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USER MODE TOOL RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009 OVERVIEW

USER MODES

BEHAVIORS

NEEDS

OPPORTUNITY

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

When it comes to dinner planning, busy moms exist in four self evaluation modes. While moms are not bound to only one self-evaluation mode, each mode is characterized by specific behaviors with specific needs.

The data can be accessed at any point. Enter through: •b  ehaviors to diagnose the selfevaluation mode of a mom •n  eeds to determine criteria for succesful solutions •m  odes to understand how each mode relates to another


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OPPORTUNITY INSIGHT

Moms base their self-evaluation on perception not reality

OPPORTUNITY

Close gap between perception and reality Women put a lot of thought into planning dinner for their families, yet rarely have the ability to truthfully evaluate the outcomes of their dinner planning. Curves has a large opportunity to help moms close the gap between their perceptions of their actions and their actual actions.

Enable moms to use their own judgement Though busy, mom’s have strong opinions about what nutritional behavior is “right” and what behavior is “wrong”. The opportunity doesn’t lie in Curves imposing a scale of right or wrong behaviors, but instead in enabling individual women to more accurately use their own scale.

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009V


OPPORTUNITY

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USER MODES Larger the gap, larger the opportunity

Click on the different quadrants to explore each mode

The Chronic justifier and the Harsh evaluator should be Curves’ initial target audience. They were the largest groups we found in our research and show the biggest discrepancy between perception and reality.

Busy moms exist in four self-evaluation modes Positive perception of actions

Chronic justifier

Proud provider

Defeated worker

Harsh evaluator

Negative perception of actions

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Remember not to impose a external scale of right and wrong on moms, instead help align moms’ actions with their own goals. Actions well aligned with goals

Actions misaligned with goals

Axis are based on moms self reports

Remember that the mode names are based on moms’ self evaluations and not on an external measurement of success.


OPPORTUNITY

NEEDS

BEHAVIORS

USER MODES

HOME

USER MODES Click on the different quadrants to explore the other modes

Click on the behaviors and needs below to see more

Harsh evaluator I dismiss many of my dinner efforts and believe there is always more I should be doing.

I have a negative perception of my actions as they map to my dinner planning goals My actual actions are successful in reaching my dinner planning goals

To identify me, look for these behaviors:

Successful solutions will provide me with:

Remember:

Devaluing dinner time

Rewards for my efforts

I am unaware of the amount

During dinner Alyssa’s children came and went, she explained to us that this was normal, dinner often last several hours because people are getting up to break for reading, work or phone calls.

- moments of celebration and appreciation

dinner planning. I’ve grown

Prioritizing my family over me Sofia served dinner for her family, but because of her baby’s early sleep schedule she told us, she was going to have to let her food get cold tonight, actually she said this was pretty common.

-a  cknowledgement and validation of modern day tensions - a objective view of my actions - the ability to track and monitor my actions

Allowing guilt to push me to do extra work

of work I am putting into accustomed to my overbearing responsibilities that I no longer notice how many I am balancing. Eventually something has to give and I’d prefer it to be me than my family, as I feel guilty that I can’t handle it all.

Sona described pre-prepared meals as cheating, even after admitting it probably would be as healthy and much easier, she told us it felt like cheating, that she was driven by a deep guilt to cook and prepare a full meal for her family, because she knows how to.

Lacking ability to recognize positive actions Sofia shared her goal of cooking more home cooked meals and adding more variety. Moments later she told us a typical dinner involved her cooking four different meals from each member of the family.

smartaction

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Final presentation 10.05.2009

Chronic justifier

Proud provider

Defeated worker

Harsh evaluator


OPPORTUNITY

NEEDS

BEHAVIORS

USER MODES

HOME

USER MODES Click on the different quadrants to explore the other modes

Click on the behaviors and needs below to see more

Chronic justifier I set high standards for dinners and incorrectly believe that my actions meet those standards.

I have a positive perception of my actions as they map to my dinner planning goals My actual actions fall short of my dinner planning goals

To identify me, look for these behaviors:

To help me, provide solutions that give me:

Remember:

Justifying wayward behavior

Honest feedback

I am unaware of the deterioration

Alyssa read Fast Food Nation and is really creeped out my McDonalds. In response to our question of the most recent visit to McDonalds, she said today, but stressed that it was because it was the baby sitter’s last day.

