__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


(since 1982)

We have the LOWEST PRICE sheep and goat equipment on the market and it’s HOT DIPPED GALVANIZED.

RM6000 Roll O’Matic Sheep and Goat Table Only $1495.00

Our NEW RM6000 comes completely galvanized so it won’t rust. Has solid tread plate floor with solid sides, so animals enter more easily with less distractions toward our V-type manual headgate. TM6000 is good for horned or pulled sheep and goats. The backside has a 12 inch strip of carpet with the help of a back support and headgate to keep animal in position, Unit can be connected to the end of your raceway.

Our table squeezes the animal evenly from both sides so animals stay centered in the headgate. Table also has an adjustable head support.

Our table has double side access doors which can be opened with the animal standing or rolled onto its side. Table also has an adjustable back support.

R M 6 0 0 0

Go Mobile optional wheel set and adjustable yoke hitch Only $130.00

Table rotates to level position on 4 rubber ball bearing wheels. Most any man or woman can rotate over 200 pound animals.

Table can rotate past level so feet point upward for easier trimming.

Call for your FREE CATALOG today or visit us at: www.dslivestock.biz We have low freight rates or order for upcoming shows  1-800-949-9997  1-301-689-1966  Fax: 1-301-689-9727 18059 National Pike  Frostburg, Maryland 21532


www.abga.org | 3


2012-2013 AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS REGION 8 - ERVIN CHAVANA (EC)

REGION 7 - LINDA WEST

PresidenttNFOHFSDSFFL!IPUNBJMDPN

ll-west@sbcglobal.net

REGION 16 - BRAD MACKEY (EC)

REGION 9 - VICKI STICH (EC)

Vice President tCSBENBDLFZ!CNBDLGBSNTDPN

ladyhogger59@hotmail.com

REGION 10 - TRACY DIEFENBACH

REGION 11 - SCOTT HAWTHORN

SecretarytUMEJFG!HNBJMDPN

TDPUU!DFEBSHSPWFGBSNTDPN

REGION 6 - DR. MARK WATKINS

REGION 12 - PAUL KINSLOW (EC)

TreasurertNEX!CFFDSFFLOFU

paul@muellerauctions.net

REGION 1 - TERRY BROWN

REGION 13 - MARK ANDERSON

DBQSJPMF!QPDLFUJOFUDPN

GBOEISBODI!BPMDPN

REGION 2 - BOYD WILLOUGHBY

REGION 14 - JOHN MORROW

wbccboers@allwest.net

NPSSPXGBSN!BPMDPN

REGION 3 - JEFF GIBBS (EC)

REGION 15 - SARA DAVIS

HJCCTGBSN!BPMDPN

DTEBWJT!PBLIPMMPXMJWFTUPDLDPN

REGION 4 - KAY GARRETT (EC)

PAST PRESIDENT - TROY VEAL (EC)

LFXMLBZ!IPUNBJMDPN

tvanveal@yahoo.com

REGION 5 - JOHN EDWARDS

*EC denotes Executive Committee member

eggstx@aol.com

Letter From the PRESIDENT

March/April 2013

Dear ABGA and JABGA Members, Happy Birthday ABGA! We turn 20 years old this year! It seems like yesterday when a small group of visionary individuals met to discuss the need to establish a meat goat industry in the U.S. and ultimately established the American Boer Goat Association. In the past 20 years, Thanks to those visionaries and you our members, the American Boer Goat Association has grown and flourished. This is an exciting time to be in our industry and celebrate what the American Boer Goat has contributed to an ever growing meat goat industry. Well it’s that time again, the ABGA / JABGA Nationals are right around the corner. In this issue you will find the centerfold National Show Program and Entry form. There have been several changes and exciting additions to the National Show schedule for both the Junior and Open shows, please take a moment to review and familiarize yourself with these changes. One of the most exciting additions this year will be the addition of a National Sale in conjunction with our National Show. This Sale is open to all goats that are entered in either the JABGA or ABGA National Show. The Sale will be held on Friday night one hour after the conclusion of the Fullblood Doe show. Please review the announcement in this issue and stay tuned to the ABGA website and Facebook for more information. Also, this year we will again have an Exhibitors Dinner and JABGA Auction. Last year’s Auction raised over $12,000 for the Juniors, I’m hoping this year with your generous support it will be bigger and better. Remember, it’s never too early to be thinking about donations to the Silent and Live Auction.

AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION STAFF 1207 S. Bryant Blvd., Suite C | San Angelo, TX 76903 Sandy Smith, Operations Manager, sandy@abga.org Mary Ellen Villarreal, Office Operations Supervisor, mary@abga.org Laurie Evans, Administrative Assistant, laurie@abga.org Belinda Constancio, Registration Support Staff, belinda@abga.org Sonia Cervantez, Accounting, sonia@abga.org Dee Ann Torres, Registration Support Staff, deeann@abga.org Aaron Gillespie, Show Coordinator/Youth Coordinator, aaron@abga.org Miranda Carrillo, Member Services, miranda@abga.org

Attention Juniors, the 2013 JABGA Leadership Conference will be held July 21-25th at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas. Also, the 2013 ABGA Scholarship applications are now available, deadline is May 1st. For more information, visit our homepage or contact Youth Coordinator, Aaron Gillespie. Lastly, please don’t forget to purchase you ABGA/JABGA Raffle tickets. This is a great fundraiser for the Juniors, with some outstanding prizes to be awarded. Again, Happy Birthday ABGA!

Ervin J. Chavana, President American Boer Goat Association

4 | THE BOER GOAT


Table of Contents MORE BANG FOR YOUR BUCK PERFORMANCE TESTING TO IMPROVE PROFITABILITY

JABGA UPDATE 2013 JABGA YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

NATIONAL SHOW PACKET

BREEDER SPOTLIGHT N&K RANCH BOER GOATS

BABY TIME! ARE YOU READY? ABOUT THE COVER

PREGNANCY TOXEMIA

The cover photo was taken by Abby Dunham of 4D Boer Goats in Pauls Valley, Okla. Hai-Lo, is Abby’s “miracle goat�.

WHAT IS IT?

WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO ON OUR COVER?

ENCORE VISIONS CONTACT Kelli Chapman PO Box 917 Aspermont, TX 79502 Toll Free 877-822-3016 (f) 806-398-9047 JOGP!UIFCPFSHPBUNBHB[JOFDPN

PUBLISHER Jackie Lackey, INC. Jackie Lackey, Editor-in-chief & creative director KBDLJF!FODPSFWJTJPOTDPN CREATIVE TEAM Robyn Amthauer Jamie Banbury

LETTER L ETTER F FROM ROM T THE HE Dear ABGA/JABGA Members,

We are still compiling entries for our next cover photo! You still have a shot at YOUR photo being the cover of the March/April issue of The Boer Goat! Submit your pic to JOGP!UIFCPFSHPBUNBHB[JOFDPN!

Allyson McGuire Sarah Vachlon

Editor

In this issue I hope you will find useful information whether you are just getting started, or you’re a veteran in the barn. From kidding essentials, to the science behind performance testing I’m excited about the fresh information in the pages of this book. In efforts to continue to better The Boer Goat in 2013, we are also debuting our Breeders Spotlight column in the this issue. We have kicked this addition off with N&K Ranches of Eldorado, TX. We hope you will enjoy learning the stories of these experts in the business. Let us know who you would like to see! A thank you to all of the photo contest entries. Although, Abby Nicole of Oklahoma was chosen with her goat, Halo, many of the stories behind the photo entries have been a pleasure to read. I was especially touched by Larry & Linda Burns, of Horner, West Virginia. They submitted a photo of their granddaughter Hope Dever showing her class winning Boer goat at the Jamboree at the Mill 4-H and open show. Finally, sale season is in full swing. Submit those sale reports for the May/June issue!

www.abga.org | 5


AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Affiliates Program

The ABGA affiliate program is a partnership between regional goat clubs and ABGA. With the rapid growth in the meat goat industry, the local meat goat and Boer goat clubs have an increased role of education, marketing and promotion. These local groups provide an essential role in promoting the industry and educating breeders. In 2004, ABGA began development of a program to aid, assist and work together with local clubs. The objectives of the AGBA affiliate program include: t1SPWJEFBEEJUJPOBMSFTPVSDFTBUUIFMPDBMDMVCTMFWFM t1SPWJEFOFUXPSLJOHPQQPSUVOJUJFTGPSUIFMPDBMDMVCT t"UUSBDUBOESFUBJOHPBUQSPEVDFST t"TTJTUXJUIFEVDBUJPOBMPQQPSUVOJUJFT t1SPWJEFBNFUIPEGPSHSBTTSPPUTJOQVUGSPNMPDBMDMVCT Piney Woods Boer Breeders Club Calvin Taylor 969 Leon Tilman Road Lufkin, TX 75901 calvintaylor@yahoo.com Serving states: TX, AR, OK, LA Cascade Boer Goat Association Duane Rogers 15675 Eaden Rd Oregon City, OR 97045 becki@coppercreekboers.com Serving states: OR, WA Midwest Boer Goat Breeders Club Cindy Wade 29856 E 2150 N Colfax, IL 61728 cwwade@hotmail.com Serving states: IL, open to midwest states North East Georgia Goat Producers Danny Stovall 1205 Greg Shoals Rd Iva, SC 29655 redcreek@wctel.net Serving states: GA, NC, SC

6 | THE BOER GOAT

Tall Corn Meat Goat Wether Association, Inc. Vern Thorp 1959 Highway 63 New Sharon, IA 50207 neverthorp@aol.com Serving states: IA Boer Goat Association of North Carolina Curtis J. Ring Greensboro, NC 27416 kellyclark@triad.rr.com Iowa Meat Goat Association Cathy Van Wyhe 625 472nd Ave Grinnell, IA 50112 Serving states : IA, MO, IL, MN East Texas Goat Raisers Association (ETGRA) Rene McCracken PO Box 2614 Jacksonville, TX 75766 lrmccraken@ag.tamu.edu Serving states: TX

North Arkansas Meat Goat Association Robert Healea 10591 Highway 7 North Harrison, AR 72601 cedarholowfarm@hotmail.com Serving states: AR Ohio Meat Goat Association Mary Morrow 13140 Stoney Point Road New Concord, OH 43762 morrowfarm@aol.com Serving states: OH, PA, NC, IN, MI, TX, KY, CT, WV If you are an officer or a member of a regional goat club, please download an ABGA Affiliate Application for your club today! Forms can be found online at www.abga.org.


