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www.abga.org | 3


2012-2013 AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS REGION 8 - ERVIN CHAVANA (EC)

REGION 7 - LINDA WEST

PresidenttNFOHFSDSFFL!IPUNBJMDPN

ll-west@sbcglobal.net

REGION 16 - BRAD MACKEY (EC)

REGION 9 - VICKI STICH (EC)

Vice President tCSBENBDLFZ!CNBDLGBSNTDPN

ladyhogger59@hotmail.com

REGION 10 - TRACY DIEFENBACH

REGION 11 - SCOTT HAWTHORN

SecretarytUMEJFG!HNBJMDPN

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REGION 6 - DR. MARK WATKINS

REGION 12 - PAUL KINSLOW (EC)

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paul@muellerauctions.net

REGION 1 - TERRY BROWN

REGION 13 - MARK ANDERSON

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REGION 2 - BOYD WILLOUGHBY

REGION 14 - JOHN MORROW

wbccboers@allwest.net

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REGION 3 - JEFF GIBBS (EC)

REGION 15 - SARA DAVIS

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REGION 4 - KAY GARRETT (EC)

PAST PRESIDENT - TROY VEAL (EC)

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tvanveal@yahoo.com

REGION 5 - JOHN EDWARDS

*EC denotes Executive Committee member

eggstx@aol.com

AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION STAFF 1207 S. Bryant Blvd., Suite C | San Angelo, TX 76903 Sandy Smith, Operations Manager, sandy@abga.org Mary Ellen Villarreal, Office Operations Supervisor, mary@abga.org Laurie Evans, Administrative Assistant, laurie@abga.org Belinda Constancio, Registration Support Staff, belinda@abga.org Sonia Cervantez, Accounting, sonia@abga.org Dee Ann Torres, Registration Support Staff, deeann@abga.org Aaron Gillespie, Show Coordinator/Youth Coordinator, aaron@abga.org Miranda Carrillo, Member Services, miranda@abga.org

Letter From the PRESIDENT

July/August 2013

Dear ABGA/JABGA Members, I would like to first congratulate all the winners from this year’s Nationals. The competition was as deep as I can ever remember. What a successful 2013 Nationals we had! Thanks to the staff, Superintendents, committee members and volunteers who made it happen without a hitch. This year there were 1030 Open exhibitors and 528 Junior exhibitors representing 23 different states, making this year’s show one of the largest ever. The National show was dedicated to the memory of one of our dearest friends, long-time supporter and Past President, Mike Masters. It was heart-warming to see Mike’s family in attendance and his beautiful daughter Mylie in the ring showing. I know Mike was looking down smiling as big as ever. One of the most exciting endeavors we undertook at the National Show was dedicating Friday of the show as “Pink Out Day� to bring awareness to Breast Cancer. Pink ABGA tee shirts were sold and every exhibitor was encouraged to wear pink on Friday. With your support, the ABGA presented $4143.50 from the sale of the Pink Out Shirts to the American Cancer Society. Every year I am reminded what a close family we really have within the ABGA which can be seen through the generosity of its members and the continued support of our Juniors. With that support, I am pleased to announce the JABGA made a $10,000 profit from the sale of the John Deere Raffle items. Congratulations to the three lucky winners. In addition, our Thursday night banquet and JABGA Auction raised over $20,000! Thank you to everyone who donated items and the bidders who made this auction so successful. Again, what a successful 2013 National Show! Make plans to attend the 2014 ABGA / JABGA Nationals in Grand Island, Nebraska, June 9-14, 2014. JABGA members, plan on attending the 2013 JABGA Leadership Conference, July 21-25, at Angelo State University, San Angelo, Texas. See the ABGA homepage for schedule and registration information. Sadly, this will be the last time I address you as President, my term is up and we will have a new President and a new seated board by the time of this issue. We have accomplished quite a lot over the past year and I would like to personally thank the staff, the Board of Directors and the members for all their help and for allowing me to serve this great association. Sincerely,

Ervin J. Chavana, President American Boer Goat Association

4 | THE BOER GOAT


Table of Contents BEST OF SHOW IDEAL EVOLUTION OF THE IDEAL SHOW GOAT

CHAMPION DRIVE A PEEK IN THE NATIONAL SHOW WINNERS CIRCLE

BREEDER SPOTLIGHT JACK & ANITA MAULDIN

ABGA NATIONAL SHOW RESULTS ABOUT THE COVER

MEET THE JUDGES A Q&A SESSION YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS

WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO ON OUR COVER?

ENCORE VISIONS CONTACT Kelli Chapman PO Box 917 Aspermont, TX 79502 Toll Free 877-822-3016 (f) 806-398-9047 JOGP!UIFCPFSHPBUNBHB[JOFDPN

PUBLISHER Jackie Lackey, INC. Jackie Lackey, Editor-in-chief & creative director KBDLJF!FODPSFWJTJPOTDPN CREATIVE TEAM Robyn Amthauer Jamie Banbury

LETTER L ETTER F FROM ROM T THE HE

These snapshots were captured by Kelli Chapman while wandering about the Ike Hamilton Expo Center in West Monroe during the National Show.

We are still compiling entries for our next cover photo! You still have a shot at YOUR photo being the cover of the September/ October issue of The Boer Goat! Submit your pic to JOGP!UIFCPFSHPBUNBHB[JOFDPN!

Allyson McGuire Sarah Vachlon

Editor

The ABGA National Show this year proved to be quite a success. The quality of animals at this year’s show was second to none, not to mention the top-of-the-line facility. I thought it was especially interesting how many West Monroe and Monroe “locals� were wandering around the barn and watching the show. After hours, I noticed quite a few Boer goat showers had the same idea I had of visiting the Duck Commander Warehouse. In this issue, not only will you be able to review the nation’s top winners, but also take a peek inside their lives as well and get to know the judges. I’m also excited to share a story about the changes (and constants) of the Boer goat breed since its inception in 1993. Have a great story idea? Share it! We love feedback from our readers! Safe Travels!