- a objective view of my actions

Covering up undesirable behavior

of my nutritional dinner habits. This cognitive gap is either due to

- the ability to track and monitor my actions

choice (denial or blame) or by my

- clear metrics for understanding my options

inability to see my life objectively.

Ava’s son told us that he sometimes gets cereal for dinner, but Ava doesn’t want to admit it. She responds with, “Usually, you are going to eat what I make!”.

Life is so hectic that I don’t have time to step back and compare my actions to my goals.

Letting clarity of metrics drive my decisions Sofia told us that she hasn’t figured out yet how much it would cost her to feed her family from scratch, but she know’s it costs $10 for the three of them to eat at McDonalds.

Lacking ability to recognize negative actions Sofia told us that on average she cooks three times a week, the other nights they eat leftovers and they avoid fast food. She seems proud of this statement, yet later in out conversation when McDonald’s comes up, she tells us that they’ve cut back their visits to only once or twice a week. She seems completely unaware of the discrepancy in her statements. smartaction

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Final presentation 10.05.2009

Chronic justifier

Proud provider

Defeated worker

Harsh evaluator


OPPORTUNITY

NEEDS

BEHAVIORS

USER MODES

HOME

USER MODES Click on the different quadrants to explore the other modes

Click on the behaviors and needs below to see more

Proud provider I reach most of the dinner planning goals I set and believe I am feeding my family well.

I have a positive perception of my actions as they map to my dinner planning goals My actual actions are successful in reaching my dinner planning goals

To identify me, look for these behaviors:

Successful solutions will provide me with:

Remember:

Practicing a routine

Staying power and mentoring opportunities

I’ve been successful in reaching

Samantha chops her carrots and celery immediately after returning from the grocery store. This advanced preparation habit has greatly increased her family’s consumption of healthy snacks, because now the veggies are equally as easy as the chips.

-c  onnection to a community to reinforce success

Feeling pride when compared to others Hannah cites compliments from others as the key driver to keeping her eating healthy.

Learning from a personal experience

-o  pportunities to act as an inspiration example to other women - r ecognition by family and non family members

Ashley’s second child was at risk for being unhealthy and she was required to change her diet. She maintained her healthy diet after her child was born, because she had experienced such great effects while on the amended diet. She knew long before that she should have changed her diet but not until he felt the effects was she convinced to change.

my nutritional goals, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy for me to stay on track. I need to feel reinforced in order to maintain my success. I’m proud of my achievements and like being an expert, so helping others learn might also give me the on going support I need as well.

smartaction

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Final presentation 10.05.2009

Chronic justifier

Proud provider

Defeated worker

Harsh evaluator


OPPORTUNITY

NEEDS

BEHAVIORS

USER MODES

HOME

USER MODES Click on the different quadrants to explore the other modes

Click on the behaviors and needs below to see more

Defeated worker

I have a negative perception of my actions as they map to my dinner planning goals

Chronic justifier

Proud provider

Defeated worker

Harsh evaluator

I’m overwhelmed by dinner and believe that there’s little use in trying to turn it around.

To identify me, look for these behaviors:

Successful solutions will provide me with:

Remember:

Abandoning a plan

Momentum

I am resigned to accepting

Kayla goes to the store on a weekly basis but augments that with daily trips for last minute items. Even after today’s trip she forgot the cheese and needs to improvise.

- quick wins for motivation -c  onfidence and reinforcement

overwhelmed and I lack the

Giving in to children

- the ability to track and monitor my actions

confidence I need to change my

Delanie will give just about anything to her picky child. “I’m tired of that battle” she explains.

my status quo of poor dinner planning habits. I feel tired and

situation. In fact, I am creating a self-fulfilling prophecy as my discouragement and

Falling in to ruts

unsuccessful actions feed off of

Ava tells us their meals lack variety, but her family rarely appreciates when she tries new meals, so she loses enthusiasm.

each other.