Be sure to visit www.abga.com for additional information, updates and a complete year’s calendar of upcoming shows and events. Don’t see your event listed? Please contact the ABGA at 325.486.2242

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

MARCH March 2 March 2-3 March 9 March 10 March 23 March 30-31

ETGRA Cream of the Crop Peach State Classic Rio Grande Valley Livestock Show Star of Texas Fair and Rodeo Area 4 JABGA Regional Show Spring Spectacular

Athens, TX Perry, GA Mercedes, TX Austin, TX Verona, MS Greenville, TX

Andrea Thompson Kim Veal San Magee Katie Richmond Jesse Cornelius Anissa O’Hair

903-216-5792 912-383-2607 956-565-2456 512-919-3000 662-891-1911 903-456-8752

April 6-7 April 6-7

April Fools May Day Classic Cedar City Classic

Brownwood, TX Lebanon, TN

325-200-8909 615-967-1415

April 6-7 April 20 April 20 April 20-21 April 20-21 April 20-21 April 21 April 26-27 April 27 April 27-28 April 27-28 April 27-28

Redbud Classic Show Me Spring Spectacular Del Marra Goat Classic April Fool Shows Cuero Spring Fling ARMGA 5th Arkansas Classic Area 2 JABGA Regional Show NC Spring Spectacular Central New Mexico Goat Days Valley Classic Guernsey County Barn Blitz 6th Annual Diamond Classic

Stillwater, OK Sedalia, MO Harrington, DE Ellensburg, MA Cuero, TX Arkadelphia, AR Sedalia, MO Shelby, NC Estancia, NM Stockton, CA Lore City, OH Glenwood, AR

Amanda Smith Mark & Debbie Anderson Debbie Dilley Tracy Diefenbach Madia Graves Leslie Bader-Robinson Robin Walters Ronald Morris Tracy Diefenbach Greg Traywick Debby Maberry Iris Lerena Judy Burnworth Mark Berry

APRIL

405-659-4574 816-533-2563 302-236-2107 509-246-9327 830-305-6161 870-279-4882 816-533-2563 704-482-4365 505-384-1874 530-749-0466 740-584-6362 870-828-1734

www.abga.org | 7


EDITORIAL

by BRANDI BUZZARD FROBOSE

GETTING THE BANG

FOR YOUR BUCK

PERFORMANCE TESTING CAN IMPROVE EFFICIENCY AND PROFITABILITY IN YOUR HERD

P

erformance testing is not a new concept in the purebred and commercial livestock communities.

environmental conditions and providing the same nutrition enables easy comparison between individuals.

The practice of performance testing allows producers to collect and evaluate data that is used as a means to more efficient meat production. Beef producers have been utilizing performance testing for bull selection and cow herds for several decades by measuring variables such as feed conversion, average daily gain, calf performance and calving interval.

Dr. Michael Salisbury, department chair of animal science and professor at Angelo State University, recalls building the framework for the program as a graduate student with a group of animal science professors and area producers who wanted to validate the positive attributes Boer goats had to offer: growth, feed efficiency and carcass characteristics.

Aside from the U.S., performance testing programs for livestock are all over the world, especially cattle. Moreover, there are performance testing programs for sheep in England and Australia. So it comes as no surprise that Boer goat producers are choosing to incorporate performance testing into the management of their herds too.

“The first performance test didn’t have any purebred Boers, they were all various crossbreds from the breeds we had available, which were Angora, Spanish goats and several breeds of milk goats,” he says. “We took those kids from the first cross and conducted a performance test and then we slaughtered those goats and collected carcass data. Based on that data we were able to determine the usefulness of the various crosses.”

Performance testing, not to be confused with expected progeny differences (EPDs) that provide estimates of the genetic value of an animal as a parent, equips producers with the production knowledge of their herd sires that is needed to make tough decisions regarding breeding records.

The following year, Salisbury and his associates received much interest in central performance testing and proceeded to test purebred goats, which were returned to production and were ranked on the most economically important traits of rate of gain and muscling.

By utilizing performance data, producers can more easily raise animals that will be efficient and improve the overall herd quality. Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, has developed a successful Boer goat central performance testing program for buck kids.

From there, the performance testing programs that we know today were developed and have been implemented around the nation. Salisbury says performance data now exists on purebred Boer, Spanish and Kiko goats, as well as the various crosses between the breeds.

The program at Angelo State, which was developed in 1996, focuses on rate of gain. However, other factors are also measured, such as rib eye area and initial and final scrotal circumference. Goats are managed with other producers’ goats so that performance data may be compared between animals. This facet of the program is crucial, because it gives the producer an idea of how his goats are stacking up to other producers’ animals. Raising the buck kids under the same

Salisbury, who manages the university’s sheep and goat ranch, conducted his graduate work on performance testing in sheep. His involvement with the sheep and meat goat program at Angelo State allowed him to be involved with the performance testing program since its genesis.

8 | THE BOER GOAT

After completing his Ph.D., he took over performance testing at Angelo State and has endeavored to keep the program


affordable and applicable to area producers. In addition to manning the helm of the Angelo State program, Dr. Salisbury has worked with other institutions to initiate performance testing programs at their sites. A widespread adoption of performance testing will further improve the Boer goat industry by bringing about increased efficiency which is ultimately profitable for producers. As one can imagine, the positive attributes of performance testing led to an almost immediate adoption of utilizing the data for herd improvement. Since implementation, Salisbury asserts that many producers have begun using performance data as a marketing tool for advertising and promoting higher gaining bucks. Salisbury adds that he knows of some breeders who use performance testing solely to choose their next herd sires, which has always been the main objective of the testing program. Although there are many benefits to performance testing, the collection of the data can sometimes be difficult, especially when environmental factors such as nutrition and behavior become involved. Salisbury and his contemporaries have had several discussions about the most ideal way to collect unbiased performance data. Goats aren’t raised in a pen in a real production setting, thus creating challenges for comparison of data. However, he says, a test can’t identify genetic factors if nutrition becomes a limiting factor.

A common question from producers: “Is performance testing is really worth the cost?” And rightly so. Producers want to be assured their hard-earned money is being spent to improve herd quality and will ultimately increase their profit margin. “If producers sell their goats, they can often recoup the cost of the test on individual goats,” Salisbury explains. “However, the real capturing cost is using performance data to select animals that are performing well and will improve the genetics of the herd.” Unfortunately, Salisbury says, the current drought is a factor in the recent decline of producers opting to utilize performance testing. “Feed costs have increased, and it’s becoming cost prohibitive for some producers up front,” he says. “The cost of the performance testing is based on our feed costs, and health regimens such as vaccinations and deworming. And in the last five years, the cost of the program has gone up close to $50 per head.” Salisbury says Angelo State’s program only seeks to recover their cost, not turn a profit. But he’s nevertheless concerned with the participation in the testing program this year.

“The real capturing cost is using performance data to select animals that are performing well and will improve the genetics of the herd.”

Dr. Michael Salisbury

“We’re measuring performance on a specific environment, and for data to be comparable from year to year, we have a constant,” he says. “So nutrition and behavior are big modifiers.” Because goats reach puberty at such an early age, performance testing must be done prior to the first rut, otherwise, the environmental changes of puberty will interfere with the testing and the resulting data. In order to combat this challenge, Angelo State’s 84-day-long program only tests buck kids that are born January 1 through March 31. Starting the program in late spring allows for completion of testing before kids reach their first fall rut. Salisbury says starting later in the year or testing for longer than 84 days could potentially impact the behavior of the kids, which could negatively influence any data that was collected. Additionally, data collected from the Angelo State test is used by the American Boer Goat Association in determining whether or not a buck is eligible for “ennoblement,” which is a program designed to provide direction for continual improvement and growth of the Boer goat industry. To qualify for ennoblement, the test must be at least 84 days long.

He says he hopes not to be forced to pass on an increase in Angelo State’s feed costs to producers who want to utilize testing. In the past, increases in feed costs and consequently, testing costs, has led to some producers decreasing the number of buck kids they bring to the performance testing site.