www.abga.org | 5


AMERICANBOER BOERGOAT GOATASSOCIATION ASSOCIATION AMERICAN

AffiliatesProgram Program Affiliates

The ABGA affiliate program is a partnership between regional goat clubs and ABGA. With the rapid growth in the meat goat industry, the local meat goat and Boer goat clubs have an increased role of education, marketing and promotion. These local groups provide an essential role in promoting the industry and educating breeders. In 2004, ABGA began development of a program to aid, assist and work together with local clubs. The objectives of the AGBA affiliate program include: t1SPWJEFBEEJUJPOBMSFTPVSDFTBUUIFMPDBMDMVCTMFWFM t1SPWJEFOFUXPSLJOHPQQPSUVOJUJFTGPSUIFMPDBMDMVCT t"UUSBDUBOESFUBJOHPBUQSPEVDFST t"TTJTUXJUIFEVDBUJPOBMPQQPSUVOJUJFT t1SPWJEFBNFUIPEGPSHSBTTSPPUTJOQVUGSPNMPDBMDMVCT

East Texas Goat Raisers Association (ETGRA)

Alabama Meat Goat and Sheep Producers

Andrea Thompson PO Box 2614 Jacksonville, TX 75766 doorslammer440@aol.com www.etgra.com

Mitt Walker P.O. Box 1100 Montgomery, AL 36191 mwalker@alfafarmers.org Serving States: AL

Iowa Meat Goat Association

Boer Goat Association of North Carolina

Cathy Van Wyhe 625 472nd Ave Grinnell, IA 50112 rcvanwyhe@iowatelecom.net www.iowameatgoat.com Serving States: IA, MO, IL, MN

Tall Corn Meat Goat Wether Association Inc. Vern Thorp 1959 Highway 63 New Sharon, IA 50207 Neverthorp@aol.com www.meatgoatwether.com Serving States: IA

6 | THE BOER GOAT

Kelly Clark P.O. Box 36497 Greensboro, NC 27416 kellyclark@triad.rr.com

Cascade Boer Goat Association Becki Crighton 14352 W Hwy 12 Touchet, WA 99360 becki@coppercreekboers.com www.cascadebga.org Serving States: OR, WA

Snake River Meat Goat Association Clara Askew 8054 Ustick Rd Nampa, ID 83687 foxtailfarms@hotmail.com www.srmga.com Serving States: ID, WA, OR, NV, UT, WY, MT If you are an officer or a member of a regional goat club, please download an ABGA Affiliate Application for your club today! Forms can be found online at www.abga.org.


Be sure to visit www.abga.com for additional information, updates and a complete year’s calendar of upcoming shows and events. Don’t see your event listed? Please contact the ABGA at 325.486.2242

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

JULY July 4 July 6-7 July 6-7 July 6-7 July 6-7 July 6-7 July 17 July 18 July 19-20 July 19 July 20-21 July 20 July 26-27 July 27-28 July 27-28 July 27-28 July 27 July 27

Schuyler County Fair Minne-Goat-A Firecracker Classic 49’er Jubilee Red, White & Boer Show Braxton Luchini Benefit Shows California State Fair Buckeye Classic Show Harrison Co Fair Boer Goat Show Ohio State Fair The Big Top Boer Goat Show State Line Boer Goat Show NC Foothills Summer Show Reno Classic NETGRA’s 9th Annual Sizzlin’ Summer Boer Goat Show New York State Boer Goat Show Southern Iowa ABGA Show Mercer County Fair

Rushville, IL Jordan, MN Kearneysville, WV Angles Camp, CA Ridgefield, WA Sedalia, MO Sacramento, CA Columbus, OH Corydon, IN Columbus, OH Chehalis, WA Centreville, MI Shelby, NC Reno, NV Athens, TX

Deric Wetherell Shelly Pitlick Susan Burner Iris Lerena Louise Goudge Tisha Diefenbach Jessica Neugebauer Philip Grover Glen Casada Philip Grover Danette Fuhrer Jessica Wood Greg Traywick Iris Lerena Summer Moeller

217-898-9358 612-791-3664 304-279-6323 530-749-0466 503-637-6244 816-519-1668 916-263-3149 740-426-6215 812-738-2895 740-426-6215 360-748-1709 269-489-2952 704-482-4365 830-749-0466 903-681-2296

Syracuse, NY Oskaloosa, IA Harrodsburg, KY

Kay Kotwica Paula Middlesworth Michele McAfee

315-889-5333 641-777-9210 859-734-0959

Springfield, MO Washington, IA Kankakee, IL

Brittany Gillig Ron Grier Deanna Hankes

417-833-2660 319-430-4332 309-212-1696

Santa Rosa, CA Topsham, ME Lincoln, NE Sedalia, MO Hamburg, NY Fairlea, WV Lebanon, TN Henderson, TX Des Moines, IA Logan, OH Lancaster, CA Grand Island, NE St. Paul, MN Pueblo, CO Salem, OR Chillicothe, MO Kennesburg, CO Salina, KS Shippensburg, PA

Monica Rodriguez John Wilcox Misty Logsdon Edna Vollmer Michelle Kruger Kelly Tuckwiller Mark & Debbie Anderson Linda Teer Jen Cannon Bonnie Harris Becky McRoberts Betty Drudik Gretchen Sankovitz Jeanne Robison Becki Crighton Tisha Diefenbach Scott Pruett Carol Bachofer Lois Zeigler

707-545-4203 207-557-0867 402-770-4469 660-530-5616 716-337-0363 304-645-6987 615-967-1415 936-635-9790 515-262-3111 ext 245 740-701-9009 661-948-6060 308-380-5581 507-835-8460 719-404-2035 503-351-4599 816-519-1668 303-732-4534 785-826-7855 717-776-7583

Blackfoot, ID

Bill Coon Deidre Redifer Marla Snead Shawna Fetters Chelli Evans Tamara Johnson Steve Hart Anita Ramsey Denise Weaver Kay Kotwica

208-681-2411 540-234-9478 417-448-9615 515-231-2208 432-550-3232 828-687-1414 405-612-5642 256-504-7808 903-597-2501 315-889-5333

AUGUST August 1 August 3-4 August 4 August 4 August 8 August 10 August 13 August 16-17 August 16-17 August 16 August 17-18 August 17 August 24 August 24 August 25-26 August 27 August 29-30 August 30 August 31-1 August 31-1 August 31-1 August 31

Ozark Empire Fair Tall Corn ABGA Open Meat & Boer Goat Show Prairie Thunder Kaukakee Co. Open Boer Goat Show Sonoma County Fair The Spirit of Maine Boer Goat Show Lancaster County Super Fair Boer Goat Show Missouri State Fair Erie County Fair ABGA Meat Goat Show 1 & 2 State Fair of Virginia Wilson County Fair Piney Wood Summer Time Classic Iowa State Fair ABGA/OHBGA Hocking Hills Caprine Classic Desert Premiere Boer Goat Show Nebraska State Fair Minnesota State Fair Colorado State Fair Oregon State Fair North Missouri Meat Goat Producers Colorado Boer Classic KMGA Fall Prairie Classic Keystone Summer Finale

