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2014 NATIONAL SHOW RECAP

CHOOSING OUR CHAMPION Meet the National Show Judges

ABGA L VES NEBRASKA


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2014 ABGA GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING THE ABGA GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING WAS HELD WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 2014, AT 8 P.M. in the show arena at Fonner Park. There were about 75 members present, including some who serve on the board. Brad Mackey, president, called the meeting to order. The meeting was conducted in an informal manner with open questions from members throughout. The plans for the new building were displayed. The question was asked about the cost of the property. The answer was that the property cost $50,000 for two city lots and already had paved parking in the front and the back of the building, and frontage on two streets. A contractor has been hired to erect the new building and ABGA is on a waiting list, due to the extensive amount of building being done in San Angelo because of the oil industry boom. Mackey introduced Mary Ellen as the new Executive Director. Laurie Evans and Cayla Wilde, who traveled from the ABGA office to help run the national show, were also introduced. He also introduced Aaron Gillespie, who returned to ABGA for the week to help with data input for entries, show results and class breakdowns. Mackey then turned the floor over to Ervin Chavana, who presented the financial report. The ABGA has $1.6 million on hand. A copy of the year-end report is available from the office. The question was asked about what ABGA is paying for rent on the current building. The answer was $2,800/month. Chavana told the members present that ABGA has Jeff Gibbs to thank for acquiring the new property for such a reasonable price, considering the high demand for lots in San Angelo. Mackey introduced Anita Dahnke, IT Manager for ABGA, who gave a report on the progress of the website and new database. The website will go live in July, and it will include a fourth-generation shopping cart that will be better and more secure for the members and the office staff. Until the new database is completed in the first part of January, the website will interface with the herd

book database in the same way it does now. She described some new features that will be available for registering goats online. There will be help screens, and members will be able to enter less information. The database will automatically check for any problems and inform the member what they are, so fixes can be done right then, or the information can be stored to allow the member to find answers to the problems being reported. Once the registration is completed and paid for, the member can print off a temporary registration certification that is good for 30 days. There are many more features that will be outlined in an article in the September/October issue of The Boer Goat Magazine. Mackey presented Jeff Gibbs, 2013-14 vice president of the board, with the retiring director award. Gibbs thanked Mackey and the members present for giving him the opportunity to serve the ABGA as a director. Gibbs then presented Mackey with the president’s buckle. Mackey thanked those present for taking time to attend the membership meeting. He then called Robyn Scherer, Director of Marketing and Communication, to the front for introductions. Scherer took pictures during the show and posted them on the ABGA Facebook page for members who couldn’t attend. The floor was opened up for any final questions from members.

The Boer Goat - 3


2013-2014 AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION REGION 16 - BRAD MACKEY (EC) PRESIDENT • bradmackey@bmackfarms.com

July/August, 2014

REGION 10 - TRACY DIEFENBACH (EC) SECRETARY • tldief@gmail.com REGION 2 - SCOTT PRUETT TREASURER • eieiowefarms@yahoo.com REGION 1 - TERRY BROWN • capriole@pocketinet.com REGION 3 - JOEL R PATTERSON • bobnjr@gmail.com REGION 4 - CECIL SWEPSTON • cecils@brokensranch.com REGION 5 - JOHN EDWARDS • eggstx@aol.com REGION 6 - PAUL GRAFE • pgrafe@valbridge.com REGION 7 - JAY EARL PEACOCK • earlpeacock@yahoo.com REGION 8 - SHON CALLAHAN • sdccccranch@aol.com REGION 9 - VICKI STICH (EC) • ladyhogger59@hotmail.com REGION 11 - JANIS WESSON • dustydan1@windstream.net REGION 12 - PAUL KINSLOW (EC) • paulsellsindy@yahoo.com REGION 13 - MARK ANDERSON (EC) • fandhranch@aol.com REGION 14 - CYNTHIA PRICE-WESTFALL cindy-price_westfall@yahoo.com REGION 15 - SARA DAVIS • csdavis@oakhollowlivestock.com ERVIN CHAVANA (EC) PAST PRESIDENT • mengercreek@hotmail.com JEFF GIBBS (EC) OUTGOING VICE PRESIDENT • gibbsfarm@aol.com *EC DENOTES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBER

To our Members: Our 20th National Show is behind us, and what a show it was. Attendance was great and we had several new vendors. The facilities got rave reviews and the big screen TV ads were so popular that people were still buying ads in the middle of the week. The goats that ABGA members brought to the show were some of the best to enter the show ring, and all the exhibitors are to be commended on their hard work and the quality of their Boer goats. Mayor Jay Vavricek attended the opening ceremony on Tuesday, and the people of Grand Island welcomed us with open arms. There were newspaper articles about ABGA and our show every day, as well as a feature article on Sunday. The local TV station also had staff at the show, and we made the news several days. Many of our members attended the Annual Membership Meeting. Full details about the meeting can be found in this issue of the Boer Goat. The Annual Banquet and Awards Event was well attended. More than 600 people enjoyed a delicious brisket dinner, and then were entertained by Ervin Chavana, who also had put together a video of the show winners from the past through the present, which ran on the big screen throughout the banquet. Several exhibitors received ennoblement certifications on goats and the Ambassador to the Breed awards were given to 16 individuals who were instrumental in bringing the Boer goats to the United States and getting everything started. Full details on the banquet can also be found in this issue of the magazine. The DNA Testing program is in full swing, and members can now get the DNA Test ID numbers printed directly on the registration certificates. Details are available on the ABGA website.

AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION 1207 S. BRYANT BLVD., SUITE C • SAN ANGELO, TX 76903 MARY ELLEN VILLARREAL, Executive Director • mary@abga.org LAURIE EVANS, Administrative Assistant • laurie@abga.org SONIA CERVANTEZ, Accounting • sonia@abga.org CAYLA WILDE, Registration Support Staff • cayla@abga.org JESSICA HERNANDEZ, Registration Support Staff • jessica@abga.org CINDY DUSEK, Youth Coordinator • cindy@abga.org MARIA LEAL, Member Services • marial@abga.org ROBYN SCHERER, M.AGR. Director of Marketing & Communication • robyn@abga.org ABGA OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday • 8:00 AM TO 5:00 PM (CST)

4 - The Boer Goat

July ABGA activities included the JABGA Leadership Conference, held at Kansas State University. The September/October issue of The Boer Goat Magazine will include coverage of what the juniors learned and the activities that were provided. The new directors took part in their first ABGA Board meeting at the July face-to-face meeting. Minutes will be posted on the ABGA website as soon as they are available.

Brad Mackey, President ABGA™ Board of Directors © 2014 American Boer Goat Association™


TABLE OF IN EVERY ISSUE

11

DARLENE BAKER Ambassadors to the Breed Awards

2014 NATIONAL SHOW RECAP

DR. FRANK PINKERTON Part 1: Supplements for Winter Feeding of Gestating and Lactating Does

15

12

BREEDER'S SPOTLIGHT

CHOOSING OUR CHAMPION

Meet the National Show Judges

McGee Goat Farm

DR. FRED C. HOMEYER Selecting Sires & Dams for Meat Goat Production

08

An introduction to the diverse group that evaluated the animals at this year's show

See Who Reigned Supreme

26

18

NEW DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATION FOR ABGA Robyn Scherer Takes the Lead of ABGA Marketing & Public Relations

JABGA INVOLVED

Juniors Get Involved at the National Show and Beyond

32

ABOUT THE COVER

MEET THE 2014 NATIONAL SHOW JUDGES

2014 NATIONAL SHOW RESULTS

30

ABGA NATIONAL SHOW = SUCCESS Some of our favorite parts of this year's show

ENCORE CONTACT PO BOX 243 • HASKELL, TX 79521 • TOLL FREE 877-822-3016 FAX 806-398-9047 • info@theboergoatmagazine.com PUBLISHER JACKIE LACKEY, INC. JACKIE LACKEY, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & CREATIVE DIRECTOR • jackie@encorevisions.com CREATIVE TEAM JAMIE BEATTY • SARAH VACHLON

28

ABGA L VES NEBRASKA

Congratulations to Taeah Fisher, pictured showing the National Grand Champion Fullblood Doe and Jeremy Church, pictured showing the National Champion Fullblood Buck at the 2014 ABGA National Show in Grand Island, Nebraska. Photos by Robyn Scherer.

WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO IN THE MAGAZINE? The photo contest will be back in the next issue. If you would like to see YOUR photo in the September/October issue please submit your picture to info@theboergoatmagazine.com! CORRECTION: The May/ June 2014 incorrectly listed the East Texas Goat Raisers Association as the West Texas Goat Raiders Association. This has been updated to reflect the correct name and contact information for the affiliate member on the Affiliate Program page (page 6). We apologize for this mistake.