Show stock producers have seen the benefits of performance testing, as well. Salisbury says many purebred and show stock producers have utilized the performance testing program to market their animals to be sold as replacement bucks to commercial producers. “The ultimate goal in any industry is to send good quality males back to commercial ranches in order to improve the whole industry,” Salisbury says. “The purebred and commercial industries are like night and day in that many purebred producers market their animals to other purebreds producers. However, some do sell to commercial producers and use performance testing to market their animals. Both areas of production are intertwined, although they use performance testing data for different reasons.” Performance data is a valuable tool for all Boer goat producers, purebred and commercial alike. The ability to manage herd sire selection with precision, regarding carcass characteristics and growth, is one that should be embraced and fully implemented in order to increase efficiency and improve the overall quality of the Boer goat industry.

www.abga.org | 9


10 | THE 10 | THE BOER GOAT


2013 JABGA LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

JULY 21-25, 2013 Angelo State University SAN ANGELO, TEXAS

CONFERENCE IS OPEN TO ALL JABGA MEMBERS AGE 13 & OLDER AND ADULT CHAPERONES

Cost:

Ä‘Ĺ? $250 per JABGA Member Ä‘Ĺ? $150 per Adult Chaperone

Includes:

Ä‘Ĺ? Lodging Ä‘Ĺ? Three meals per day + snacks Ä‘Ĺ? Local transportation to events

Boer Goat Topics Ä‘Ĺ? %2!Ĺ?*%)(Ĺ?2(10%+*Ĺ?Ĩ* /ÄĄ+*ÄŠ Ä‘Ĺ?.//Ĺ?2(10%+*Ĺ?Ĩ* /ÄĄ+*ÄŠ Ä‘Ĺ?!*!.(Ĺ? *#!)!*0Ĺ?.0%!/ Ä‘Ĺ?!(Ĺ?##Ĺ?+1*0/Ĺ?Ĩ* /ÄĄ+*ÄŠ Ä‘Ĺ?2(10%+*Ĺ?* Ĺ?1.$/%*#Ĺ?0Ĺ? Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ?(!Ĺ?.*Ĺ?Ĩ* /ÄĄ+*ÄŠ Ä‘Ĺ?!*!.(Ĺ?!,.+ 10%+* Ä‘Ĺ?+0Ĺ?.2!/0%*#Ĺ?Ĩ* /ÄĄ+*ÄŠ Ä‘Ĺ?/01.!Ĺ?* Ĺ?*#!Ĺ?1,,(!)!*00%+* Ä‘Ĺ? ,.+/+,%Ĺ? Ĺ?Ĩ* /ÄĄ+*ÄŠ Ä‘Ĺ?!. Ĺ?!(0$Ĺ? *#!)!*0

Leadership Ä‘Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ? ! !./$%,Ĺ?4!.%/!/ Ä‘Ĺ?!)Ĺ?1%( %*#Ĺ?!*.%+/

Conference Features Ä‘Ĺ?1%6Ĺ?+3( Ä‘Ĺ?.+1,Ĺ?.+&!0/ Ä‘Ĺ?0%2%0%!/Ĺ?Ĩ+'Ĺ?((ÄŒĹ?!Ĺ?!*0!.ÄŒĹ? Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ?+3(%*#ÄŒĹ?3%))%*#ÄŒĹ?0Ä‹ÄŠ

For registration documents: Please contact the ABGA office 325.486.2242

or

Print the registration documents from our website www.abga.org

Ĺ?  Ĺ?Ĺ? Ĺ?Ĺ? Ĺ?  Ĺ?Ĺ?  Ĺ?  Minimum attendees needed to hold conference is 20.

  Ĺ?Ĺ?  Ĺ? Ĺ? Ĺ? Ĺ? Ĺ?Ä‚Ä ÄŒĹ?Ä‚Ä€Ä ÄƒĹ?Ä? American Boer Goat Association 1207 S. Bryant Blvd., Suite C San Angelo, TX 76903

www.abga.org | 11


e v a S te a D

the BUILDING BLOCK PRODUCTION GOAT SALE

the

May 25, 2013 Mercer County Fair Grounds Celina, OH Sale time: 1 pm EST More info to come

IB

s Z728 iamond ion Buck D f o e k amp Du Hobby al Reserve Ch n tio GA Na

Show Doe prospects, Bred Does, Herd sire Prospects, bred recips and semen lots from the nations leading bucks- WILL SELL! Advanced Boer Genetics Aaron & Denise Crabtree Chillicothe, OH 740-701-0364 www.advancedboergenetics.com

Feathers and Horns Ranch Mark & Debbie Anderson Lebanon, TN 615-967-1415 www.fandhranch.com

Land Of Grace Farm Phil & Sharon Fullerton Elizabethtown, PA 717-689-0010 www.landofgracefarm.com

Bar None Meat Goats Robin Walters Seguin, Tx 830-305-0161 www.barnonemeagoats.com

Florence Farms Boer Goats Riggs Florence Coldwater, OH 419-852-7836 www.orencefarmsboergoats.com

M & C Farms Cindy Price- Westfall Cable, OH 937-215-4143 www.mandcfarms.com

Boers by Hobby Bill & Sue Hobby Hughson, CA 209-632-4492 www.boersbyhobby.com

Lamoni Farms Boer Goats Maurice & Kim Erwin Davis City, IA 641-223-0023 www.lamonifarmsboergoats.com

Rio Grande Boer Goats Rick Labunski Harlingen, Tx 956-245-7898 www.riograndeboergoats.com

Elk Creek Boer Goats Jeremy Church Sentinel, OK 405-747-1647 http://oklahomashowsteer.com/ elkcreekboers/

2M Boer Goats Painted Pretty ABGA National Grand Champion Doe

For More Informaton Contact Riggs Florence #VSSWJMMF3Et$PMEXBUFS 0)

419-852-7836

www.buildingblockgoatsale.com IBGA Nat

A 12 | THE BOER GOAT

Check us out on Facebook!

rose 3tri z3 96 ional Gra nd Cham pion Doe


www.abga.org | 13


2013 ABGA National Show Schedule Monday June 10th 3:00 am - 3:00 pm unloading 8:00 am - 3:00 pm ABGA Check In (All animals must be checked in during this time) 6:30 pm – JABGA General Membership Meeting Tuesday June 11th 9:00 am - JABGA National Show Noon - Lunch 1:00 pm - Resume JABGA National Show Wednesday June 12th 9:00 am – JABGA Showmanship Resume JABGA National Show Noon - Lunch Noon - JABGA Judging Contest 1:00 pm - Percentage Doe Show Percentage Pair Classes immediately following the Percentage Doe Show Percentage Get of Sire Percentage Doe Herd 7:00 pm - JABGA Public Speaking Contest 8:00 pm - General Membership Meeting to be held at the Ike Hamilton Fair & Expo Center

Thursday June 13th 8:00 am - Jr Fullblood Does Noon - Lunch Noon - JABGA Boot Scramble & Goat Scramble 6:00 pm – ABGA Awards Appreciation Dinner - BBQ Dinner (See map for location & directions) Friday June 14th (Pink Out Day – Proceeds to be donated to the American Cancer Society) 8:00 am - Yearling and Senior Fullblood Does Noon - Lunch Noon - Old Timer’s Showmanship Produce of Percentage Dam Fullblood Doe Pairs classes ABGA National Sale – Sale Conducted by RMA – One hour following the conclusion of the Fullblood Doe show Saturday June 15th 8:00 am - Fullblood Bucks Noon - Lunch Buck Pair Classes Pair Class – Best Pair of Kids – both sexes represented Group Classes * All animals must be out of the barn by 8:00 am Sunday

*Tentative schedule subject to change.

Back to West Monroe, LA… Sponsorship Tables Ring side seating is a great way to enjoy the ABGA National Show and promote your ranch or business. As a Table Sponsor, you will receive special seating during the ABGA Nationals and will include a daily snack tray. A limited number of tables are available. ABGA Appreciation Dinner Enjoy the fun and excitement at the ABGA Awards Appreciation Dinner! (See map for location & directions) A BBQ dinner with all the fixins will be served. You will have the opportunity to fellowship and share stories with breeders in the industry. This event will be at no charge and is meant to be a family friendly experience.

A National Show for ABGA’s Youth The excitement of the show ring is an activity that brings our JABGA members together allowing them the opportunity to meet one another, share ideas and form lasting relationships. Make plans to attend all of the scheduled events. Hotel Accommodations To make hotels reservations; contact the hotel of your choice directly at the numbers listed below. Please specify that you are booking for the ABGA National Show when making your reservation. Hampton Inn (Host Hotel) 601 Mane Street West Monroe, LA (318) 938-2800 Hilton Garden Inn West Monroe 400 Mane Street, West Monroe, LA (318) 387-2711

Travel east on Interstate 20 E, Go to exit 117 A, Merge onto Hall St, Turn right onto Oak St, Turn left onto Hart St, Take 1st right onto Wood St, Monroe Civic Center will be on the right 401 Lea Joyner Memorial Expy, Monroe, LA

14 | THE BOER GOAT

Quality Inn 503 Constitution Drive West Monroe, LA (318) 398-0653

Americas Best Value Inn 310 Thomas Road West Monroe, LA (318) 325-5780


2013 ABGA NATIONAL SHOW RULES Eligibility – ABGA National Show

Exhibitors must be a current active or a current junior member of the American Boer Goat Association to submit a show entry for the ABGA National Show. Competition is open to goats registered in the Herdbook of ABGA by May 17, 2013. Active or junior members of ABGA must be listed as the current owner on the ABGA registration certificate on or before May 17, 2013. Custom fitters / agents, if different from the owner, will register with the superintendent if the owner will not be in attendance at the show. There is no limit on the number of goats that can be entered in a class by a member. Application for entry must be on current, official entry forms. Junior members can enter the ABGA National Show by completing the entry and paying the correct fees for each animal.

Eligibility – JABGA National Show

Exhibitors must be a current member of the Junior American Boer Goat Association to submit a show entry for the JABGA National Show. Goats must be registered in the JABGA member’s name only. No ranch or family name can be listed in the owner section of the certificate. There is no limit on the number of goats that can be entered in a class by a member. If the JABGA owner has more than one entry in a class, the other goats must be shown by another JABGA member. Application for entry must be on current, official entry forms.

Executive Committee reserves the right to refund the $300.00 fee. Only members in good standing with ABGA can file a protest. Any such protest must plainly state the fraud or misrepresentation of the exhibitor. Any protest filed more than 24 hours after the alleged incident shall not be considered. Protests shall be referred to the Executive Committee which shall have full and final authority to determine the matter and from whose decision there is no appeal. The Executive Committee will determine the method in which the protest is reviewed. Judging procedures shall not be interrupted for protest investigation.

Disqualification

Any goat showing any pronounced defect or abnormality will be barred from the show. Any evidence of a cosmetic surgical alteration of an exhibited animal will be a disqualification. Also, the exhibitors of animals deemed to have been surgically altered will be banned from future ABGA and JABGA National Shows. Artificial coloring will be a disqualification. Illegible tattoos or tattoos inconsistent with registration papers will result in disqualification. Any animal testing positive for any performance enhancing drug and/or chemical, their substitutes or derivatives will be disqualified. Should any animal that has been awarded a prize be disqualified, the lower placing animals will not move into any higher position.