SEPTEMBER September 4-5 September 7-8 September 7-8 September 7-8 September 11 September 15 September 21-22 September 24 September 26 September 28-29

Eastern Idaho State Fair 6th Annual Shenandoah Valley Showdown Southwest Missouri Boer Goat Classic IMGA Open Boer Goat Show Permian Basin Fair North Carolina Mountain State Fair Oklahoma State Fair Dekalb County VFW Fair Goat Show East Texas State Fair NYS Jack Front Classic

Oklahoma City, OK Tyler, TX Syracuse, NY

www.abga.org | 7


EDITORIAL

by GINGER MERRITT

Best of Show I

t wasn’t too long ago that the judges were giving their reasons with words like “too muscular” or “lighter bodied,” but those days are gone. The transformation of the ideal show goat has been an interesting journey over the last few years, and especially since the Boer goat transformed the meat goat industry in the U.S. “When the Boer goat was first introduced, the goats were shorter necked and shorter legged, and now they’ve become longer necked, longer bodied and thicker,” says Chad Broyles, co-owner of Chestnut Springs Farms. “They’ve really improved over the years.” In 1993, the Boer goat came to the U.S., and its genetic propensity for good muscles led to the meat goat industry standard becoming more muscular and well built. Of course, some things have not changed. The ideal show goat needs to be structurally sound. Broyles, who has been in the goat industry since 1996, says he believes show goats have not changed that much over the years, but they have definitely improved. Broyles, who runs around 100 does on his West Virginia farm, is not the only one who feels that way. Kevin Mock of Mock Livestock has been in the Boer goat industry since 2008 when he and his family made the switch from hogs. He says the industry is making huge strides toward producing a better animal. 8 | THE BOER GOAT

“When I started in the industry, goats were narrower and a little frailer,” he says. “As an industry, they’ve gotten stouter and have become better livestock in my opinion.” Kevin and his wife, Megan, and two boys, Blaze and Braxson, raise and sell market goats. They have been doing that since 2008 when the goat industry piqued Kevin’s interest. As his family began their foray into the goat world, he knew the type of goat he would be breeding. “I wanted to make my goats more three-dimensional before we worried about muscle,” he says. “I wanted them to have more dimension to the center of the body, and I felt the muscle would come with that.” Mock Livestock has primarily Boergoat influenced animals, and they run around 100 does in Hico, Texas. They raise, market and sell them with a very hands-on approach. “As a whole, goats have gotten stouter, heavier structured and wider centered,” Kevin says. “I think that’s a very good thing.” The Boer goat industry is a young one, but the U.S. arrival of the Boer goat in the 1990s has already made an enormous impact on market goats. The Boer goats, prized for their size and meatiness, came from South Africa and had to be under strict quarantine for five years in New Zealand before entering the U.S.

Soon after the Boer goat came into the U.S. in the fall of 1993, the traditional meat goat business was transformed into an exciting, booming industry. The incredible size of the Boer males and their impressive appearance created a “mystique” that may have contributed to the rapid increase of U.S. goat ranching in the 1990s. Since arriving here, Boer goats have been crossbred with Spanish goats more than any other goat. The result has been a bigger, meatier Spanish/Boer goat that demands a higher price. Meat goat production has been around through the ages. But commercially, it is an agricultural industry in its infancy. The demand for high-quality, lean, healthy red meat is the one of the underlying forces behind the development of the American meat goat industry. With an eager base of ethnic consumers, the demand for goat meat continues to grow in the U.S. each year. The importation of goat meat into the U.S. is estimated at over $30 million annually. Besides expanding the presence of the meat goat industry in numbers, the Boer goat also has made three other clearly positive contributions to the agricultural economy including extra pounds of meat, increased price per pound and greater number of births. The Boer goat is capable of three kiddings every two years; twins are common, and the breed reaches maturity early resulting in a young, large carcass.


Although the industry and show circuit is young, the big, open shows are now paying cash prizes for winning, which was not always the case. “It’s only been a recent development that the bigger shows have been paying large cash prizes, which shows how the industry has quickly evolved into something bigger and better,� Mock says. Mock says he believes that the ideal goat has changed as result of industry demand for animals that produce more muscle at a faster rate and likens the industry change to that of the beef industry. Similar to what has been seen in the goat industry, other livestock industries’ ideals have changed throughout the years. Much like fashion, the design of a goat and the judging of that design is subjective and changes with time and tastes. The goat industry has been moving from a lighter animal to one that is more muscular, wider structured and functional to meet the demand. Even as the industry has breed standards to reach and an ideal goat that is consistently picked for the top prizes, each producer has their own take on perfection, or close to it. “I like a goat with a wide stance, clean chest and pretty head that is structurally sound and follows the breed standards,� Broyles says. “I tend to shy away from the extremes and focus on structure and balance.�

Even as the ideal goat continues to evolve to meet the industry’s needs and standards, those heavily involved in the industry say their desire to be in the industry and the reasons they are involved will remain the same. “I enjoy seeing those goats grow and perform in the way that we hope they would,� Mock says. “I also really like being able to work in a hands-on way with my customers.� For those just getting started in the industry, Mock believes they should look to those who have much experience in selection of goats before they determine the goat for their project or farm. If they choose animals with a good foundation, they will be able to adapt to changing industry trends with style and grace.

Broyles says he has had a great return on investment and predicts the changes his farm will face in the future will be good. “I’m happy with the direction that the American Boer Goat Association and the Boer goat industry is going,� he says. “I see a great future in this industry.�

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“My ideal goat would be 110-115 pounds and moderate plus in frame size,� he says. “He would have an outward curvature to his center body and be as wide to the ground as he is to the top of his skeleton with no buckles or bends in the middle.�

“I hope they continue to have enough muscle while getting sounder in shape and in structure so they can function better mechanically,� he says.

“In the grand scheme of things, goats have plenty of muscle right now,� he says. “I hope and believe they will continue to get better structurally and mechanically, which will lead to a better goat industry.�

It’s the dawn of a new, better Show Goat Feed.

Mock’s ideal is very specific and also centered on structure and balance.

Looking forward, many in the goat industry believe the ideal will continue to change, and Kevin Mock believes it will be for the better.

Both Mock and Broyles see a bright future for the Boer goat industry, which they believe includes a constant evolution of the ideal show goat. Mock says he has hope that the ideal show goat will continue to get better in design and in shape and structure.