The Boer Goat - 5


AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

The ABGA affiliate program is a partnership between regional goat clubs and the American Boer Goat Association. With the rapid growth in the meat goat industry, the local meat goat and Boer goat clubs have an increased role in education, marketing and promotion. These local groups provide an essential role in promoting the industry and educating breeders. In 2004, ABGA began development of a program to aid, assist and work together with local clubs. The objectivies of the ABGA Affiliate program include: • Provide additional resources at the local clubs level • Provide networking opportunities for the local clubs • Attract and retain goat producers • Assist with educational opport • Provide a method for grassroots input from local clubs

Boer Goat Association of North Carolina

Cascade Boer Goat Association Crystal Fenton 14352 W Hwy 12 Touchet, WA 99360 info@cascadebga.org www.cascadebga.org Serving States: OR, WA, ID, MT, CA

East Texas Goat Raisers Association [ETGRA] Gwen VanderMartin PO Box 2614 Jacksonville, TX 75766 etgra13@gmail.com www.etgra.com Serving States: TX

Keystone Goat Producers Association 106 Carlisle Rd Newville, PA 17241 rzeigler@centurylink.net Serving States: PA

Kelly Clark P.O. Box 36497 Greensboro, NC 27416 KellyClark@triad.rr.com Serving States: NC

Tall Corn Meat Goat Wether Assoc Inc Vern Thorp 1959 Highway 63 New Sharon, IA 50207 neverthorp@aol.com www.meatgoatwether.com Serving States: IA

Tri-State Goat Producers Association [TSGPA] 5125 State Rt 2 Greenup, KY 41144 billupsfarms@windstream.net Serving States: KY

ABGA Apologizes to the East Texas Goat Raisers Association The American Boer Goat Association apologizes to the long-time affiliate member of ABGA, the East Texas Goat Raisers Association [ETGRA] because their association was left out of the Affiliates List in not only the March/April issue of the Boer Goat magazine, but also the May/June issue. While the correct information was listed on the ABGA website, for some reason it did not get published in the magazine. In recognition of the serious nature of this inadvertent error, the ETGRA will receive their 2015 Affiliate membership from ABGA at no charge.

6 - The Boer Goat


OF EVENTS 2014 AUGUST AUGUST 2 Bond County ABGA Show Greenville, IL Casey Adamick 618-978-6365 AUGUST 2-3 Tall Corn ABGA Open Meat and Boer Goat Show Washington, IA Chris & Ron Grier 319-430-4332 AUGUST 3 Sonoma County Fair Santa Rosa, CA Monica Rodriguez 707-545-4203 AUGUST 7 Spirit of Maine Boer Goat Show Topsham, ME John Wilcox 207-557-0867 AUGUST 8-9 Illinois State Fair Springfield, IL Carol Chapman 217-782-0786 AUGUST 12 Missouri State Fair Boer Goat Show Sedalia, MO Edna Volmer 660-530-5616 AUGUST 15 Wilson County Fair Lebanon, TN Mark & Debbie Anderson 615-967-1415 AUGUST 15-16 Erie County Fair Hamburg, NY Michelle Kruger 716-337-0363 State Fair of West Virginia Fairlea, WV Kelly Tuckwiller 304-645-1090

AUGUST 16-17 Rolling Hills Casino Boernanza Bella Vista, CA Megan Shepherd 916-705-1582 AUGUST 17 Iowa State Fair Des Moines, IA Misty Logsdon 402-770-4469 AUGUST 18-19 Kentucky State Fair Louisville, KY Ray Graves 895-209-0695 AUGUST 21 Butte County Fair Gridley, CA Kathy Ingvoldson 530-846-3626 AUGUST 23 Southeast Kansas ABGA Show Girard, KS Pennie Grotheer 620-249-1002 Desert Premiere Boer Goat Show Lancaster, CA Matthew Jimmink 661-948-6060 The Great Darke County Fair Greenville, OH Doug Hesson 937-459-9246 AUGUST 23-24 Hocking Hills Caprine Classic Boer Goat Show Logan, OH Bonnie Harris 740-385-0383 AUGUST 24 Maryland State Fair Timonium, MD Rebecca Williams 410-252-0200

AUGUST 24-25 Nebraska State Fair Grand Island, NE Betty Drudik 308-380-5581

SEPTEMBER 9 Kansas State Fair Hutchinson, KS Susan Sankey 620-669-3614

AUGUST 26 Minnesota State Fair St. Paul, MN Gretchen Sankovitz 507-363-1564

SEPTEMBER 10 Permian Basin Fair Odessa, TX Chelli Evans 432-550-3232

AUGUST 29 ABGA Show at the Oregon State Fair Salem, OR Cary Heyward 541-228-8580

SEPTEMBER 13-14 North Carolina State Fair, Jr Meat Goat Show Fletcher, NC Tamara Johnson 828-687-1414

AUGUST 30 Keystone Summer Finale Shippensburg, PA Lois Zeigler 717-776-7583

SEPTEMBER 20 CCMGA Boer Goat Show Owensville, OH Pamela Motta 513-739-9383

AUGUST 30-31 Colorado Boer Classic Keenesburg, CO Scott Pruett 303-732-4534 KMGA Fall Prairie Circuit ABGA Sanctioned Show Salina, KS Teresa Simmons 316-213-3649

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 3-4 Eastern Idaho State Fair Blackfoot, ID Bill Coon | 208-681-2411 SEPTEMBER 6-7 Shenandoah Valley Showdown - 7th Annual Harrisonburg, VA Deidre Redifer 540-234-8301 IMGA Fall Shows Indianiola, IA Shawna Fetters 515-231-2208

Oklahoma State Fair Oklahoma City, OK Steve Hart 405-466-6138 SEPTEMBER 23 Panhandle South Plans Fair Lubbock, TX info@southplainsfair.com SEPTEMBER 27 Keystone International Livestock Expo Harrisburg, PA Lois Zeigler 717-776-7583

Be sure to visit www.abga.org for additional information, updates, and a complete year’s calendar of upcoming shows and events. Don’t see your event listed? Please contact the ABGA at: 325-486-2242. The Boer Goat - 7


NATIONAL 2014 ABGA SHOW JUDGES by Rachel Stine

Like the industry itself, the 2014 American Boer Goat Association (ABGA) national show judges are diverse. While their backgrounds, reason for becoming involved and daily lives differ, they all bring a passion for the industry every time they step in the ring. One thing they can all agree on: their devotion to Boer goats and the people who breed, sell and show them. Anton Ward, Sherri Inman Stephens, Scott Pruett and Josh Taylor give us a glimpse into their lives in and out of the ring.

Anton Ward, ABGA judge Anton Ward of Magnolia, N.C., is a six-time veteran judge of the national show. In fact, he was one of the first ABGA-certified judges. Born and raised on a South African ranch, Ward is a Boer goat expert. Having raised and judged cattle, goats and sheep in his native country, he says when Boer goats were first imported into the U.S., he saw them as a promising venture so much that he followed them here. Before moving to the states in the ’90s, he worked closely with feedlots in South Africa. Involvement in the industry has always been something he’s enjoyed, he says. “It’s nice to look at quality animals, but I’ve also enjoyed connecting with breeders,” he says. “Learning from and educating others, standing and talking about goats is something I just really like to do.” Although he enjoys judging, it’s most about the socialization that happens at shows, especially the national show. “It’s the one time a year everyone 8 - The Boer Goat

comes together in one place,” he says. “A lot of stories are told. It’s a very good event, and everyone is able to have a good time.” Ward says one of his most memorable moments happened in El Paso, Texas, at their Boer goat show. He likes to evaluate goats loose from their exhibitors. At this particular ring, the gates were low. From his vantage point, he could see a buck jump the fence and head straight into the bathroom where a group of young ladies had just walked in. “All of the sudden, it got quiet,” he laughs. “Pretty soon, the goat came running out, followed by the girls. It was quite funny to watch.” But his day-to-day routine doesn’t always deliver that much excitement, he says. Ward lives on a farm where he breeds and sells goats and cattle. Aside from daily chores, farm visits, marketing and typical farm jobs, he sells poultry equipment off-farm. His love for the industry has been in his blood since birth, he says, and he plans to continue with a strong involvement in it. He says his goals are to see breeders strive to the original breed standards and view the goats as meat animals first and foremost. “I’ll continue trying to educate as many breeders as possible, and do my part to continue to help the industry grow and keep it the successful as the fastest-growing ag venture in the country,” he says. “It’s a nice industry, and I’m fortunate to be a part of it.”