No Liability JABGA Showmanship Classes

Exhibitors entered in showmanship classes must own the goat that is being shown.

ABGA or JABGA SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY LOSS, INJURY OR DAMAGE IN CONNECTION WITH, ARISING OUT OF OR INCIDENTAL TO THE ABGA NATIONAL SHOW or JABGA NATIONAL SHOW.

Defining an Exhibitor

Release of Liability

Throughout the ABGA National Show and JABGA National Show Rules the term “exhibitor” is defined as the owner of the animal listed in the ABGA registry.

Defining a Participant

Throughout the ABGA National Show and JABGA National Show Rules the term “participant” includes but is not limited to an exhibitor, agent, custom fitter, vendor, office staff, superintendent or spectator.

Junior Exhibitor Age Requirement

In order to show, the junior exhibitor must be at least 4 years of age on the day of the show.

Special Needs of an Exhibitor

Any exhibitor with special needs is required to contact the ABGA office prior to June 1, 2013.

PARTICIPANT EXPRESSLY WAIVES ALL RIGHTS TO CLAIM AGAINST ABGA BY REASON OF, AND RELEASES ABGA FROM ANY LIABILITY WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO, ANY INJURY TO PERSON OR DAMAGE TO OR LOSS OF PROPERTY (INCLUDING CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES) RESULTING FROM ANY CAUSE WHATSOEVER (EXPRESSLY INCLUDING ABGA’S NEGLIGENCE).

Indemnification

PARTICIPANT AGREES TO HOLD HARMLESS AND UNCONDITIONALLY INDEMNIFY ABGA AGAINST AND FOR ALL CLAIMS, LIABILITIES, LOSSES, COSTS, EXPENSES, AND DAMAGES (ACTUAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR PUNITIVE) WHICH ABGA MAY AT ANY TIME SUFFER OR SUSTAIN OR BECOME LIABLE FOR BY REASON OF ANY ACCIDENTS, DAMAGES, INJURIES OR LOSSES EITHER TO PERSONS, PROPERTY OR BOTH, OF PARTICIPANT, OF ANY OTHER PARTICIPANT, OF ANY OTHER PARTIES, OR TO THE PROPERTY OF ABGA, IN ANY MATTER ARISING FROM, CONNECTED WITH OR INCIDENT TO THE ACTIVITIES HEREUNDER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY NEGLIGENT ACT OR OMISSION OF ABGA, IT’S OFFICERS AGENTS, EMPLOYEES OR VOLUNTEERS. [THE TERM “ABGA” MEANS AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION, JUNIOR AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION, ITS OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, AGENTS, EMPLOYEES, SUPERINTENDENTS AND VOLUNTEERS.]

Interpretation and Violation of Rules

The American Boer Goat Association (ABGA) reserves to its Executive Committee the final and absolute right to interpret these rules and to arbitrarily settle and determine all matters, questions and differences in regard thereto or otherwise arising out of or connected with, or incident to, the ABGA National Show or JABGA National Show. The ABGA further reserves to its Executive Committee the right to amend or add to these rules as its judgment may determine. Any exhibitor, custom fitter, agent or spectator who violates any of the rules will forfeit all privileges and be subject to such penalty as the Executive Committee may order. The Executive Committee may apply other penalties and sanctions from time to time as deemed appropriate.

Computing Ages for ABGA & JABGA National Shows

ABGA will establish June 1 as the ending date for computing age classes.

Classes with more than 50 entries will be divided into classes as equal as possible with no more than 50 to a class and all class breaks will be done by age. Date of birth as listed on the ABGA registration certificate will be used to determine the class breaks. The first and second from each class will return to the ring for the Championship Drive.

Entry Deadline Superintendents

National Show regulations and show rules will be adhered to and enforced by ABGA National Show Superintendent(s). The decision of the Superintendent(s) shall be final in all cases except where a protest has been properly filed.

Judges Decision

The decision of the judges shall be final in all cases except where fraud or misrepresentation on the part of an exhibitor is proven. Any such claim of an exhibitor’s fraud or misrepresentation must be timely submitted as an official protest.The judging and procedures method are at the discretion of the judges.

Official Protests

Official protests for exhibitor’s fraud or misrepresentation shall be submitted to the Superintendent(s) in writing and be accompanied by $300.00 fee. The ABGA

To enter without paying double the entry fee, entries and accompanying fees must be in the ABGA office by May 17, 2013. Entry fees are nonrefundable

Entry Fees / Late Entries Option I – Provide Registration Numbers

The entry fee for animals is $40 per head in the ABGA National Show and $30 per head in the JABGA National Show. Substitutions are available for a fee of $5 per head until the end of Check In at 3:00 p.m. Monday, June 10, 2013.

Option II – Slot Entry

The entry fee for slot entry is $45 per head in the ABGA National Show and $35 per head in the JABGA National Show. Actual registration numbers must be provided at check-in.

www.abga.org | 15


All entry fee(s) for animals received after May 17th is doubled. Mail courier and other delays are not considered in determining entry fees: the receipt date will determine if an entry fee is doubled. Please remember the Herdbook closes May 17, 2013, for ABGA Nationals and JABGA Nationals. Entries are required to list only the number of head entered. Entry for group classes is required but will also be done at check-in.

Identification

All goats must have a legible permanent ear identification (ear tags are not permanent IDs) corresponding to the registration certificate upon arrival on the grounds. GOATS WILL BE DISQUALIFIED FROM JUDGING WITHOUT PROPER IDENTIFICATION. All goats must be registered purebred, fullblood or percentage Boer goats. Percentage doe classes are for goats 50% to 87.5% Boer. Fullblood classes are for does that are 15/16 blood (93.7%) and higher and 31/32 blood (96.8%) and higher for bucks. Progeny of fresh does will NOT be allowed in the ring. Goats entered in group classes also must be entered and shown in the appropriate individual class. Does must have kidded or exhibited pregnancy by 24 months of age.

disease; (ii) the protection of animals from disease or exposure to disease; (iii) the enforcement of animal health laws or regulations; or (iv) notifications or warnings about disease or other animal health related concerns. In this regard, ABGA shall not be liable for any damages, injuries or losses arising from, connected with or related to disease or the exposure of animals thereto. This includes, but is not limited to, actual and consequential damages.

Louisiana State Veterinary Office

The Louisiana State USDA Office contact number is (225) 925-3980. Each exhibitor’s veterinarian is required to call the Louisiana State USDA Office to obtain animal health requirements. Exhibitors failing to meet Louisiana animal health requirements are subject to fines and removal from the Ike Hamilton Expo Center.

Veterinary Services

ABGA will provide contact information to exhibitors during check-in of a local veterinarian that can assist exhibitors with animal health issues. The contact information of the veterinarian will also be posted in the check-in area.

JABGA Bred & Owned Classes

All JABGA National Show entries reflecting the JABGA member as both the Breeder and the Owner will have automatic entry into the applicable JABGA Bred & Owned Class in addition to the regular class.

Pets

Heelers / JABGA National Show

Exhibitor Parking

Heelers are allowed in the JABGA National Show in the yearling classes and older. Heelers must be a JABGA member in good standing.

Pets on the grounds must be leashed. ABGA reserves the right to remove disruptive pets from the grounds.

The Ike Hamilton Expo Center will provide trailer parking which is at the risk of the exhibitor. Exhibitors may only park in designated areas reserved for the ABGA Nationals. Vehicles and trailers improperly parked will be fined and towed at the exhibitor’s expense.

Unauthorized Goats

Goats for which the owner has not paid an entry fee will not be allowed on the grounds, with the exception of those goats that are nursing (Examples: the dam of a 60-day-old entry or the 40-day-old offspring of a two-year-old entry). All goats on the grounds must meet Louisiana State health requirements.

Exhibitor Numbers

Each entry will be assigned a number. Exhibitors will receive cards which correspond with the numbers; these cards must be worn by the exhibitor in the show ring when goats are being judged.

Unruly Animals

The exhibitor will be liable for damage to fences, other goats or injury to people. In addition to penning, unruly bucks may be required to be restrained or removed from the show if deemed necessary by the show management. If any goat is a threat to the public or is unruly, precautions must be taken. Exhibitors are responsible for the actions of their goats.

Show Schedule

A tentative schedule is listed in the show packet and noted as subject to change. The schedule of classes for the show will be posted each day. The schedule of classes is at the discretion of the Superintendents based on in the barn entries

ALL ANIMALS MUST BE OUT OF THE BARN BY 8:00 AM Sunday June 16, 2013.

Judging

Exhibitors are responsible for knowing the times at which their goats will be judged. Any goat not presented promptly will be ruled ineligible and barred from competition in the class.

Participant Conduct

If any participant, in any way, whether in person or by agent or employee, interferes with the judges, show officials or staff during their adjudication or shows any disrespect to them or the show, ABGA may demand a proper apology from the exhibitor, may exclude the exhibitor and animal in question from competition, bar exhibitor from the grounds, and may also withhold prizes that may have been awarded. The Executive Committee may apply other penalties and sanctions from time to time as deemed appropriate.

Ike Hamilton Expo Center Regulations

Exhibitors are responsible for knowing the regulations of the Ike Hamilton Expo Center. Regulations of the Ike Hamilton Expo Center will be enforced by ABGA Superintendents and/or Ike Hamilton Expo Center officials. Any charges or material cost incurred by ABGA due to an exhibitor violation or ignorance of these regulations will be paid by the exhibitor. The facility is a non-smoking, no

alcohol venue.

