Copper Oxychloride. Spray all of the leaves, stems, trunk and fruit for effective results.

> For a Christmas harvest of watermelon for friends and family to devour, plant now. > Place fruit fly traps around the perimeter of your orchard or veggie garden and one trap in the centre to monitor fruit flies. The traps will kill the male flies stopping the breeding cycle and also indicate fruit flies are around. Fruit fly particularly sting the fruit of tomatoes, citrus and passionfruit. Check traps weekly. > Before planting spring veggies, mix into existing soil a good dose of 5 IN 1 Organic Fertiliser. Plant warm season vegetables such as, tomato, capsicum, beetroot, beans & carrot. In warmer areas, sweet corn, zucchini, pumpkin, cucumber and beans can also be planted from early spring. For cooler areas, hold off planting these until mid to late spring. > Plants are hungry feeders in spring. Sprinkle 5 IN 1 Organic Fertiliser Pellets around gardens, lawns and fruit trees to enrich the soil with well composted manures and nutrients for healthy organic growth. > Don’t let pests and diseases take hold. Control them early to ensure less spray will be used and the plant can continue to flourish.

Blackspot on pawpaw Prune gall wasp off citrus trees and burn or bin them to stop the breeding cycle.

Gall wa

page 20 | About the garden magazine

sp

> Spray mangoes with Searles Mancozeb fungicide after flowering to protect them from anthracnose - a common cause of fruit drop. Spray passionfruit with Searles Bug Beater, a natural pyrethrum spray to control sucking and chewing pests.


Even if you have limited garden space, a passionfruit vine can provide not only two delicious fruit crops a year but also beautiful, shiny green foliage and breathtakingly ornamental, purple and white owers. All this in a vertical growing space! Passionfruit have a climbing habit and can become very heavy when laden with fruit. They require ample room and a strong structure for support. Fences, pergolas, trellises and chook runs all make great support structures. In preparing the soil for planting, be aware that passionfruit must have excellent drainage as they are susceptible to phytophthora root rot. If drainage is a problem, add Searles Gypsum and plenty of organic matter such as Searles Premium Compost to the soil. The best time of year to plant out your vines is between October and April. Once planted, water in well with SeaMax Fish & Kelp Fertiliser and mulch thickly with lucerne or sugarcane mulch. Make sure your chosen position is in full sun and is protected from strong winds and frost. Adequate water is essential throughout the growing season. It is critical to keep the water up to your vine once fruit set has occurred and until it has ripened. Inconsistent watering will cause water stress and can result in fruit drop. For passionfruit to produce well, they need to be fed around three times throughout the growing season. Using a combination of 5 IN 1 Organic Fertiliser and Searles Fruit & Citrus Plant Food will ensure your vine has adequate nutrients for successful cropping. It is advisable not to prune your passionfruit vine too hard. If necessary, a very light trim in spring and summer can help keep it in check, size-wise. Passionfruit will produce better crops for longer if left alone. Vines are most productive and healthy in their first 3 years of life, after which time they should be replaced with new vines. Use Searles Fruit Fly Traps to control fruit fly. Pyrethrum can control fruit spotting bugs. Passion vine mite can cause your vine to lose a lot of leaves, especially during dry spells. Apply Searles Wettable Sulphur. Septoria spot, brown spot and alternata spot are fungal diseases and can be controlled using Searles Copper Oxychloride.

It is one of life’s simple pleasures to walk about in your garden in the warmer months and notice rich juicy berries ready for picking. For most the temptation is too great and they are consumed right there and then. Strawberries will crop throughout spring and summer with many varieties continuing through autumn. Raspberries are generally available throughout garden retailers in cooler climates and ready to plant in winter and depending on the variety, flower and fruit at different times from late spring to late Autumn. Support shrub with a trellis. Mulberries are hardy in most parts of Australia. They generally grow as tall as a tree, but you can prune them to remain in a shrub. Dwarf varieties suitable for pots and small gardens are available in garden centres. The red fruit develop to their distinctive purple colour quickly in early spring in tropical and sub-tropics regions and more gradually in cooler regions giving these regions an extended harvest period. Blueberries love warm days and cool nights. Depending on where you live in Australia white belled shaped flowers start appearing on the bush in spring. Then a month or two later the flowers wither and the fruit appears. As a general rule, blueberry bushes flower earlier in Queensland and Northern NSW compared to their southern states. Give berries a sunny position with good drainage and plenty of rich well composted soil. Strawberries can be planted in hanging baskets so their fruit over hang, easy to pick. For berries in pots, plant in Fruit, Citrus & Rose Specialty Mix.