Sherri Inman Stephens, ABGA judge Sherri Inman Stephens didn’t have a livestock background when she became involved in Boer goats. But it didn’t take her long to learn and become an influence in the industry. Stephens was first exposed to Boer goats through 4-H when her son wanted to show. It started off as a new project in her area, and quickly turned in to traveling outside of her Indiana roots to open shows. “We decided we liked it and wanted to get more serious and competitive,” she says. It was through her son, Cain’s, involvement that he talked her in to her first big goat investment, Gandolph, a young buck purchased from Greg Patterson. “I thought I was crazy to pay that much for a goat, but thanks to Cain, Gandolph put us on the right track in the Boer goat show industry,” she says. Shortly after starting to show in 2000, the Stephens family went on to win the grand and reserve champion doe titles at the Indiana State Fair open show. It was while watching her son show that she says she first became interested in judging. “I saw a judge working with the kids in showmanship, and it looked like so much fun,” she says. “I could place the goats like the judges, and I realized this was something I could do.” She studied the breed standards, and in 2005, became an ABGA certified judge. In the beginning, she just wanted to do county fairs, but since then, she’s shown and judged at the national level. “I really appreciate the people of the Boer goat industry. Every place I’ve been, I’ve been welcomed,” Stephens says. “I love the camaraderie. I always


say, ‘Good people find good people.’” Outside of the industry, Stephens owns an independent insurance agency. Although circumstances led her off the farm, she is currently looking for a place with some acreage so she can have a few goats for her young grandkids and get back into showing. She says she is very passionate about the youth side of the ABGA. “Youth are the driving force behind Boer goats. I’ve seen kids pay for college and invest in their futures stemming from their involvement,” she says. She says youth are the future of the industry, and established breeders need to continue to reach out and encourage them. It was that encouragement that helped her get started with her own herd, and encouraged her to judge in the first place. Stephens has also done her part to continue to educate the next generation, presenting seminars on showing, fitting and herd management. As far as introducing new technology, she is also a proponent of artificial insemination and embryo flushing, crediting those advances to furthering the Boer goat industry. She also encourages breeders and young exhibitors to study the breed standards and the original South African Boer goats. Although she has plenty of wonderful memories of her involvement, Stephens says one of her most vivid was when she traveled to San Angelo to become ABGA certified. “I was a stay-at-home mom, and this was the first major venture of my own,” she says. “I was worried coming into an industry where many had a lot more experience and background. But I passed, and on the way home, I saw the most beautiful sunset over a rocky Texas bluff. It was absolutely gorgeous. And that’s where it all began!” Stephens says everywhere she travels to judge, she asks locals what one place is she has to see before she leaves. And through judging, she’s been able to see many incredible places all over the country. In fact, her biggest goal is to travel to South Africa for the world show.

Scott Pruett, ABGA judge Scott Pruett says he became involved in

the Boer goat business by accident. When researching profit centers for his Keenesburg, Colo., E-I-E-I-Owe Farm, the animals came across his radar. He decided to pursue the opportunity, starting a commercial meat goat operation with some Boer crosses. As time went by, he and his wife Linda bought more into registered stock and have become successful breeders. For the past 13 years, he and Linda have maintained about 50 head of breeding does. In addition to the management, he also works an off-farm job at an aviation company and raises cattle and hay. Now as a judge, he travels around the country and says the industry has seen exponential growth and progression in high-quality genetics. Through judging in 4-H, college and now within the industry, Pruett says he’s enjoyed working with producers, and especially the youth. In fact, it was judging a peewee showmanship class that brought his favorite judging memory. In the ring, Pruett says, he began asking a young exhibitor questions about her animal and if she raised it. Not afraid of anything, she responded with exactly how old her goat was. “She was the only female who I directly asked about her age and she didn’t lie,” he smiles. While Pruett sees great potential in the show industry, and particularly for the JABGA, he says his goal is to help Boer goats become a mainstream high-quality meat product. “I’d love to get into research and establish a meat-quality standard grading system,” he says. “I don’t see any reason we can’t get goats into every supermarket, overcome the consumer bias against the product and bring it forward as the superior meat product it is.”

Josh Taylor, JABGA Judge

he was led to his current management position at H2 Ranch in Perkins, Okla. Although he was an avid livestock judge, he didn’t encounter many goats – except occasionally a pygmy. When he moved to the Southwest in ’99, he was able to watch the junior wether goat show at the Fort Worth Stock Show. He and his wife, Ashly, welcomed their son a year later, and he thought goats would make a nice family project. Already knowledgeable about livestock genetics, he says he “became somewhat addicted.” In the early ’00s, he and his family started and built up a herd, and went on to become ABGA-certified in 2009. After selling the goats to relocate, he recently moved back Oklahoma and has again built up a modestly sized herd. Once he began showing in the ABGA, he realized he would enjoy judging, especially youth. “When I first started, it was rare to see a junior member show and do well. Now, it’s more rare to see an adult in the champion lineup,” he says. “That tells us that we need to do more for junior members in terms of support and opportunities.” Taylor says he’s passionate about helping youth learn, and he’d like to see a judging program become part of the JABGA. “We need to involve kids now so we have them as part of the industry in the future,” he says. His son, Sam, currently shows Boer goats at the county fair. The family aims to keep the operation small, simple and fun. Part of the fun of working in the livestock industry is the interaction with breeders and showmen. Being influenced as well as being an influencer has been key to Taylor’s involvement with goats, he says. He says his most memorable moment in the ring thus far came at the 2013 national show, judging with two men he highly respects – Eddie Holland and Ron Dilley. “Being there on that type of stage, in that venue with all of the adrenaline and nerves, excitement and anticipation, it was a pretty neat feeling.”

Josh Taylor’s strong livestock roots led him to Boer goat involvement. Growing up on a Midwest Hereford and row crop farm, The Boer Goat - 9


ANNOUNCEMENTS DNA TESTING REMINDER

JULY FACE-TO-FACE BOARD MEETING

If you submit an online request for DNA testing and don’t receive a sample kit by email within a couple of weeks, check your junk folder. The sample kit emails are sent out by UC Davis. If you don’t find the sample kit email in your junk folder, call the office. The actual DNA Test results are sent via US Postal Service.

Minutes from the July face-to-face meeting will be posted on the website as soon as they are available.

NEW WEBSITE The new website was activated on July 19. While there are many changes, all of the online activities that involve interaction with the database will remain the same until the new database is functional, which is scheduled for the first part of January, 2015.

DNA TESTING UPDATE ABGA now has the capability to print the DNA Test VGL ID on the registration form. Anyone who would like to have that done would need to return the registration form to the office with the $5.00 fee for the change.

May You And Your Goats Have A Happy And Safe Summer.

ABGA is now able to accept DNA test results that were completed earlier on ABGA registered goats. The fee for processing the paperwork on these tests is $5.00 each, and is payable when the test results are submitted to the ABGA office.

DNA TESTING REPORT As of June 23, 2014 the ABGA Office has received 323 requests for DNA Sample Kits. Of those, 75 DNA samples have been received and processed by UC Davis, and the results have been sent to members by the ABGA office.

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10 - The Boer Goat


AMBASSADOR BREED AWARD to the

by Darlene Baker

The American Boer Goat Association honored 16 people with Ambassador to the Breed Award at the Annual Members Banquet that took place during the 20th Anniversary ABGA National Show.

THE RECIPIENTS OF THE 2014 AWARDS ARE: Buck Pruitt Jimmy Day Kim Halfmann Sammy Helmers Don Jackman Stan Keen Norman Kohls Mike Masters (Deceased)

Jane Meacham F. Dian Newman Dr. Lou Nuti Ernest Schwartz Mary Powis Walter Pope III (Deceased) Charles Turner W.E. Whitehead

The Ambassador to the Breed Award was initiated by the ABGA Board of Directors in 2012 to honor people who the association believes have made an impact on the goat industry. In addition to receiving an ABGA bronze, the recipients’ names are placed on a plaque that resides in the ABGA office. They are also listed on the Ambassadors to the Breed page on the ABGA website. The first awards were given in 2013 and went to Dr. Frank Pinkerton, Marvin Shurley, the Kearney Family, and Dr. Frank Craddock. Buck Pruitt and Dr. Lou Nuti both attended this year’s banquet and received their awards in person. The 16 individuals who received 2014 awards are those who first realized the full impact the South African Boer

Dr. Lou Nuti and Buck Pruitt, Photo by Robyn Scherer

goat could have on the U.S. goat industry. They had the foresight and vision to enable them to put their personal differences aside and begin the work that would lead to the formation of the American Boer Goat Association.

The Boer Goat - 11


SUPPLEMENTS FOR WINTER FEEDING This information is provided in response to recurring producer inquiries regarding economical supplementation of winter diets. It is predicated on the assumption that most producers do not have winter forages for grazing and thus depend mostly on legume, grass or mixed grass/legume hays. It is also predicated on the assumption that such hays are cheaper (in terms of protein and energy content) than commonly available grains, grain byproducts and oilseed meals.

PREFACE

In prior articles, I have made the case that females of breeding age can “make it” on all-forage diets, either pastures or hays, provided the protein and energy (TDN) contents of the hays are adequate for individual goat needs (maintenance, gestation, lactation and, as necessary, growth).

INTRODUCTION

I have said that dry and early-gestation does typically require diets containing 8-10 percent CP and TDN of 4850 percent. Since many higher-quality grass hays meet these figures, no supplementation would be needed. I have also said that legume or grass/legume hays may contain enough protein and TDN to meet the increased needs of late-gestation and early-lactation does. If so, no supplementation would be needed. There are, however, certain situations in which protein and/ or energy supplementation could be nutritionally required (and might be economically feasible, depending on prices of the extra nutrients and on specific management objectives). These situations mostly occur when younger females are still growing, when does are carrying triplets (or unusually large twins), when does are suckling triplets or quads, or when does are not in good enough body condition. In such situations, it would be logical to separate the “more needy” animals from the “less needy” animals in order to offer costlier supplements only to the most needy. On the other hand, site-specific circumstances may not permit such separations. If so, owners face the dilemma of over-feeding one group or underfeeding the other group… bummer. Feeding a compromise (mid-point “average offering”) might make some owners feel better, but it would not circumvent the issue; owner’s choice, of course.

