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The Serenity Prayer

TM

in autumn 19... Bromeliad family Growing strawberries Growing Peas On the table - recipe - Simple strawberry jam At your local - Flowering plants - Green life Cacti & succulent problem solver Growing cyclamen Planting spring bulbs Heavenly hoyas African Violets About autumn - Autumn native care - Autumn pest watch - Garden events - Climatic zones

Issue 88

4 8 9

Let nothing disturb thee. Let nothing affright thee Who has God. Wants for nothing. All things pass God alone suffices. God never changes. (St Teresa of Jesus) Patience gains all.

10 12 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 24 24

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference. Living one day at a time; Enjoying one moment at a time; Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace; Taking, as He did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it; Trusting that He will make all things right if I surrender to His Will; That I may be reasonably happy in this life and supremely happy with Him Forever in the next. Amen. Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will direct your paths. Proverbs 3, 5-6

Bromeliads p4

Managing Director: Conway Searle Contributors: Ashley Searle, Magazine Manager: Alana Searle Design & Layout: Alana Searle ATG Group Co-ordinator & Advertising: Jason Searle About the Garden is published seasonally by About the Garden Pty. Ltd. ABN 21 076 919 992 • 4914 D’Aguilar Highway, Kilcoy or P.O. Box 70, Kilcoy Qld. 4515 Phone: (07) 5422 3090 • Fax: (07) 5497 2287 Email: atg@aboutthegarden.com.au

African violets p21

The material appearing in About the Garden is subject to copyright. Other than as permitted by the Copyright Act, no part of this magazine may be reproduced without the permission of the publishers. No responsibility is accepted by About the Garden Pty. Ltd. for the accuracy of information contained in the text, illustrations or advertisements. Although believed to be accurately and correctly sourced, thereof disclaims any liability against itself, editor/s or employees arising from any person acting on the material herein. The opinions expressed in the magazine, or by contributors, do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher. ©Copyright 2019 About the Garden Pty. Ltd.

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Guzmania are suitable for potted specimens

The stately vriesea flower. Behind flower: guzmania.

How bromeliads like to grow Delve into the exotic world of bromeliads and see how many of our popular garden plants are classified under the bromeliad family. Originating from the tropical Americas, bromeliads come in array of fascinating florescent colours, leaf characteristics and growing habits bringing an instant touch of the tropics to the coolest and driest climate gardens. Many are epiphytes (i.e. using other plants as a non parasitic host), growing happily in a fork of a tree or on a log. page 04 | About the garden magazine

Like orchids, bromeliads use the soil they grow in more for anchorage than for sustenance. They grow very well in pots with a light, open potting mix such as Searles Cymbidium & Bromeliad Specialty Mix. They can also do well when tied into the boughs of trees. This can create extra ‘levels’ of interest in your garden, but make sure it doesn’t mean they don’t miss out on being watered during dry periods. Bromeliads come from the tropical Americas where they grow as forest under storey plants and tree-dwelling epiphytes. Most are shade lovers and need shelter from frost in very cold or mountain areas. Despite their tropical origins, they grow happily in all but the coldest and driest of climates.

Watering tips

Most bromeliads form a ‘well’ structure in their centre where water pools and acts as a reservoir which can help sustain them during dry periods. It is often a heavenly poolside retreat for frogs. Whenever this well dries up, it’s time to water them again. Although bromeliads don’t necessarily need feeding, this ‘well’ is the place to apply fertilisers if you wish. Never drop slow release fertiliser pellets into the reservoir as they will quickly dissolve and overdose your plants. An application of SeaMax Fish & Kelp at one-third strength can be the perfect food for your bromeliads. To make the most of this feature, make sure that the central cup is positioned upright.


The distinctive Aechmea fasciata

There are 250 species of aechema known to gardeners, displaying spike-like bracts extending from a centre cup. Most have broad rosettes and arching low-shaped leaves often with spiky margins. Aechmeas are relatively easy to grow, enjoy warmer temperatures and their colourful bracts last for many months. The commonly known Aechmea fasciata (pictured above) is a popular choice for enjoying long lasting displays of pretty pink bracts with small purple flowers appearing at the top and can be used as an indoor plant. Also look out for Aechmea chantinii, Aechmea fosteriana and Aechmea Del Mar.

Aechmea gamosepala - Matchstick bromeliad

Aechmea chantinii

Vriesea are easily distinguished by their sword shaped flowering spikes, with Vriesea splendens the showiest and most popular variety for indoor displays. Some vrieseas display multi-branched flowers. Vrieseas flourish in bright indirect sunlight and enjoy high humidity, warm temperatures and can tolerant cool climates as well. Like other bromeliads vrieseas are epiphytic, but can be grown in specifically designed soil mix, such as Searles Cymbidium & Bromeliad Mix.

