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DESIGN CAN BE ART DESIGN CAN BE AETHETICS. DESIGN IS SO SIMPLE, THAT’S WHY IT IS SO COMPLICATED. -PAUL RAND


This project attempts to bring under one cover the entire hard work and dedication put in by me in subjects of communication Design done in the past years. All constructive feedbacks are cordially invited!


CONTENTS

1

GRAPHICS

2

PHOTOGRAPHY -Outdoor -Experimental -Product -Animals -Styling -People and Places

3

MAGAZINE

-Campaign -Illustration -Report Design -Rebranding -UI/UX -Typography -Packaging -Freestyle -Experimental -Children’s Book -Advertising

-Content & Layout


GR


RAPHICS


CAMPAIGN project- WWF India This campaign is designed for WWF India for their biggest event “Earth Hour.” This year they planned to give it a call to action, the final campaign decided was “BUZZ FOR NATURE #Bee4ThePlanet,” where people have to buzz like a bee for as long as they can. Here is the Bee Character with some collaterals supporting the campaign, it outreached 72million+ individuals and is still running successfully.

To view more collaterals please visit the given linkhttps://www.instagram.com/wwfindia/?hl=en

Join The Earth Hour

for Nature onMain earthhour.in Element 8:30 PM - 9:30 PM 30 March 2019

Character


JOIN THE BUZZ TO

JOIN THE BUZZ TO

13 million tonnes of plastic are thrown into the oceans every year!

Only 27% of the total paper consumed in India is recovered!

GIVEUP single-use plastics and protect our oceans. Because Giving Up means Giving Back.

GIVEUP paper wastage to help the Earth’s forests. Because Giving up means Giving Back.

#Buzz2GiveUp

earthhour.in

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#SwitchOff

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8:30 PM - 9:30 PM

#Connect2Earth

#Buzz2GiveUp

30th March 2019

earthhour.in

JOIN THE BUZZ TO

A leaking tap has the capacity to waste about 15 liters of water a day! GIVEUP water wastage and save freshwater resources. Because Giving up means Giving Back. #Buzz2GiveUp

earthhour.in

|

#SwitchOff

|

8:30 PM - 9:30 PM

#Connect2Earth

30th March 2019

Posters

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#SwitchOff

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8:30 PM - 9:30 PM

#Connect2Earth

30th March 2019


GIFs,Mailers and Web Banners


Front

Back Campaign T-Shirt


ILLUSTRATION projectThese illustrations are for NEst by Arpit Aggarwal, which is a product and lifestyle brand that boasts about the culture of northeast India. The illustrations have been published in VOGUE, september’18 edition.


REPORT DESIGN This report was designed for WWF India for its sparrow conservation project known as “Helping House Sparrows.” The report had to be visually appealing with infographics wherever needed, representing data in an interesting way and make it aesthetically clean.

HELPING HOUSE SPARROWS WWF-India’s efforts towards protecting sparrows in Gujarat and Daman


REBR ANDING This is a project for Canadian Automotive giants in collaboration with Michelin & AUDI, “PartsAvatar.� It extends from designing the website, rule book, brand manual, etc.


UI/UX projectThis is a in process UI of an upcoming store ARTMART, where you can directly showcase and sell your artwork without paying the galleries or any sort of mediators.

10.10 AM

ART MART ARTIST LOGIN

BUYER LOGIN


COMPARE

MEET & BUY

COMPARE EXPLORE

COMPARE MEET & BUY EXPLORE GET STARTED

GET STARTED SKIP

SKIP

SKIP

SKIP

SKIP

ARTIST Centric10.10 AM

10 AM

ART MART

10.10 AM

10.10 AM

$

10.10 AM

ART MART

E

E

ART MART

10.10 AM

L SA

L SA

$

10.10 AM

UPLOAD ON ARTMART UPLOAD ON ARTMART UPLOAD ON PUT PRICE OR BID DELIVER WHEN SOLD DELIVER ARTMART PUT PRICE OR BID WHEN SOLD GET STARTED SKIP

SKIP

SKIP

GET STARTED

SKIP

SKIP

BUYER Centric10.10 AM

10.10 AM

10.10 AM

10.10 AM

2 2

1

COMPARE

EXPLORE MEET & BUY

MEET & BUY EXPLORE

GET STARTED

GET STARTED SKIP

10.10 AM

10.10 AM

10.10 AM

SKIP

10.10 AM

SKIP

10.10 AM

10.10 AM


COLLATERALS projectThis project is for largest indian medical chain called “plexus.� designed their logo, patient report files, ID Cards and many other collaterals.