Animal Health Requirements

Goats are required to have a current health certificate to enter the state of Louisiana. A copy of the health certificate is required. The health certificate is to be issued by your veterinarian within the past 30 days. All animals are expected to be healthy, free of disease and in show condition. All animals in the barn must comply with Federal and State Scrapie and the state of Louisiana animal health requirements. ABGA assumes no duty or responsibility nor shall it otherwise be liable to any exhibitor for any of the following: (i) the prevention of

16 | THE BOER GOAT

Fitting

Fitting will be left to the discretion of the exhibitor. All fitting and trimming must be done in the designated area. No fitting or trimming will be permitted in the show barn. Any altering of pigmentation is prohibited. If an exhibitor’s goat is found to have altered pigmentation, the goat will be disqualified from the show and the exhibitor will be banned from future National Shows. Any evidence of a cosmetic surgical alteration of an exhibited animal will be a disqualification and that exhibitor will be banned from future National Shows. The use of any performance enhancing drug and/or chemical, their substitutes or derivatives, is prohibited and will result in disqualification and that exhibitor will be banned from future National Shows. The exhibitor agrees to submit any goat entered by him/her to inspection by any veterinarian appointed by the Board of Directors and agrees to have such goat submitted to such tests as may be requested.

DNA Testing / Urine Testing

ABGA reserves the right to DNA test and/or urine laboratory test any goat entered for competition. The conclusions based upon the analysis of any of these tests by the veterinarian in charge shall be final, conclusive, and without recourse against ABGA, any officer, director, volunteer or employee thereof or any veterinarian in charge shall be final, conclusive, and with recourse against ABGA, any officer, director, volunteer or employee thereof or any veterinarian appointed by the ABGA. The exhibitor waives any right of action which he might have for action taken under this rule and releases ABGA and the veterinarian from any claims or demands whatsoever in connection with the inspection or testing of any such goat or any ruling or action taken due to the conclusion of the veterinarian. All testing required by the ABGA will be performed at a laboratory selected by ABGA, will be paid for by ABGA and will be completed within 60 days after the show.


Pens

Due to the expected large number of entries and limited animal pens, pens will be assigned based on 1.5 goats per pen based on the number goats presented by the exhibitor to show officials at check-in. The assigning of pens is at the discretion of the Superintendents. Pens for entries received at check-in are subject to availability. Upon arrival, the pens will have shavings. Extra shavings will be available for a fee at the Ike Hamilton Expo Center office. Pens will be filled on a first-come, first- served basis. Members can divide the pens with a divider. There will be no reserving� pen space for other exhibitors. If several exhibitors want to pen together, they must arrive and check-in together. No hay will be allowed in the barn. Exhibitors may have a sign over their exhibit advertising their own herd. Superintendents can remove exhibitors’ signs at their discretion. An animal pen can be used as a tack or display as long as the display and tack fits in the pen. Tack and goat carts will not be allowed in alleys, showing area or staging area.

Tack & Display Pens

Exhibitors can use their assigned animal pens for tack or displays. One additional pen may be purchased at the fee of $40, limit one pen per exhibitor/fitter. Displays must fit in the pen space as allocated. Displays cannot be located in a walk area, end cap or alley. Superintendents can remove displays at their discretion. Exhibitors are permitted to display prize ribbons or trophies at their allocated space during the entire show at their own risk in a pen. If the display area needed is larger than 2 pens, commercial exhibit space may be purchased by contacting the ABGA office. NO TACK Pens will be assigned. Horse stalls in the fitting area will be available for rental.

Pen Chart Head

Pens

1

1

2

1

3

2

4

2

5

3

6

4

7

4

8

5

9

6

10

6

11

7

12

8

13

8

Reserve Champion Senior Fullblood ........................... National Grand Champion Fullblood ........................... National Reserve Champion Fullblood ........................

The Donald Bird Premier Breeder Award

The point system for the Premier Exhibitor will be used giving the same points to the breeder. THIS AWARD IS FOR FULLBLOOD BOER GOATS ONLY.

*Awards for Junior Show Classes

Ribbons will be awarded to the first through tenth place goats in all classes. A cash prize, banners and bronzes will be awarded to all Grand ($400) and Reserve ($300) Grand Champion goats.

*JABGA Premiums

Premiums in the individual JABGA classes will be paid based on the following schedule:

14

9

15

10

16

10

17

11

18

12

# in class 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 1-2 20 3-4 25 20 5-8 30 25 20 9-12 35 30 25 20 13-16 40 35 30 25 20 17-20 45 40 35 30 25 20 21-24 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 25-28 55 50 45 40 35 30 2

19

12



20

13

21

14

22

14

23

15

24

16

25

16

Over 25

See Show Official

PREMIER SIRE AWARD: The Premier Sire Award will be given to the sire that has accumulated the most class points (10 point system) earned by three or more exhibited offspring during the 2013 National. If there are 10 or more goats in the class, the first place goat will receive 10 points, second place 9 points, etc., through tenth. If there are less than 10 goats, the first place goat will receive points equal to the number in the class. Class totals will be determined from the total number of animals entered in a class from the official class sheets. The Premier Sire Award will be presented to the current owner of record according to ABGA.

 

3HU,565HJXODWLRQVDFDVKSUL]HPD\EHVXEMHFWWRDQ ,56)RUPDQGZLOOEHKHOGIRUSURSHU GRFXPHQWDWLRQDVUHTXLUHG

No vendor/individual sales from display/tack pens.

Premier Exhibitor Award

The Premier Exhibitor Award will be given to the Premier Percentage Exhibitor and the Premier Fullblood Exhibitor determined by the 10 point system. The exhibitor must be an active member of ABGA and be listed as the current owner on the ABGA registration certificate and in ABGA records. Each exhibitor must enter a minimum of three goats in the respective herd books. If there are 10 or more goats in the class, the first place goat will receive 10 points, second place 9 points, etc., through tenth. If there are less than 10 goats, the first place goat will receive points equal to the number in the class. Class totals will be determined from the total number of animals entered in a class from the official class sheets. Animals owned in partnership will accrue points for that partnership towards the Premier Percentage Exhibitor or Premier Full Blood Exhibitor Award. In the event of a tie the exhibitor winning the most first place awards will receive the award. If the tie still exists then the one with the most second place awards will win. If necessary this process will continue until the tie is broken. ABGA will post accumulated points daily. It will be the responsibility of the exhibitor to review these points and report any discrepancies to the show superintendents. Champion points will be determined as follows: Grand Champion Junior Percentage............................ Reserve Champion Junior Percentage ........................ Grand Champion Yearling Percentage........................... Reserve Champion Yearling Percentage ...................... Grand Champion Senior Percentage........................... Reserve Champion Senior Percentage ...................... National Grand Champion Percentage........................ National Reserve Champion Percentage..................... Grand Champion Junior Fullblood............................... Reserve Champion Junior Fullblood ............................ Grand Champion Yearling Fullblood........................... Reserve Champion Yearling Fullblood ...................... Grand Champion Senior Fullblood...............................

5 points 20 points 15 points

10 points 5 points 10 points 5 points 10 points 5 points 10 points 5 points 10 points 5 points 10 points 5 points 10 points

 

Pair Classes

Entry fee is $5 per pair. Animals must be shown in their regular class and preentered. Pair entries must be owned by the same exhibitor. Entry Deadline and Entry Fees / Late Entries Rules apply. BEST PAIR CLASSES: See Class Schedule Best Pair of Kids: Both sexes represented. One fullblood/purebred doe and a fullblood buck kid that has shown in respective classes.

Group Classes

The following rules apply for group classes. The animals must be shown in their regular class and pre-entered by the Yearling division class of each division. FULLBLOOD GET OF SIRE: Three fullblood or purebred offspring of the same buck with both sexes represented. Do not have to be owned by the same person. PERCENTAGE GET OF SIRE: Three percentage does, any age, that are out of the same buck (50%, 75%, & 87% are eligible) Do not have to be owned by the same person. FULLBLOOD PRODUCE OF DAM: Two offspring of the same doe. Do not have to be owned by the same person. PERCENTAGE PRODUCE OF DAM: Two offspring of the same doe. Do not have to be owned by the same person, and must be a 75% or better. FULLBLOOD BREEDER’S HERD: The exhibitor of the breeders herd must be breeder of record. Animals owned by other exhibitors may be included provided the exhibitor of the breeders herd is the breeder of the included animal(s): 1.) Two fullblood or purebred does less than 12 months, 2.) Two fullblood or purebred does 12 months or greater, 3.) a buck of any age. PERCENTAGE DOE HERD: The exhibitor of the breeders herd must be breeder of record. Animals owned by other exhibitors may be included provided the exhibitor of the breeders herd is the breeder of the included animal(s). 1.) Two percentage does less than 12 months, 2.) Two percentage does 12 months or greater.

www.abga.org | 17


Fullblood Bucks

Fullblood Does

Percentage Does

Class # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Class Date Range Start Date Ending Date 3/2/13 6/1/13 12/2/12 3/1/13 9/2/12 12/1/12 6/2/12 9/1/12

2/2/12 10/2/11 6/2/11

6/1/12 2/1/12 10/1/11

6/2/10 n/a

6/1/11 6/1/10

RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION PERCENTAGE DOE NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION PERCENTAGE DOE Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids – from classes 1, 2, 3 or 4 Best Pair of Percentage Does one year or older – from classes 7, 8, 9 ,12 or 13 Produce of Percentage Dam – See Group Classes rules Percentage Doe Herd – See Group Classes rules Fullblood Doe Kids, 0 to under 3 months Fullblood Doe Kids, 3 to under 6 months Fullblood Doe Kids, 6 to under 9 months

3/2/13 12/2/12 9/2/12

6/1/13 3/1/13 12/1/12

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41

Fullblood Doe Kids, 9 to under 12 months GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD DOE Fullblood Yearling Does, 12 to under 16 months Fullblood Yearling Does, 16 to under 20 months Fullblood Yearling Does, 20 to under 24 months GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD DOE Fullblood Two Year Old Does, 24 to under 36 months Fullblood Aged Does, 36 plus months GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION FULLBLOOD DOE NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD DOE Best pair of Doe Kids – from class 22, 23, 24 or 25 Best pair of Senior Does one year or older from class 28, 29, 30, 33 or 34 Fullblood Buck Kids, 0 to under 3 months