GUIDELINES FOR NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTATION I have constructed Table l to show the pounds of protein and TDN required daily for early- and late-gestation and for early-, mid-, and late- lactation does weighing 132 and 154 lb. For reader convenience, I also show these daily protein and TDN requirements as percentages of the average daily feed intake (DFI). The pounds of DFI shown in the table (and also the pounds of protein and TDN) are taken from the book, Nutrient Requirements of Small Ruminants, published by the National Research Council (NRC). This is the “bible” for goat nutritionists worldwide because it reflects international research results over many years using many breeds. I have converted NRC metric figures, and I also converted NRC figures from dry-matter basis to as-fed basis in order to reflect the fact that your goats typically eat hays containing about 10 percent moisture. Reader caveat: only a pure fool would think that all goats would always consume the “average” DFI shown in this book and in my derived Table, but I cannot even talk about percentages of protein and TDN in a total daily diet (ration) without using an estimated DFI. To illustrate, look at the first line-entry in Table 1; it shows a DFI of 3.50 lb./day for a 132 lb. doe in early gestation carrying twins. This doe requires 0.31 lb. of CP and 1.67 lb. of TDN per day. By dividing each of these figures by the DFI of 3.50 and multiplying by 100, I calculated the %CP in the diet to be 8.86 (.31/3.50 x 100) and the %TDN to be 47.8 (1.67/3.50 x 100). A second very important caveat: if this doe consumed, say, 10 percent less of this diet (3.15 lb. DFI), she would be short of protein by the same 10 percent (3.15 x 8.86% = 0.28 lb. CP, as compared to 0.31 lb needed — her performance could suffer). What to do with a doe that under-consumes? Raise the %CP by 10 percent to 9.70. Contrarily, if she consumed 10 percent more of the diet (3.85 lb. DFI), she would ingest 10 pecent more protein than she needed (which would be largely wasted). So, if she over-consumes, lower the %CP in her diet by 10 percent to 8.00. Such fine-tuning of diets is obviously unjustifiable for individual does in even a very small herd. Accordingly,

12 - The Boer Goat


OF GESTATING AND LACTATING DOES by Dr. Frank Pinkerton

one formulates diets based on the expected average consumption — and declares it a great victory. Yes, I concede that DFI will vary from day to day among animals, but it will usually be “equalized” over consecutive days (the rumen serves as a equilibrating tank). However, some portion of the goats will likely not get what they need. In point of fact, otherwise good genes for performance are sometimes lost, via culling, because individuals are not aggressive enough eaters.

bearing triplets require slightly more protein/day (and higher dietary %CP) than does bearing twins. As shown, dams with triplets also require a bit more daily TDN intake than those with twins; however, the dietary percentages of TDN are not appreciably different.

As you closely examine the figures in Table 1, certain principles become obvious. For example, the heavier the doe, the more nutrients are required. To illustrate, does weighing 154 lb. will, on the average, eat 10-11% more feed/ day than 132 lb. goats.

During early lactation (parturition to 45 days), the DFI of does, regardless of weight, is usually lower than needed (they simply can’t eat enough); this causes the animals to lose weight. During mid lactation (46-90 days), they eat more and body weight tends to stabilize; in late lactation (91-135 days), even though they typically eat somewhat less, they begin to gain weight as they dry up. (During the ensuing dry period, if they do not gain sufficient condition, they may need extra nutrients 45 days or so pre-breeding (called flushing).

See early gestation does carrying twins and compare their DFIs (3.89 lb. – 3.50 lb. = 0.39 lb./3.50 x 100 = 11.1% greater DFI). For the same weights of does carrying twins in late gestation, the increase in DFI is about 10.5 percent (4.11 -3.72 lb. = 0.39 lb./3.72 x 100 = 10.48). If you had does in similar status that weighed 176 lb., they would require 1011% more DFI than 154 lb. does; inversely, does weighing only 110 lb. in similar status would require about 10 percent less feed than 132 lb. does. A second principle is demonstrated when comparing nutritional needs of does (of the same weight and same number of kids en utero) as between early and late gestation. As evident, does in late gestation (last six to eight weeks) require more feed than comparable does in early gestation. Moreover, a third principle is here demonstrated: there are major differences in the levels of dietary protein (quantity and percentage) required for late-gestation does over early- gestation does. To illustrate, does carrying twins or triplets in early gestation require not less than 12 percent CP in the total ration while does carrying twins and triplets in late lactation require only about 9.0 percent CP. Note also a fourth principle: late-gestation does require higher TDN (quantity and percentage) than do early-gestation does, regardless of number of kids carried. Readers will also note a fifth principle: does carrying triplets require more DFI than does carrying twins. This holds true over different doe weights and across early and late stages of gestation. Similarly, a sixth principle indicates that does

Similar variations in nutrient needs across body weights, number of kids suckling, and stages of lactation are also observable.

Note a seventh principle: does suckling triplets require more DFI, more daily protein, and more daily TDN than does suckling twins, whether stated as actual daily intakes or as dietary percentages. Quads would require even more nutrients from the doe, of course. I have not shown nutrient needs for does with single kids during gestation and lactation because of space limitations, but the requirements for such does are 5-6% less (DFI, protein, TDN) than those needed for twin-bearing does. The application of these demonstrated principles of nutrition to practical herd management situations will be discussed in a follow-up article. In the meantime, a close examination of the percentages of dietary protein and TDN needed, as shown in Table 1, suggests strongly that forage-only feeding programs are quite doable if you have sufficient hays in the 10-13 percent CP range and 47-50 percent TDN range, asfed basis. Some extra grain (for TDN) would likely be required only for late-gestation does and for pregnant kids and thin yearling does. Moreover, some portion of large, heavy-milking does and yearling first-fresheners in early lactation might also benefit from a bit of concentrate (containing perhaps 16 percent CP and 60 percent TDN, or more). The Boer Goat - 13


More on this in the next issue (which will also contain selected hay composition figures for your use).

GUIDELINES FOR NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTATION

GOAT CLASS

WT, LB

DFI, LB

CP, LB

TDN, LB

%CP

%TDN

EARLY GESTATION

32

.50

31

1.67

8.86

47.8

WITH TWINS

154

3.89

.34

1.85

8.74

47.6

EARLY GESTATION

132

3.62

.33

1.74

9.12

48.1

WITH TRIPLETS

154

4.03

.37

1.94

9.18

47.9

LATE GESTATION

132

3.72

.45

2.25

12.20

60.5

WITH TWINS

154

4.11

.50

2.46

12.11

60.0

LATE GESTATION

132

3.94

.50

2.35

12.69

59.6

WITH TRIPLETS

154

4.38

.55

2.62

12.56

59.8

EARLY LACTATION

132

4.28

.46

2.05

10.74

47.9

WITH TWINS

154

4.72

.55

2.24

11.65

47.4

EARLY LACTATION,

132

4.48

.57

2.13

12.72

47.5

WITH TRIPLETS

154

4.96

.63

2.35

12.70

47.4

MID LACTATION,

132

4.57

.46

2.18

10.06

47.7

WITH TWINS

154

5.08

.50

2.42

9.84

47.6

MID LACTATION,

132

5.11

.54

2.44

10.56

47.7

WITH TRIPLETS

154

5.65

.59

2.71

0.44

48.0

LATE LACTATION,

132

4.08

.37

1.96

9.08

48.0

WITH TWINS

154

4.55

.41

2.18

9.01

47.9

LATE LACTATION,

132

4.57

.43

2.18

9.41

47.7

WITH TRIPLETS

154

5.08

.48

2.42

9.45

47.6

DR. FRANK PINKERTON is one of America’s speakers

best on

known meat

writers

goat

and

nutrition,

marketing and management. He has been involved in the goat industry for over thirty years; actively working with 14 - The Boer Goat

dairy goat, Angora goat, Cashmere goat,

TAMU system in 1997, he also worked on

Boer goat and meat goat producers. In

several short-term livestock development

1968 Dr. Pinkerton joined the University

programs in Morocco, Nigeria, Egypt,

of Kentucky and was sent to Thailand

Syria, Sudan and Iran for the USFGC. In

as livestock specialist. He also served as

1978 TAMU reassigned him to the task of

Administrator of the nascent Northeast

developing the International Dairy Goat

Agricultural

Extension

Research Center. In 1983 Dr. Pinkerton

Center. In 1973 he went to Tokyo as Asian

relocated to Langston University to do

Director of the U.S. Feed Grains Council

extension work in dairy, Angora and

where he conducted demonstrations and

meat goats. In 2010, with the assistance

educational programs using American

of Terry Hankins, long time friend and

feed grains in beef, dairy, swine and

publisher of the Goat Rancher magazine,

poultry operations in Japan, Korea, Hong

Frank’s book, “A Compilation of the

Kong and the Philippines. Before moving

Wit and Wisdom of ‘The Goat Man’”

on to Prairie View A&M U, a unit of the

was published.

Research

and


BREEDER’S

MCGEE GOAT FARM,

owned by Ralph and Barbara McGee, is located in Lawrenceburg, Tenn. They specialize in goats of all colors: blacks, reds, spots and dapples, with a few traditionals. They answer a few questions about their operation.

By Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.

1. HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN THE BOER GOAT INDUSTRY? In 2003, we purchased a small farm near Lawrenceburg. Much of it was overgrown with kudzu, blackberry vines and wild roses, so we bought 11 traditional Boer goats to help clear it – and they did! During the next few years, we purchased some very nice red and black Boers from consignment sales, and our addition of Bon Joli/Lazy S-T Sir Spotsalot and Bon Joli Kingsnake as herd sires has produced a really colorful herd.

2. HOW MANY GOATS DO YOU HAVE, AND WHAT DO YOU USE THEM FOR? We now have more than 250 Boer goats – reds, blacks, paints, dapples, spotted and a few traditionals. Ralph loves his goats and hates to part with any of them, but we do sell some at a meat goat sale in Columbia, Tenn; a few off the farm; and some in the Splash of Color Sale and the Color Connection Labor Day Sale. We don’t show goats, but our friends, Garth and Kelley Eledge, have shown a few for us.

4. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES YOU HAVE FACED, AND WHAT DID YOU DO TO OVERCOME THEM? Our greatest challenge is trying to control the parasites in our herd. We have used several different dewormers and follow a fairly strict deworming program.

5. WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR YOUNG PRODUCERS GETTING INTO THE BOER GOAT INDUSTRY? We would advise young producers to start with just a few goats with good bloodlines – especially the herd sire. They need to consider how much time and money they will be able to spend taking care of their herd. To learn more about McGee Goat Farm, please visit www.mcgeegoatfarm.com.

3. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART ABOUT RAISING BOER GOATS? Definitely the kids! It’s such a joy to watch them jump and climb and play.

The Boer Goat - 15


Roeling Chance Boer Goats Lacey Roe (859)340-0188

BAB Boer Goats Bailey Bergherm (812) 870-0924

KDCL Boer Goats Kurt, Donna, Logan, & Chelsea (859) 801-1480

Goodwin Boer Goats Doug & Leigh Ann Goodwin (304) 646- 0834

Total Boer Concepts Adam & Lanette Keene (612) 963-3357

Chestnut Springs Chad Broyles & Patrick Aliff (304) 589-3972

Boer Brothers Goat Farm Michael West & Cody Coffey (270) 566-4939

Perry Farms Boer Goats Isaiah Perry (615) 888-2495

Hidden Falls Ridge Boer Goats Sue Wall (812) 690-0910

Rising Sun Boer Goats Joey Clark (740) 643- 2060

Dixieland Ranch Marshall & Janet Griffith (615) 444.8598

Advance Boer Genetics Aaron & Denise Crabtree (740) 701-0364

Westfall Boer Goats Cindy Westfall (937) 215- 4143

Arnold’s Time Well Spent Boer Goats Dave & Kim Arnold (814) 623-1857

Billups Farms Dennis, Shari, Emily, & Corey Billups (606) 473-0040

Carolina Connection Boer Goats Robby Bell & David Eubanks (803) 924-8094

SNS Boer Goats Shelia Smith (660) 734-3115

Wireman Family Farm Jeff, Missi, & Ashley Wireman (606) 923-7631

Knob Creek Farm Frank & Heath Hickox (706) 490-3350

Topnotch Livestock Gary Mitchell (517) 719-5892

Redden Brothers Livestock Tom & Jackie Redden (812) 278-4697

Catalogs available at http://www.boergoats.com


Time Well Spent-Shot In the Dark Sells!

Offspring Sells! Sire of 2014 National Champion Percentage Doe!

BAB4 Fired Up Sells and is nearly ennobled! (ABGA# 10566652)

KDCL Miss Fancy Pants Sells with 32 Points!

BA CSF Booty Call Sells!

1HFR Hearts on Fire Placed 3rd out of 48 at Nationals! Flushmates Sell! (BAB4 Fired Up X 2M Boer Goats Arm Candy)

SNSD Blings Jewel Sells with 71 Points!

She Sells! BDK2 Ripper's Reload X 2DOX Storm Surge


NATIONAL SHOW

GRAND ISLAND, NE JUNE 9 - 14, 2014 We knew he was good, but you just don’t expect those kind of results for yourself. I take everything as it comes. One year we can be the best, and next year not so good. We are going to enjoy this, work hard and hope for the best again next year. -Kent Hollingsworth, IN The judge scared me when he smacked the goat! I am going to bring her back to nationals next year to see if I can do it again! Big thanks to Newton Farms for their help. -Sydney Lewis, IN

NOT PICTURED CHAMPION JUNIOR SHOWMAN Mattie Frenton CHAMPION PEE WEE SHOWMAN Piper Fisher

National Champion Senior Showman Noah Teel

National Champion Fullblood Buck Grand Champion Junior Fullblood Buck Newton Farms Back To Square Kent Hollingsworth

National Champion Fullblood Doe Grand Champion Junior Fullblood Doe Newton Farms Ima Smokin’ Star C242 Sydney Lewis

National Reserve Champion Fullblood Doe Grand Champion Yearling Fullblood Doe 2M Boer Goats Sophia Noah Teel

National Champion Percentage Doe Grand Champion Yearling Percentage Doe Newton Farms Squared Blonde Noah Teel

National Reserve Champion Percentage Doe Grand Champion Junior Percentage Doe MFR1 Sunday’s Best Raelynn Butler

NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD BUCK MCR Power Surge Trey Chavana RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR PERCENTAGE DOE MFR1 Devil in Disguise Raelynn Butler RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING PERCENTAGE DOE SLKY So Real Noah Teel GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE CLD1 Tangletrees Trace of Snow Sydney Lewis RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE Bosque Valley Festus Fame Reilly Butler RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD DOE TST1 Windy Acres Paint the Town Noah Teel 18 - The Boer Goat


I’ve been impressed from top to bottom. To see kids drag out this many good ones is truly remarkable. The junior association is the most important aspect of the goat business. Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Buck Kids Nicholas Pitlick

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Bucks Tyler Peterson

JABGA Judge Josh Taylor, Stillwater, OK

RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD DOE MCR Center of Attention Trey Chavana GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE CGJG Gibbs Star Logan Gibbs Grand Premier Fullblood Exhibitor Noal Teel

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Doe Kids Cole Hammett

RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE MVP Westfall’s Ms. Magoo Matthew Westfall RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK Teel JB Man of Steel Noah Teel GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK MCR Power Surge Trey Chavana

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Doe Kids Noah Teel

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Does Noah Teel

RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK MVP Westfall’s Top Dog Matthew Westfall GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK SGR Cat Scratch Fever *Ennobled* Tyler Peterson RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK MCR Money Maker Carlie Callahan

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Does Matthew Westfall

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Kids Both Sexes Noah Teel

RESERVE CHAMPION BEST PAIR OF FULLBLOOD BUCK KIDS Braxton Luchini The Boer Goat - 19


RESERVE PREMIER FULLBLOOD EXHIBITOR Matthew Westfall OVERALL PREMIER BREEDER Maddison Fenton RESERVE CHAMPION BEST PAIR OF PERCENTAGE DOES Heather Hubler RESERVE PREMIER PERCENTAGE EXHIBITOR Raelynn Butler

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Kids Both Sexes Cole Hammett

Grand Champion Fullblood Get of Sire Noah Teel

Grand Champion Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids Raelynn Butler

Reserve Champion Fullblood Get of Sire Cole Hammett

Grand Champion Fullblood Breeders Herd Evie Gates

Overall Premier Exhibitor Noah Teel

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids Taeah Fisher

Grand Champion Best Pair of Percentage Does Noah Teel

Grand Champion Percentage Produce of Dam Raelynn Butler

Grand Champion Percentage Get of Sire Taeah Fisher

Reserve Champion Percentage Get of Sire Matthew Westfall

Grand Champion Percentage Doe Herd Tyler Peterson

20 - The Boer Goat

Reserve Champion Percentage Produce of Dam Reilly Butler

Grand Premier Percentage Exhibitor Noah Teel


JABGA BRED & OWNED

Overall National Champion Buck JB Man of Steel Buck OverallTeel National Champion Noah Teel Teel JB Man of Steel Noah Teel

Overall Reserve Champion Buck MADI Bernie Overall Reserve Champion Buck Madison Fenton MADI Bernie Madison Fenton

Overall National Champion Fullblood Doe COLAChampion Catniss C19 Overall National Fullblood Doe ColeCatniss Hammett COLA C19 Cole Hammett

Overall Reserve Champion Fullblood Doe MADI BellancaFullblood Doe Overall Reserve Champion Madison Fenton MADI Bellanca Madison Fenton

Overall National Champion Percentage Doe MFR1Champion Sunday's Best Overall National Percentage Doe Raelynn Butler MFR1 Sunday's Best Raelynn Butler

Overall Reserve Champion Percentage Doe Teel Champion Loaded Beauty Overall Reserve Percentage Doe Noah Teel Teel Loaded Beauty Noah Teel

Goat Association. This year, over 600 people attended the annual banquet, and during the event, a slideshow highlighting every national champion was played. The slideshow, created by Ervin Chavana, past president, showcased the best Boer goats over the last 20 years.