OPTION 1


The colours chosen here were decided only after a client research and designing a specific persona for the same.

OPTION 2


PACKAGING This project consists of rebranding and packaging of Flavoured Milk “Yummy Moo,� a prouct of Bharti Enterprise. To compete with existing products in the market, new simple logo and minimal yet geometrical label was designed.


Logo Options-

R

T I

E N T E R

H

A

P

R

B

IS

A

E

2019

EST.

YUMMY MOO T

H

T A E

L

S

T

&

H E

A

2019

EST.

V ANILLA 1 00% L OV E


TYPOGRAPHY projectTHIS IS BASED ON EXPLORING TEXTURED AND NATURAL TYPOGRAPHY.


FREESTYLE projectTHIS IS BASED ON EXPLORING FREESTYLE ART.


DON


EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTIt is based on differen thought processes and representing them in the form of Collages.


CHILDREN'S BOOK Knit It- HIMACHAL TOURISM This book is for children to understand how wool is produced, products are made and how they are transported. (in Kullu) It is supported by a video.

Knit It


Far away in the middle of the Himalayas, there is a land called Kullu.

Nestled in the lap of the majestic Himalayas, Kullu is a veritable jewel in the crown of Himachal Pradesh. The climate is mostly cold throughout the year. Cold climate means a huge collection of woollens in every wardrobe. Also, the perfect climate and numerous grazing pastures makes it one of the perfect place for rearing sheep and rabbits. Thus, the valley is a home to many shepherds. Every woman in Kullu knits as a hobby, which they have been doing since they were very young. Socks, sweaters, scarves, knee warmers - you name it and they can create beautiful patterns in various colours.

The major problem of the knitting industry is that 80% of the wool produced in India goes for carpet making because of it’s low quality. The rest goes into making shawls. Thus wool for knitwear is ususally imported from foreign countries, which makes it expensive. As a solution to this problem the International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO) and Australian Wool Board recognised a concept - “farm to fork”; that is usually used in the agriculture industry. Farm to fork is a concept in which food production, processing, distribution and consumption are integrated to enhance the environmental, economic, social and nutritional health of a particular place.

and a sheep named Ruby.

Similarly, this model could be used in the wool industry so that better quality wool can be produced and the imports are reduced.

There lived a rabbit named Snowball

Here is a glimpse of their daily lives: They love munching on their high quality fodder.

S T EP O N E Sheep and rabbit rearing - they are provided with proper care and fodder. Grazing pastures are changed continuously.


CHILDREN'S BOOK

Snowball and Ruby wake up inside a farm in an organisation called Knit It, where they are provided with proper care and affection.

STEP T WO The animals are given proper love and care. They are washed, dried and groomed nicely.

Every year during the month of June, they go through the process of Snipping, where their fleece is taken from their legs and bellies. The fleece is then washed and combed after which it is taken to another place where the process of Spinning takes place.

ST EP T HR EE Combing and Snipping are done during the month of June. The snipping is usually done before they become mothers as it becomes easier for them to feed the babies.


The spun yarn is then twisted together into two or more ply yarns to make the finished wool. In another corner of Knit It are the designers who come up with creative ideas and patterns.

STEP FOU R Snipping is done in large units for less wastage and easier spinning. Spinning and twisting of yarn is monitored for quality. The spun wool is dyed in beautiful colors.

These designs are given to a group of ladies from nearby villages who hand knit them into warm and cozy garments.

S T EP FIVE The dyed wool is used to hand knit various products. A designer creates designs and patterns which are followed by the knitters.


CHILDREN'S BOOK

Pa c k a g i n g d e pa rt m e n t

These garments are then handed over to the packaging department.