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www.abga.org | 9


The

ONE and

ONLY! Big Tex invites you to the great State Fair of Texas ! 速

Sept. 27 - Oct. 20, 2013 IMPORTANT DATES Market Week - Sept. 30 - Oct. 4 Validation & Ownership Deadline - June 30

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10 | THE 10 | THE BOER GOAT


www.abga.org | 11


EDITORIAL

by ROBYN SCHERER, M.AGR.

Champion Drive: INSIDE THE LIFE OF AN ABGA CHAMPION A

ttending the ABGA National Show is the highlight of the year for many Boer goat producers. Held in West Monroe, LA, June 10-15, this year’s show boasted 528 junior entries and 1030 open entries exhibited by 268 owners from 23 states. “The National Show allows members to exhibit and have their Boer goats and breeding programs evaluated against other breeders who are also competing for top honors. The Boer goats are judged on breed standards, confirmation, soundness, finish, and obviously degree of muscling since they are meat goats,” said Ervin Chavana of Menger Creek Ranch, ABGA board President. The show is divided into two shows. The junior show is held first, followed by the open show. “The Junior National Show is specifically for the junior members. The juniors must own the goats they are exhibiting. This competition allows junior members the opportunity to have their goats to be evaluated against others based on the same criteria as used in the ABGA National Show. Junior members vote on the three judges that will judge their National Show as well,” said Chavana. “Within the Junior National Show are Bred and Owned Classes and Showmanship classes.” A special event held this year was the Pink Out Day. “The ABGA chose to bring awareness to breast cancer and set aside the Friday of Nationals as “Pink Out Day,” said Chavana. “Pink Tee shirts were sold and the money collected was donated to the American Cancer Society. Everyone wore their pink shirts on Friday to show unity and awareness and $4,143.50 was donated to the American Cancer Society.” Two young ABGA members that competed in both shows, describe this year’s nationals as a dream come true. Kami Oller of Enid, Okla, began raising Boer goats, when she was in the sixth grade. “I fell head over heels in love with them and that’s when my true passion kicked in. My parents believe in extremely hard work, so when my Mom told me we were either in 150 percent or not in at all, that’s when I made the commitment to follow through. I began with grade does, and slowly worked up to better genetics along the way,” she explained. As Oller’s operation began to grow, her mother advised that she recruit a team to help with various activities.

12 | THE BOER GOAT

“I became really serious just last year when I asked my Mom to join forces with me. My Mom is successful in the barrel horse industry, so she knows what it takes to start at the very bottom and make it to the top. The first thing she said to do was to assemble a team because one person can’t do it on their own. It takes a team effort.” The team she selected included friends and family. “With that advice we began discussing how to go about it. The first person I picked was Kelly Edwards. She has been a major reason why we’ve succeeded. Then we asked Dexter Matlock and Robbie Sanders to start clipping for us and that was the beginning of our successful year,” she said. Now 17, Oller owns her own business, Oller Boer Goats, and has added the titles of ABGA Premier Fullblood Exhibitor and JABGA Overall Premier exhibitor to her list of accomplishments. “I am still shocked. First and foremost I felt blessed. I asked God how in the world did I get that lucky because I didn’t feel like I deserved it. Then I realized it was because of all the team effort we had, the advice we got, and the people who pulled together to help my operation get off the ground. I didn’t accomplish this on my own,” Oller said. Since then, she’s picked up several wins at the National Show with her goats as well. “It meant the world to me to have my herd perform so well. Honestly, I had hoped to do well, but they completely exceeded my expectations,” said Oller. “I feel so thankful and blessed, but I’m also humbled because the reality of competing that well next year will be extremely hard to do.” Raising champion goats takes a lot of hard work, something Oller doesn’t shy from. “It takes dedication, passion, desire, and the willingness to not be afraid of failure to raise one. It takes a great team, hard work, and the mindset to always want to be better,” she said. However, her successes have come with their fair share of challenges. “Being successful at anything is not only challenging but rewarding. I guess I could say the most challenging part would be the time and effort it takes to reach the goals I’ve set,” she explained.


But, at the end of the day these challenges are more than worth it for Oller. “It’s fun, exciting, and an amazing experience from start to finish. I love raising them, and I love showing them. Plus I absolutely love and respect the people associated with goats,” she said. Reilly Butler, a 13-year-old of Bandera, Tex. has been showing goats competitely for five years. “I enjoy showing Boer goats, not only because it’s fun but I get to see old friends and make new ones at each show I attend,” Butler said. He showed the Grand Champion Percentage Doe in both the JABGA and ABGA National Show this year, as well as the JABGA Reserve Champion Percentage Doe. “I have learned that success at the national level requires a commitment to hard work on a daily basis. This includes cleaning feed/water troughs and pens, exercising goats, training them to lead, stand still and and set up, keeping up with vaccines/worming and delicing as well as a multitude of other things that go into taking care of a show goat, he explained. He added, “Success doesn’t always mean winning in the show ring, but knowing I have done my best.” Butler attributes his success to a team of people of well. “I have also learned that one person cannot achieve success without help.” Another youth who found success at the show was Noah Teel of Stillwater, Ok. Also 17, Teel works with his family at Teel Show Goats. “We got started in the Boer goat business as a show project when my brother was in 4-H. My mother thought the goats looked like a lot of fun and would be a great project for the family. The whole family fell in love with the goats right off,” Teel said.

eliminate the ones they don’t like so they are as relaxed as possible in the show ring. First of all they must know that I’m in charge, this is serious and no fooling around in the show ring. I work hard to keep the goats set-up and trained not to move once they are set.” Teel’s work has paid off. In addition to having several class and division winners, he was also named the ABGA Percentage Show Premier Exhibitor, as well as the JABGA Reserve Grand Champion Premier Fullblood Exhibitor. “This was the highlight of my show career. There are so many great breeders from all across the country that come to Nationals every year. I’m just honored to be able to compete with large breeders and their Boer goats. I think the joy comes from knowing that all the hard work paid off,” Teel said. Both exhibitors credited their success to all of those who have helped them along the way, and plan to continue to raise Boer goats. “I just want to say thank you to all those who have supported me through the past years. I would not have been able to accomplish any of these things without the love, and support of family and my dear friends,” Teel said. The junior program is especially important to ABGA members. They view these young adults as the future of their respective industry. “Throughout the week are activities for our junior members such as, the boot scramble and goat scramble which gets all the kids involved. The strength of any association can be seen through their Junior Association and the ABGA continues to focus on their junior members,” said Ervin.