EACH YEAR at the National Show, members gather to celebrate and honor each other, as well as to raise money for the Junior American Boer

New staff members Robyn Scherer, Director of Marketing and Communication, and Cindy Dusek, Youth Coordinator, were introduced to the membership.The Ambassador to the Breed awards were also presented, which were given to the 16

founding members of the American Boer Goat Association. The highlight of the banquet was the JABGA auction, which raised nearly $11,000 through silent and live auction donations. The items in the auction were donated by members and supporting companies. At the end of the evening, the Sire of Merit, Doe of Excellence and Ennoblement awards were presented. A total of 100 Ennoblements, 26 Doe of Excellence and two Sire of Merit Awards were given. The Boer Goat - 21


NATIONAL SHOW

GRAND ISLAND, NE JUNE 9 - 14, 2014 JUDGES: ANTON WARD, SCOTT PRUETT, SHERRI STEPHENS

National Champion Fullblood Buck ROR1 EGGS Fixin’ to Party Iris, Samuel & Deanna Lerena

National Reserve Champion Fullblood Buck TST1 Windy Acres Triple D Iris, Samuel & Deanna Lerena; Terry & Sue Taylor

National Champion Fullblood Doe TST1 Windy Acres Precious Jewel Taeah Fisher; Terry & Sue Taylor

National Reserve Champion Fullblood Doe AABG Busy Being Fabulous Bailey Bergherm

National Champion Percentage Doe BGBG1 Cranberry Ice Knox Larner

National Reserve Champion Percentage Doe AGNEW Just Showed Up Knox Larner

Grand Champion Junior Percentage Doe GSR Focus on Me Sarah Brend

Reserve Champion Junior Percentage Doe River Valley Farms Make Me Blush Cindy & Whitney Black

Grand Champion Yearling Percentage Doe BGBG1 Cranberry Ice Knox Larner

22 - The Boer Goat


Reserve Champion Yearling Percentage Doe AGNEW Just Showed Up Knox Larner

Grand Champion Senior Percentage Doe Bosque Valley Festus Fame Reilly Butler

Reserve Champion Senior Percentage Doe Walking K Agnew Rip This Alex Prickett

Grand Champion Junior Fullblood Doe AABG Busy Being Fabulous Bailey Bergherm, IN

Reserve Champion Junior Fullblood Doe 7PML Lyons 25 Rob & Neil Marjorie

Grand Champion Yearling Fullblood Doe TST1 Windy Acres Precious Jewel Taeah Fisher; Terry & Sue Taylor

Reserve Champion Yearling Fullblood Doe 2M Boer Goats Square Peg Rob & Neil Marjorie

Grand Champion Senior Fullblood Doe TH Y9013 Rob & Neil Marjorie

Reserve Champion Senior Fullblood Doe CGJG Gibbs Star Logan Gibbs

Grand Champion Junior Fullblood Buck TVVF Beyond the Limits Tyler Van Voorst

Reserve Champion Junior Fullblood Buck BF02 Bjerke Farms Dom Peri Faith Bjerke

Grand Champion Yearling Fullblood Buck TST1 Windy Acres Triple D Iris, Samuel & Deanna Lerena; Terry & Sue Taylor


Reserve Champion Yearling Fullblood Buck DHTBG Go Big Red Kathie & Katie Diemer

Grand Champion Senior Fullblood Buck ROR1 EGGS Fixin’ to Party Iris, Samuel & Deanna Lerena

Reserve Champion Senior Fullblood Buck MVP M&C Farms Rey Ban Matthew Westfall

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Buck Kids Sammy Lerena

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Bucks Tyler Von Voorst

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Bucks Brad Mackey

Premier Sire Award *AABG NBD Square One* Newton Farms

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Doe Kids Taeah Fisher

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullbllood Does Marge Newton

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Kids Both Sexes Tyler Van Voorst

Grand Champion Fullblood Produce of Dam Newton Farms

Reserve Champion Fullblood Produce of Dam Justin Stuart

24 - The Boer Goat


NOT PICTURED: RESERVE CHAMPION BEST PAIR OF FULLBLOOD BUCK KIDS Matthew Westfall

GRAND CHAMPION BEST PAIR OF FULLBLOOD DOE KIDS Cecil and Sharon Swepston

RESERVE CHAMPION BEST PAIR OF FULLBLOOD DOES Cecil and Sharon Swepston RESERVE CHAMPION BEST PAIR OF FULLBLOOD KIDS BOTH SEXES Cole Hammett RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD GET OF SIRE Broken S Ranch, Cecil & Sharon Swepston GRAND CHAMPION PERCENTAGE DOE HERD 4-L Boer Goats GRAND PREMIER PERCENTAGE EXHIBITOR Knox Larner

Grand Champion Fullblood Get of Sire Justin Stuart

Grand Champion Breeders Fullblood Herd Broken S Ranch

Grand Premier Fullblood Exhibitor Taeah Fisher

Reserve Premier Fullblood Exhibitor Samual Lerena

Donald Bird Premier Breeder Award Windy Acres, Terry & Sue Taylor

Grand Champion Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids Sarah Brend

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids Lil Dudes Show Goats

Grand Champion Best Pair of Percentage Does Cindy & Whitney Black

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Percentage Does Heather Hubler

Grand Champion Percentage Produce of Dam Sarah Brend

Reserve Champion Percentage Produce of Dam Matthew Westfall

Grand Champion Percentage Get of Sire Taeah Fisher

Reserve Champion Percentage Get of Sire Matthew Westfall

Reserve Champion Percentage Doe Herd River Valley Farms

Reserve Premier Percentage Exhibitor Reilly Butler

The Boer Goat - 25


ABGA HIRES NEW DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATION The American Boer Goat Association is pleased to announce that Robyn Scherer, M.Agr., 26, of Kiowa, Colo., has joined the organization as the Director of Marketing and Communication. She will be responsible for all of the marketing, communications and public relations aspects of the ABGA. “I feel so honored to be able to work on behalf of such wonderful people and beautiful livestock. I am excited to help improve ABGA, and increase communication with the membership. I believe the members are the lifeblood of ABGA, and look forward to showcasing and promoting everything the membership is doing,” said Scherer. She has been a member of ABGA since 2010, and has written for The Boer Goat Magazine for the past three years. Scherer is a graduate of Colorado State University, where she completed a dual Bachelor of Science in Animal Science and Agricultural Business, and a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and Technical Communication in May 2010. She graduated with a Master’s of Agriculture in Integrated Resource Management, also from CSU, in May of 2011. While at CSU, she served as a Ram Handler, as well as being involved in several student agricultural organizations, including Sigma Alpha Sorority, a professional agricultural sorority, where she currently serves on the national board. She works with several industry organizations, including FFA and 4-H. Scherer was a participant in 11th class of the Colorado Agricultural Leadership Program (CALP), which she graduated from in April of 2014. Scherer grew up on her parents’ equine operation in Cedaredge, Colo. She is an American FFA Degree recipient, and her experience in FFA led her to start her own business, Champion Livestock. She raises purebred Hampshire and Exotic/crossbred pigs, alpacas, as well as Boer, Alpine, LaMancha, Nubian and Nigerian Dwarf goats.

CONTACT INFORMATION: Cell: 325-812-5593 Email: robyn@abga.org

HUMANE – BLOODLESS – DRUG FREE EARLY CASTRATION

Proudly

DELAYED CASTRATION

MADE INUSA

She focuses her livestock production on breeding livestock for 4-H and FFA projects. “I believe that youth are the future of any industry, and I love working with 4-H and FFA members on their projects,” she said. Previously, Scherer worked as the Director of Communication for the Colorado Farm Bureau, where she was responsible for all of the communications and public relations of the Colorado federation. She served as the editor and publisher of CFB's bi-monthly publication, Colorado Way of Life, and oversaw all aspects of the publication. Before that, she worked as a reporter and photographer for The Fence Post, an agricultural publication that covers the states of Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming. 26 - The Boer Goat

CALL FOR A DISTRIBUTOR NEAR YOU.

800-858-5974

www.CallicrateBanders.com


ABGA Sanctioned

B o eThursday, r G oat Show November 20

Official Media ParTNer

Junior Wether Goat Show - Wednesday, November 19

North American International Livestock Exposition * Expo Dates: November 4-21 * Kentucky Exposition Center PO Box 36367 * Louisville, KY 40233-6367 * Phone 502-595-3166 * Fax 502-367-5299 * www.livestockexpo.org


SELECTING

FOR MEAT GOAT PRODUCTION by Fred C. Homeyer, South African Boer Goat Breeder and Judge

You may contact, Dr. Fred C. Homeyer, at Antelope Creek Ranch, Box 47, Robert Lee, TX 76945 (325)-944-2056 • ancreek@yahoo.com • www.antelopecreek.com THE MOST IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION IN SELECTION OF MEAT GOAT BREEDING STOCK IS THE PRODUCTION OF RED MEAT. Goat meat is consumed by 63 percent of the world’s population and as the ethnic groups immigrate to the United States, they bring their taste for goat meat with them, which would seem to indicate that goat meat production is a 21st industry livestock endeavor.

should be deep with considerable width and depth of skin to insure good muscle development in the stifle area. The back should be level and long with a deep barrel for body capacity. The rump (from hook bone to pin bone) should be long and relatively level. A little angle in the rump is desirable as a goat with a totally straight rump will have a hard time standing on its hind legs to eat browse in the trees. Too steep of a rump will result in birthing problems for kids.

strong maternal traits and mothering ability can possibly be indicated through existence of these hair swirls on the back legs of bucks. The testicles on bucks should be equal sized in a single sack as some people feel that good shaped testicles indicates that the doe kids produced by this buck will have good shaped functional udders with a strong medial suspensory ligament.