spring planting and care guide

> Pandorea pandorana ‘Lemon Bells’ is a fast-growing, well-behaved native climber. In spring it becomes smothered in gorgeous yellow flowers which can persist into summer. Plant it in full sun or part shade in a reasonably well-drained soil. Great for covering fences, pergolas and latticework. Keep moist while establishing and protect from severe frost. > Butterflies are a joy to watch about the garden. Entice them to play in your garden by growing buddlejas. The large spikes of sugar-sweet flowers range in colour from indigo to butter-yellow, orange, pink, lilac and white. Hybrids with silvery grey foliage are particularly attractive. > Rhondeletia amoena, the most romantic of scented shrubs. Its billowing salmon-pink flowers appear from late winter to late spring, and are offset by deep green leaves. Rhondeletia is both reliable and easy to grow. > If a corner of your garden needs cheering up, plant a Streptosolen jamesonii, also known as browallia. This fast-growing shrub comes with either orange or yellow flowers in an intense burst during early spring. Cut it back after flowering and forget about it for the rest of the year – it’s that easy. page 22 | About the garden magazine

There are many types of azaleas suited to a range of lighting conditions from full sun positions to shaded areas. This gives an excellent range of azaleas to choose from to suit almost any area of your garden. Ask your local garden centre for the most suitable varieties. When planting azaleas, remember that they love an acidic soil, rich in organic matter. Improve the soil by planting into Searles Azalea & Camellia Potting Mix. This will give your azaleas the right mix of nutrients and pH for a great start and strong, healthy growth.

Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens ), also called ‘cherry pie’ is a small, evergreen shrub. In spring and summer, it bears purple flowers with a strong, vanilla fragrance. Give it full sun and keep it moist.

SIZE

1mH 1.5mW

Flowering: Continuous bloomer and rebloomer featuring pink star pattern on large crisp white petals. Habit: Slightly mounded habit perfect for fillers and spillers. Trails up to 80cm. Position: Plant in full sun to part shade for excellent landscape situations, hanging baskets and potted colour. Care: Self cleaning. Fertilise with Searles Flourish Flowers & Foliage Soluble Plant Food for better flower performance.


Searles is committed to improving environmental outcomes by reducing packaging, reusing material and recycling materials. Searles have been a signatory to the Australian Packaging Covenant for over 10 years and have a strong empathise on ‘Buying recycled’ and sourcing more sustainable and environmentally friendly packaging solutions for their products.

It’s easy to choose the perfect size succulent for your pot with the ‘InStyle’ Succulent categories. Simply select from the Small, Medium or Large category depending on the pot size, or Spreading if you want the plant to trail over the edges for a softened look. You can create an amazing look in your larger pots by mixing your succulents and layering different types with these size guides. We love the idea of using a ‘Thriller, Spiller and Filler’ to cover all bases and make an impressive display. Choose different colours and textures. The Thriller adds height or drama, the Filler is a bit wider and fills things out, and the Spiller is a plant that has movement and will eventually spill out of the piece. Succulents in containers will require protection from extreme heat and cold. They will need a suitable succulent potting mix that has a good component of sand, and there will need to be plenty of sunshine. You can buy a special succulent mix, such as Searles Cacti & Succulent Mix from your local plant nursery. A sprinkling of pebbles on top will help give a neat finish and anchor any loose soil down. An occasional sprinkle or mist with water is all that’s needed to keep them hydrated, and this is best done in the warmer months.

RED U

Previously, recycled content was traditionally more available on cardboard packaging and Searles have now successfully converted 100% of their shipping cartons to recycled content. No stopping there, Searles have recently CE taken further steps to collaborate with plastic manufacturers to source plastic packaging which has been produced RE with a considerable percentage of C YC L E recycled plastic. Look out for our THIS PACKAGING CONTAINS ‘Reduce, reuse and recycle’ logo RECYCLED PLASTIC. SEARLES IS COMMITED TO on many Searles bagged product IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL OUTCOMES BY REDUCING packaging of composts, potting mixes PACKAGING, REUSING & and fertilisers which contain recycled RECYCLING MATERIALS. plastic.

USE RE

Perfect for those without a garden or who only have a small space to work with, succulents love growing in pots. A potted succulent can really brighten up a balcony, patio, table or windowsill. They’re small, and easy to carry from house to house, or simply shift around for a new look.

How to recycle Searles plastic bags.

All Searles potting mix, compost, mulch and garden soil soft plastic bags can be recycled at any REDcycle participating collection centre. After use give each bag a quick rinse with water and cut the plastic down to A3 size before placing them in the REDcycle recycling collection centre, located in most major supermarkets (e.g. Coles & Woolworths). For more information on what you can recycle visit www.redcycle.net.au. Watch this space next edition for more initiatives implemented to help the environment.