Prepping his animals for Nationals took a lot of time. “The two months before Nationals, my days are spent entirely at our barn. I entered several goats in the JABGA and ABGA National shows, and it takes all my time to get that many goats ready for a high level of competition,” said Teel. “I start each day by feeding, drenching and leading each of the goats in my show string. Once that is complete I start the day long process of washing blowing and managing hair on each animal. My goal is that each animal get a bath and be blown out five times a week to get their hair in the best shape for clipping.” This is an arduous process, especially in the summer time. “When it comes to showing goats at the National show, the most challenging part is growing hair in the Oklahoma heat and getting them to look their best in June. This takes a lot of time, management, and energy to keep them all looking their best every day,” Teel said.

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AUTGH,U12PM 25

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OSWEGO, KS FAIRGROUNDS 100 Woodcliffe Drive

Saturday, August 24 th, 2 pm Seminar on goat health and management to be held by Dr. Brian Faris, head of goat and sheep at Kansas State University.

When it comes to showing a champion, Teel believes that it’s a team effort between the showman and the goat.

Consignors from Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico & Texas.

“I think you first must have a great animal, and then you must bond with the animal to know their every move. They are just like us, they have good days and bad days, they have things they like and don’t like,” said Teel. “I try to get to know those things and

View our online catalog ad at www.boergoats.com Sale will be broadcasted live via www.dvauction.com Find us on Facebook! www.abga.org | 13


make

K7 KFF Pure Pleasure

2013 JABGA Reserve National Champion % Doe by Reilly Butler

K7 KFF Hot!Hot!Hot!

ABGA National Champion % Doe, owned and exhibited by Reilly Butler, bred by Kroeker Family Farms

K7 KFF Hot Cookie

2011 JABGA National % Champion Bred and Owned and Reserve JABGA National % Champion by John Kroeker

family

Mazurek Family Ranch

K7 KFF Fortune Cookie

2012 Reserve JABGA National % Champion by Reilly Butler

JORD Marmi

2010 JABGA National % Champion by John Kroeker

Bruce Kroeker and Family | 6908 North Peking | Mcallen, TX 78504 | (c) 956-467-8096 | (h) 956-821-1056 kroekerfamilyfarms@yahoo.com | www.kroekergoats.com Mazurek Family Ranch | 522 Rikki Drive | Bandera, TX 78003 | (c)210-289-7677 | (h) 830-966-3313 ruthbutler35@yahoo.com | www.mazurekfamilyranch.com 14 | THE BOER GOAT

For more information, scan this QR Code to visit our website!


Breeder SPOTLIGHT Jack & Anita Mauldin Boer Goats by y ROBYN SCHERER, M.AGR.

Jack & Anita Mauldin Boer Goats, located in Ector, Texas, is owned by Jack and Anita Mauldin. They focus on raising quality fullblood Boer goats, with breed characteristics that can be financially justified and require minimal management. They answer a few questions about their operation.

1. HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN THE BOER GOAT INDUSTRY?

3. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART ABOUT RAISING BOER GOATS?

2. HOW MANY GOATS DO YOU HAVE, AND WHAT DO YOU USE THEM FOR?

4. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES YOU HAVE FACED, AND WHAT DID YOU DO TO OVERCOME THEM?

In Texas, you can have an ag exempt status on your land if you raise animals to sell, so a lot of people with small acreage will get a few animals to get that status, and that’s what we did. We were buying scrape goats to get started. Then we saw a billboard sign someone had put up for Boer goats, and I looked around and found those and fell in love. In 1999 when I retired, we got into Boer goats full time.

We breed about 30 does a year, and have about 2.5 kids per doe each year, so we can have 60-100 at one time. We usually keep back 10 doelings that we hold over to breed for the next year. We breed to sell breeding stock to other people. We don’t like to breed for some of the things that judges are liking right now, but we try to raise them in order to be better meat goats and if they can show that’s fine. We focus on goats that are more hardy and resistant against the worms. We do a monthly maintenance study that we look at the goats each month. We only worm when it’s necessary, and trim feet only when needed. Each year we will sell the ones that need more maintenance. What we found out is that there is some genetics that won’t need as much worming and their kids are the same. We kept track of the size of the udder when a doe is about to kid, and the teat structure of the doe and the buck and then the result. We study what you get when you put certain does and bucks together. We found out the bucks have a lot to do with teat structure, and can clean up on does that don’t have show quality teats.

The thing we enjoy most is when kidding season comes and our babies start arriving. We are moving more to reds and paints, and it’s like Christmas when they come and we can see the colors. We kid in the winter because there are less worms and coccidia problems when they are born in the winter, and it gives them more time to start building their own immunity.

One of the problems we found out when we moved to northeast Texas is there is a lot of lush grass and we started realizing when they were eating that grass they were getting bloat. Learning all of the health issues with goats is one of the biggest things. Each year is a learning experience. We learn a lot and the more you can share with other people, the better it is.

5. WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR YOUNG PRODUCERS GETTING INTO THE BOER GOAT INDUSTRY?

Read as much as you can on what is ahead of you. We have had people call up and ask us questions that they should have known before they got into it. You need to have a business plan with what you want to do and what you are trying to grow. You need to understand that business plan and what you want to do. We look at all of the features of a goat and they have to justify financially why they have that or don’t have certain traits. To learn more about Jack & Anita Mauldin Boer Goats, please visit www.jackmauldin.com

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16 | THE BOER GOAT


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photo contest

THE 2013 3

ABGA

TAKE A LOOK AT YOUR PHOTO SUBMISSIONS!

A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS.