Guzmanias are a popular bromeliad due to their inflorescent fountain forming bracts, often mistaken for the flower, sitting proud from its centre. Bracts and flowers will last for many months. Its foliage is mostly dark green creating the perfect contrasting backdrop to their luminous bracts. Naturally adapted to lower levels of light than other bromeliads, Guzmania are suitable for indoor decor displays and shadier parts of the garden. Do not expose them to direct sunlight. Guzmanias prefer warmer temperatures and humid spots. Guzmanias are naturally epiphytic, so they can be grown on a host tree or planted in a specifically designed bromeliad soil mix such as Searles Cymbidium & Bromeliad Mix. If anchoring on a tree, secure the roots firmly around the host as the bracts can be top heavy. Water guzmanias through their centre ‘tank’, the area where the leaves form a cup at the base of the plant to preserve the life of the bract.

Most common guzmania is the Guzmania lingulata

Like most other bromeliads, guzmanias will die after flowering, but new pups form before it dies, awarding you new plant and bracts for the next season. The pups can also be gently removed and transplanted elsewhere. About the garden magazine | page 05


Making up one of the largest in the bromeliad hybrid is the diverse range of Neoregelia. Noted for their showy and varying foliage colours and markings, their distinctive open vase-shaped wells at their centre are a haven for frogs. Their flowers are insignificant, barely sitting above the well of water, but they are generally grown for their foliage attributes and easy care nature. Given plenty of bright light, young green pups gradually change foliage colour and display their signature bright colours as they mature. Modern neoregelias can exhibit varying different markings, from spots, mottling, banding or variegated leaves and ranging assorted sizes for all types of garden applications. These bromeliads do require some sunlight or bright light to morph into their stereotypical hallmark colours. Plant neoregelias in Searles Cymbidium and Bromeliad Mix in the garden or in pots for a ideal open soil mix and nutrient balance for growing healthy bromeliads. Keep water in their ‘well’ and flush out the well periodically to remove stagnant water and bacteria.

The most noted neoregelia hybrid is the most distinguishable ‘Blushing Bromeliad’ Neoregelia carolinae

Propagating bromeliads

Bromeliads can be grown from seed, but this is the most time-consuming method of propagating them. Most bromeliads are propagated from ‘pups’. After the mother bromeliad flowers, it will die, but subsequent offsets or ‘pups’ will grow and can be cut away from the mother plant and replanted when they are about 15cm high.

Typically, billbergia can be identified by their narrow channelling of foliage from the centre. Its flower spike extends from the middle in a pendulous form with often spotted or banded rosette foliage patterns. Billbergia easily clump well at the base of trees and are easy to grow for all gardeners. Their flower spikes are Billbergia beautiful but short lived. Their inflorescence and flowers can grow in varying colours from red andAspidistra pinks to purples and blues. Billbergias tolerate most Australian ‘Starry Sky’ climates where strong frosts are not present. page 06 | About the garden magazine

‘Pups’ can be planted in pots, in a borough of a tree or mass planted in gardens. Use a specifically designed bromeliad mix containing controlled release fertiliser, flower booster potash and water efficiency properties. Searles Cymbidium & Bromeliad Mix is perfect to use as a garden soil mix or for potted specimens.

Note for indoor Bromeliads

Because most bromeliads enjoy shady conditions, they can make ideal indoor plants, although they will still enjoy a period in outdoor shade from time to time in order to rejuvenate.


Cryptanthus

Wavy, star-shaped foliage of cryptanthus have low-spreading rosettes.

Alcantarea

Have extremely large rosettes.

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Protects one plant or a whole area — perimeter &/or band sprays.

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Tillandsias are a first cousin to the bromeliads that are mostly grown and are true ‘air plants’. There are many forms in cultivation and most produce brightly coloured appealing blooms on delicate flower spikes directly from the centre of each plant. These are extremely easy to grow and can be simply attached to pieces of wood and hung in position or even in a vertical wall situation combined with orchids and other small bromeliads. Fully adaptable to both full sun and light shade, Tillandsias truly bring strong fascination to a garden scene and are highly popular with the younger generation for their novel appearance. The most well-known of all species is the old fashioned ‘Old Man’s beard’ (Tillandsia usneoides) with its attractive silver grey fine foliage cascading over low branches or wooden fences. This form is eagerly utilised by many smaller bird species that use it as nesting material and in turn unwittingly spread this species to many neighbouring branches of trees and shrubs. In nature, tillandsias capture heavy dew on their fine foliage so do not require heavy watering to survive. During the heat of summer, simply splashing water over the plants is more than enough to ensure a gradual colonisation can occur.