Letting time dictate decisions Taylor stopped at KFC today because it’s on the way home from her work. She compares it to Boston Market, where they rarely eat but doesn’t refer to food, instead says she doesn’t think Boston Market has a drive through.

smartaction

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Final presentation 10.05.2009


OPPORTUNITY

NEEDS

BEHAVIORS

USER MODES

HOME

BEHAVIORS Understanding each mode allows us to diagnose and respond Busy moms are not bound to only one self-evaluation mode, but each mode is characterized by specific behaviors that are accompanied by specific needs. It is therefore critical for Curves to be able to identify the self-evaluation mode a mom at any time. Click on the behaviors below to see more

BUSY MOM BEHAVIORS: CHRONIC JUSTIFIER

PROUD PROVIDER

Justifying wayward behavior

Practicing a routine

Covering up undesirable behavior

Feeling pride when compared to others

Letting clarity of metrics drive my decisions

Learning from a personal experience

Lacking ability to recognize negative actions

DEFEATED WORKER

HARSH EVALUATOR

Abandoning a plan

Devaluing dinner time

Giving in to children

Prioritizing my family over me

Falling in to ruts

Allowing guilt to push me to do extra work

Letting time dictate decisions

Lacking ability to recognize positive actions

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT窶ポ窶ェALL 2009


OPPORTUNITY

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NEEDS A personalized response to moms needs differentiates our offering Busy moms need integrated plans that recognize food is only one aspect of getting dinner on the table. Moms need flexible plans that adjust to their unpredictable life. By recognizing and responding to each of mom’s selfevaluation modes, Curves will be able to provide moms support at each inflection points of their variable life. Attention at each inflection point will give moms the ability to course correct and give Curves the ability to poise moms for success.

Traditional plans are linear but life isn’t Goal

Today

TRADITIONAL PLANS

Life is too unpredictable to plan Traditional nutritional support solutions provide a strict plan that the individual must follow. Though our research showed moms were enthusiastic about the idea of a ‘perfect’ plan, we repeatedly saw these plans fall short of moms’ expectations. The plans were too inflexible to match to their unpredictable life, therefore setting women up to fail. Click on the needs below to see more

BUSY MOM NEEDS: CHRONIC JUSTIFIER

PROUD PROVIDER

Honest feedback

Staying power

DEFEATED WORKER

HARSH EVALUATOR

Momentum

Reward and celebration

OPPORTUNITY RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

LIFE

INFLECTION POINTS: moments of course correction


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NEEDS CHRONIC JUSTIFIER

Honest feedback Chronic justifiers are unaware of the state of their nutritional dinner habits. They have high standards but their daily actions do not match those standards. This cognitive gap is either due to choice (denial or outside blame) or by their inability to see their life objectively. Life is so hectic that they don’t have time to step back and compare their actions to their goals.

They need honest feedback, and - a objective view of actions - the ability to track and monitor actions - clear metrics for understanding options

OPPORTUNITY RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Chronic justifier


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NEEDS DEFEATED WORKER

Momentum Defeated workers are resigned to accept the status quo of their poor dinner planning habits. They feel tired and overwhelmed and they lack the confidence they need to change their situation. In fact, they are creating a self-fulfilling prophecy as their discouragement and unsuccessful actions feed off of each other.

They need momentum and - quick wins for motivation - confidence and reinforcement - the ability to track and monitor actions

OPPORTUNITY RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT窶ポ窶ェALL 2009

Defeated worker


OPPORTUNITY

NEEDS

BEHAVIORS

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NEEDS HARSH EVALUATOR

Reward and celebration Harsh evaluators are unaware of the amount of work they are putting into dinner planning. They’ve grown so accustomed to their overbearing responsibilities that they no longer notice how many responsibilities they are balancing. Eventually something has to give and they’d prefer it to be their own needs rather than their families, as they feel guilty that they can’t handle it all. They need reward and celebration and - moments of celebration and appreciation - acknowledgement and validation of modern day tensions - a objective view of actions - the ability to track and monitor actions

OPPORTUNITY RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Harsh evaluator


OPPORTUNITY

NEEDS

BEHAVIORS

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NEEDS PROUD PROVIDER

Staying power Proud providers have been successful in reaching their nutritional goals, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy for them to stay on track. They need to feel reinforced in order to maintain their success. They are proud of their achievements and they like being an expert. Helping the proud provider mentor others will beneifit those who aren’t reaching their individual goals well as giving the proud provider the on going support they need as well. They need staying power and - connection to a community to reinforce success - opportunities to act as an inspiration example to other women - recognition by family and non family members