TRENT HULLOPETER

ASLEY PETERSON

MICHAEL CRISSON

MARY STORY SVR1 PISTOL PACKIN MAMA

KATIE CUPP

BREE BARNICKOL LESLIE BRYANT

KATIE CUPP HALLEY LAUCHLAND GINGER

BILL AND SUE HOBBY BOER GOAT 18 | THE

SYAKAY SHIFFLETT ALMOND JOY

BREE BARNICKOL HAWK

DIANE HESS ADELE

JERRED BLANTON ROXY AND RYDER

HALLEY LAUCHLAND GINGER


West Monroe, LA ~ June 10 - 15, 2013 Judges: Sherri Stephens, Coni Ross, Chris Shaffett

Champion Senior Showman Bailey Bergherm

Champion Junior Showman Alexis Honag

National Champion Fullblood Buck Alex Prickett, TX

National Reserve Fullblood Buck Carlie Callahan, TX

National Champion Fullblood Doe Noah Teal, OK

National Reserve Fullblood Doe Kami Oller, OK

National Champion Percentage Doe Reilly Butler

National Reserve Percentage Doe Reilly Butler www.abga.org | 19


Best Pair of Fullblood Buck Kids TK Fisher

Reserve Best Pair of Fullblood Buck Kids Noah Teel, OK

Grand Champion Get of Sire Noah Teel, OK

Reserve Champion Get of Sire Todd Landry

Reserve Best Pair of Fullblood Doe Kids Kendall Keene

20 | THE BOER GOAT


Judges: Sherri Stephens, Coni Ross, Chris Shaffett NOT PICTURED: Best Pair of Senior Fullblood Bucks, Quincy Edwards Best Pair of Fullblood Doe Kids, Kami Oller

Best Pair of Senior Fullblood Does, Kamii Oller Ollller er

Reserve Best Pair of Senior Fullblood Does TK Fisher

Grand Champion Fullblood Produce of Dam Samuel Lerena

Reserve Grand Champion Fullblood Produce of Dam Mathew Westfall

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Kids both Sexes Noah Teel

Reserve Best Pair of Fullblood Kids both Sexes Samuel Lerena

Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids Kami Oller

Reserve Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids Kendall Keene

Best Pair of Senior Percentage Does Kaitlynn Miller

Reserve Best Pair of Senior Percentage Does Corbin Bell

Grand Champion Percentage Doe Herd Bell 7 Ranch

Reserve Champion Percentage Doe Herd Bell 7 Ranch

Grand Champion Fullbood Herd Khi-ra Santiago www.abga.org | 21


National Champion Fullblood Buck Brad Mackey, NC

National Reserve Champion Fullblood Buck Aaron & Denise Crabtree

National Champion Fullblood Doe Laramie Epplar, TX

National Reserve Champion Fullblood Doe Terry & Sue Taylor, TX

National Champion Percentage Doe Reilly Butler, TX

National Reserve Champion Percentage Doe Noah Teel, OK

22 | THE BOER GOAT


West Monroe, LA ~ June 10 - 15, 2013 Judges: Ron Dilley, Eddie Holland, Josh Taylor Grand Champion Junior Fullblood Buck

Reserve Champion Junior Fullblood Buck

Brad Mackey, NC

Newton/Kootz, Rob & Neil Marjorie, IN

Grand Champion Yearling Fullblood Buck

Reserve Champion Yearling Fullblood Buck

Grand Champion Senior Fullblood Buck

Reserve Champion Senior Fullblood Buck

Aaron & Denise Crabtree

Menger Creek Ranch

Bill Stanton

JR Patterson

Grand Champion Junior Fullblood Doe

Reserve Champion Junior Fullblood Doe

Grand Champion Yearling Fullblood Doe

Reserve Champion Yearling Fullblood Doe

Terry & Sue, Taylor, TX

Newton/Kootz, Rob & Neil Marjorie, IN

Newton/Kootz, Rob & Neil Marjorie, IN

Skyler Brite, TX

Grand Champion Senior Fullblood Doe

Reserve Champion Senior Fullblood Doe

Grand Champion Junior Percentage Doe

Reserve Champion Junior Percentage Doe

Laramie Eppler, TX

Newton/Kootz, Rob & Neil, Marjorie, IN

Reilly Butler, TX

Cooper Bounds, MD

Grand Champion Yearling Percentage Doe

Reserve Champion Yearling Percentage Doe

Grand Champion Senior Percentage Doe

Noah Teel, OK

Alexis Briley, NC

Mike & Maureen Reis, CA

Reserve Champion Senior Percentage Doe Alexis Hoang, OK www.abga.org | 23


Judges: Ron Dilley, Eddie Holland Holland, Josh Taylor NOT PICTURED: Reserve Champion Best Pair Percentage Does, Kaitlynn Miller Grand Champion Best Pair Fullblood Kids Both Sexes, Harmony Hill

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Buck Kids TK Fisher

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Buck Kids

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Bucks

Grand Champion Fullblood Get of Sire

Reserve Champion Fullblood Get of Sire

Bill Stanton

Newton Farms

Bill Stanton, Terry Taylor, Kami Oller

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Doe Kids

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Doe Kids

Grand Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Does

Newton/Koontz

Harmony Hill

Newton Farm

Reserve Champion Best Pair of Fullblood Does

Grand Champion Fullblood Produce of Dam

Reserve Champion Fullblood Produce of Dam

Kami Oller

Maurica & Kim Erwin

Bell 7 Ranch

Noah Teel


Grand Champion Fullblood Breeders Herd Menger Creek Ranch

Reserve Champion Fullblood Breeders Herd Circle Star Boers

Reserve Champion Best Pair Fullblood Kids Both Sexes Melissa Love

Grand Champion Best Pair Percentage Doe Kids Newton Farm

Reserve Champion Best Pair Percentage Doe Kids Erin Johnson

Grand Champion Best Pair Percentage Does A Bar Boer Goats

Grand Champion Percentage Produce of Dam A Bar Boer Goats

Reserve Champion Percentage Produce of Dam Bell 7 Ranch

Grand Champion Percentage Get of Sire A Bar Boer Goats

Reserve Champion Percentage Get of Sire River Valley Boers

Grand Champion Percentage Doe Herd GGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boer Goats

Reserve Champion Percentage Doe Herd River Valley Boers www.abga.org | 25


EDITORIAL

by STACEY STONEMAN

MEET THE Judges HOW MANY TIMES (AND WHICH YEARS) HAVE YOU JUDGED ANY TYPE OF NATIONAL SHOW FOR THE ABGA? RON DILLEY: This was my first time to judge the ABGA Nationals. It was the most enjoying show I’ve ever judged! CHRIS SHAFFETT: I have had the oppurtunity to judge the JABGA National show three times: in Tulsa, OK in 2008, in Louisville, KY in 2010, and this year in West Monroe. The first two times I judged I was alone and this time it was with a team. Working with Mrs. Coni and Mrs. Sherri was a pleasure. We discussed and analyzed these goats thoroughly and while everyone has their personal preferences I am confident we chose the best set of goats. EDDIE HOLLAND: 3 times. In 2007, 2010, and 2013. CONI ROSS: I judged ABGA Nationals in 2007, 2009, 2012, and JABGA this year. JOSH TAYLOR: This was my first time judging the National show. SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: 2009 I judged JABGA showmanship. In 2011 I judged the ABGA National show, and this year the JABGA show.