6/2/12

9/1/12

2/2/12 10/2/11 6/2/11

6/1/12 2/1/12 10/1/11

6/2/10 n/a

6/1/11 6/1/10

42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

Fullblood Buck Kids, 3 to under 6 months Fullblood Buck Kids, 6 to under 9 months Fullblood Buck Kids, 9 to under 12 months GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 12 to under 16 months Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 16 to under 20 months Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 20 to under 24 months GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK Fullblood Two Year Old Bucks, 24 to under 36 months Fullblood Aged Bucks, 36 plus months GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION FULLBLOOD BUCK NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD BUCK Best Pair of Buck Kids – from classes 41, 42, 43 or 44 Best Pair of Senior Bucks one year or older – from classes 47, 48, 49, 52 or 53 Best pair of Kids, both sexes represented – See New Pair Classes rules Produce of Dam –See Group Classes rules Get of Sire – See Group Classes rules Breeders Fullblood Herd – See Group Classes rules





15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

55 56 57 58 59 Pairs 60 61 18 | THE BOER GOAT 62 63

Group

Class Name Percentage Doe Kids, 0 to under 3 months Percentage Doe Kids, 3 to under 6 months Percentage Doe Kids, 6 to under 9 months Percentage Doe Kids, 9 to under 12 months GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR PERCENTAGE DOE RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR PERCENTAGE DOE Percentage Yearling Does, 12 to under 16 months Percentage Yearling Does, 16 to under 20 months Percentage Yearling Does, 20 to under 24 months GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING PERCENTAGE DOE RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING PERCENTAGE DOE Percentage Two Year Old Does, 24 to under 36 months Percentage Aged Does, 36 plus months GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE

3/2/13

6/1/13

12/2/12 9/2/12 6/2/12

3/1/13 12/1/12 9/1/12



2/2/12 10/2/11 6/2/11

6/1/12 2/1/12 10/1/11

6/2/10 n/a

6/1/11 6/1/10


 2013 ABGA and JABGA National Show Entry Form Owner/Exhibitor Name

Member Number

Address City, State, Zip Contact Telephone

Alternate Telephone

E-mail Address

  



x Complete the form x Include payment (Check, Money Order or Credit Card) x Mail application or fax to ABGA x Note Animal Health Requirements x B & O = Bred & Owned (JABGA Members Only) x Herdbook Deadline – May 17,2013 x Entry Fees doubled if not received in ABGA Office by May 17, 2013 x See 2013 ABGA National Show Rules for more information

 

Option I # Entries

Tattoos Right Left

Registration #

B&O

National Show (circle one)

Open Fees

Junior Fees

Totals

1

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

2

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

3

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

4

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

5

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

6

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

7

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

8

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

9

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

10

ABGA

JABGA

Both

$40.00

$30.00

$

SUBTOTAL

Option II Slot Entries # of Open Slots #of Junior Slots

Qty

$

Additional Pens / Pair’s Classes

Cost X $45.00

$

Total

Name #of Additional Pens

$

X $35.00

$

SUBTOTAL

$

Limit 1 per exhibitor/ fitter

#of Pair’s Classes

Qty

Cost

Total

X $40.00

$

X $5.00

$

GRAND TOTAL

SUBTOTAL

$

$

  PAYMENT: _______ Visa _______ MC _______Am Ex _______ Disc _______ Check (#__________) __________ MO _____ Cash

   _____________________________________________  Card Number

_________________ Expiration Date

__________________________________________________________ Cardholder’s Signature Print Name on Card

APPLICANT HEREBY ACKNOWLEDGES AND AGREES THATTHE AMERICAN BOER GOATASSOCIATION, ITS OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, AGENTS, EMPLOYEES AND VOLUNTEERS (HEREAFTER COLLECTIVELY “ABGA�) SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY LOSS, INJURY OR DAMAGE IN CONNECTION WITH, ARISING OUT OF, OR INCIDENTTO THE NATIONAL SHOW.APPLICANT FURTHER AND HEREBY EXPRESSLY WAIVES ALL RIGHTS TO CLAIM AGAINST ABGABY REASON OF,AND RELEASES ABGA FROM ANY LIABILITY WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECTTO, ANY INJURY TO PERSON OR DAMAGE TO OR LOSS OF PROPERTY (INCLUDING CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES) RESULTING FROM ANY CAUSE WHATSOEVER (EXPRESSLY INCLUDING ABGA’S NEGLIGENCE). APPLICANTHEREBY AGREES TO HOLD HARMLESS AND UNCONDITIONALLYINDEMNIFY ABGA AGAINST AND FOR ALLCLAIMS, LIABILITIES, LOSSES, COSTS, EXPENSES, AND DAMAGES (ACTUAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR PUNITIVE) WHICH ABGA MAYATANY TIME SUFFER OR SUSTAIN OR BECOME LIABLE FOR BY REASON OF ANYACCIDENTS, DAMAGES, INJURIES Or LOSSES EITHER TO PERSONS, PROPERTY OR BOTH, OF PARTICIPANT, OF ANY OTHER PARTICIPANT, OF ANY OTHER PARTIES, OR TO THE PROPERTY OF ABGA, IN ANYMATTER ARISING FROM, CONNECTED WITH OR INCIDENT TO THE ACTIVITIES HEREUNDER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY NEGLIGENT ACT OR OMISSION OF ABGA, IT’S OFFICERS AGENTS, EMPLOYEES OR VOLUNTEERS. The undersigned applicant further acknowledges the receipt of a copy of the National Show Rules and certifies that he/she has read and understands them. Applicant further agrees to abide by all of the Show Rules and acknowledges that the Executive Committee of ABGA reserves the final and absolute right (a) to interpret the Show Rules; and (b) to determine all matters, questions and differences in regard thereto and from which determination no appeal or cause of action shall be available.

X ___________________________ ___________ _________ X ___________________________ ___________ ________ Signature

Date

ABGA#

Signature (if owner is under 18 years of age)

Date

Relationship

RETURN ENTRY FORM TO: American Boer Goat Association 1207 S. Bryant Blvd., Suite C, San Angelo, TX 76903 3KRQH‡)D[

www.abga.org | 19




2013 ABGA Vendor Reservation Show: June 11-15, 2013

Name of Company

Product/Service

Address City, State, Zip Fax

Contact Telephone

Contact Person

Alternate Telephone

Contact E-mail

10’ x 10’ booth space ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌$300 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $300

Please note any special requests here:______________________________________________________

Payment: ___Visa ___MC ___Disc____Am Ex_____ _______________________________ _____________ Name on Card Expiration Date

Check (#_______) ___Money Order ___Cash ________________________________ Cardholder’s Signature

Applicant hereby acknowledges and agrees that the American Boer Goat Association, its officers, directors, agents, employees, and volunteers (hereafter collectively “ABGA�) shall not be responsible for any loss, injury, or damage in connection with, arising out of, or incident to the ABGA National Show. Applicant further and hereby expressly waives all rights to claims against the ABGA by reason of, and releases ABGA from any liability whatsoever with respect to, any injury to person or damage to or loss of property (including consequential damages) resulting from any cause whatsoever (expressly including ABGA’s negligence). Applicant hereby agrees to hold harmless and unconditionally indemnify ABGA against and for all claims, liabilities, losses, costs, expenses, and damages (actual or consequential, or punitive) which ABGA may at any time suffer or sustain or become liable for by reason of any accidents, damages, injuries or losses either to persons, property, or both, of participant, of any other participant, of any other parties, or to the property of ABGA, in any matter arising from, connected with or incident to the activities hereunder, including but not limited to any negligent act or omission of ABGA, it’s officers, agents, employees, or volunteers.

X________________________________________________________ Signature

_______________ Date

RETURN WITH PAYMENT TO: American Boer Goat Association 1207 S. Bryant Blvd., Suite C, San Angelo, TX 76903 3KRQH‡)D[

20 | THE BOER GOAT


Breeder SPOTLIGHT

by y ROBYN SCHERER, M.AGR.

N&K RANCH BOER GOATS, located in Eldorado, Tex., is owned by Norman and Kathy Kohls. They answer a few questions about their operation. 1. How did you get started in the Boer goat industry? We started looking into the Boer breed when a friend from the experiment station said they would be eligible for release in 1994 from New Zealand. We needed a meat goat that would cross with our Spanish and/or nubians to make meat goats. We wanted to make a good wether for our kids to show. We had to be creative and bring in embryos with a group of friends, because they were so expensive to buy. We had a great group, and things progressed from there. 2. How many goats do you have, and what do you use them for? We have a small satellite herd of 45 does and 3 bucks, with another 50 recipient does that have 71 embryos in them for spring kidding. With the drought, we have had to cut our numbers back. Goats are the natural environmentalist. They eat things that many of our other livestock species will not eat. 3. What is your favorite part about raising Boer goats? My favorite part is making the genetic combinations, and seeing the reward they bring to the young people and their families who show. For the past four years, I have been involved with a project with three other

breeders to create the CBS goats. They are a natural selection goat. We do not doctor them, vaccinate or help kid, they are strictly range gaots. A professor helped us map out the genetic plan, and we went from there. Thus far this is an exciting experience for the commercial end. 4. What are some of the challenges you have faced, and what did you do to overcome them? Everything is a challenge. We have had goats get hung up in the fence, bucks breaking heads, and drought, but the biggest challenge was bringing the goats over from another country. There was a lot of paper work, quarantines, the goats adapting to a different environment, skeptics and lots of time spent on the phone. 5. What advice do you have for young producers getting into the Boer goat industry? Spend your dollar on great females. They are the foundations of your herd. You can lease a buck or buy semen, but the real value is in your doe line. Be sure you don’t try to fly your ship alone. Make sure you have an intelligent and honest mentor looking over your shoulder. Please don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Good ones are built on solid breeding principles and are good everyday of the week and not just a current fad.

www.abga.org | 21


EDITORIAL

by STACEY STONEMAN

BABY TIME!