OPPORTUNITY RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Proud provider


OPPORTUNITY

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BEHAVIORS

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BEHAVIORS CHRONIC JUSTIFIER

Justifying wayward behavior Alyssa read Fast Food Nation and is really creeped out my McDonalds. In response to our question of the most recent visit to McDonalds, she said today, but stressed that it was because it was the baby sitter’s last day. “Basically the goal is to save time, so we don’t have to do so much when we get home from work and we can spend time with the kids.” —Alyssa

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Chronic justifier


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BEHAVIORS CHRONIC JUSTIFIER

Covering up undesirable behavior Ava’s son told us that he sometimes gets cereal for dinner, but Ava doesn’t want to admit it. She responds with, “Usually, you are going to eat what I make!”. “I cook three times a week and the other nights we eat leftovers. Every once and awhile we eat McDonalds but we are trying to not eat there anymore.” —Sofia But later in conversation we hear that they go to McDonalds once every 2 weeks.

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Chronic justifier


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BEHAVIORS CHRONIC JUSTIFIER

Letting clarity of metrics drive my decisions Sofia told us that she hasn’t figured out yet how much it would cost her to feed her family from scratch, but she know’s it costs $10 for the three of them to eat at McDonalds. “I don’t put anything into my shopping cart without reading the label first. Period.” —Isabella

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Chronic justifier


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BEHAVIORS CHRONIC JUSTIFIER

Lacking ability to recognize negative actions Sofia told us that on average she cooks three times a week, the other nights they eat leftovers and they avoid fast food. She seems proud of this statement, yet later in out conversation when McDonald’s comes up, she tells us that they’ve cut back their visits to only once or twice a week. She seems completely unaware of the discrepancy in her statements. “My family is extremely health conscious, I read Fast Food Nation and I’m creeped out by McDonalds... the kids go once a week to get fast food.” —Alyssa

“I cook three times a week and the other nights we eat leftovers. Every once and awhile we eat McDonalds but we are trying to not eat there anymore, now it’s maybe only once every 2 weeks.” —Sofia

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Chronic justifier


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BEHAVIORS DEFEATED WORKER

Abandoning a plan Kayla goes to the store on a weekly basis but augments that with daily trips for last minute items. Even after today’s trip she forgot the cheese and needs to improvise. “I get home from work around 4:30, the kids play soccer, they swim, each child practices two or three times a week, but never on the same day, practice is an hour and half... Soccer practice is 6:30–8:00. Depending on what else needs to be done we’ll eat before practice or have a PB&J and then eat after or get something on the way, or drop them off, pick up food then go back to get them... many variations.” —Kayla

“ I like to have the supplies at home so I can just wing it.” —Alyssa

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Defeated worker


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BEHAVIORS DEFEATED WORKER

Giving in to children Delanie will give just about anything to her picky child. “I’m tired of that battle” she explains. “We are eating tacos tonight, I made this decision at the grocery store when my daughter spotted a bag of nachos in the aisle .” —Sofia

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Defeated worker


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BEHAVIORS DEFEATED WORKER

Falling in to ruts Ava tells us their meals lack variety, but her family rarely appreciates when she tries new meals, so she loses enthusiasm. “Cooking isn’t my favorite thing to do, to plan and think, I like it when it’s all done Sometimes I’d rather just go out and let someone else do all the work.” —Lauren

“Take out is a treat Treat for me, treat for the kids, treat for everyone. Largely because it gets delivered all ready here.” —Sona

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Defeated worker


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BEHAVIORS DEFEATED WORKER

Letting time dictate decisions Taylor stopped at KFC today because it’s on the way home from her work. She compares it to Boston Market, where they rarely eat but doesn’t refer to food, instead says she doesn’t think Boston Market has a drive through.

I stopped at KFC today, it’s an easy route on the way home from work and only takes a few minutes to pick up, we rarely eat at Boston Market, I don’t think they have a drive through and I wont go anywhere that doesn’t have a drive through.” —Taylor

“Convenience is the top thing for me, McDonalds is the closest fast food restaurant to us, if it were Burger King, we’d be going there.” —Sofia

“Basically the goal is to save time, so we don’t have to do so much when we get home from work and we can spend time with the kids.” —Alyssa

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Defeated worker


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BEHAVIORS PROUD PROVIDER

Practicing a routine Samantha chops her carrots and celery immediately after returning from the grocery store. This advanced preparation habit has greatly increased her family’s consumption of healthy snacks, because now the veggies are equally as easy as the chips.