Everyone loves strawberries, and anyone with a reliable patch of sunlight can grow them! Here’s how to have your own supply of sweet, fragrant, vitamin-packed strawberries.

Buying

When buying a strawberry plant, consider its cropping season, because they’re not all the same. Some crop predominantly in the spring, others continue through summer and into autumn. Planting a range of varieties can greatly extend your harvest.

Planting

Strawberries need full sun and love a welldrained, slightly acidic soil that is rich in organic matter. To improve the soil, add plenty of 5 IN 1 Organic Fertiliser to the soil before planting and dig it in thoroughly. Don’t plant strawberries too deep — they should be no deeper in the soil than they were in the punnet. They will mound and spread as they grow, so give them space. As a guide, rows of strawberries should be planted about 75cm apart with 30cm between plants. (Overcrowding them can result in a reduced crop, so don’t be greedy by planting too many!)

page 08 | About the garden magazine

Strawberries in pots

Strawberries grow beautifully in hanging baskets, pots, strawberry planters or wine barrels and look gorgeous on a sunny deck or verandah. This also benefits the fruit, as the fruit spills over the edges making them easy to reach and protects the fruit from the soil. Growing them in pots is also a great solution if space is limited or you have poor soil. Grow in Searles Platinum Potting Mix for easy results.

Feeding

Straight after planting, give strawberries a good watering and feed them with a half-strength application of SeaMax Fish & Kelp. To produce the amount of fruit required for a healthy crop, feed them as you would a hungry teen boy - often. Continue feeding every two weeks with a potassium rich instant fertiliser such as Searles Flourish Fruit & Citrus Soluble Plant Food throughout the growing season for a bumper crop.


Watering

Strawberries are shallow-rooted, so mulch them well and keep them well-watered — especially in very hot or dry weather. Strawberries in pots need to be watered more frequently — once every day in normal conditions. Laying straw around the base of each plant will help control weeds and keep the roots from overheating in the sun. It can also stop the fruit coming in contact with the soil, which can rot them.

Propagating

Strawberries can be easy to propagate as they often grow runners. To create new plants, peg the runners down — still attached to the parent plant — until new roots form, then snip them off and plant them in a new location. (If you don’t want more plants, remove the runners immediately to give the parent plant more energy for fruiting.)

Sweet, crunchy peas straight off the vine can be the ultimate winter treat — and they are so easy to grow! Being a climber, snow pea and pea plants will need a trellis to grow onto. It’s easiest to install this before planting so as not to risk damaging young plants. Ready-made trellises can be bought from garden centres. They can also be constructed from 3 or more tall sticks wound together with twine and meeting at the top to create the shape of a teepee. As peas are tall plants, any trellis should stand at least 1.8m high. Peas prefer to be sown in their final position. Find a position in full sun and cultivate the soil by digging in Searles Kickalong Vegetable & Herb Organic Plant Food. For peas in pots, grow in Searles Herb & Vegetable Mix. Plant peas about 9cm apart and (for seeds) 35mm deep. Although peas grow better in the cool season, young plants will need protection from frost and plants won’t flower until frosts have passed.

for pots

Peas, like other legumes, produce their own fertiliser (nitrogen) so they usually require very little nurturing. Searles Liquid Potash can be applied to boost flower and pod production. Feeling like a healthy snack? Munch away! The more peas you pick, the more they will produce, so harvest them as soon as they reach their full size.

1.

Pick strawberries as soon as they’re ripe — you’ll beat the birds and insects to it. Snipping them off with scissors makes it easier not to squash them. Strawberry plants will perform at their prime for about 3 years, after which time they should be replaced. Strawberry plants can be covered with hand-made cages to protect them from birds.

Being an annual crop, peas will die at the end of their season. When they have finished, plant leafy vegetables (such as lettuce, silver beet, cabbage or broccoli) in their place. If you’re not growing vegetables, any plants that grow lush, leafy foliage will benefit from being planted in a previous pea bed. This is because the nitrogen that peas ‘fix’ in the soil is an important nutrient for healthy foliage growth in other plants, so rotating crops in this way can make the most of this natural boost of nutrients. Don’t allow peas to flop off the trellis or they may become spoilt by soil or infected with fungus. Fungus can also be a problem in humid conditions, in which case water only in the mornings and rotate crops to limit contamination. Protect young seedling from birds.