FARMTOFORK CORP. SOCKS MULTI PATTERN #20IKLY RS. 8,000/-

STEP SIX The final producls are wrapped in designer packaging. These are further packed in cartons to protect them while transportation.

farm 1 Swe to fork pat ater corp. tern #30 8TH YU

FARMTOFORK CORP. SWEATERS MULTI PATTERN #30K7RF RS. 10,000/-

FARMTOFORK CORP. SCARVES RS. 5,000/-

FARMTOFORK CORP. GLOVES GREEN PATTERN #49NYG RS. 4,000/-

They are then transported to the showroom, so that people like you and me can buy them. FARMTOFORK CORP. SOCKS MULTI PATTERN #20IKLY RS. 8,000/-

SHOWROOM

FARMTOFORK CORP. SWEATERS MULTI PATTERN #30K7RF RS. 10,000/-

STEP SEV EN The cartons are sent to the shop owned by the organization. The products can be sold through other shopkeepers as well.


VIDEO LINK

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1398wieyd-RjKMkj-X0y0Xyf1bImT47x7


ADVERTISING

ProjectThis project focuses on preparing article based illustrations for better understanding. Client- MINDLER World’s Most-Advanced and Award-Winning Career Guidance Platform.


PHO


OTOGRAPHY


OUTDOOR projectThis shoot displays models styled as tribes all around the world.


EXPERIMENTAL project 2This shoot Celebrates women beauty, yes they do have wings!


PRO DUCT


ANIMALS


STYLING project 3This is a sample shoot for a Fashion Film that focuses on how Underpriveledged kids can style if given a chance. The name of the film is “MAGAZINE.” Video Linkhttps://drive.google.com/ open?id=1398wieyd-RjKMkj-X0y0Xyf1bImT47x7


pEOPLE & PLACES


MAG


GAZINE


CONTENT & LAYOUT


MAGAZINE COVER 1

Design a magazine cover on InDesign.

RIKA

R I K A M A G A Z I N E -T W E N T Y S E V E N T E E E N - U S A

T E XT U R E S A N D M O N O S

In eachy issue of International Rika magazine we take you inside the studios of the world’s best artists+stylists. They tell you the thought processes behind their creative methods and reveal their


With rush hour seeming like an everyday affair in McleodGanj, I stumbled upon this little café cum shop, which seems to be known for its flavourful tea and handmade products. I walked in and was greeted warmly by two people working behind the counter. I ordered some flapjacks and mint tea. I had always thought flapjacks were pancakes, but it turns out they are some delicious sweet British dessert. I’ll definitely try more things from this little, beautiful and cosy place on my next visit.

Photo: Abhir Avasthi

I met Pema who cofounded Rogpa along with her husband. She explained a few things to me: Rogpa means “help” in Tibetan. It offers free baby care for the Tibetan women while their mothers work. Pema and her husband started the foundation in 2004 when they saw the problems Tibetans were facing while adjusting in Dharamsala.

ART

WITH

HEART

Rogpa is not a charity. They wanted to do something to help the Tibetan community become self-sufficient and saw there was a need for a free daycare. That’s why they focussed there first.

A few hours later I met Pema again at Rogpa’s headquarters. It was a pretty building painted a bright blue, a bit off the main path snuggled into the side of the mountain. Pema explained that ninety seven percent of the Tibetans in Dharamsala rent out their properties. They do not feel like they can fit into Indian society. They can’t even go back. There is not enough work in Dharamsala to support them, they are overeducated. They feel their future is bleak. It’s hard to grow without roots.

I met Yeshi, a man sitting behind the desk, weaving large pieces of thread into thick chunks of handmade paper: binding for journals. Yeshi hopes to help addicts by teaching them this trade and helping them to support themselves. “The work needs expertise and is labour intensive that you cannot be on drugs while doing it,” said Yeshi. Then I entered a room full of ladies chit-chatting. A head tailor along with ladies was actively involved in sewing on a few large, old-fashioned sewing machines, they were making a bag for me. There is something moving about watching your items being made by an actual person. We as consumers are so separated from the making of the products, that we don’t know what it means and takes to produce it with hands and the effects our purchases have.


Photo: Abhir Avasthi

“Where one gets help and another gets the chance to help.”