Are you ready?

W

orking at a retail farm supply store, I often get asked by new goat owners what kinds of things they should have on hand at home to be prepared for kidding season. So through a social media site, I asked the public what key items meant the most to them and I received several responses. Here are the top items you responded with:

HEAT LAMPS The overwhelming “must have on hand” was the wonderful heat lamps offered by Premier1supplies.com. At a cost of $30 you may be wondering what makes them so special? As a long time user of these lamps, they are almost indestructible. I have had them down at levels that bucks could rub their horns at the base of them, and they were never able to be destroyed. Because they are fully enclosed, it lowers the risk of fire as the light bulb is never able to make contact with combustible material it may fall on. When it comes to peace of mind, these are the only heat lamps I use for my late winter/early spring kidding dates.

GLOVES Gloves, betadine scrub and a good lubricant in case you need to assist with delivery is a must have. If you don’t know anyone you can call to help you if you are alone, get in touch with your vet to help you find someone who has had goats for awhile. Sometimes a good mentor will go a long way in this business. Especially if you are new to goats.

correct position without losing the other leg that is in the correct position. If all of this talk about delivering babies with abnormal presentation at birth scares you, there is hope. Contact your closest veterinary teaching hospital about hosting a dystocia (difficult birthing) class. I live in Oklahoma and attended one at Oklahoma State University and used it two days later on triplets. The cost of the clinic was about the same as a veterinary clinic visit but it allowed me to have the knowledge for years to come and increased my confidence in my abilities to deliver on the farm.

TOWELS Towels to dry off the babies, a nasal aspirator and 7% iodine in a spray bottle to spray the navel and umbilical cord. Because kids are born with no natural immunity, iodine should be used on the umbilical cord for the prevention of navel ill. Be sure to remove any wet or moist bedding to further aid in controlling any risk of infection. One respondent suggested to lay the babies on old feed sacks while you dry them off, then to toss the feed sacks out along with the afterbirth and wet bedding. Kids often have membranes covering their face which can deter their ability to breathe. Using a clean towel, clean around the nose and mouth and ensure the newborn is breathing. If the breathing is labored, pick up the kid by the back legs and allow the fluids to drain. Sometimes a firm but gentle swing helps to remove fluids. Using a bulb sucker in the nose and mouth also help to remove fluids. Don’t have an aspirator? A small piece of straw can stimulate the baby to sneeze and help remove excess fluids.

TUBING KIT ROPE A small 5/16th diameter or so rope to use as a leg snare in case you have to assist the mother in delivery. This allows you to reach for the other leg or head in case your bundle of joy isn’t in the 22 | THE BOER GOAT

A tubing kit and frozen colostrum in case you have a situation where the doe either doesn’t have enough colustrum for the number of kids or the kid is having a rough start and has to be taken in the house.


KIDDING GATE A kidding gate is something I have in each pen. Some does can be a bit aggressive with wanting their kids to get up and will paw aggressively until they stand. I purchased a kidding gate from a dealer and then took it to my local FFA chapter to have them make me four of them for the price of one. The gates I use were custom made by my local FFA chapter and have are made of 1 ½ inch metal tubing and goat panels. The outside measurements are 45in x 36in high on their outside dimensions. At the bottom they have a 7 ¾ inch wide x 9 inch high slots all along the bottom for the babies to be able to enter and exit as they desire. I place one lamp above the gate so that the babies know it’s a warm safe place until they are ready to venture out to get a meal or stretch those long legs.

GOAT COATS Goat coats are great to have on hand if you don’t have electricity in your barn and you are dealing with cold temperatures. No goat coats? Try converting the sleeve of a large sweatshirt with the correct amount of holes for legs and another hole for urine to flow through for the boys.

WARM WATER WITH MOLASSES

From the location of the monitor in a single story ranch style home made of brick, it has to reach through another 50x60 foot metal shop that houses a bulldozer located 120 feet from my home. From beyond that, another 150 foot is where the kidding barn is located which is also a metal barn. I was stunned at its reception and ability to pick up a signal and sound from that incredible distance. I had been researching all sorts of camera systems that were particularly specified for metal and rock but carried a price tag just under $500. On a whim and being familiar with Walmarts no hassle return policy, I decided to give it a shot. It offers a $7.00 two year replacement warranty, so it was definitely something attractive for anyone on a budget. I am extremely pleased with the performance it offers and I wake more rested than past kidding seasons. I had many more great suggestions and things my friends considered their most valuable assets. Too many for one article really, and I would like to thank all of you for taking the time to write in regarding my questions on Facebook. If there is a product that you can’t live without or would like to see featured, please feel free to contact me via Facebook. In the meantime, find yourself a good book and prepare for the waiting games to begin. Happy Kidding!

An offering of warm water with molasses in it not only gives the doe instant energy, but it’s also a delicious treat. Nutridrench is another popular product purchased at your local farm store to restore essential nutrients the doe needs for her role as a new mother.

DRUGS Check with your local veterinarian to see what sort of drugs he recommends keeping on hand in case of emergencies. If you have the possibility that your goat is carrying multiples, ketone sticks from your local pharmacy to test for pregnancy toxemia, (SEE THE ARTICLE WRITTEN BY LAUREN GREEN IN THIS MONTH’S ISSUE) or various drugs in case your doe will need to be induced will be worth their weight in gold if it’s a weekend and you can’t get in touch with your veterinarian.

VIDEO MONITORING SYSTEM The last item I’m going to recommend is something I personally discovered this month. In the past, I have used a good set of walkie talkies from my hunting gear to be able to hear my goats noises to determine if a goat is in labor, or for listening for kid cries. But this month I discovered a video monitoring system I purchased at my local Walmart. Day & Night Baby Video Monitor made by Summer brand was a low cost risk at $74.88. I thought I would try it just to see if it would save me the long walk to the barn every 2 hours during my kidding season. With a 350ft range and its night vision capabilities, I can not only hear my goat chew her cud, but can detect changes in her breathing when I placed it closer to the kidding pen. Worried about it reaching through metal? I doubt you can have more metal than what mine is shooting through. www.abga.org | 23


EDITORIAL

by LAUREN GREEN, RVT, CVT

Just what is PREGNANCY TOXEMIA?

I

am not a veterinarian but I am a registered, licensed veterinary technician who has raised goats off and on for the past 30 years. This article is intended to explain what is going on with pregnant does that develop a condition called pregnancy toxemia, how to possibly prevent it, diagnose it and what works in my herd (U-BAR Boers) to treat it. Pregnancy toxemia is the same as preeclampsia in women. It’s a metabolic disease of does that occurs in the final weeks of pregnancy (usually the last 1 to 3 weeks). Signs of the condition, due to low glucose (sugar) levels include a gradual decrease in food intake, depression or inactivity, down and unable to rise, tremors, wobbly gait, weakness, swelling of the feet, weight shifting, walking tenderly as if their feet hurt, and teeth grinding. If left untreated or not treated quickly enough, this condition can result in the death of the doe and her kids. Pregnancy toxemia is typically seen in does carrying more than two kids. Does who are obese or very thin are also more at risk. The condition develops due to a reduced ability to consume enough food and obtain energy from their diet to meet the energy demands of the doe and her kids. 80% of the growth of the kids occurs during the last 6 weeks of gestation. As the doe’s uterus enlarges, there is less room for her stomach (rumen) to fill with feed or there simply may be no way for the doe to eat enough. In order to meet the nutritional requirements of the growing kids and still maintain her own body, the doe’s liver begins to convert stored fat into sugar for energy. This process (gluconeogenesis) is also what causes the ketone production and why it is critical that the doe be in good condition, not thin or obese and have plenty of good feed available in the last weeks prior to kidding. If at all possible, an ultrasound at 45-50 days of pregnancy is highly recommended to identify does with multiple fetuses. This allows for more intensive management and observation of those that are more prone to the development of pregnancy toxemia. If ultra-sounding is not possible, pay particular attention to does that are overly large for their stage of gestation and monitor their eating habits and behavior closely. Make note of the ‘pecking order’ during feeding time and make sure some are not being pushed out and not receiving adequate nutrition. Early diagnosis is critical to managing this potential fatal condition. Once the doe is down and refuses to get up, or if 24

ketone levels have been high and 2 days of drenching have not reduced ketone levels to moderate or low, the decision must be made to induce or have a C-Section performed. In some cases, the doe is more important to the breeding program than the kids and the kids may have to be sacrificed. It is extremely risky to not induce a doe with high ketone levels that is not responding to treatment. If left too long, the doe may lack sufficient energy to even deliver the kids and the risk of losing both the doe and the kids is great. It is also possible for the kids to die due to pregnancy toxemia and leave the doe with a potentially fatal infection called septicemia.

Preventing pregnancy toxemia involves four management goals 1. Show or obese does should lose excess weight and very thin does should be fed to gain some weight prior to breeding and all bred does should be maintained on a maintenance diet until the final month of pregnancy at which point their feed intake should be increased. Growing kids more than double a doe’s nutritional requirement. 2. There should be ample room for exercise (exercise is extremely important), and control of other conditions that might result in reduced feed intake or increased energy demand, such as parasitism, adequate shelter from bad weather or illness. You may also worm and vaccinate your does about 30 days prior to kidding. 3. During the last 3-4 weeks of pregnancy, monitor suspect pregnant does for the signs of pregnancy toxemia and test their urine using Ketostix. (As soon as a doe gets up, she will usually urinate, have the Ketostix ready and insert it into the urine stream, or catch some in a cup and dip the stick into it.) Separate, increase feed intake, and begin drenching at the first sign of ketones. Worm or insure your does are free of parasites that can drain their energy resources. 4. Does confirmed carrying 3-4 fetuses or those showing ketones on the Ketostix should be offered continual access to a high energy feed during the last month of gestation. (Feed that contains some of the following corn, milo, barley, wheat or cottonseed meal, soybean hull pellets and the label reads 16% or more protein. I do not feed whole or ‘just’ cracked corn as it can lead to founder and other issues.) Prepared feed containing the additive Rumensin or Monensin can also


be helpful as those ingredients increase feed utilization in the rumen. At 3 to 4 weeks prior to kidding, increase the feed amount and quality gradually so as not to upset the normal function of the rumen, which could also cause pregnancy toxemia as well.