About the garden magazine | page 09


For more tasty recipes from the garden, visit www.aboutthegarden.com.au

page 10 | About the garden magazine


In a medium-sized pot, add mashed strawberries, sugar and lemon juice, stir constantly while bringing to the boil. Continue boiling until the mixture reaches 100°C on the jam thermometer and thickens (approximately 30 minutes). While mix thickens, sterilise jars and lids in boiling water. Fill thickened jam mix into clean jars immediately, seal and let cool. Store jars in the fridge. Once open use as soon as possible.

Serve immediately on your favourite bread, scones or use as a cake filling.

About the garden magazine | page 11


find these beauties at your local gardening outlet

> > > > > > >

PART SHADE

FULL SUN

Flowering: Their perfumed flowers are almost constant year round in most climates. Attracts butterflies and small birds. Size: Its dwarf habit is well behaved, growing only to a metre in height with little pruning needed. Position: Easy to grow in sunny to semi-shaded positions. Buddlejas will not tolerate heavy frosts. Great for large pots, massed plantings or in a mixed garden. Care: Plant in well composted soil mixed with 5IN1 Organic Fertiliser. Trim back the older growth when flowers are showing signs of slowing down and getting smaller.

sedum pelargoniums daisies heleniums rudbeckias hydrangeas cyclamens

SIZE

45cmH 50cmW

page 12 | About the garden magazine

PART SHADE

FULL SUN

LOVES POTS


FULL SUN

COASTAL

CUT FLOWERS

Of all autumn-flowering shrubs, there are few that rival the sasanqua camellia in its beauty or flowering performance. They are among the hardiest and most versatile of the camellias and can happily grow in full sun. The key to growing them successfully is in getting the soil right. Plant in a mix specifically designed for camellias, such as Searles Azalea & Camellia Specialty Mix.

‘Marge Miller’ is a groundcover sasanqua

SIZE

60cmH 50cmW

FULL SUN PART SHADE

DRY TOLERANT

Image & information courtesy of Plants Management Australia www.pma.com.au


SIZE

30cmH 30cmW

FULL SUN

PART SHADE

SIZE

25cmH 30cmW

LOVES POTS

FULL SUN

Flowering: The bi-colour yellow and orange flowers are borne in profusion all through the season. In warmer areas they flower right through the year. Their flowers are larger and longer flowering than other varieties available. Position: They grow best in full sun. Small shrub with soft, fern like foliage. The bright golden splashes of colour contrast against other smaller shrubs and flower borders. Plant in pots for patio colour and garden pot combinations. Prune back lightly if any branches become too leggy.

FULL SUN

LOVES POTS

page 14 | About the garden magazine

plant with lots of bright It is hard to find a great ve an improved version blue flowers. Here we ha spreading in its habit, of Evolvulus, dwarf and . which flowers its head off ent in frost

s a statem Position: This plant make

free gardens. h good Care: Keep soil moist wit red garden pa drainage. Any well pre suitable. be l wil e in sun to semi-shad with s ek we two ery ev Liquid feed e iag Fol rs & Searles Flourish Flowe nt pla the ep ke to Soluble Plant Food flowering.


Dazzling colour for indoor spaces and shady spots in the garden.

Image & information courtesy of Plants Management Australia www.pma.com.au

Many cordylines have big colourful foliage

Acacia ‘Limelight’

Produces fine compact foliage

FULL SUN PART SHADE

COASTAL

SIZE

30cmH 50cmW

‘Feather Falls’ is a highly decorative Carex with outstanding garden and pot performance. The long clean and crisp foliage will reward you with a year round maintenance free plant. A highlight of this new variety is its beautiful plumes of feathery flower stems that emerge from the centre of the fresh new variegated foliage during the spring months.

Check out Senecio ‘Blue Chalk Sticks’. Upright narrow fleshy leaves in a vivid blue colour, adding an amazing design edge to your garden. People will stop and marvel as they walk down your garden path. It would look lovely tucked around some stepping stones, in the corners of natural stairs, or anywhere bare that needs a bit of interest. Match and layer your landscape with contrasting burgundy-leaved plants for a stylish design. About the garden magazine | page 15


This echeveria is affected by sooty mould

page 16 | About the garden magazine


let your cyclamen sit in a saucer of water permanently — this will cause a yellowing of the leaves, rotting of the stems, and eventual death of the plant.

How do you brighten up your indoor sanctuary with colour or spread the love when temperatures fall? Cyclamen are the perfect plants for living life indoors or shady areas in winter. They have a long, continuous flowering period — usually from May until October and make ideal living gifts to the recipient to enjoy for many months. They are available in a rich tapestry of colours, ranging from white to pink, red and mauve. Some are even bicoloured. The leaves come in a range of shapes and patterns. A cyclamen’s foliage is so pretty and distinctive that it can be worth growing for its foliage alone.