As well as displaying stunning foliage colour, shape and texture, most succulents bloom with beautiful and unique flowers. Application of Searles Flourish Cacti & Succulent soluble plant food will really make them sparkle! Succulents are a special addition to your garden and home, and sure to be a talking point. Gift one to your friends and family, or treat yourself to some succulent love. About the garden magazine | page 23


Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Hervey Bay Toowoomba Warwick

Brisbane

Grafton Port Macquarie

> Lawns come alive in spring, especially after a bit of rain. Feed with Robust Lawn Booster for slow release continued feeding throughout the season. Bindii will be out in force. Repeat spray with Searles Lawn Perfect for couch lawns or Searles Buffalo Master for buffalo lawns. Repeat spray if necessary to hit the new weeds that have come out after your initial spray. > Great time to plant spring salad vegetables, such as lettuce, cucumber, rocket, beans, capsicum, spring onion and tomatoes for a quick harvest within weeks. Plant in rich well composted and nutrient enriched soil for fast growing. Searles Herb & Vegetable Specialty Mix is designed for hungry feeding vegetables. > Keep checking your mulberry tree for ripening fruit and pick regularly when they do come.

Floriade

14 September - 13 October 2019 Commonwealth Park, Canberra www.floriadeaustralia.com

Brisbane Garden & Plant Expo 5 – 6 October 2019 Brookfield Showgrounds - Brookfield plantexpo.com.au

Tulip Time Festival

24 September - 7 October 2019 Corbett Gardens, Bendooley Street, Bowral www.southern-highlands.com.au/tulip-time

> Daylilies, agapanthus and hippeastrums are in flower now. Boost flower production by watering with Searles Flourish Flowers & Foliage Plant Food every two weeks. > Azaleas, buddleja, plum gorgeous and cliveas all show their glory at the start of spring. > Most flowering annuals can be planted now. Make them flourish and produce more blooms with Searles Flourish Flowers & Foliage Soluble Plant Food. > Pineapple fruit will begin to grow. Fertilise with Searles Fruit & Citrus Plant Food to promote juicy fruit.

Kings Park Festival

September 2019 Kings Park and Botanic Garden, Perth www.bgpa.wa.gov.au

Buddleja bring a flurry of butterflies to gardens

For more information for what to grow in your climatic zone visit www.aboutthegarden.com.au page 24 | About the garden magazine


Darwin

Cairns Townsville Mt. Isa Longreach Carnarvon

Rockhampton

Emerald

Blackall

Brisbane

> Lift, divide and replant ginger in readiness for the hot wet growing season when they will take off. > Great time to plant edible ginger, turmeric and galangal. > Watch out for fruit fly. Hang Searles Fruit Fly Traps around the perimeter of your garden and orchard to control male fruit flies and stop the breeding cycle.

Name: ............................................................................... Age:

25–35

36–45

46–55

55+

Address: ........................................................................... .................................... City: ............................................ State: .............. P/code: ...................

> Spring can be a very dry season, keep the water up to plants and veggies, especially lettuce, tomatoes, ferns, etc.

Phone: ..............................................................................

> Bromeliads and cannas are looking good now. They can also be divided and replanted.

Enclosed is a cheque for:

> If you have a little room in your backyard, trying planting wet season crops such as pumpkin, zucchini and melons. Look out for powdery mildew and rust and act early. > Sow summer flowering annuals such as petunias, marigolds, zinnias, portulacas, gazanias and salvias. > Poinciana, Flame Tree, Acacias, Alloxylon flameum – Tree Waratah, Silver Trumpet Tree Tabebuia Argentea all come into full bloom in spring. Mango trees are loaded with fruit by now. Protect from stinging fruit fly by hanging fruit fly traps out now and prevent anthracnose with Searles Mancozeb.

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Spring 2019

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Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Moree Port Augusta

Perth Esperance

Adelaide

Albany

Hervey Bay

Brisbane Grafton

Armidale

Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

Moree

Port Macquarie

Tamworth Orange

Newcastle

Armidale

Port Augusta

Perth

Tamworth

Sydney

Canberra Wodonga

Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Hervey Bay Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

Esperance

Orange

Adelaide

Albany

Melbourne

Canberra Wodonga

Melbourne

Hobart

> Viburnums are wonderful shrubs to grow in spring. They are fragrant and make a great hedging plant. > Watch out for scale on citrus trees and aphids on ornamentals and ferns. Control outbreaks with Searles Ecofend Organic Fruit & Garden pest spray. Feed citrus with Searles Fruit & Citrus Food. > Indian hawthorn, Pride of Madeira, wax flower, may bush, viburnums and many callistemons are creating a floral display during spring. > For early summer crops, plant capsicum, chilli, eggplant, sweet corn and tomatoes as the frosts have passed and the temperatures warm up. > The growing vines of jasmine and wisteria are a blaze of floral displays. Don’t be afraid to prune during the season if the vines become unruly. > Azalea petal blight is a common fungal problem effecting azalea flowers. Remove petals promptly and destroy. If severe, treat plant with Mancozeb Plus and avoid watering over plant foliage and flowers. > Plant warm weather herbs - basil, chives, coriander, dill, mint, oregano, parsley, sage and thyme. > Plant pumpkins throughout spring for crops in late summer and autumn. To save space, trim the plants before fruit set for more compact fruit production. Beacons of purple pride, ‘Pride of Maderia’