“Now [not drinking soda] is the easiest thing in the world to not do! It actually tastes bad because it has been so long.” —Madison

“When I get home from the store and am unpacking my groceries, I wash and cut up celery and carrots and put them into the bottom drawer of the fridge. Then it is easy to grab as a snack for any of us, as it is ready to go... I do it upon returning from the store, as I noticed when I would just leave them in the bags they came in, my family would not take the time to wash, cut and peel them in the moment for a snack. Having them ready to go makes it easy!” —Samantha

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Proud provider


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BEHAVIORS PROUD PROVIDER

Feeling pride when compared to others Hannah cites compliments from others as the key driver to keeping her eating healthy.

“There was no initial motivation, but like I was saying above seeing the sizes of people who typically consume these foods and the thought of what’s in the foods is motivation enough. It’s important to me to stay in shape, healthy and thin. I really beat myself up over staying thin and although that may not be healthy, I’m not engaging in any habits aside from mental encouragement to do that.” —Abigail “I know this is terrible but I also see the types of people who are eating them and they typically are not slim or healthy looking and that alone is enough to make me queasy.” —Abigail “I’m motivated by compliments from others” —Hannah

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Proud provider


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BEHAVIORS PROUD PROVIDER

Learning from a personal experience Ashley’s second child was at risk for being unhealthy and she was required to change her diet. She maintained her healthy diet after her child was born, because she had experienced such great effects while on the amended diet. She knew long before that she should have changed her diet but not until he felt the effects was she convinced to change. “Probably working in a restaurant and seeing so many raw, bloody things in the kitchen. I can’t get those visuals out of my head, they stick with me and make me not want meat” —Hannah

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Proud provider


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BEHAVIORS HARSH EVALUATOR

Devaluing dinner time During dinner Alyssa’s children came and went, she explained to us that this was normal, dinner often last several hours because people are getting up to break for reading, work or phone calls.

“It’s typical for meals to drag out and take hours, because we eat at different times and take breaks for reading, homework, etc.” —Aylssa

“We don’t always eat together, but we try to at least a few times each week, but as usual, tonight, my eldest daughter got up a few times to tend social requests.” —Taylor

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Harsh evaluator


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BEHAVIORS HARSH EVALUATOR

Prioritizing my family over me Sofia served dinner for her family, but because of her baby’s early sleep schedule she told us, she was going to have to let her food get cold tonight, actually she said this was pretty common. “My priority is feeding my family, protein at breakfast, veggies and fruit for lunch, and lots of water, but I’m much better at keeping track of what the kids are eating than what I eat.” —Brianna “We are on a early eating schedule I eat breakfast at 5am, lunch at 10am and dinner early. I’m going to have to let my food get cold while I put the baby to bed tonight. This is pretty common.” —Sofia

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Harsh evaluator


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BEHAVIORS HARSH EVALUATOR

Allowing guilt to push me to do extra work Sona described pre-prepared meals as cheating, even after admitting it probably would be as healthy and much easier, she told us it felt like cheating, that she was driven by a deep guilt to cook and prepare a full meal for her family, because she knows how to. “My husband keeps trying to convince me to pick easy meals, but I guess I have a bit of a 1950s mentality where I feel guilty if I don’t prepare meals.” —Sofia

“It seems like cheating, I mean I could cook a real meal for my family, so I wont do the prepared meals I don’t know what it is, maybe it’s that Armenian guilt that you need to cook and provide for your family.” —Sona

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Harsh evaluator


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BEHAVIORS HARSH EVALUATOR

Lacking ability to recognize positive actions Sofia shared her goal of cooking more home cooked meals and adding more variety. Moments later she told us a typical dinner involved her cooking four different meals from each member of the family. “I’d like to start making lunch for my kids because I know how unhealthy the fast food they serve at school is.” —Ava

RESEARCH INSIGHTS: CURVES BUSY MOM NUTRITION PROJECT | FALL 2009

Harsh evaluator

Curves_DataPersistanceFinal  

(please) HOW TO USE THIS TOOL 2. Navigate through each mode through the colored tabs 1. Choose where you’d like to eneter by clicking on a c...

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