Cyclamen appreciate a feed with a liquid fertiliser. If done fortnightly with Searles Flourish Soluble Fertiliser, cyclamen should continuously bloom until mid-spring. Another way to promote plentiful, longlasting blooms is to remove the spent flowers. A spent cyclamen flower should never be cut off. Instead, remove tired blooms and stems by gently twisting them off at the base and pulling them away from the main bulb. Cyclamen grow from a tuber or corm and tend to die down during our hot, humid summer. If you are lucky though and find a cool, dry, shady spot in the garden they can continue to grow. If your cyclamen do die down, keep them in a cool, dry, shady position and water sparingly and hope they reappear in the cool months again.

Cyclamen aren’t fussy: ‘Treat ‘em cold, keep ‘em beautiful!’ Even though cyclamen grow fantastically indoors, they love the cold; it seems to refresh and revitalise them. Plant them in a potting mix like Searles Cyclamen & African Violets Mix, specifically designed for their special needs. Every few days give your cyclamen a drink and put them outside for the night. Keep them away from ‘hot spots’ such as heaters and fireplaces; the flowers will soon droop if kept in a room that is too warm. They will appreciate the cold, frosty night more than us! Never

About the garden magazine | page 17


hoya carnosa

Australia can hoya austr lay claim to the p re alis - Nati ve wax flo ttiest Hoya, wer.

Hoyas will quickly become a gardeners favourite after they experience their hardiness and scented pendulous blooms during the warmer months. With many variations available to suit different climatic zones and large pendulous blooms, this hardy evergreen climber will grow on you. Most commonly grown, and familiar to many as the wax flower, the Hoya carnosa is easy to grow. Australia can claim to the Hoya australis, having many derivatives around the country with each showing small differences in leaf and flower shape and colour.

Location

Naturally found in Northern parts of Australia, Americas, Pacific islands and parts of Asia they will no doubt flourish well in tropical and sub-tropical zones. Surprisingly they will grow well in most parts of Australia where the winter is mild or can be protected from heavy frost preferring to bask in a warm position. Varieties of hoyas vary with some suitable for cooler regions. Try the popular varieties Hoya carnosa, Hoya australis, etc. Being epiphytic, Hoyas have small roots, traditionally living high in trees feeding from rotting leaf matter. Their small root requirements make them perfect for pots. They don’t mind at all being root bound in a small pot. If planting them in the ground, provide them with a trellis or climbing vessel to happily trail along. Keep their growing media free draining. Ideally, plant hoyas in Cymbidium & Bromeliad Specialty Mix. This mix has open free draining properties and contains a 4 month fertiliser for flower boosting. page 20 | About the garden magazine

LOVES POTS

Lighting

Hoyas flourish in very bright light, in dappled shade areas and under patios in warmer zones. In southern, cooler zones they will tolerate more sun exposure in winter. They do require some sunlight to flower well. Morning sun or dappled shade are ideal positions for flowering. Protect from harsh summer sunlight.

Watering

Coming from the tropics, naturally hoyas require wet, humid summers and drier winters. Water well in the warmer months and a little less during the winter months.

Fertilising

Feeding hoyas before their flowering season and during flowering will greatly encourage more blooms. Feed at half rate with Searles Flourish Orchid Booster Soluble Plant Food.

Flowering

Expect flowering to occur during the warmer months of the year from October right through to April. Hoyas produce flowers from peduncles protruding from the same stem junction every year, so it is important not to cut the flowers off after they finish flowering. They will drop off on their own. In addition to older flower heads, new growth will form every year, creating new peduncles.


Watering

When watering African Violets, allow the potting mix to become reasonably dry before the next watering (but not completely dried out to the point the plants foliage is wilting!). Apply water to the soil surface or from the bottom-up using the saucer below the potted container. DO NOT WET the foliage or leave water droplets on the leaves as this can cause leaf marking and spotting.

Fertilising

African Violets require specially formulated fertiliser to promote healthy growth and most importantly, abundant flowers. Searles Flourish Flowers & Foliage, is an ideally suited soluble fertiliser. Apply this (following instructions) to the potting mix every two to four weeks from spring though to autumn. DO NOT fertilise in the cooler cold weather, as African Violets are usually actively growing in temperatures of 18 degrees Celsius and above.

Location

African Violets require moderate to bright indirect light all year round to encourage flowering. A well lit kitchen bench or coffee table is perfect. They also prefer humidity in the atmosphere (thus why they are ideal for terrarium environments). This is not usually a problem except in dry climates, if the room has a air-conditioner in use or during winter when indoor heaters dry the air inside the house.