Now here I was facing the lady making my bag. “Thank you!” the lady said. “Thank you,” the rest of the ladies and the head tailor, all nodded at me and smiled. “You are welcome. Thank you.” I said. Suddenly I realized that so many people’s hopes rode on this order, and how small decisions like purchasing these things can make such meaningful changes in other people’s lives. Rogpa is a micro lending program. They are not training the women to be employees, but to start their own business. Pema explained that the quality of the products are good, which I can attest to, because this is not a handout. Rogpa is here to help others become self-sufficient. It is continually striving to preserve Tibetan culture, integrity and independence for many generations to come. ROGPA has an interconnected ideology. “where one gets help and another gets the chance to help’, stemming from the ideal of a self-sufficient Tibetan community, that is not over dependent upon outside assistance to preserve Tibetan culture and identity. -ABHIR AVASTHI


Sustainand

Retain

-ABHIR AVASTHI

On the busy and chilly streets of McleodGanj, I found a hidden gem; the Tibetan Handicraft Cooperative Society Ltd. The Tibetan women refugees were weaving beautiful traditional carpets. I was allowed to walk around and photograph freely; other than a warm welcome when I walked through the door, I was left alone to wander and watch these women do their craft. Some looked up to smile briefly in greeting, then turned back their eyes to the task. They were dressed in the traditional Tibetan attire, Chuba and sat in front of vertical looms tying ties over a rod, from which spilled woollen threads, like stream of colours. These threads flowed into boxes, resting behind the women, where they were gracefully arranged into colourful bales. In the adjacent room was a pretty store selling Tibetan artefacts, a few visitors were enquiring about the handmade carpets that these women were weaving. Some of the women worked quietly, in concentration, others chattered with each other from across the L-shaped open room while their hands moved with precision and expertise. 

“This co-operative was started with the Dalai Lama’s blessings in 1963 to preserve the ancient craft of Tibetan carpet weaving.”

At the corner of the hall was Tamding Tsering, Production manager, who has been with the cooperative since 1972, said, “This co-operative was started with the Dalai Lama’s blessings in 1963 to preserve the ancient craft of Tibetan carpet weaving. In 1959, the year of the Tibetan Uprising, when the Chinese took control, thousands of Tibetans followed the young Dalai Lama’s flight to Dharamsala in India through the Himalayas.” He shares that his family was one amongst them and that he was still a child when he came to Sikkim. “I grew up here and joined the cooperative as an employee, learnt carpet weaving in 1976, and in 1983, I was promoted to the position of a carpet teacher. And since 1992, I have been the production manager.” This centre have been creating jobs for refugees who arrive from Tibet as well as for those Tibetans like him who have grown up in exile. The society also provides accommodation and assistance with children education; pension plan for the retired workers; co-ordinates medicare; and takes care of workers and funeral expenses.


Tibetan Handicraft Cooperative Society Ltd. The society provides 3 months winter holidays and helps give loans to share holders, who are sweater sellers and and need to travel down to the plains of India to sell hundreds of woollen in various towns, streets and stalls. It has also been contributing to the Tibetan Government in Exile, he said, which is located a little down the road. Carpets have been an intrinsic part of Tibetan culture, they have been used for many of purposes: Sleeping, sitting, as horse saddles, wall hanging, flooring etc. Another teacher, Dawa Dolma, sitting beside a fellow weaver, where they were working on the same carpet on a loom. She had learnt the craft in Nepal, where her family fled for exile. Incidentally, she told, “Though carpet weaving still exists in Tibet, most of the work for its preservation has been done in India and Nepal. Over the years, in fact, these two countries have produced more Tibetan carpets than Tibet.” The techniques used in their weaving are unique, they still use the archaic vertical loom and double knots. Tsering told that there are about 63 weavers with the co-operative today. “We have three places here in Mcleodganj apart from this centre where these carpets are being produced and we export 85 per cent of our carpets, which are mostly sent to the US, Canada, Belgium, France and Japan, and we have a loyal clientele. We are the only ones in McLeodGanj making these handmade Tibetan carpets since 1963.” The organisation have been calling for young Tibetans to join them, providing free training, accommodation, and later job opportunity. But the response has been “disappointing.” Just about the time I was ready to visit the store to make small purchases, the mid-day meal arrived. Most of the women left their work stations to cluster around in a large loom, seated on the floor, to eat together merrily.


Profile for abhir avasthi

Portfolio  

This project attempts to bring under one cover the entire hard work and dedication put in by me in subjects of Communication Design done in...

Portfolio  

This project attempts to bring under one cover the entire hard work and dedication put in by me in subjects of Communication Design done in...