> Plant prunus, viburnum, may, plum, apricot, almonds, wintersweet, daphne, crabapple, waratahs and apple trees. They look stunning in a cool-climate spring. > Give all flowering pot plants, indoor plants and gardens a dose of Searles Flourish Flowers & Foliage Soluble Plant Food to give them an instant hit of essential trace elements and fertiliser for strong spring growth. > Plant berry bushes. Blueberries are starting to appear on bushes. Liquid feed with Searles Flourish Fruit & Citrus for more yummy berries. > Feed hungry fruiting passionfruit vines with Searles Fruit & Citrus Plant Food. > Warmer weather vegetable plants such as tomato, basil, corn, zucchini, capsicum, pumpkin and watermelon can be planted now. Dig into the existing soil 5 IN 1 Fertiliser to enrich the soil with heaps of well composted manures for excellent growth. Protect plants if late frosts occur. > Repot indoor plants that have become rootbound with Searles Premium Potting Mix. This will give them a fresh start and long lasting feed for a happy, healthy year ahead. > Watch out for aphids on citrus trees and spray with Searles fully organic Ecofend Vegetable & Garden Spray.

TM

page 26 | About the garden magazine

Brisbane Grafton Port Macquarie Newcastle

Sydney


Alice Springs Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Hervey Bay

Brisbane

Esperance Albany

Adelaide

Grafton

Armidale

Port Augusta

Perth

Newcastle

Sydney

Esperance

Canberra Wodonga

Albany

Melbourne

> Time to harvest the last of winter vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower and sow climbing beans, beetroot, carrot, celery, cucumber, lettuce, okra, silver beet, snow pea, spinach, sweet corn, zucchini and tomato. > Watch out for blackspot on roses this time of year. Ensure bushes have good air movement around the branches to keep fungal problems to a minimum. > After the last of the frosts, plant warm season vegetables, such as capsicum, tomato, sweetcorn and pumpkins. > Watch out for aphids, leaf miners and leaf chewers on vegetables. Control if severe with Searles Conguard. > Mulch garden beds and vegetable patches to keep roots protected in preparation for warmer months ahead. > Strawberries can be planted now. Fertilise with Searles Flourish Fruit & Citrus Plant Food to promote better fruit. > Sturt’s desert rose is blossoming now. It tolerates dry conditions and alkaline soils. > Grevilleas and hakeas will wow the garden now with colours of the rainbow.

Adelaide

Armidale Tamworth Orange

Grafton Port Macquarie Newcastle

Sydney

Canberra Wodonga

Melbourne

Hobart

> Take a hike and visit Western Australia’s roadsides and national parks to see our country’s spectacular wildflowers.

Brisbane

Moree

Kalgoorlie

Port Macquarie

Tamworth Orange

Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

Moree Port Augusta

Perth

Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald Carnarvon

Hervey Bay Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

Hobart

> If planting flowers, use advanced potted plants to ensure a good flowering before it gets too hot (by November/December). Try petunia, vinca, cosmos, marigold, salvia, portulaca, nasturtium and zinnia. > Watch out for fruit fly that can sting and rot fruit and vegetables like citrus and tomatoes. Attach Searles Fruit Fly traps to your plants to stop their breeding cycle. > Perfect weather is still here to stay for a little while longer. Establish some Australian natives, in particular, our best flowering species the grevillea and flowering gums. Depending on your garden type and use, there is one to suit your needs. Visit your local gardening outlets for the latest in breeding cultivars and the best natives to suit your area. > Inland areas have a good climate for growing all types of herbs such as basil, rosemary, coriander, sage and oregano. > Many garden insect pests come into their active period in spring. Be vigilant for aphids, leaf miners, and leaf chewing bugs. Watch out for aphids munching on new branches of roses and citrus. Spray with Searles Bug Beater. > Watch for weeds emerging in gardens and lawns. Spray early to stop of weeds from setting seed. Time to plant vines such as watermelon, cucumber and rockmelon.

Sturt’s Desert Rose is a floral emblem for Northern Territory.

About the garden magazine | page 27


Ask for Searles quality garden products at your nearest gardening outlet. Ph: 07 5422 3000 www.searlesgardening.com.au

Profile for About the Garden Magazine

About the Garden Spring 2019 Magazine  

Great gardening advice for spring gardening in Australia. Packed with information on new release plants, easy care plants, foliage plants, s...

About the Garden Spring 2019 Magazine  

Great gardening advice for spring gardening in Australia. Packed with information on new release plants, easy care plants, foliage plants, s...