Re-potting

African Violets need to be re-potted about once a year to maintain healthy and strong growth and promote continued flowering. A sign that your African Violet requires repotting is if there is increased stem length from soil level to lower leaves. When re-potting, use Searles Cyclamen & African Violet Mix. Replant your African Violet so the lower leaves are only just above the potting mix level. New roots will grow from the stem of the plant that is now below the soil. Water the mix and keep the plant away from strong light for three to four weeks, then move it back to its favoured position.

Remove spent flowers to redirect growth into producing more blooms.

About the garden magazine | page 21


Scale

Myrtle Rust

Many varieties of Pelargoniums flower well in Autumn

Planting natives in Autumn gives them time to establish their roots and settle in before the winter months and ready for spring growth. Plant in Searles Native Plant Specialty Mix for the right nutrient ratio for these low phosphorous plants.

> Sow sweet peas before Anzac Day. Give them a trellis for support and a rich soil full of well composted manure. They make pretty posies for indoor decor.

Natives are susceptible to scale during autumn. Look out for evidence of these insects on leaf stems and branches on bottlebrushes (Callistemon and Melaleuca), lilly pillys (Syzygium), emu bushes (Eremophila) and wax flowers (Philotheca).

> Trim bougainvilleas if they have grown out of control during summer.

Myrtle Rust is an insidious disease arriving in Australia in 2010, rapidly setting about infecting a broad range of Aussie natives in the Myrtaceae family, including Syzygium, Callistemon, Melaleuca, Austromyrtus, Leptospermum, Agonis, and many other genera grown as ornamental garden plants. Symptoms include red and purple discolouration on leaves, with the fruiting bodies being quite distinct bright yellow pustules on the new growth, causing distortion, then death of the foliage. Control – Avoid close planting, replace susceptible species with resistant varieties. If treatment is required use a registered This t’ product such as Searles Scaevola albida ‘White carpe native flourishes in coastal areas, Mancozeb Plus. rockeries, as ground cover and displays well in hanging baskets.

page 22 | About the garden magazine

> The most compact form of tibouchina available at about 60cm high, Groovy Baby, is very hardy and easy-care. It has low water needs and bears large, vibrant purple flowers throughout the warmer months. Plant it in full sun or part shade in a moist, well-drained soil. Give it occasional, deep waterings during extended periods of heat. > Sow autumn loving beauties like mandevillas, petunias, buddlejas, grevilleas, tibouchinas, orchids, sweet peas, pansies, violas, snapdragons, lobelias, cyclamen, marigold and nasturtium, geraniums, red hot pokers, salvias, camellias sasanquas, dahlias and plumbago.

Tibouchina ‘Groovy Baby’ are an easy compact form to grow.


> Autumn is the time to harvest the last of the summer edibles and time to plan for cooler weather vegetables and herbs such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage, broad beans, brussel spouts, snow peas, onions and leeks. > Fig fruit are forming now. It is also a great time to plant a fig tree, whether in the ground or in a large pot, plant in Searles Fruit, Citrus & Rose Specialty Mix for the correct nutrient balance for producing succulent figs and an abundant crop. > Now that the last of the summer heat has passed, plant some quick sprouting greens for a culinary supply until the slower growing winter crops have time to produce a harvest. Micro greens, lettuce, dwarf beans, Asian greens (pak choy and chinese cabbage), sprouts, spring onions, peas, rocket and leafy herbs will produce a crop within weeks. Tip: plant seedlings for quicker produce. Ideal for small areas and in pots for easy reach. Plant in Searles Herb & Vegetable Specialty Mix for excellent deep green leaf growth.

White scale

Mealybug

> Time to plant a few rows of beetroot. Grow them in sweet well drained soil and full sun. Sow in early March for a mid May crop. > With the milder weather here plant new citrus trees, passionfruit vines and strawberries. Plant in Searles Fruit, Citrus & Rose Specialty Mix for the right nutrient balance to establish themselves leading up to the winter months. Prune lower branches and dead branches to concentrate new growth into new branches and flowering.

Citrus leaf miner

Fruit Fly

Scale is an immobile, sap-sucking insect which can seriously weaken plants if it colonises them in great numbers. Like scale, mealybug sucks sap from plants and can weaken or kill plants in severe cases. Citrus leaf miner is a tiny insect that tunnels through the inside of leaves as it feeds. Control infestations of these pests with Searles Conguard or Searles Pest Gun.

Fruit y infests fruit with its maggot-like larvae and is a major pest in warm climates. Hanging Searles Fruit Fly Traps around your trees breaks the breeding cycle by trapping all male fruit ies in the area.