Considerable research in beef cattle indicates that the hair swirls over the In this article, some of the main criteria body are manifestations of proper Issues of masculinity and femininity are involved in the selection of meat goat glandular function. I see no reason of prime importance. Bucks should look breeding stock will be considered. that the same this applies to goats. very masculine and does should exhibit Whether male (buck) or female (doe) For example, a hair swirl located in the femininity, being more refined especially the goat should be boldly three middle of the barrel down low is called in the head and dimensional, that the pancreatic swirl (pancreas located neck. Bucks should is, long, deep and “ISSUES OF MASCULINITY here in body) and may be a indicator be bigger in the wide. The animal AND FEMININITY ARE OF of good reproduction traits. Two hair front end, as they should exhibit more PRIME IMPORTANCE.” swirls that appear on each side of the have to compete than adequate front of the chest are called thymic for the does, and covering of muscle swirls (thymus gland located here) and does should be bigger in the rear end, over the body especially in the rear may be an indication of a strong immune as they need capacity to hold babies. end (loin, thigh and buttock). The goat system. These observations are “food A sign of masculinity in bucks is when should have good skeletal dimension, for thought” and need more study and the circumference of the hearth girth be structurally correct, be muscular research in goats, both meat and dairy exceeds the topline length (from first and have eye appeal. The goat should animals. cervicle vertebrae to the pin bone) by walk on sound feet and legs with feet 10 percent. A sign of femininity in does that have hooves that point forward The head shape predicts many traits is when the circumference at the flank neither slanting inward or outward. in the body. In Boer goats, the South exceeds the circumference of the heart The goat should have adequate width Africans say, “Breed the head – if you girth (measurement just behind the in the body from front to back with breed the head properly the body goes front legs). tight shoulders and straight legs. Once along.” Wide set eyes, strong nostrils we have determined that the goat can and a powerful underjaw are desirable. Predictors of muscling, maternal traits travel efficiently in the pasture over an A triangular shaped head that exhibits or mothering ability, width of body extended lifetime the correct bite in the power and presence shows strength. and length of body can be exhibited by mouth should be observed, that is, the The head should look like that of a cape width between the eyes (proportional teeth in the bottom jaw meet with the buffalo (wild ox in South Africa). “The to width of the shoulders and width gum on the top jaw with no over bite buck looks like your of loin), length of or under bite. (Goats do not have teeth banker – you owe the face, which is “BREED THE HEAD – IF YOU in the upper jaw.) Goats are browsers him money”, say measured from BREED THE HEAD PROPERLY and eat primarily a meter and above the South Africans. horn set to muzzle THE BODY GOES ALONG.” the ground on a diet of leaves, twigs (proportional to Balance and and weeds which means that they need length from hook physical bearing should be considered strong teeth and gums to cut their food. bone to pin bone or rump – you can’t in the selection process. Balance is when have a short body with a long rump), When viewed from the rear, the rear you let your eyes track from nose to tail circumference of the forearm (predictor hocks should be straight and separated of the goat and your eyes never stop of overall mass and muscle) and more from each other exhibiting overall width and all the parts fit together and the sleekness in the head and neck of does of body. The area from anus to testicles goat looks like a statue carved in stone to indicate femininity. Maternal traits in bucks and anus to udder in does and makes you smile. If your eyes stop and mothering ability can possibly should have a lot of meat and muscle. as they trace through the animal, that be predicted through observation of This area is called the twist or stitch. is where the goat has parts that don’t circular hair whorls or swirls halfway The widest area when viewed from the fit. About balance I have heard is said, down both back legs of does. Prediction rear should be stifle joint to stifle joint. “I don’t know what it is but you know of bucks that will produce doe with When viewed from the side, the flank it when you see it.” Physical bearing or 28 - The Boer Goat


pride in itself is a desirable trait in both bucks and does. It is sometimes called aristocratic bearing or “eye of the eagle”. Not all goats have this property, but the one’s that do catch your eye. In kids, it is the kid that jumps up on the feed trough or climbs to a high spot and stands proudly as if to say, “I am a beautiful goat and I give you the privilege of looking at me.” In mature animals, it is unmistakable when you see it. The goat will pose and say “take a good look at the most beautiful goat you have ever seen.” The proper angle of the neck coming out of the topline should ideally be 40 percent. More then 50 percent will result in an animal that has a weak front end

and will break down in the pasture over time due to shoulders not tying properly into the body (called hyperextended scapula). The ideal angle at the point of the shoulder (where the scapula or shoulder blade connects with the humerus) is 137 degrees. A greater angle creates a goat whose front end assembly is badly out of balance with front legs too straight similar to posted legs in the rear end. These properties result in the goat breaking down in the pasture over time. The proper angle at the rear hock is ideally 160 degrees. A greater angle in the rear hock results in the goat having “posty” or “posted legs” that will cause it to break down in the pasture over time.

Short, strong pasterns are a must to provide a shock absorber for the body as the goat travels around the pasture. A study of genetic background including number of kids produced per kidding is important. First time kidders should preferably have single kids, but the ones that have twins will usually be more prolific over their lifetime. In does, a tight udder that does not extend below the hocks is desirable as well as no more than two functional teats per side of the udder that are totally separated. Separated teats in a multiple teat situation should provide for viability when the kid nurses. A single orifice in each teat is desirable.

IN SUMMARY YOU WANT A GOAT THAT IS AND POSSESSES: V Skeletal dimension V Structural correctness V Muscularity V Eye appeal V Good width between the eyes V Long face from horn set to muzzle V Big circumference of the forearm V Proud physical bearing V Long, straight legs with strong pasterns, straight hocks and feet that point forward V Signs of masculinity in the buck (big heart girth exceeding topline length) V Signs of femininity in the doe where circumference at the flank exceeds circumference at the heart girth with more refinement particularly in head and neck V Sound genetic potential through multiple kids per birth V Separated teats on each side of udder to facilitate kid nursing V Good bite in mouth with bottom teeth touching upper gum V Angle of head coming out of the topline ideally about 40 degrees V Angle at the rear hock ideally 160 degrees V Angle at the point of the shoulder ideally 137 degrees You should be aware that most of these traits are exhibited in young goats no more than 30 days or one month old. The goat tells us what it is and is going to be, we just have to learn to “hear” or “see” what it is telling us. GOOD LUCK BREEDING MEAT GOATS!

DR. FRED C. HOMEYER is a retired college professor of Computer Science having taught at the University of Texas at Austin and Angelo State University at San Angelo, Texas for a total of 38 years. He has been raising South African Boer goats and Dorper sheep at his Antelope Creek Ranch in Robert Lee, Texas for 20 years. He lacked one college course attending medical school and as a result goat health and goat medicine are primary interests. He

receives emails from around the world on goat health issues every month. He is considered to be an international Boer goat judge having traveled around the world nine times judging Boer goats and presenting seminars about goats and goat raising. He was the first American to judge Boer goats in Australia when he judged the RNA Queensland Royal Show in 2006 and again in 2008 in Brisbane, Australia. Dr. Homeyer is the only person certified as a Boer goat judge by all three Boer Goat Associations in the U.S. (ABGA, IBGA and USBGA) and also holds the designation of International Boer Goat Judge for Brazil. He has taught numerous judging schools to the Brazilian judges as well as the Mexican judges, as well

as Breeders Workshops and South African Boer Goat Judging School in New South Wales, Australia with the South African who judged the Australian National Show in 2010 and is the only American that has taught a South African judging school with a South African. His current research interests include extrapolation of physical traits from the observation of other traits and evaluation of caprine hair coats as an indication of proper glandular function to predict a strong immune system, fertility and maternal traits. Dr. Homeyer has a passion for the Boer goat and is internationally recognized for his efforts and international travels. He is truly a worldwide ambassador for the South African Boer Goat. The ABGA Boer Goat Magazine - 29


JABGA INVOLVED... AT THE NATIONAL SHOW AND BEYOND TOP 10 TIPS FOR GIVING A GREAT PRESENTATION Know Your Topic Knowing your topic inside out and back to front is absolutely critical to giving a confident and successful presentation. Knowledge is power – the more you know, the more empowered you will feel. Giving presentations is about information exchange. Use conversational language and personal experiences. Know Your Audience Knowing who will be listening to your presentation is very important, as you need to tailor it to the needs of the audience. Understanding the culture of those listening will help you monitor the inflections in your voice, control your body language and tailor your overall delivery. Have an Expert Mindset Be confident in the fact that you have been asked to talk in front of an audience on a topic that you are familiar with. It is a great way to learn and develop a new skill. Familiarize Yourself with the Room Know the room and what would work best in regards to working the space. Test what the room looks like, what the sound system sounds like and run through your presentation to ensure there are no technical glitches. Practice Once your presentation is written, you must start practicing it aloud in a private place. Practice it over and over until it sounds right and you are confident with

JABGA PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST They say if you can grasp a subject, the words will flow with ease when trying to convey your knowledge to others. The Junior American Boer Goat Association (JABGA) juniors know their subject! The 2014 JABGA public speaking topics were: What are your daily activities with your goats? (PeeWee, 8 and under); What does your goat mean to you? (Junior, 9-14); and What could you do to improve the goat industry? (Senior, 15-18). A total of 19 juniors participated in the speaking contest.

the delivery. You can go the extra step and record yourself, then review the presentation as an audience member. Visualization If you can see it, you can achieve it! Visualization is a powerful tool that allows your subconscious mind to believe your thoughts and imaginations. So if you can see and hear yourself giving the presentation of a lifetime, you are on the road to success. Work the Room Knowing your audience and topic go hand-in-hand with working the room. It is always better to stand than sit. Make good eye contact with the audience and move around the room so that each section feels like you are talking to them. Breathe Remember to breathe when you are giving a presentation. Pause when you speak and keep composed. Do Not Read From Notes Reading from notes can insinuate a lack of confidence and/or knowledge on the topic of presentation. It is acceptable to glance at notes throughout your presentation but be mindful not to read from them continuously. Speak with Conviction and Confidence Speaking with passion and conviction captures an audience. Believing in what you are saying is key to nailing a presentation.