WHAT DID YOU SEE AS FAR AS QUALITY THIS YEAR COMPARED TO PREVIOUS YEARS EITHER AS A JUDGE OR ATTENDING PARTICIPANT? RON DILLEY: I have never seen the quality of animals run so deep in each class as it did this year. The National show is always double-tough as far as quality animals are concerned, but this year was exceptional! We had classes where we pulled our top ten, then turned to each other and said “This one is going to be fun”. They were all ten that close! CHRIS SHAFFETT: It is amazing to see how far these goats have come and

how deep the quality is at the National show. We are finding even in local shows deeper quality nowadays. Goats we used to be able to place at the top of classes are now lucky if they are able to make the first cuts due to overall improvements in everyone’s stock.

animal. I ask similar but less complicated questions of the Junior showman. I expect that student to know body parts, and type of wormer, and that they handle the animal smoothly similar to above. Pee Wee showmen need to handle the animal to the best ability, and at least know their goat’s birthday, which most do know. There are some very professional Pee Wees out there.

JOSH TAYLOR: Showmanship is the toughest contest to judge. So much of what goes on is subjective in nature that sometimes it is hard to overlook one flaw to find the good in the others that a person might posses. The younger kids should be able to maintain control of the goat and have a general understanding of ring procedures as well as what they need to do to make their animal look good. The older they get is where personal preference takes over and we start to prefer they hold the chain certain ways, stand with a certain posture and attitude, and even how the goat responds to them in the ring as well. I am super critical of adults because they are the ones the kids are learning from. My biggest concern after Nationals concerning showmanship was the attire that I saw exhibitors entering the ring with. This is the National show. Every effort should be made to put your best foot forward. I would never place someone down because of what they are wearing but we do need to show some pride in our apperance as well as the goats. If i judged the National Show in shorts and a ball cap I feel would receive criticism from every corner of the barn. SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: For me it’s about how they handle the animal.

For the Pee Wees, its about what side to be on and to hold the head up. With Intermediate, by then I expect them to know body parts, what they use to worm their animals and I expect them to be able to take directions when instructed to walk to me, etc. The Juniors, I felt they were very advanced this year. For Seniors, I expect them to talk about what they like about their goats, what to change and how to make it a better breed.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE EVENT OR LOOK FORWARD TO A CERTAIN CLASS EACH YEAR AT NATIONALS?

EDDIE HOLLAND: In previous years the quality has been excellent at the top of each class. This year the quality ran deep in all classes.

RON DILLEY: I always look forward to the Overall Fullblood Doe drive. For years now, I have stood in awe of the power and beauty of these does. Last year was a dream come true for Debbie and I. Having the privilege of talking the doe drive this year allowed me to “Pass the Torch” so to speak. It was a great honor.

CONI ROSS: The quality was excellent in the Junior show this year.

CHRIS SHAFFETT: Nationals as a whole is a fantastic event and I always look

JOSH TAYLOR: I felt compared to the goats I have seen at Nationals in previous

years, the quality was deep in every class and division. I saw more sound functional goats than I ever have, with something that every breeder could use.

SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: I felt like the quality was way up and very

impressive which is encouraging, telling us the industry is going in the right way.

JUDGING SHOWMANSHIP, WHAT DO YOU EXPECT FOR THESE EXHIBITORS TO KNOW AT EACH LEVEL?

forward to it even if its from home viewing on DV Auction. I do think the bred and owned classes are a wonderful edition to the Jr. Show. This will encourage these young people to not only to buy good goats to show, but also focus more on the production side of things themselves in raising their own stock.

EDDIE HOLLAND: I look forward to selecting the National Grand Champions. JOSH TAYLOR: I look forward to the Junior divisions. You get to see the upand -coming gentics that are out right now. SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: I guess the youth start goat scramble and I love the judging contest. Its all about the year and everything they do and watching the kids.

CHRIS SHAFFETT: I had the opportunity to judge Pee Wee showmanship

which was awesome. These kids are adorable and what I like them to know or practice is just the basics: keep eye contact with the judge, never be between the goat and the judge. As they get older we expect them to know more details about their project. My favorite thing is to know what they like about their animal and what they would change. This is a very useful information aid in making your animal look its best.

CONI ROSS: I expect Senior showman to handle the goat smoothly with no

or few mistakes. Keep the judge in continual view, and execute instructions correctly. Answer questions: the senior needs to know body parts, common diseases, and vaccines used to prevent those dieases. Which wormer was last used. If they don’t, it means they have not participated much in the care of the 26 | THE BOER GOAT

WHAT FIRST MOTIVATED YOU TO GO TO JUDGING SCHOOL? RON DILLEY: I’ve been breeding and evaluating animals all my life. I just wanted to offer a simple approach to judging. CHRIS SHAFFETT: I came straight out of high school when I wanted to go

to judging school. In high school I judged poultry and participated in meat identification in 4-H and FFA. I saw that judging for ABGA would allow me to do several things including improve my personal knowledge, an opportunity to travel, and to pick up a few dollars while spending time evaluating great stock. I was most encouraged when I came in 2nd at the JABGA National Judging contest in 2005.


EDDIE HOLLAND: I’ve always judged and when the Boer goat industry started, I wanted to become involved. CONI ROSS: I was already judging Angoras, meat goats, and Cashmere goats. I was asked to certify to judge Boers also.

SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: Actually this started with my son wanting to

show goats, then I became a 4H leader, then I started doing the open shows then I watched the judge and thought wow..I could do this. So as a stay at home mother, I thought this was something I could do. It was a new life experience for me.

will not fool a judge that is willing to put their hands on a goat. I handle the animals a lot. I know these breeder’s goats are not market animals, but they do have an end product that is meat. By handling the goat I can truly tell what’s really their fat, fluff, muscle, etc. You can tell the difference. The true great goats will come to the top.

EDDIE HOLLAND: I feel like it was judged according to the ABGA rules. I personally do like using leg adhesives. CONI ROSS: I was isolated from that, and heard none of it. I examine every goat anyway, so fluffing hair or other means of grooming do not disguise the animal.

WHEN SELECTED AMONGST YOUR PEERS, WHAT WERE THE FIRST THOUGHTS THAT CAME INTO YOUR MIND UPON LEARNING YOU HAD BEEN CHOSEN TO JUDGE? RON DILLEY: I was humbled by the support of my friends and fellow exhibitors. My goal was no different here than any other show, I just wanted to use the best goats I think we got that accomplished, and they all passed our breed standards. I am very proud of that! CHRIS SHAFFETT: I was completely excited! It is so humbling to have people

put their confidence in you that you are competent and will do what’s right. Also, working with the youth are amazing. I am a youth pastor so I deal with young people often and enjoy making a difference in their life. I know the few years that I enjoyed as a junior in our association made a positive impact on my life and I hope the same experience is enjoyed by these children as well.