About the garden magazine | page 23


Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Hervey Bay Toowoomba Warwick

Brisbane

Grafton Port Macquarie

> Tomato seedlings can still be planted early autumn for an extra crop of your favourite tomatoes. > Prune summer flowering plants to encourage a generous flush of new growth when the new flowering season starts. > Brush up on your herb knowledge at the QLD Herb Awareness Fair, Sunday 26th May at Albion Peace Hall, Windsor - www.qldherbsociety.org.au > Harvest mature macadamias nuts from the ground from February through to May. Remove their green outer husk and keep them in a dark dry place to preserve their freshness. > Powder puff tree (Calliandra haematocephala) is a 2-3m tree which displays crimson fluffy flowers in autumn.

Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show

27th March - 31 March 2019 Royal Exhibition Building & Carlton Gardens www.melbourneflowershow.com

Herb Awareness Fair

Sunday 26th May 2019 Albion Peace Hall, 102 McDonald Road, Windsor www.qldherbsociety.org.au

Garden Releaf Day

Sunday 24th March Check with your local garden outlets for details www.gardenreleaf.com.au

> Sow snow peas mid autumn. For a continued harvest plant a follow up crop a month later. > Look out for the Queensland Fire Wheel trees flowering now. Their flowers form dense clusters of wheel-shaped bright red blooms with a backdrop of glossy evergreen leaves. > Time to lift and divide agapanthus, daylilies and clivias. > Prune mango trees after fruiting to reduce its size for a more manageable harvest next season.

Brisbane Plant Collectors Fair

1st - 2nd June 2019, Rocklea Showgrounds

Brisbane Garden & Plant Expo

Saturday 16th - Sunday 17th March 2019 Doomben Racecourse, Hampden St, Ascot

Red powder puff

For more information for what to grow in your climatic zone visit www.aboutthegarden.com.au page 24 | About the garden magazine


Darwin

Cairns Townsville Mt. Isa Longreach Carnarvon

Emerald

Rockhampton

Blackall

Brisbane

> Plant tomato, cucumber and zucchini seedlings. > Colour up your garden this autumn with a mix of calendula, dianthus, pansy, zinnia, gerbera, snapdragon, petunia, sunflower, nasturtium and marigolds. Plant in Searles Garden Soil Mix for gardens or Searles Platinum Potting Mix for great potted results. > Tidy up summer growing plants such as heliconia, ginger, calathea, maranta and cannas by pruning dead stems from the ground level first to concentrate new growth for the next season. Divide if desired and replant for new gardens.

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> Sow or plant herb seedlings in a large pot of Searles Herb & Vegetable Mix. Autumn weather is mild and favourable to plant oregano, thyme, dill and savoury.

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> Grasshoppers are on the hop at this time. Hand pick them off at dawn or spray them on contact with the natural pyrethrum spray, like Searles Bug Beater.

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> Protect paw paw from blackspot by spraying with Searles Wettable Sulphur at first sight of disease. > Watch out for armyworm and lawn grubs that can eat the roots of your grass and create large patches of dead grass in the lawn. Control them with Searles Dead Grub Pro when they first appear.

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Autumn 2019

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Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Moree Port Augusta

Perth Esperance

Adelaide

Armidale Tamworth Orange

Hervey Bay

Brisbane Grafton

Brisbane

Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

Moree

Port Macquarie

Esperance Albany

Melbourne

Grafton

Armidale

Port Augusta

Perth

Newcastle

Port Macquarie

Tamworth

Sydney

Canberra Wodonga

Albany

Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Hervey Bay Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

Orange

Adelaide

Newcastle

Sydney

Canberra Wodonga

Melbourne

Hobart

> Feed azaleas and camellias in readiness for the next flush of blooms. Searles Azalea & Camellia Plant Food is perfectly designed for these big bloomers. > Feijoas are fruiting now. Give them a fortnightly feed with Searles Flourish Fruit & Citrus Soluble Plant Food for better produce. Feijoas can be grown to form a tall hedge. > Encourage passionfruit to fruit by applying a bloom booster such as Searles Liquid Potash. > Autumn delivers stunning foliage colours in rich red, yellows and burgundy. Now is a great time to choose a tree. Enquire at your local gardening outlet. > Tibouchinas are in bloom now. > Trim overgrown summer bougainvillea growth. Cut back to desired size. > Figs put on a flush of fruit in Autumn. Net fruits with an animal friendly netting to safe guard against birds and bats who quickly know when the fruit is ripe for picking. Harvest regularly and fertilise with Searles Fruit & Citrus Plant Food to keep the hungry feeders happy. > Powdery mildew can destroy crepe myrtles, begonias, dahlias and roses. Remove and bin affected leaves and spray promptly with Searles Wettable Sulphur. > Plant spring flowering bulbs.