30 - The Boer Goat

PEEWEE

JUNIOR

1 Teighum Wiedebush

1 Clint Demmitt

2 Emma Wrede

2 Levi Wiedebush

3 Kennadee Wiedebush

3 Samantha Phillips

SENIOR

1 JaelAnn Hoover 2 Anna Schmidt 3 Cody Wafford


JUNIOR SHOW RECAP

Q&A with JABGA Judge Josh Taylor, Stillwater, Okla.

Was the quality of livestock the same or above average when compared to other shows you have judged? I felt the quality of the goats exhibited by the junior kids was outstanding. Very comparable to the open show, just without the depth. I believe the juniors always handle themselves appropriately in the ring. Most are very humble in winning and congratulatory in losing. This is the essence of proper teaching from mom and dad. Overall, the experience was great. Have you seen a shift in junior exhibitors becoming more involved in showing in the open shows as well? I think the shift in the juniors is starting to become more prevalent across the nation. If we start to look at who is showing the majority of the goats, you will find mostly juniors in the ring. I think this is due to the fact that the kids can just flat out show better than most of us adults. They have more drive and willingness to try new things and put in the extra work that adults may not have time for. That is why we see more and more juniors in the ring and in the open shows than ever before. I think the juniors have embraced the showing aspect of our industry full throttle. They have formed lasting friendships across the country because of this and have developed several relationships and contacts with adult breeders, also. Probably the best scenario possible for young folks nowadays, in my opinion. As adults, how do we continue this growth and momentum? I do believe we, as adult breeders, need to nourish the youths’ idea of their own breeding programs. They have the showing part down, now let’s get them focused on raising them. This is why I believe the bred-and-owned show is probably one of the most important shows to institute into our JABGA national show. Put more emphasis on the breeding and make it a bigger deal to those kids by giving that particular

show its own day and its own focus in the spotlight. And lastly, with the increased involvement of our juniors and the friendship gained by all, I think the next logical step is to solidify and promote that aspect of our association to outside goat owners. Start trying to increase our junior memberships and involvement overall. One way to possibly make an impact is to institute an unregistered portion to our doe shows. This has the potential to open a floodgate of new junior members to our association. If we can increase the involvement at the local and regional levels, it will spill over to the national scene. This will lead to a stronger junior membership, which we need for the future. Regardless of whether you are a diehard fullblood breeder, a straight-up wether producer, or you dabble a little in both, we all have to agree with one thing. We all want to see more kids with any kind of goat in their hands!

MORE KIDS + MORE GOATS = A STRONGER ASSOCIATION AND MORE OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL.

The Boer Goat - 31


There are so many people that help make our show happen and we would like to extend a

to the exhibitors, judges, parents, facility staff, volunteers and people of Grand Island, Nebraska for making our

show a success! In addition to these

great people, here are a few of the other things that made this show one to remember!

ABGA NATIONAL SHOW A BIG THANK YOU TO VICKI STICH, ABGA NATIONAL SHOW DIRECTOR Vicki Stich has been with the ABGA for the past 10 years and spent the last four as region 9 director. As National Show Director, she was responsible for the food preparation and all food trays, decorations, end caps, and working alongside the facility management.

“I just wanted it to be a success – when you put a woman in charge, if nothing else, you’re going to get something pretty. I think this show has been a huge success!” said Stich. “It’s been an experience that I would never change!”

YOUTH ACTIVITIES JABGA members had opportunities to take part in a public speaking contest, goat judging contest, photography, scrapbook & costume contests along with a fun boot scramble. Juniors not only gained knowledge in the ring, but also built on leadership skills through contests and peer involvement opportunities.

32 - The Boer Goat


FANTASTIC FACILITY ABGA members loved the facility and hospitality that was extended in Grand Island, Neb. A new, functional and huge facility at Fonner Park; no humidity and great air-conditioned barns were some of the main perks. The show was also highlighted in the Grand Island newspaper, twice.

END CAP FARM DISPLAYS This was the first year to sell the end cap displays. The breeders did a great job displaying their operations and sprucing up the barns!

Looking to expand your herd? Funds are now available to increase goat numbers. NLPA has developed this one-of-akind program that adds a new dimension to the Sheep & Goat Fund for new and current producers looking for a loan to increase their herd with breeding stock. • Minimum loan amount of $50,000 with a five-year maturity date. • Proceeds may only be used for the purchase of breeding animals, not used for other operating expenses. • Generational transition of goat operations and/or those with a developed mentor relationship with an experienced producer are encouraged to apply.

TURNOUT toAremember ABGA

1,091 entries 234 exhibitors

JABGA 455 entries 129 exhibitors

The Sheep & Goat Fund encourages innovation and efficiency in the sheep and goat industries by providing credit to eligible and qualified entities. These loans are a valuable tool for sheep and goat producers who need assistance in financing projects that go beyond the farm gate.

1-800-237-7193 ext. 10 - www.sheepandgoatfund.com The Boer Goat - 33


DIABETES AWARENESS was selected by the American Boer Goat Association’s Board of Directors to be represented at this year’s National Show. Our efforts RAISED $1679.86 for the American Diabetes Association to assist their mission to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all the people affected by diabetes. If anyone would like to contribute that did not have a chance to, please visit WWW.DIABETES.ORG for information on how to do so.


Please Make All Payments Payable To: Encore Visions

CLASSIFIEDS

Completed Subscription Cards Mail To: PO BOX 243 HASKELL, TX 79521

MERCHANDISE & SERVICES PENNSYLVANIA

TEXAS

ARKANSAS

Pit Kemmer, Auctioneer 931-335-4628 www.kemmerranch.com

36 - The Boer Goat


GEORGIA

IOWA

IOWA

IOWA

MARYLAND

MISSOURI

OHIO

TENNESSEE

TEXAS

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WEST VIRGINIA

BOER BREEDERS BY STATE

ARKANSAS

Windrush Farms RAISING TOP-NOTCH BOER GOATS & SUPERIOR AUSTRALIAN KELPIES

VERN THORP/641-660-1390 SUSAN THORP/641-660-1388

www.windrushboers.com | windrushia@gmail.com 1959 HWY 63 | New Sharon, IA 50207

ERIK AND SUSAN GRILL 304.832.6194 P.O. Box 152 - Lindside, WV 24951 gramacfarm@hotmail.com www.gramacfarm.com

The Boer Goat - 37


Heartland Showcase Boer Goat Sale August 24, 2014 Sale Time: 12 P.M.

Consigners: CP3, Lanham Farms, StripeBoers, JCKN, Tate Farms, Exor Boer Goats, Zook Hillside Farms, Rocken 3E Boer Goats, Road 20 Farms, Quality Boer Goats, Criser Ranch, Sunflower Boer Goats, and Bushwhacker Boer Goats

AMERICAN LEGION FAIRGROUNDS 100 EAST COUNTY ROAD COLUMBUS, KANSAS WWW.HEARTLANDSHOWCASEBOERGOATSALE.COM High selling lot prizes being offered along with door prizes being drawn for buyers that are present.

To watch or bid online visit: WWW.DVAUCTION.COM Auctioneer: Lonnie Stripe Announcer: Roger Miller

VIEWING ON AUGUST 23RD (4-6 P.M.) AND AUGUST 24TH (STARTING AT 10 A.M.)

First Place 16-20 Month Fullblood Buck Reserve Champion Yearling Fullblood Buck 2014 ABGA National Show ◆ DHTBG Go Big Red

Semen Available $75/straw Live Breeding $5 00 Flush $1000

His first offspring placed 4th at Nationals

Diemer's Boer Goats

Kathie and Katie Diemer • Hawkeye, Iowa • 563-429-2311 WWW. DIEMERSBOERGOATS .COM


Goats Galore Boer Goat Sale September 6, 2014: 1 pm Preview September 5, 2014: 5-8 pm 4476 Korte Rd, Metropolis, IL 62960

Meets all ABGA show standards Less than 15% bucks Up to 115 lots Color, dapples, paints & traditional ABGA registered Online Bidding: dvauction.com | Online Catalog: boergoats.com Questions Contact: (847) 254-9989 or goatsgaloresale@gmail.com


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The Boer Goat - July/August 2014  

The Boer Goat - July/August 2014  

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