Treating pregnancy toxemia Again, it cannot be stressed enough that diagnosing the early stages of pregnancy toxemia is key to the success of treating it. Have the Ketostix readily available, (an empty syringe case works well and is good to catch urine if you need to) and test suspect or multiple (more than 2 kids) does daily.

Dosing Syringe - Drencher (Different sizes available)

Fill syringe with drench, holding does head slightly tilted up, insert the metal end far back into the mouth between the cheek and the teeth and slowly depress syringe. Allow the doe to swallow often. (Do not try to administer this to a doe that has no swallowing reflex.) Note: Do not wear good clothes when administering this drench; you will be wearing some of it!

PREGNANCY TOXEMIA RECIPE: Equal parts of 50% dextrose, CMPK or Calcium Gluconate, Nutridrench, or Goat Aid, Propylene Glycol, Amino Acids (all can be ordered at most Veterinary/Farm/Ranch internet sites) and a bottle of Keep’N On made by Essentials. (Perfected by Lori Peterson – Show Me Boers) t $.1,ESFODI has Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Potassium, all things a toxic doe can become deficient in.

t /VUSJESFODI has vitamins, minerals, dextrose and provides energy, nutritional support and stimulates the appetite. (It is also good for weak newborns.) t 1SPQZMFOF(MZDPM assists in the conversion of glucose into energy. t "NJOP"DJETplay an important role in nutrition and utilization. t ,FFQ/0O is a mixture of supportive vitamins, minerals and provides energy. If a doe’s Ketostix test strip indicates low ketone levels (5 to 15 on the stick), usually about 60 cc’s of the drench mixture given orally once a day via a drench gun is sufficient. Higher levels (40 or higher on the stick) giving 60 to 80 cc’s 3 to 4 times daily is usually sufficient to bring down the ketone levels within a day. If multiple daily drenching’s do not lower levels significantly and the stick does not show ‘large’, the doe is still eating and within 7 days of her due date, you can administer 1cc (IM) of dexamethasone daily for two days (to encourage development of the kids lungs) and then induce. If the doe continues to have ‘large’ readings on the Ketostix after two days of the drenching treatment, stops eating or appears weak, induction is no longer a matter of choice regardless of the stage of pregnancy. At this point, the doe should be offered all the grain/good hay she will eat. Use 10 cc’s of dexamethasone (IM) and 2 cc’s Lutalyse (IM) to induce. Generally, the doe will kid within 24 to 48 hours. Continue to administer the drench during this period and 1-2 times daily for 2 days after kidding. Offer the doe a bucket of warm water with molasses after kidding. Keep a close eye on her after kidding to insure complete delivery of the afterbirth. Wishing everyone the very best luck this coming kidding season. Lauren Green RVT, CVT

Lauren Green

about

I began raising Nubian dairy goats in 1980 in New Mexico with my daughters Lori and Kristen. We showed extensively at the time all over New Mexico and Arizona (that’s how Lori met her husband Wess Peterson). I worked as a ranch manager and was also the ranch vet for a herd of over 3,000 head of cattle and 50 head of horses. After leaving the ranch I returned to school in Colorado and received a degree as a registered Veterinary technician and did an internship at Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, Co, specializing in large animal reproduction and nutrition. I worked in several large veterinary practices in Denver, Oregon and New Mexico before relocating here to Missouri and becoming involved with the Boers. I am a member of the ABGA and served on the last Breed Standards committee. I am the owner of U-BAR Boers in Joplin, MO and work closely with my daughter Lori Peterson and her husband Wess (ShowMeBoers) in trying to prevent

or resolve successfully, some of health issues that we all seem to deal with from time to time. Years ago, when we first started with goats, I like any newbie, bought a book on how to raise goats. I was totally overwhelmed after reading to discover all the things that can go wrong with such a friendly and supposedly hardy little critter. Over the years we experienced every issue in every chapter and then some but sure learned a lot along the way. After receiving my veterinary education in Colorado I returned to Missouri and combined my medical education with Lori’s actual experience and we began to formulate some practices and procedures that actually started to work. We learn something new every year in the way of a different procedure, a different medication or something else to enhance an already working formula. But the one thing we and many others have learned the very difficult and heartbreaking way is, that if your doe develops Pregnancy Toxemia and

you don’t catch it early enough and start aggressive treatment, you will more than likely lose your kids and quite possibly the doe as well. So many of us have tried for just one more day, to get those kids just a little closer to being able to make it, and have gone out to the barn to find that the whole game has been lost. It is truly heartbreaking. The article I wrote just basically outlines our pregnant doe management plan of plenty of exercise, moderate feed to maintain a ‘good’ body condition and during the last month, the does feed amount and quality is adapted to meet the demands of the ever-growing kids. Does are monitored carefully for any indication of pregnancy toxemia and treatment is begun immediately. In the past few years, we have been able to successfully carry several toxic does long enough to be able to induce and receive perfectly healthy kids. Now we’ve set about developing the ideal diet and exercise program to hopefully prevent any toxemia issues from occurring at all. www.abga.org | 25


Tired of the stress and complications caused by elastrator rings?

..... Put a

‘WEE’ in

your pocket today! HIGH TENSION

Worth the Investment

1-800-858-5974

www.CallicrateBanders.com

It’s the dawn of a new, better Show Goat Feed. Innovative nutritional technologies raise MoorMan’sÂŽ ShowTecÂŽ AminoGainÂŽ Goat Feed above other show goat feeds. What AminoGain Goat has that others don’t . . . Patented cold pellet technology AminoGain technology CitriStimÂŽ Fire Extinguisher™ R Be one of the ďŹ rst to rise above the competition with MoorMan’s ShowTec AminoGain Goat DC (81667MPSP4). Log on or call us to gain the competitive edge with

AminoGain Goat. Scan here with your smart phone.

Like MoorMan’sŽ ShowTecŽ on Facebook!

www.admani.com/moormansshowtec            

26 | THE BOER GOAT


Alex Jurica

Emily Reuter

aLEXIS Briley

Laurie Savage

TAKE A LOOK AT YOUR PHOTO SUBMISSIONS!

THE 2013

ABGA

photo contest

A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS.

Mary Kate Harrod

Halley Lauchland

Abby Dunnam

Brittney t Rya n

Ida Hulsey

Anissa Comer

aLEXIS Briley

Heather t Gleason “ALLIE” Laurie Savage

Mary Kate Harrod

Mary Bracken Alex Jurica

Cheryl Ganci Sarah Marquette “IDGIE”

Ida Hulsey

aLEXIS Briley

Jeremy re Ellis

aLEXIS Briley

Sarah Marquette “ZORRO”

aLEXIS Briley Shelby Feldman


28 | THE BOER GOAT


www.abga.org | 29


World Class Fencing

DWDIIRUGDEOH SULFHV

www.w winnin inggt gtraadittioonsalle.ccom m Offering 100 head of quality show and breeding stock Boer’s from these top breeders: Complimentary lunch available + Auctioneer, Pit Kemmer Visit WWW.DVAUCTION.COM for more information.

ZZZSRZHUĂ H[IHQFHFRP

)XOO/LQHRI3HUPDQHQW 3RUWDEOH)HQFLQJ

ABLE ACRES BOER GOATS

Gary Duncan: 765-366-6000 Sandy Duncan: 765-714-4551 ableacres@tds.net Lary & Nathan Duncan: 615-957-9163 laryduncan@att.net ROCKING “C� BOER GOATS

Richard & Sandy Cook: 217-343-9047 rockingcbg@hotmail.com DNW FARMS

Gary: 812-486-5410 Wilmer: 812-486-9460 goingbroke73@yahoo.com COLE’S CREEK BOER GOATS

Larry & Penny Cole: 615-598-7484 colefamily976@aol.com 2-M BOER GOATS

Paul & Kim Morgan: 502-643-5662 kmorgan@hughes.net

WILSON FAMILY BOER GOATS

Steve Wilson: 812-444-9581 Dale Wilson: 812-444-9580 wfarms@rtcom.net

HILL TOP FARM BOER GOATS

Kyle Shipley: 660-953-0758 mctitle@grm.net B-MARK FARMS LLC

Brad Mackey: 252-521-2002 bmackfarms@gmail.com M&C FARM

Cindy Price Westfall: 937-215-4143 cindy_price_westfall@yahoo.com 2-BIT BOER RANCH

Scott & Margie Turner: 512-415-6522 2bitboer@gmail.com BAB BOER GOATS

Bailey Bergherm: 239-848-8868 bailey@babboergoats.com

GIBBS FARM BOER GOATS - JJeff ff & Christie: 405-743-9420

gibbsfarm@aol.com

BREEZY OAKS BOER GOATS - Tom & Julie Moore: 219-866-7048

breezyoaks@centurylink.net

‡LQIR#SRZHUĂ H[IHQFHFRP

&DOOXVWRUHTXHVW\RXUIUHHFDWDORJRUJRRQOLQHWRZZZSRZHUĂ H[IHQFHFRP

30 | THE BOER GOAT

ANDERSON & FRASER BOER GOATS - Wade: 217-840-5801, Mark: 217-497-2781

wadeanderson@ecicwireless.com

For more information & catalog requests ~ Goingbroke73@yahoo.com Gary Kemp: 812-486-5410 ~ Richard Cook: 217-343-9047 ~ Wilmer Kemp: 812-486-9460


www.abga.org | 31


www.abga.org | 23

Profile for American Boer Goat Association

The Boer Goat - March/April 2013  

The Boer Goat - March/April 2013  

Profile for abga-org