> Olives grow well in cold winters and dry summers, making them perfect to plant in this climate. Olive trees can be grown as medium size trees (4-6m) or grown in large pots to be featured around patios and entertaining areas. Plant in a quality soil which provides excellent drainage. They don’t like wet feet. Pruning is essential to promote new growth. Harvest olives from late April to early spring. > Prune roses to encourage new growth. Fertilise with Searles Rose & Flower Plant Food for their next flowering flush. > Sow sweet peas in a sunny spot. > Harvest the rest of your summer produce such as pumpkin and capsicum. > Clean up lavender for autumn new growth. > Plant your winter vegies now for a long crop of edibles. Plant beans, beetroot, cabbage, capsicum, carrot, cauliflower, cucumber, English spinach, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, onion, parsnip, pumpkin, radish, silver beet, spring squash, swede, sweet corn, tomato, turnip and zucchini. Prepare vegie patch two weeks prior with 5 IN 1Ž Organic Fertiliser to give your produce the best results. Keep up the water and remove weeds from around the base of the plant to keep the plant performing optimally. > Repeat spray peaches, nectarines and almonds with Searles Copper Oxychloride to curb peach leaf curl.

Powdery mildew on crepe myrtle.

TM

page 26 | About the garden magazine

For more information for what to grow in your climatic zone visit


Alice Springs Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald

Moree

Esperance Albany

Grafton

Adelaide

Moree

Kalgoorlie

Port Macquarie

Sydney

Esperance Albany

Adelaide

Newcastle

Sydney

Canberra Wodonga

Melbourne

Hobart

Hobart

> Banksia Cherry Candles (Banksia spinulosa dwarf selection) is an easy-care, compact shrub (up to 50cmH x 90cmW) and ideal in gardens or large containers. It flowers from late summer to winter. Suitable for cool temperate to tropical semi-arid climates, Cherry Candles tolerates light frosts and first line coastal conditions. Only use a fertiliser specialised for Australian natives like Searles Native Plant Food. Plant in full sun in moist, well-drained soil.

> Plant olive, fig, citrus and loquat trees. Mix into existing soil some 5 IN 1 Organic Fertiliser, water well and mulch after planting.

> Start planting winter vegetables after the worst of the heat has passed. Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and silverbeet can all be planted in a rich well manured mix of Searles Herb & Vegetable Mix.

> Plant garlic cloves and onion seedlings.

> Clean up summer flowering plants for continued flowering and new dense foliage.

Port Macquarie

Tamworth Orange

Melbourne

> By mid autumn, start fertilising fruit & citrus trees with Searles Fruit & Citrus Plant Food. This plant food releases fertiliser slowly to supply balanced nutrients to the roots over the next few months to promote flowering and fruiting.

Grafton

Armidale

Port Augusta

Perth

Newcastle

Canberra Wodonga

Brisbane

Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

Tamworth Orange

Hervey Bay

Brisbane

Armidale

Port Augusta

Perth

Rockhampton Gladstone

Emerald Carnarvon

Hervey Bay Toowoomba Warwick

Geraldton

> Harvest summer produce and store correctly to preserve shelf life. > Look out for autumn garden plant pests such as scale, fruit fly, citrus leaf miner and mealybug. > Plant beetroot, broccoli, carrot, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage, endive, lettuce, leeks, onion, silver beet, shallots, snow pea and spring onion. > Harvest pomegranates as they mature. Wait until they split and store them indoors.

> Now is a great time to plant citrus trees before the cooler weather arrives. > Australian natives and wildflower seeds are popular to plant this time of year, such as aloes, gazanias, salvias and pigfaces. > Replant tired potted plants into a premium potting mix which contains fertiliser to rejuvenate, such as Searles Premium Potting Mix.

> Plant winter annuals such as panises, violas, poppies, snapdrgaons, primulas and cinerarias. > Cymbidium orchids are flowering now until spring. Place them in a sunny position protected from strong winds, hail and frost. Liquid fertilise prior to flower bud formation and up to and during flowering with Searles Flourish Orchid Bloomer every 7 to 14 days. Water diluted mix over foliage and potting mix.

Autumn is harvest time for olives and also a great time to plant one.

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About the Garden Autumn 2019 Magazine  

Great gardening advice for autumn gardening in Australia. Packed with information on new release plants, easy care plants, foliage plants, c...

About the Garden Autumn 2019 Magazine  

Great gardening advice for autumn gardening in Australia. Packed with information on new release plants, easy care plants, foliage plants, c...