JOSH TAYLOR: We definitely saw some powder and adhesives used in the

shows. Honestly the powder is more of a hassle to us judges than anything else. It gets on our pants!! It really does not make that much difference to how the animal appears. It may brighten them up a little but not enough to put you over the top of one that is better. The adhesives really do much more harm than good to a goat. From someone that fits cattle, you cannot add the appearance of more bone to a goat. Nothing changes foot size and muscle mass through the lower leg. When you pull up the hair on the legs of one that is small footed and light muscled it makes the legs appear out of proportion and that takes away from the balance of the animal.

SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: There was a lot of baby powder so they were

still using it. It was addressed to one of the breeders, but we left the placing the same. It’s hard for us as judges to police such policies.

EDDIE HOLLAND: It is an extreme honor to be selected by one’s peers when there are so many qualified judges from which to choose.

HOW MANY YEARS HAVE YOU BEEN JUDGING AND WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO JUDGING GOATS?

JOSH TAYLOR: When I heard of the news I was amazed. It really made me

RON DILLEY: This is my fourth year judging for the ABGA. I started in 2005 with another association and also judge their nationals.

proud and it felt awesome to have accomplished so much in the time I have been judging goats.

SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: Honor. It’s a great honor and great feeling that

they trust you to analyze their goats and I think it says a lot about me as a judge. It’s a great feeling.

IS THERE A CERTAIN BODY STYLE EITHER AMONGST DOES OR BUCKS YOU FEEL LIKE THE BREED IS CHANGING TOO DRAMATICALLY? RON DILLEY: I don’t see any drastic changes in the type of goats we are using.

They just keep getting better each year. I do see a move towards cleaner front ends, less throat latch and brisket, and more muscle. We continually strive to strengthen toplines and square and level hips. We just keep getting them better!

CHRIS SHAFFETT: I am excited to see that we seem to be putting more bone and substance back into these goats as it should be, while at the same time we are still maintaining the power and elegance. It’s really neat to see these goats getting even better.

CONI ROSS: I just want the goat correct, with muscle and femininity or masculinity per gender. JOSH TAYLOR: I think the body styles are going in the correct directions as far

as staying functional and productive with some muscle. I do worry about how expanded we are getting the chest floors in some of these goats just to make them wider up front. I think we made lead ourselves down the path of more kidding problems.

SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: I think we are getting to a wider stouter heavier

muscled animal and are away from the elegant, too pretty and fine boned animal which we saw for awhile.

GOING INTO THIS YEAR’S NATIONALS, THERE WAS A LOT OF CONTROVERSY OVER THE USE OF BABY POWDER AND LEG ADHESIVES. DO YOU FEEL LIKE THE PUBLIC’S CONCERNS ARE NECESSARY? DO YOU FEEL THE WARNINGS POSTED IN THE NATIONAL PACKET WERE ADHERED TO? RON DILLEY: There have always been people with a talent for fitting goats. I am

impressed by how hard they will work to make a goat look better for the showring. Let them fit. If I need to know if something is real, I just go put my hands on the goat. If baby powder and hairspray offend you, get out of the ladies room!

CHRIS SHAFFETT: I understand why some folks would be concerned especially since everyone has invested so much time and money in their preparation and just want things to be straight and a level playing field; however, the one thing I find is that while great clipping and so forth is very eye appealing, artful design

CHRIS SHAFFETT: Since 2005. I must also say that my ag teacher was very

influential in my judging career as he is the one that taught me how to construct a logical set of reasons and to further progress my public speaking ability.

EDDIE HOLLAND: I have been an approved ABGA judge since 2000. I have been judging at county and state livestock shows for over 40 years. CONI ROSS: I have been judging goats almost 30 years. JOSH TAYLOR: I certified in 2009. I took the course to learn more about the industry and try to help educate when I could. I felt my background within the livestock industry could really help achieve this.I grew up in a family that farmed and raised Hereford cattle in Illinois. I grew up showing cattle and started working full time on show cattle right out of college. I worked in Skiatook,OK for 14 years on a large scale Hereford ranch before I moved to Oregon this past Feb. My family had a small herd of goats in Oklahoma that we exhibited with success for 7 years. We sold the herd when we moved out west. We intend to build our goat herd again and continue to show and market our animals around the country, with a major emphasis on the junior showman, as that is where our future is. SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: I started judging in 2004. (see question number 5 for more elaboration). It was my passion to work with youth.

DESCRIBE BRIEFLY YOUR HOME/FARM LIFE AND ANIMALS OWNED. RON DILLEY: Debbie and I live on a little 10 acre farm held together by bailing wire. We normally keep between 40 and 50 head year-round. We have raised some amazing goats there over the past 11 years. Izzy is obviously the biggest accomplishment of all. I still get goose bumps when I walk by the trophy! CHRIS SHAFFETT: My family own and operate CMT Boer Goats in Hammond,

LA. We have run anywhere from 2 to 80 head of goats since 2003. We have enjoyed our experience in this industry and the opportunities it has offered. Our current focus is on raising show quality yet still productive percentage Boers. In the past we have focused on doing a little bit of everything with some success, but currently feel that this sharper focus on our percentages will continue to let us excel in our endeavors. We now have about 16 does and 2 bucks. My little boy Preston has fallen in love with the goats already so I am sure the number of goats we have will continue to grow as he does.

EDDIE HOLLAND: I live on a working cattle ranch, and also raise trophy

Whitetail deer.

CONI ROSS: I ranch in Blanco county Texas and have a registered and commercial herd.

SHERRI INMAN STEPHENS: I currently have no goats right now, but will get back to that point later in life.

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2013 North American International Livestock Exposition ABGA Sanctioned

Boer Goat Show Thursday, November 21

Junior Wether Goat Show Wednesday, November 20

North American International Livestock Exposition z November 9-22 Kentucky Exposition Center z PO Box 36367 z Louisville, KY 40233-6367 Phone 502-595-3166 z Fax 502-367-5299 z www.livestockexpo.org

30 | THE BOER GOAT

Official Media Partner


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Profile for American Boer Goat Association

The Boer Goat - July/August 2013  

The Boer Goat - July/August 2013  

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